Loading...
HomeMy WebLinkAbout2023-2024 Adopted BudgetCity of Renton • 1055 South Grady Way • Renton, WA 98057 • rentonwa.gov 2023-2024Adopted Budget VISION Renton: The center of opportunity in the Puget Sound Region where families and businesses thrive MISSION The City of Renton, in partnership and communication with residents, businesses, and schools, is dedicated to: ƒProvide a safe, healthy, vibrant community ƒPromote economic vitality and strategically position Renton for the future ƒSupport planned growth and influence decisions to foster environmental sustainability ƒBuild an inclusive informed city with equitable outcomes for all in support of social, economical, and racial justice ƒMeet service demands and provide high-quality customer service with measurable outcomes Provide a safe, healthy and vibrant community ƒPromote safety, health, and security through effective communication and service delivery ƒFacilitate successful neighborhoods through community involvement ƒEncourage and partner in the development of quality housing choices for people of all ages and income levels ƒSupport the growing need of human services funding to address the challenges of housing and mental health ƒPromote a walkable, pedestrian and bicycle- friendly city with complete streets, trails, and connections between neighborhoods and community focal points ƒProvide opportunities for communities to be better prepared for emergencies Promote economic vitality and strategically position Renton for the future ƒPromote Renton as the progressive, opportunity-rich city in the Puget Sound region ƒActively seek grants and other funding opportunities ƒCapitalize on opportunities through bold and creative economic development strategies ƒRecruit and retain businesses to ensure a dynamic, diversified employment base ƒNurture entrepreneurship and foster successful partnerships with businesses and community leaders ƒLeverage public/private resources to focus development on economic centers Support planned growth and influence decisions to foster environmental sustainability ƒFoster development of vibrant, sustainable, attractive, mixed-use neighborhoods in urban centers ƒUphold a high standard of design and property maintenance ƒAdvocate Renton’s interests through state and federal lobbying efforts, regional partnerships and other organizations ƒPursue transportation and other regional improvements and services that improve quality of life ƒAssume a critical role in improving our community’s health and environmental resiliency by addressing impacts of climate change for future generations ƒPursue initiatives to increase mobility, promote clean energy in our existing buildings and in new development, preserve and expand open spaces and tree coverage, and other efforts to reduce CO2 and greenhouse gas emissions Building an inclusive, informed and hate-free city with equitable outcomes for all in support of social, economic, and racial justice ƒAchieve equitable outcomes by eliminating racial, economic and social barriers in internal practices, city programs, services, and policies such as hiring and contracting ƒImprove access to city services, programs and employment, provide opportunities and eradicate disparities for residents, workers and businesses ƒPromote understanding and appreciation of our diversity through celebrations, educational forums and festivals ƒSeek out opportunities for ongoing two-way dialogue with ALL communities, engage those historically marginalized, and ensure that we lift every voice, listen and take action on what we learn ƒBuild capacity within the city to implement inclusion and equity by providing the knowledge, skills, awareness, and tools to integrate anti-racist approaches into daily work Meet service demands and provide high-quality customer service ƒPlan, develop, and maintain quality services, infrastructure, and amenities ƒPrioritize services at levels that can be sustained by revenue ƒRetain a skilled workforce by making Renton the municipal employer of choice ƒDevelop and maintain collaborative partnerships and investment strategies that improve services ƒRespond to growing service demands through partnerships, innovation, and outcome management CITY OF RENTONBusiness Plan 2023–2028 GOALS 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington i Updated 09/20/2022    Boards, Commissions, and Committees Location Day  Time  AIRPORT ADVISORY COMMITTEE Meetings scheduled as needed  CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 1st Flr. HR Training Rm. 4th Tuesday            4:15 p.m.  COMMUNITY PLAN ADVISORY BOARD ‐ BENSON HILL Meetings scheduled as needed  COMMUNITY PLAN ADVISORY BOARD ‐ CITY CENTER Meetings scheduled as needed  EQUITY COMMISSION Council Chambers   2nd Tuesday 5:30 p.m.  FIREFIGHTER’S PENSION BOARD 7th Flr Council Conf. Rm.    3rd Thursday  2:00 p.m.  HISTORICAL SOCIETY BOARD Renton Museum        4 th Tuesday 5:30 p.m.  HOUSING AUTHORITY 2900 NE 10th St. 2nd Monday   9:00 a.m.  HUMAN SERVICES ADVISORY COMMITTEE 7th Flr. Council Conf. Rm. 3rd Tuesday  3:00 p.m.  INDEPENDENT SALARY COMMISSION      Meetings scheduled as needed  LEOFF BOARD 1st Flr. HR Conf. Rm. 4th Tuesday 9 a.m.  LODGING TAX ADVISORY COMITTEE Meetings scheduled as needed  MAYOR’S BUDGET ADVISORY COMMITTEE Meetings scheduled as needed  MUNICIPAL ARTS COMMISSION 7th Flr. Council Conf. Rm            1 st Tuesday         6:00 p.m. NON‐MOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE      Meetings scheduled as needed  PARKS COMMISSION Locations vary 2nd Tuesday  4:30 p.m.  PARKS, TRAILS & COMMUNITY FACILITIES – COMMUNITY  ADVISORY COMMITTEE  Meetings scheduled as needed  PLANNING COMMISSION Council Chambers 1st and 3rd     Wednesdays  6:00 p.m.  SENIOR ADVISORY BOARD   Senior Activity Center  1st Monday  9:30 a.m.  SISTER CITY ADVISORY COMMITTEES ‐ Cuautla & Nishiwaki Meetings scheduled as needed  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington ii  Mayor Armondo Pavone    Judge Jessica Giner    Judge Kara Murphy Richards   Serving as Mayor since 2020  Serving since 2021  Serving since 2020              City Council 2014‐2019  Renton City Council       Carmen Rivera     James Alberson         Ryan McIrvin    Valerie O’Halloran     Serving since 2022   Serving since 2022         Serving since 2016               Serving since 2019  Ruth Pérez         Ed Prince           Kim‐Khánh Văn            Serving since 2014       Serving since 2012                         Serving since 2020  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington iii PRESENTED TO City of Renton Washington For the Biennium Beginning January 01, 2021 Executive Director GOVERNMENT FINANCE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION Distinguished Budget Presentation Award 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington iv Table of Contents  Page   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  Budget Message from the Mayor 1‐1  2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1‐7  Budget at a Glance 1‐19  Long Range Plan 1‐29  Financial Management Policies 1‐50  RENTON RESULTS  Budget Framework 2‐1  Renton Results Overview 2‐5  Safety and Health ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐8  Representative Government ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐10  Livable Community ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐12  Mobility ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐13  Utilities and Environment ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐14  Internal Services ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐15  Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area 2‐17  Reconciliation to Total Budget 2‐24  BUDGET BY DEPARTMENT  Legislative 3‐1  Executive 3‐9  City Attorney 3‐29  Court Services 3‐33  Community and Economic Development (CED) 3‐37  Equity, Housing and Human Services (EHHS) 3‐53  Finance 3‐64  Human Resources and Risk Management (HR&RM) 3‐73  Police 3‐80  Parks and Recreation 3‐94  Public Works (PW) 3‐110  Other City Services 3‐139  DEBT MANAGEMENT  Overview 4‐1  Outstanding Debt 4‐2  Computation of Limitation of Indebtness & Debt Service to Maturity by Funding Sources 4‐3  Debt Service Coverage Ratio 4‐4  General Obligation Debt 4‐5  Waterworks Debt 4‐7  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington v Table of Contents  Page   CAPITAL INVESTMENT PROGRAM  City Wide Narrative 5‐1  City Wide Summary 5‐5  General Government 5‐7  Parks 5‐9  Facilities 5‐60  Information Technology 5‐82  Transportation 5‐97  Airport 5‐127  Golf Course 5‐139  Water 5‐145  Wastewater 5‐161  Surface Water 5‐172  BUDGET BY FUND  Summary All Funds 6‐1  General Government 6‐11  Special Revenue 6‐12  Debt Service 6‐20  Capital Investment Program 6‐21  Enterprise 6‐28  Internal Service 6‐35  Investment Trust 6‐42  APPENDIX  General Information 7‐1  Largest Taxpayers/Principal Employers 7‐4  Full‐Time Employee Staffing 7‐5  Comparison of Taxes and Rates 7‐6  2023 Index of Positions and Pay Ranges 7‐7  2023/2024 Rates and Fees Schedule 7‐19  2023/2024 Utility Rates Brochure 7‐36  Budget Glossary 7‐40  Adopted Legislations (Budget, Taxes, Fees, and etc) 7‐46  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington vi Readers Guide to the Budget  The following reader's guide lists each major section of this document in the order that it appears and provides a  brief description of what you will find in that section.  Please refer to the table of contents for specific section  locations and content details.  Section 1:  Executive Summary  The introduction presents the mayor’s budget message.  His letter articulates city initiatives and issues for the  2023/2024 biennial budget.  Following this are the 2023/2024 Budget Highlights, Budget at a Glance, Long Range  Plan, and Financial Management Policies.  Included in the executive summary section is a condensed view of the  budget, covering everything from a summary of the budget process to summaries for fund types, department  expenditures and employment history, and revenue sources and levels.  Section 2:  Renton Results  In this section we present the City of Renton’s performance management initiative originated in 2007 to clearly  illustrate the services provided by the City of Renton, the resources needed to provide these services, and the  results of the service efforts to facilitate policy decisions and provide accountability to the community.  Section 3:  Budget by Department  In this section we present budget information organized by department and division. Each department, and each  division  within  that  department,  presents  its  mission  statement,  expenditure  budget,  staffing  levels,  major  accomplishment in the 2021/2022 biennium, and goals for 2023/2024.  Section 4:  Debt Management  An  extensive  overview  of  Renton’s  debt  program  is  presented  here.  This  includes  financial  data  on  debt  limitations, property tax rates and revenues, long‐term debt service requirements, and a schedule of the city’s  overall outstanding debt.  Section 5:  Capital Investment Program (CIP)   This project listing provides a summary of the six‐year CIP plan.  Projects are listed by activity and by managing  department.  Section 6:  Budget by Fund  This section provides an overview of each fund’s revenue, expenditures, and fund balance.  In addition, this section  includes comparison of 2020 actual, 2021/2022 budgeted revenue and expenditures, and 2023/2024 adopted  budget.  Section 7:  Appendix  In this appendix, we provide selected demographics, economic statistics, an index of salaries and pay ranges, and  some general information about the City of Renton.  We have also included here a glossary of the terms and  acronyms used in the document.  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington vii This page is intentionally left blank 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington viii 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  Budget Message from the Mayor 1‐1  2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1‐7  Budget at a Glance 1‐19  Long Range Plan 1‐29  Financial Management Policies 1‐50  FINANCEKariRoller, Administrator425-430-6931 RENTON CITIZENS MAYORArmondo Pavone425-430-6500 MUNICIPAL COURT JUDGESKara Murphy RichardsJessica Giner 425-430-6550 CITY COUNCILRyan McIrvin, PresidentJames Alberson, Valerie O'Halloran, Ruth Pérez, Ed Prince, Carmen Rivera, Kim-Khánh Văn425-430-6500 CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICEREd VanValey425-430-6500 PARKS & RECREATIONKelly Beymer, Administrator425-430-6617 PUBLIC WORKS MartinPastucha, Administrator425-430-7311 EXECUTIVE SERVICESKristiRowland, Deputy CAO425-430-6947 COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTChip Vincent, Administrator425-430-6588 POLICEJon Schuldt, Chief425-430-7500 HUMAN RESOURCES & RISKMANAGEMENTEllen Bradley-Mak, Administrator425-430-7657 Renton History Museum Golf Course Maintenance Services Utility Systems Transportation Systems Economic Development Development Engineering City Clerk Communications & Engagement Support Operations Bureau Field Operations Bureau Emergency Management Labor, Class, and Compensation Risk Management Benefits Fiscal Services Staff Services Special Operations Investigations Administrative Services Patrol Services Patrol Operations CITY ATTORNEYShane Moloney425-430-6487 Human Services Parks Planning and Natural Resources Recreation Airport Development Services Organizational Development Facilities Parks and Trails Planning Information Technology Prosecution EQUITY,HOUSING & HUMAN SERVICESMaryJaneVan Cleave, Administrator425-430-6569 Community Development and Housing Executive Department  Memorandum  DATE: October 3, 2022  TO: Ryan McIrvin, Council President  Members of Renton City Council FROM: Armondo Pavone, Mayor  SUBJECT: 2023‐2024 Proposed Budget  Good evening, Council President, and Councilmembers.      I am pleased to present my 2023‐24 biennial budget proposal. The presentations that  will be provided over the next three meetings result from numerous meetings and  conversations held by city staff, with candid and direct input from the Mayor’s Budget  Advisory Committee. Guidance for these conversations came directly from my priorities,  council requests, and, most importantly, the community feedback received over the last  year.  In May, city staff began to meet to discuss new budget requests to address the  needs of our community by creating, improving, or maintaining a service that supports  the city’s business plan and overall success.   At the conclusion of the Mayor’s Budget Advisory Committee’s meetings, I was provided  with their four identified priorities and recommendations. I was encouraged by their  report as they were identical to my priorities and the same ones discussed at our  administrator retreat early this year: public safety, business development and  downtown revitalization, human services, and communication. Over the next few  weeks, you will see the city’s efforts to address these priorities.  Before I go further, I want to thank Kari Roller and her budget team, led by Kristin  Trivelas, for their hard work and dedication in preparing the proposal.  It is a  tremendous undertaking, and I am grateful for their work.     I’d also like to acknowledge the collaboration among our administrators led by CAO Ed  VanValey.  As you might imagine, each administrator brought projects to the table:  some that had been deferred during our last budget cycle and new projects responding  to changes in community expectations.  Together, they worked to find the right balance  of projects and programs that would benefit the community most, moving us toward  our goals.   Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor 1-1 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Ryan McIrvin, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 2 of 6  October 3, 2022  Last, I’d like to thank those that served this year on our Mayor’s Budget Advisory  Committee.  Each esteemed member represented a unique and critical voice from the  community, and their ideas and feedback helped to bring our priorities into sharper  focus.   When I took office, we almost immediately pivoted into a time of financial uncertainty  and braced for a recession.  Fortunately, we were well‐prepared and made quick  financial decisions that preserved our ability to continue providing services and retain  the dedicated professionals that make up the City of Renton team.  After adopting a  baseline budget in 2020–with no cuts or additions—we innovatively worked toward the  goals you have emphasized as priorities in your updated business plan.        With your support, we reorganized our departments to align and elevate key programs,  and we captured a new tax revenue in support of affordable housing and behavioral  health programs.     One of the most common questions I’ve been getting over the last two years is: “What  are you doing to make Renton safe?”   This is a fair question and a responsibility I take very seriously. I hear from the  community and the business owners, read the emails, and see the change in our city. It  should be no surprise that this is a top priority. To create a shift in direction and  enhance the safety of our community, we are approaching this responsibility on  multiple fronts.         Recruiting for law enforcement is a challenge across the nation.  Like many agencies in  our area, we compete for the same qualified candidates. Chief Schuldt and his staff will  be providing a plan to fund new recruiting and retention efforts, bringing in more  qualified and diverse candidates to our department.   Increased visibility and faster response times are necessary.  In our 2023‐24 proposal,  you will see an increase of four commissioned police officers dedicated to a new policing  district in the downtown core area.   The objective is to restore a sense of safety in the  heart of our community through a dedicated presence, while allowing officers outside  the downtown area more time to patrol and engage with our residential and business  communities throughout all of Renton.   Successful engagement with the community is critical for law enforcement. It is the  basis for building trust and partnerships with a shared goal of a safer community.   Most  recently, Chief Schuldt has formed the “Chief’s Community Council,” whose  fundamental objective is to empower civic stakeholders to advise the police department  on ways to positively impact relationships and better serve the public. Together they  Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor 1-2 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Ryan McIrvin, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 3 of 6  October 3, 2022  will identify public safety issues and collaborate with community leaders, local  organizations, and stakeholders to create practical, effective, and equitable community  policing practices, such as our newly implemented body camera program.         The Renton community is a dedicated one. The number of expressed concerns for safety  is equally matched with offers to help address safety in our city. Our budget proposal  includes a new Communications and Engagement Manager position in our police  department to increase our connection and responsiveness to the community.   Increasing opportunities to collaborate with the community, publishing more timely  information, and creating more transparency in our process will allow our communities  to engage with us in addressing and solving issues affecting their lives.    The goal of making Renton a safe, healthy, and vibrant community also includes tackling  the challenge of access to affordable housing .         With your adoption of the 1/10th of 1 cent sales tax authority (“1590” authority), you  ensured a permanent stream of $3 to 4 million per year that can be devoted to  affordable housing and behavioral health service.  EHHS will handle most of the funds  and partner with the Police and the Court.          With these funds, we were immediately able to partner with Renton Housing Authority  (RHA) to secure $8 million in public funds for the 75‐unit Sunset Gardens affordable  rental housing project, and with your approval, allocated $1.5 million of our 1590  funding for a total of $9.5million toward the project.       1590 funds will also be used for behavioral health by supporting people through  challenging times that may impede their ability to retain a home.   We have identified  funds to contract with the FDCARES program, a partnership between Renton Police  Department and Renton Regional Fire Authority.  This program will provide a new and  additional resource, not available before, to our first responders dealing with increased  calls for service on those suffering from mental health and addiction issues.  FDCARES  helps people navigate health and mental health care systems and connects them to  social services such as food banks, rental assistance, fall prevention, therapy, and  substance use treatment.       We allocated one‐time funding of almost $1.8 million in CARES funding through multiple  grants and $1.5 million in ARPA funding to support human services such as rental  assistance, utility bill debt forgiveness, and emergency feeding programs.  In the budget  proposal, you will see an additional $600k for direct human services and affordable  housing programs to provide additional resources to those in need. With this increased  focus and support, we have increased our human and social services funding nearly  threefold—from $800,000 to $3.4 million.    Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor 1-3 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Ryan McIrvin, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 4 of 6  October 3, 2022  Another newly created resource is our Community Court, launched last year by our  Municipal Court.  This non‐traditional, therapeutic approach to justice provides  practical, targeted solutions rather than traditional punishment in cases involving low‐ level offenses.   Community Court brings together community service partners  specializing in services for housing, education, employment, chemical dependency,  health care, licensing, mental health, and veterans.    Last year we made some bold changes to our organizational structure.  With your  support we formed the Equity, Housing, and Human Services (EHHS) Department. This  action shifted existing programs, aligned in purpose, from several longstanding  departments to EHHS so we could more efficiently allocate, and leverage resources  designed to help the most vulnerable in our community.       Another crucial role of this department is community outreach and engagement with  our culturally diverse communities through relationship building and identifying  obstacles to our services that we can work to overcome.  By realigning the  neighborhood program within this department, we can leverage well‐established  channels within neighborhoods, plus the Inclusion Task Force and other groups to  provide equitable outreach throughout the city.     In our budget proposal, we created an Equity Manager position to support our equity  work performed for several years by a consultant.  We believe this will further embed  equity into our operations and open the door to new opportunities to connect with all  of our diverse communities as our demographics continue to shift and change with  time.    We are proud to celebrate our homegrown and small businesses that continue to  demonstrate their resilience and commitment to our community.  We’ve continued our  effort on your adopted Civic Core Vision and Action Plan, including the award of our  Main Street designation for the downtown.  We have added a Downtown Manager to  our team whose focus will be on the continued revitalization of our downtown core.     We have allocated nearly $2.5 million in CARES and ARPA funding for our small  businesses and provided marketing team support over the last three years. Included in  this effort were allocations for our downtown core, who were disproportionately  impacted by the delays during the Wells/Williams conversion project.  We’ve also  worked to offer activities that attract people to Renton, and we’ve offered over $995k  over the last two years in Lodging Tax grants for local events.     Development activities have also been robust, with new construction contributing to  our property tax revenue.  Our projected development for 2022 and beyond is 8,625  Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor 1-4 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Ryan McIrvin, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 5 of 6  October 3, 2022  additional residential units and another 1.2 million square feet of commercial office  space.      An element that is key to positioning ourselves for success is our appearance as a city.   One area we will be emphasizing soon is an effort to improve our physical appearance.        Within our budget proposal, you will see requests for an additional code compliance  inspector and three additional park maintenance workers dedicated to assisting with  encampment cleanup and landscape maintenance that will help with crime‐prevention  efforts.  These positions, along with the additional funding and support of our Human  Services team, should immediately impact the city's visual appeal and connect our most  vulnerable and previously unsupported populations with much‐needed services.     In fostering environmental sustainability, we won a Governors Smart Communities  Award in the Smart Partnership category for the Willowcrest Townhomes project. This  project is the first multi‐family, net‐zero energy, permanently affordable  homeownership development in King County and is our greenest residential  development in the city (our contribution to this was approximately $375k).      We have just concluded a series of work sessions to refresh our Clean Economy  Strategy. An interdepartmental team has prioritized these focus areas: Buildings &  Energy, Transportation & Land Use, Materials & Consumption, Natural Systems & Water  Resources, and Community Resilience & Well‐Being.  Our teams continue to lead the  region in work to foster environmental sustainability.    Regarding customer service, we’ve gone through a revolutionary period of change in  customer service expectations.         We must take care of our workforce to meet service demands and provide high‐quality  customer service.  We are supporting our employees through increased training,  technology, and tools that invest in their development and ability to deliver excellent  customer service.  We are continuing the hybrid work model because it is critical for  retaining and recruiting high‐performing employees.  We continue to adapt our work  processes to be as efficient (and paperless) as possible, while still addressing the needs  of our community with professional in‐person services.       This proposal will include a one‐time request for contracted services for paperless  processing and additional records management tools to perform our public records  requirements. With the growing expectation for local governments to be equitable,  honest, and transparent, the city’s ability to be responsive to these requests must be  met.     Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor 1-5 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Ryan McIrvin, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 6 of 6  October 3, 2022  Last, in 2023 we will evaluate our performance metrics and the expectations of our  community through data gathering programs. This will involve connectivity of all our  customer service tools systems such as Renton Responds and our website, as well as a  revival of our Community Survey that was paused just before launch in March 2020.    Within the proposal, you will see one‐time funding requests for professional services  and contracted work to assist in data report writing, website enhancements, dashboard  development, and other methods of increasing transparency and storytelling of our  work.  Our goal is to provide this information to the community before they ask the  question.  I started this message with words of appreciation, and I’d like to end in the same  fashion.     Our city’s success is impossible without strong partnerships and relationships  throughout the community.  We work with countless individuals and agencies that go  above and beyond for us, just like we aim to do for them, and that’s what makes Renton  so great.  Some of our key partners are Renton Regional Fire Authority, Renton School  District, Seattle Seahawks, Seattle Sounders, Valley Medical Center, Family First  Community Center Foundation (Doug Baldwin, Health Point, Renton School District),  Bezos Academy, Renton Chamber of Commerce, Renton Downtown Partnership, Renton  Regional Community Foundation, and our boards and commissions.  There are many  more, and I thank you for all you do for our community.    Thank you for your time and consideration of the proposal over these next three weeks.  Following me this evening, our Finance Administrator Kari Roller will provide our  financial position and budget details for your awareness as you review and consider  what is proposed.        Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor 1-6 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   City of Renton  2023‐2024 Budget Highlights      Budget Overview   The total adopted 2023‐2024 budget has revenue of $584.5 million and  a total expenditure of $581.2 million. This is an 18.3% increase in  revenue and a 14.5% increase in expenditures when compared with the  2021‐2022 adopted budget.   The majority of the city’s revenue sources are projected to continue to  increase in 2023 due to overall recovery from the pandemic. The 2021‐ 2022 adopted budget anticipated a slow recovery from the many  closures resulting from COVID‐19, particularly retail sales and use tax,  B&O tax, utility tax, and other licenses and permits. As the economy  continues to recover from the pandemic, the city is also seeing recovery  in many of the tax revenues.  The city added positions in order to address increased workload and the  growing population for whom the city provides services. This budget  adds 15.875 additional positions as compared to the 2022 authorized  number of positions in the 2021‐2022 amended budget, for a total  authorized number of 650.5 FTEs for 2023 and 649.5 for 2024.     2023‐2024 Budget Focus      Public safety     Human services     City infrastructure  maintenance    The focus of the adopted 2023‐2024 budget is to increase core city  services at a level that is expected by our residents and businesses and  increase funding dedicated to public safety, human services, and  maintenance and improvements to the city’s infrastructure that had  been postponed over the past several years.   Overall, the adopted budget includes 15.875 new positions in the  general government funds of which 2.5 are limited term positions and  will remove 1 limited term position as compared to the 2022 authorized  number of positions in the 2021‐2022 amended budget. The general  government positions include: 1 code compliance inspector in  community and economic development, 3 parks maintenance staff for  parks and recreation, 1 equity manager in the equity, housing and  human services department, 2 police records specialists, 1 police  communications and community engagement manager, 4 police  officers, 1 communications manager and .375 mailroom clerk  (increasing a part‐time position to full time) in the communications  division of the executive department. The limited term positions will  add 1 business systems analyst in the information technology division  of the executive department, 1 senior finance analyst in the finance  department and .5 human resources analyst in the human resources  department. One limited term position will be eliminated in 2023 in the  parks and recreation department.   Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-7 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   There are no additions to the enterprise fund positions.   The adopted 2023‐2024 budget is balanced; it will transfer a total of  $12.2 million into the capital funds of transportation, parks, and  facilities to fund major capital improvements. The money comes  primarily from B&O tax revenue, property tax, real estate excise tax,  and one‐time sources such as grants.      Fund Balance                          The citywide 2023‐2024 adopted revenues exceed the adopted  expenditures by $3.3 million and results in a projected overall fund  balance of $213.5 million, approximately 1.5% more than the estimated  2022 estimated ending fund balance.  The increase in the fund balance is primarily attributable to planned  capital improvements beyond the 2023‐2024 budget year.   The general fund balance will be maintained at $57.5 million, above the  reserve target of 12% of general fund operating expenditures, as  outlined in our fiscal policy.   Overall, the city is in sound financial condition.     General Fund Overview             Of the $584.5 million total revenue, $254.9 million is in the city’s  general fund. The projected revenue is $51.6 million or 25% greater  than the 2021‐2022 budget. The increase is due to an increase in all  revenues as the 2021‐2022 budget anticipated significant decreases  due to the pandemic. The 2023‐2024 budget is more in line with pre‐ pandemic revenues with a small increase to property taxes, business &  occupation tax, and modest increases in other revenues.   Personnel makes up the largest single category of expenditures for the  general fund at 62%. Wage adjustments, medical premiums, and  pension increases tend to rise at a higher percentage increase than  revenues grow.   Given various cost increases to maintain existing services, even with  accompanying revenues and fee adjustments, the general fund  continues to show persistent budget gaps into the future. The gap is  due to the fundamental imbalance between the revenue options  available to local governments and the services local governments are  expected to provide. Renton is not an exception. This issue has been a  high priority topic for the state legislature and citizen advisory panels  for various past state governors. But, in the end, this is a problem left  for local governments to solve themselves with the limited tools  available. As such, the city made key changes in tax rates this past year  to help offset or lessen the projected gap for future years.     Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-8 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   Projected Budget Gap  The adopted budget reflects a general fund balance decrease of $5.5  million at the end of 2024, in large part due to the city’s costs growing  faster than the pace at which revenues grow. With an inflationary  adjustment for future wages and projected employee medical benefit  cost increases, use of general fund balance will be needed each year to  fund ongoing costs and will continue to grow larger beyond the current  biennium.   To help offset the rising operating costs, the city increased the B&O tax  rates beginning in 2023 and increased the maximum tax any one  taxpayer would be required to pay each year. This, along with the  adopted increase in property tax, will help to lessen the ongoing need  to use fund balance.   Further, the city set aside an inflationary reserve to lessen the impact  of the loss of sales tax annexation credit in mid‐2018; the reserve will  continue to be used by $0.9 million each year until depleted.   Although the current budget reflects changes in tax rate structure to  help offset the rising costs, further ongoing analysis will be needed as  long‐term projections continue to show the revenues cannot keep pace  with inflation.  General Fund Revenues          Business and Occupation  (B&O) Tax/Business License  Fees                                                                      The adopted 2023‐2024 budget reflects some changes to B&O tax rates  to help continue to address the general fund budget gap. The city  implemented a B&O tax in 2016 to help generate a sustainable revenue  needed to fund ongoing costs. The key provisions of the B&O tax are:   Businesses with $500,000 or higher annual gross receipts are  required to pay B&O tax.   The B&O tax maximum amount paid by any one taxpayer is  capped at $9 million and $11 million respectively for the 2023‐ 2024 budget. This is an increase over the previous year  maximum amount of $7 million.    The tax rate will be increased to 0.121% for all business  activities other than retail, which have a rate of 0.07%.    Limits the non‐profit and government exemptions for both  B&O tax and business license fee.   A three‐year, new employer tax credit for new businesses with  50 or more employees in Renton.     The B&O tax is an excellent option to help generate the funds needed  to maintain general fund city services into the future. It is projected to  provide approximately $15.4 million in revenue in 2023 and $17.6  million in 2024. Most of the revenue generated will be needed for the  general fund, although a portion will help fund capital improvement  projects.     Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-9 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Citywide     Legislative    Property Tax    Sales Tax   Utility Tax  Fee Adjustments  Property tax revenue is projected to grow by just over $2.4 million  based on the 1% growth limit plus 1% for new construction and a  adopted increase in rate of 10 cents per $1,000 assessed value or  approximately $2 million. The increase is needed to help fund major  maintenance projects for parks, facilities, and transportation projects  as well as to help with the overall projected fund balance gap  anticipated due to costs increasing at a faster rate than our revenues  increase. The total levy collection for 2023 is projected to be $25.2  million.  Sales tax is most volatile during recessionary periods and with  predictions of a future recession in the next several years, this budget  is anticipating only a slight increase in sales tax revenues. The budget  does reflect modest increases with the addition of some large retail  establishments in the city.   Although there are some general rate increases adopted for the city’s  utilities, due to the fluctuation of revenues in other utilities from the  effects of the pandemic, the utility tax is expected to continue to  rebound in 2023 and then level off to only a slight increase in 2024.   Consistent with prior year practices, the fee schedule has been  reviewed and the adopted budget includes various fee increases, as  outlined in the adopted fee schedule.   General Fund Expenditures  Executive  1 communications specialist II .375 print and mail assistant $513K software and professional services $112K for court public defenders Wage adjustment of 4.5% and 4% for 2023‐2024 respectively as well as  increased costs for medical and employee benefits.  No additional budget requests other than those noted above.   The executive department adopted budget includes the addition of a  communications  specialist  to  improve  efforts  in  overall  citywide  communication and increases a part‐time  position  to full‐time  in the  print and mailroom to support growing project workload.  The  adopted  budget  also  includes  an  increase  of  $225  thousand  for  contracted  services  to  expand  the  capacity  of  the  division,  $128  thousand  to  accommodate  the  King  County  election  costs,  $160  thousand  for  a  text  capturing  software  to  assist  with  public  records  requests, and $112 thousand for increased costs for public defenders.   Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-10 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   Community & Economic   Development     1 code compliance  inspector      Equity, Housing and Human  Services     1 equity manager     $600K human  services funding     The adopted budget for community and economic development  includes the addition of one new code compliance inspector to help  assist with growing project workload.           The adopted budget for equity, housing and human services includes  the addition of one new equity manager to replace work previously  done by a consultant, and an increase of $600 thousand in human  services funding.     Parks and Recreation     3 park maintenance  positions     Convert limited‐  term capital project  manager to full time       The adopted budget includes the addition of three additional parks  maintenance staff to assist with encampment cleanup, landscape  maintenance to assist with crime prevention efforts, and converting a  capital project manager position to a full‐time position to assist with  ongoing capital parks projects identified through the parks  maintenance levy for major parks improvements.       Police   1 communications &  community  engagement manger     2 public records  specialists     4 commissioned  officers     $176K Valley  Communications     $500K equipment       The adopted budget for police includes an increase of 7 positions: 1  communications and community engagement manger, 2 public records  specialists to help with increased workload of public records requests  with the addition of the body cameras, and 4 commissioned officers to  focus primarily on the downtown area.  Also, the addition of $176 thousand in increased costs at Valley  Communications emergency call center and an increase of $500  thousand in general police equipment.  Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-11 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   Public Works   $170K supplies     $60K sustainability  program     The adopted budget for public works includes a slight increase of $170  thousand for general street and traffic supplies and $60 thousand for  the sustainability program. Both increases are to account for overall  increases due to inflation.     Finance     1 limited‐term  financial analyst     The adopted budget includes the addition of one limited‐term finance  analyst position for project management to replace the financial  accounting system or enterprise resource planning (ERP) system.   Human Resources &   Risk Management   .5 limited‐term  position     $60K in professional  and consulting services        City Attorney   $70K software      Court       The adopted budget includes the addition of a halftime limited‐term  human resources analyst to support the finance ERP transition and an  additional $60 thousand in professional and consulting services for  overall increased costs and to support with the transition to electronic  data records.           The city attorney’s office adopted budget reflects an increase for new  case management system software.      No additional budget requests other than those noted above.    Capital Funds  Governmental Capital  Improvements Fund (316)  2‐Year Total $4.6M  Sources:  REET:  $2.5M    Transfers from other funds:  $500K  Property & B&O taxes: $1.6M       The adopted 2023‐2024 budget includes $4.6 million in general  governmental capital projects. The funds are needed to preserve and  enhance over $80 million of sports courts and fields, outdoor  structures, buildings, and amenities in our community. This budget will  continue to dedicate the B&O taxes to supplement the real estate  excise tax, King County parks levies, grants, donations, and general fund  transfers.   Details of the $4.6M million projects and use of city resources for these  projects can be found in the CIP section (5) of this budget.    Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-12 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   Transportation Improvements  Fund (317)   2‐Year Total $5.9 million  Sources:  REET:  $4.7M    Transfers from other funds:  $850K  Property & B&O taxes: $350K       The adopted budget includes $5.9 million in general capital projects for  roads, sidewalks, and bridges. Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP)  is set to be approved by the city council after the public hearing  scheduled in October. Details of the projects and use of city resources  for these projects can be found in the CIP section of this budget.      Enterprise Funds    The city has several enterprise type (or business type) operations, that  must be self‐sustaining. These include the water, wastewater, and  surface water utilities; the solid waste utility; the Maplewood Golf  Course, and the Renton Municipal Airport.     Utilities   $3.6M increase in  payment to garbage  contractor     $160K  comprehensive rate  study     $3M increase in King  County wastewater  charge     Rate increases         The water, wastewater, and surface water utility funds are accounted  for and budgeted separately but are managed as a system in  accordance with the city’s financial management policies. The system  conducts a comprehensive rate study every six years with the  assistance of outside consultants, with biannual updates performed  by city staff.   The adopted budget for utilities includes an increase of $3.6 million  for payment to garbage contractor (Republic Services), $160  thousand for a comprehensive rate study, $3 million increase in King  County wastewater charges as King County Metro is raising the sewer  treatment charge by 5.75% effective 2023.  The 2023 and 2024 update shows no increase in water rates, a 3%  increase for wastewater, and a 4% increase for surface water.   The solid waste utility is proposing a 7.8% rate increase in residential  rates for 2023 and a 7.7% increase in 2024.  Maplewood Golf Course   $270K general costs     The adopted budget for the Maplewood Golf Course includes funding  of an additional $270 thousand to account for general increases in  costs due to inflation. In addition, adopted fee increases are also  incorporated into the adopted budget to be in line with the market  average of other neighboring courses.         Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-13 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   Internal Service Funds         The city operates several “businesses” that provide service internally  to other city departments. These include the equipment rental fund  (501), insurance fund (502, property, liability, worker’s comp, and  unemployment), information technology fund (503), facilities fund  (504), communications fund (505, print, mail, and general  communication), healthcare insurance fund (512), and LEOFF1 retiree  healthcare fund (522).  All of the costs identified herein are paid for and included in the  operating departments’ budget. The charges are calculated based on  either specific charges or by systematic cost allocation. The health  insurance charge (for both active and retired employees) is part of  personnel benefit costs. The remaining internal service funds (fleet,  property/liability insurance, technology, facilities, and  communications) services are paid as internal service charges.   About 75% of all internal service charges are paid by the general fund;  therefore, the cost of internal service fund operations directly affects  the general fund’s bottom line.     Equipment Rental Fund  Operating: $3.1M in  2023/$3.2M in 2024    Capital: $2.2M in  2023 and $2.1M in  2024 adopted   equipment  replacements/new  additions        The equipment rental fund maintains nearly 700 pieces of equipment,  of which approximately 500 are vehicles and mobile equipment used  intensively in delivering city services. The fund also accumulates  replacement reserves for the replacement of vehicles when needed.    The adopted budget includes $2.2 million in 2023 and $1.4 million in  2024 for equipment replacements and new acquisitions. See public  work’s budget by department (section 3) for the full detailed listing.  Information Technology  Operating: $7M in  2023/$7.2M in 2024     Capital: $2M     1 business systems  analyst      The information technology (IT) fund was created in 2007 to allocate  the costs of the city’s centralized IT services costs. This fund provides  for citywide communication and data processing systems  improvements, maintenance and support including phone and  computer hardware and software, data center servers, storage and  network systems, business application systems development,  implementation and support, geographic information systems and  services, and mobile devices, copier and printer equipment for the  city.    The adopted budget of $8.1 million in 2023 and $8.2 million in 2024  includes a total of $2 million in IT capital projects over the 2‐year  budget period. This includes major replacement and enhancement of  Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-14 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   existing core networking, servers and storage equipment, end‐user  computers, copiers and printers.     Also, the adopted budget includes the addition of one limited term  position for project management and information technology support  for the finance ERP transition.    Risk Management  Operating: $22.4M in 2023  /$23.7M in 2024           The city’s risk management program consists of three funds: the  property and liability insurance fund (502), the employee health  insurance fund (512), and the LEOFF I retiree medical fund (522). The  502 fund’s annual budget totals $5.8 million for both 2023 and 2024,  consisting of property and liability insurance, workers compensation,  unemployment insurance, and program administration. Fund 502 also  includes one‐time transfers of $900 thousand each year to the general  fund to help with the loss of the annexation sales tax revenues that  ended in 2018. Initially these reserves were to be used in 2020,  however due to key decisions made early in the pandemic, these  reserves were not needed.   The city self‐insures employee health benefits with stop‐loss coverage  of $250k per incident. The 2023 and 2024 budget are based on  projected plan costs by the number of employees. The premium  increase is based on actual plan cost for the prior year along with an  actuarial analysis. At this time, the increase is projected at 8% for both  years.   Providing retiree health care is required by state law for LEOFF I  retirees. The city’s contribution is determined actuarially and re‐ evaluated every other year. The most recent actuarial study put the  city’s obligation at approximately $35.5 million in present value  therefore the city is contributing $1.8 million in 2023 and $2 million  in 2024 to fund this obligation.  Facilities  Operating: $6.8M in  2023/$7.0M in 2024     The facilities fund (504) was fully implemented in 2010 to accumulate  costs for maintaining and operating the city’s offices, public facilities  (primarily used by the general public), and operational facilities  (primarily used for city operations purposes), and charges the costs to  the appropriate functions/departments.    The adopted budget also includes $120 thousand per year for security  at the downtown parking garage.    Communications  Operating: $1.6M/year      The communications fund was also created in 2010 by pooling  citywide communications resources for the central print shop,  interoffice mail, external postage and printing services, and the  government TV channel operation. These were put in one place for  consistent coordination of brands, messages, and better prioritization  Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-15 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington                                                   of workload. The annual operating cost is at $1.6 million per year,  which is allocated based on actual services demand by departments.      Pension Trust Fund      Firemen’s Pension  Operating: $250K/year        The city is the custodian of the firemen’s pension fund, a trust fund  managed by appointed trustees consisting of city elected officials and  retired pensioners.  The fund accumulates resources and pays current pension benefits  per state law. The fund has sufficient assets to fully fund the city’s  pension obligation. Currently the plan assets generate more than  sufficient earnings to cover the benefits; and the city also receives a  distribution of a state fire insurance premium surcharge that is  restricted exclusively for fire pensions. The fund balance is expected  to grow due to the “overfunded” status of the pension. After the plan  is closed and all beneficiaries are expired, the balance may be moved  to LEOFF 1 retiree medical.        Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-16 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   Summary of New Programs (as mentioned in Highlights)            2023 Adopted 2024  Adopted Dept/Package #DescriptionOne‐Time (1x)/  Ongoing (O) FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTETot Exp $Tot Rev $ Legislative Dept Baseline 8.00         737,169                 ‐                                   8.00         767,280                 ‐                                    No new requests ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    Legislative Dept New Programs Total ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    Legislative Dept Total 8.00         737,169$              ‐$                          8.00         767,280$              ‐$                           Executive Dept Baseline 41.63      14,737,291          9,908,534             41.63      15,090,943          10,108,877           250003.0017 New Position ‐ Communications Specialist II O 1.00         176,401                 ‐                                   1.00         172,621                 ‐                                    250003.0018 City wide communications increase professional svcs O ‐            36,000                    ‐                                    ‐            36,000                    ‐                                    250003.0019 City Clerk Election Costs & Text Capuring software O ‐            149,000                 ‐                                    ‐            139,000                 ‐                                    250003.0020 Mayor's Office Operations O ‐            11,454                    ‐                                    ‐            16,454                    ‐                                    250003.0021 Court Public Defenders O ‐            22,000                    ‐                                    ‐            90,000                    ‐                                    650003.0006 Executive Services Administration Increase 1x ‐            125,000                 ‐                                    ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    650003.0007 Increase Print & Mail Assistant to 1.0 O 0.38         31,660                    ‐                                   0.38         32,872                    ‐                                    650003.0008 503 ISF Charges for New FTEs 1x ‐            ‐                                   51,150                    ‐            ‐                                   21,730                     650006.0003 New Case Management System O ‐            68,000                    ‐                                    ‐            3,000                       ‐                                    650004.0034 ERP Transition O 1.00         163,418                 163,418                 1.00         183,761                 183,761                  Executive Dept New Programs Total 2.38         782,933                 214,568                 2.38         673,708                 205,491                  Executive Dept Total 44.00      15,520,224$       10,123,102$       44.00      15,764,650$       10,314,368$        City Attorney Dept Baseline 15.00      3,224,711             ‐                                   15.00      3,331,592             ‐                                    150006.0009 Training and Licensing Costs O ‐            2,000                       ‐                                    ‐            2,000                       ‐                                    City Attorney Dept New Programs Total ‐            2,000                       ‐                                    ‐            2,000                       ‐                                    City Attorney Dept Total 15.00      3,226,711$          ‐$                          15.00      3,333,592$          ‐$                           Court Services Dept Baseline 17.00      3,395,240             3,871,060             17.00      3,563,092             3,871,060              No new requests 0 ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    Court Services Dept New Programs Total ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    Court Services Dept Total 17.00      3,395,240$          3,871,060$          17.00      3,563,092$          3,871,060$           Community and Economic Development Dept Baseline 63.00      13,995,174          6,482,414             63.00      14,626,002          6,485,144              150007.0010 New Code Compliance Inspector 1x 1.00         227,929                 ‐                                   1.00         174,749                 ‐                                    Community and Economic Development Dept New Programs Total 1.00         227,929                 ‐                                   1.00         174,749                 ‐                                    Community and Economic Development Dept Total 64.00      14,223,103$       6,482,414$          64.00      14,800,751$       6,485,144$           Equity, Housing, and Human Services  Dept Baseline 11.00      3,152,967             83,133                    11.00      3,264,634             83,133                     150010.0006 Human Services Funding Increase O ‐            250,000                 ‐                                    ‐            250,000                 ‐                                    150010.0008 Housing Opportunity Fund 1x ‐            100,000                 ‐                                    ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    250010.0001 Equity Manager 1.0 FTE O 1.00         124,705                 ‐                                   1.00         147,263                 ‐                                    Equity, Housing, and Human Services  Dept New Programs Total 1.00         519,705                 ‐                                   1.00         442,263                 ‐                                    Equity, Housing, and Human Services  Dept Total 12.00      3,672,672$          83,133$                 12.00      3,706,897$          83,133$                  Finance  Dept Baseline 24.00      5,848,243             500,000                 24.00      6,054,473             480,000                  650004.0034 ERP Transition O 1.00         165,419                 ‐                                   1.00         183,041                 ‐                                    650004.0035 Bank Merchant Fee 1x ‐            30,000                    ‐                                    ‐            30,000                    ‐                                    750005.0002 Increase Fire Pension Annual Expenditures O ‐            43,000                    ‐                                    ‐            44,000                    ‐                                    Finance  Dept New Programs Total 1.00         238,419                 ‐                                   1.00         257,041                 ‐                                    Finance  Dept Total 25.00      6,086,663$          500,000$              25.00      6,311,514$          480,000$               Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-17 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   Summary of New Programs (as mentioned in Highlights) continued      2023 Adopted 2024  Adopted Dept/Package #DescriptionOne‐Time (1x)/  Ongoing (O) FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Human Resources and Risk Management Dept Baseline 14.00      24,203,720          22,523,044          14.00      25,545,413          23,871,566           650014.0014 Cost Increases for Services O ‐            15,130                    ‐                                    ‐            15,130                    ‐                                    650014.0015 Employee Accommodation O ‐            10,000                    ‐                                    ‐            10,000                    ‐                                    650014.0016 Temporary employee for Laserfiche data transfer 1x ‐            9,600                       ‐                                    ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    650004.0034 ERP Transition O 0.50         111,528                 ‐                                   0.50         121,768                 ‐                                    Human Resources and Risk Management Dept New Programs Total 0.50         146,258                 ‐                                   0.50         146,898                 ‐                                    Human Resources and Risk Management Dept Total 14.50      24,349,979$       22,523,044$       14.50      25,692,311$       23,871,566$        Parks & Recreation Dept Baseline 72.50      19,718,829          5,631,397             72.50      21,294,462          6,086,549              350020.0058 Add three (3) fleet vehicles to Parks Maintenance 1x ‐            75,000                    ‐                                    ‐            150,000                 ‐                                    350020.0059 Add One Lead and Two Parks Maintenance Positions 1x 3.00         545,083                 ‐                                   3.00         426,543                 ‐                                    550020.0023 Increase Golf Course Fees 1x ‐            127,012                 328,850                 ‐            132,912                 408,735                  550020.0025 PPNR ‐ Capital Project Manager Conversion 1x 1.00         176,731                 ‐                                    ‐            7,427                       ‐                                    Parks & Recreation Dept New Programs Total 4.00         923,826                 328,850                 3.00         716,883                 408,735                  Parks & Recreation Dept Total 76.50      20,642,654$       5,960,247$          75.50      22,011,344$       6,495,284$           Police Dept Baseline 164.00   47,765,851          425,000                 164.00   49,988,282          425,000                  150008.0040 Comunications and Community Engagement Manager‐FTE O 1.00         180,570                 ‐                                   1.00         200,120                 ‐                                    150008.0042 Valley Communications ‐ Increase O ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    ‐            176,000                 ‐                                    150008.0043 Police ‐ Public Records Request Additions O 2.00         262,359                 ‐                                   2.00         263,968                 ‐                                    150008.0044 Police ‐ New Equipment 1x ‐            500,000                 ‐                                    ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    150008.0045 Police ‐ Additional Police Officers O4.00         619,564                 ‐                                   4.00         706,052                 ‐                                    Police Dept New Programs Total 7.00         1,562,494             ‐                                   7.00         1,346,141             ‐                                    Police Dept Total 171.00   49,328,345$       425,000$              171.00   51,334,423$       425,000$               Public Works Dept Baseline 203.50   121,795,509       105,376,448       203.50   127,752,408       109,542,379        150015.0001 City Parking Garage Security Contract O ‐            120,000                 ‐                                    ‐            120,000                 ‐                                    450015.0017 Airport Operations Increase O ‐            28,500                    ‐                                    ‐            28,500                    ‐                                    450015.0018 Traffic Signal Supply Increase O ‐            15,000                    ‐                                    ‐            15,000                    ‐                                    450015.0019 Traffic Sign Supply Increase O ‐            15,000                    ‐                                    ‐            15,000                    ‐                                    450015.0020 Comm Supply Account Increase O ‐            10,000                    ‐                                    ‐            10,000                    ‐                                    450015.0021 Marking Supply Account Increase O ‐            15,000                    ‐                                    ‐            15,000                    ‐                                    450015.0022 Lighting Supply Account Increase O ‐            10,000                    ‐                                    ‐            10,000                    ‐                                    550015.0025 2024 Comprehensive Rate Study 1x ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    ‐            160,000                 ‐                                    550015.0026 Solid Waste Litter Control Increase O ‐            118,000                 ‐                                    ‐            45,700                    ‐                                    550015.0027 Public Works Sustainability Increase O ‐            29,653                    ‐                                    ‐            29,653                    ‐                                    550015.0028 NPDES Permit Fee Increase O ‐            30,000                    ‐                                    ‐            30,000                    ‐                                    550015.0030 Water Engineering and Planning Increase O ‐            200,197                 1,970,815             ‐            78,059                    945,572                  550015.0031 Wastewater Engineering and Planning Increase O ‐            113,640                 648,479                 ‐            183,391                 674,616                  550015.0032 Surface Water Engineering and Planning Increase O ‐            76,084                    889,878                 ‐            90,777                    1,061,719              550015.0033 King County Metro Fund Increase O ‐            951,091                 951,091                 ‐            2,078,551             2,078,551              550015.0034 Solid Waste Collection Increase O ‐            1,760,960             1,820,764             ‐            1,795,956             1,833,404              650015.0003 504 ISF Charges for New FTEs 1x ‐            ‐                                   65,040                    ‐            ‐                                   8,640                        650015.0004 501 ISF Charges for New FTEs O ‐            ‐                                   376,700                 ‐            ‐                                   171,200                  Public Works Dept New Programs Total ‐            3,493,125             6,722,767             ‐            4,705,587             6,773,702              Public Works Dept Total 203.50   125,288,634$    112,099,215$    203.50   132,457,994$    116,316,081$     OCS‐LTGO Bonds Dept Baseline ‐            16,534,552          125,294,499       ‐            18,446,635          128,761,031        No new requests ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    OCS‐LTGO Bonds Dept New Programs Total ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    ‐            ‐                                   ‐                                    OCS‐LTGO Bonds Dept Total ‐            16,534,552$       125,294,499$    ‐            18,446,635$       128,761,031$     Citywide Baseline 633.63  275,109,257    280,095,529    633.63  289,725,214    289,714,739     New Programs Total 16.88    7,896,688        7,266,185        15.88    8,465,269        7,387,929         Citywide Total 650.50  283,005,945$  287,361,714$  649.50  298,190,483$  297,102,667$   Executive Summary - 2023/2024 Budget Highlights 1-18 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington The Budget Process    Washington state law requires that cities must adopt a balanced budget prior to the beginning of the fiscal year.  The adopted budget appropriates funds and establishes legal expenditure limits for the upcoming fiscal year.  Washington state law also allows for the adoption of biennial budgets provided the city council also adopts a  second ordinance for a mid‐biennial review and modification prior to the end of the first year in the fiscal  biennium. In 2011, the City of Renton moved from an annual budget to a biennial budget with mid‐biennial review.     Budget Development and Adoption    The City of Renton’s development of the biennial budget occurs every two years from February through October.  Development begins with the mayor and the council’s review of the city’s current service levels and projected  revenues into the new biennium to determine if they need to make significant changes to the budget. During this  review, the mayor’s first priority is to ensure that the city is able maintain the current levels of service. As costs to  maintain service levels continue to rise, additional funding may need to be identified to preserve the current levels  of service. Alternatively, if revenues are expected to decline, cost‐cutting measures may be implemented.        The mayor and the council hold a strategic planning retreat in February/March of each year in order to determine  whether the city’s current levels of service are meeting the needs of our community, adopt the city’s business  plan goals, and sets policy direction and priorities for the next budget cycle.      During May, June and July, city departments prepare and submit budget proposals with the estimates for  providing existing service levels for each year in the biennium. In addition, they submit capital improvement  program (CIP) budgets and requests for new programs that they would like the mayor to consider, which include  current service level expansion and new services. The mayor then evaluates the departments' proposals to ensure  they align with council’s adopted business plan goals and recommends to council for approval.    The mayor must provide a proposed biennial budget to the council no later than the first Monday of October. The  mayor’s proposal also includes the estimated revenue to support the costs of providing city services. Proposed  expenditures cannot exceed the reasonably anticipated revenue sources, unless new revenue sources are also  being proposed, in which case, proposed legislation to authorize the new revenue sources must be submitted to  the city council along with the proposed budget.     After the mayor submits the proposed budget, the council conducts public hearings. During the same time frame,  the council holds committee meetings in open sessions to discuss budget requests with department  representatives and make subsequent amendments to the mayor’s proposed budget. Once the public hearings  have been held, the deliberative process is complete, and the council has made their changes, the city council will  adopt the budget ordinance in November.    Once the council adopts the budget, the mayor must ensure that expenditures are made within legal limits. If the  economy changes or the city identifies unanticipated needs during the year that require changing the budget, the  mayor will recommend those changes. A council‐adopted ordinance must accompany all budget increases. If  revenues fall short, the mayor can make decreases to the budget to ensure that the city does not overspend  available resources.       Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1-19 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Biennial Budget Calendar    The following table illustrates a typical biennial budget calendar for both the initial budget development year and  the mid‐biennium adjustment year. The process and legal deadlines in Year 1 is identical to the annual budget  process. Year 2 is the simplified mid‐year review process.    123456789101112123456789101112 1. Administration planning retreat 2. Council sets budget priorities and guidance in workshop 3. First quarter financial report to Council Committee of  the Whole 4. Administration develops budget parameters 5. Staff provide capital facilities plan update to council 6. Mayor’s staff prioritize programs/proposal and submit  recommendation to the mayor 7.    Departments submits budget requests 8. Finance reviews requests to ensure consistency with  council’s and mayor’s directions  9.  Departments identify necessary mid‐biennium  adjustments 10. Finance updates revenue estimates and compiles with  department submittals 11. Preliminary budget document prepared, printed, and  filed with city clerk and presented to the city council (at least  60 days prior to the ensuing fiscal year) 12. City clerk publishes notice of the filing of preliminary  budget and notice of public hearing to be held during  preliminary budget deliberations  15. City council adopts an ordinance to establish the  amount of property taxes to be levied in the ensuing year  16. Final budget/mid‐biennium adjustments, as adopted, is  published and distributed within the first three months of  the following year            represents mid‐biennium process instead of proposed biennial budget   14. City council makes modifications to the proposed  budget/mid‐biennium adjustments Process Description Year 1Year 2 13. City council conducts workshops and public hearings on  the preliminary budget including  revenues and property tax  Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1-20 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Budgetary Basis and Basis of Accounting     Basis of accounting refers to the point at which revenues or expenditures/expenses are recognized. The city’s  budget is adopted on the modified accrual basis of accounting: revenue is reported when it is both measurable  and available and expenditures are reported when the liabilities are incurred. Property tax, sales taxes, and other  tax‐payer assessed revenues due for the current year are considered both measurable and available for budgetary  purposes, even though a portion may be collected in the subsequent year. Licenses, fines, penalties, and  miscellaneous revenues are recorded as revenue as they are received in cash since this is when they are both  available and can be accurately measured.     The budgetary basis of accounting does vary slightly from the city’s financial statement reporting. Both  governmental activities and business‐type activities in the government‐wide statements, the proprietary fund,  and the fiduciary fund statements are presented on the full accrual basis of accounting. Revenues are recognized  when earned and expenses are recognized when incurred. Whereas, the governmental fund financial statements  are presented on the modified accrual basis of accounting, similar to the budgetary basis of accounting except for  the following differences:      Perspective differences – the general fund is structured differently for budgeting purposes than it is for  reporting under GAAP. This city maintains various management funds that are reported within the general  fund. Consolidation of the funds results in the elimination of transfers between the consolidated funds  for GAAP reporting.       Basis difference – certain payments and receipts are budgeted for in a manner that is inconsistent with  GAAP. Interfund payments for indirect cost allocations and reimbursement of payroll costs associated  with capital projects are budgeted as interfund revenues; however, these payments are reclassified as a  reduction of the expenditure for GAAP reporting. In addition, interfund loan payments are budgeted as  debt service expenditures; however, these payments are reclassified as a reduction of the interfund loan  payable for GAAP reporting.     The budget, as adopted, constitutes the legal authority for expenditures. The budget is adopted with budgetary  control at the fund level, by year. Expenditures may not legally exceed appropriations at the fund level of detail  for each year of the biennium. Transfers or revisions within funds are allowed, but only the city council has the  legal authority to increase or decrease a given fund’s budget. Any unspent operating appropriations automatically  lapse at the end of each fiscal year, except for any amounts that are continued through the city’s annual adopted  carry‐forward ordinance. The carry‐forward ordinance also identifies unspent capital appropriations to be carried  forward into the following year.                        Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1-21 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Governmental Funds *General Government General Fund 000 Community Services  Fund 001 Street Fund 003 Leased City Properties  108 Economic Development Reserve 098 Museum Fund 005 Municipal Art 125 Debt Service LTGO 215 Special Revenue Special Hotel/Motel  Tax 110 Cable Communication  127 Housing & Supportive Services 130 Springbook Wetlands  Bank Fund  135 Police Seizure Fund 140,141 Mitigation Funds 304,310,311,312 *Capital Projects Mitigation Funds 303, 305 REET Funds  308, 309 Municipal Facilities  316 Transportation 317 Family First Center 346 Proprietary Funds Enterprise *Waterworks Utilities Utility Operations 405,406,407, 416 Utility Construction 425,426,427 Utility Debt Service Airport Airport Operations 402 Airport Construction 422 *Solid Waste Utility 403 Golf Course Golf Operations 404 Golf Construction 424 Internal Service Equipment Rental 501 Insurance Services 502, 512, 522 Information  Technology 503 Facilities 504 Communication 505 Budgetary Fund Structure     Financial Structure  The city’s budget comprises seven major fund types, as shown below: General Government, Special Revenue,  Debt Service, Capital Projects, Enterprise, Internal Service, and Fiduciary Funds. The following pages provide a  general overview of each fund type.         Major Funds are those with budgets representing ten percent or more of the city’s overall budget. They are marked  with an asterisk (*).  Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1-22 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1. General Governmental Funds  These funds are used to account for resources that are generally not dedicated for a specific purpose. They  are used to meet the basic services that your local government provides.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Taxes • Police protection  • Fees, licenses, and permits • Parks and recreation  • Fines and forfeitures • Municipal court / legal services  • Intergovernmental (Federal, State, and Local) • Street maintenance planning   • Economic development / planning   • Administrative functions   • Housing and human services    2. Special Revenue Funds  These funds are used to account for revenues that are to be used for a specific purpose as required by law or  administrative action.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Federal, State, and Local Grants • Economic development  • Taxes • Cable communications   Drug seizure funds • Police drug enforcement   Impact mitigation • Art fund    3. Debt Service Funds  These funds are used to account for accumulation of dedicated revenue and payment of principal and  interest related to the city’s general obligation bond issues.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Property tax levies • Payment of principal and interest on  outstanding bonds  • Real estate excise tax   • Special assessments                     Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1-23 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   4. Capital Investment Funds  These funds are used to account for the acquisition and construction of major capital facilities and  equipment. All projects supported by these funds can be found in the 2023‐2028 City of Renton capital  investment program section.      5. Enterprise Funds  These funds are used to account for operations that are financed and operated in a manner similar to private  business enterprises. Services are financed primarily through user fees.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Service (user) charges • City utilities  • Federal, state, and local grants • Renton municipal airport  • Revenue bonds • Maplewood golf course  • State loans     6. Internal Service Funds  These funds are used to account for the goods and services furnished by one city department for another  department on a cost reimbursement basis.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Charges to other city departments • Fleet management   • Insurance, health / property liability   • Information technology   • Facilities   • Communications    7. Fiduciary Funds  These funds are used to account for assets held by the city in a trustee capacity.  Major Revenues Primary Services  • Investment interest • Fire pension fund  Major Revenues Primary Services  • Federal, state, and local grants • Capital investment projects  • Special assessments   • Property tax   • B&O tax & business licensing fee   • Real estate excise tax   • Impact mitigation   Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1-24 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Employment History – City of Renton  The total authorized FTE count is for regular full‐time, part‐time and limited term positions. Refer to the Budget by Department section for additional detail.  General Government Enterprise Total FTE's 2023 Adopted Staffing Changes Regular (full‐time and part‐time)516.54 118.09 634.63 Community & Economic Development 1.00 1.00 Executive 1.38 1.38 Equity, Housing & Human Services 1.00 1.00 Parks & Recreation 2.00 2.00 Police 7.00 7.00 Total Regular (full‐time and part‐time) 528.91 118.09 647.00 Authorized Limited Term Staffing 2.00 0.00 2.00 Parks & Recreation ‐1.00 ‐1.00 Executive 1.00 1.00 Finance 1.00 1.00 Human Resources & Risk Management 0.50 0.50 Total Limited Term Staffing 3.50 0.00 3.50 Total 2023 Adopted Staffing (Regular + Limited Term)532.41 118.09 650.50 2024 Adopted Staffing Changes Regular (full‐time and part‐time)528.91 118.09 647.00 Parks & Recreation ‐1.00 ‐1.00 Total Regular (full‐time and part‐time) 527.91 118.09 646.00 Limited Term Staffing 3.50 0.00 3.50 Total 2024 Adopted Staffing (Regular + Limited Term)531.41 118.09 649.50 Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1-25 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Employment History – City of Renton (continued)  General Government Enterprise Total FTE's 2021/2022 Adopted Staffing Changes Regular (full‐time and part‐time)497.94 117.09 615.03 Parks & Recreation ‐1.00 ‐1.00 Total Regular (full‐time and part‐time) 496.94 117.09 614.03 Authorized Limited Term Staffing 1.50 0.00 1.50 Executive ‐1.00 ‐1.00 Parks & Recreation ‐0.50 ‐0.50 Total Limited Term Staffing 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 2022 Adopted Staffing (Regular + Limited Term)496.94 117.09 614.03 2021/2022 Adjustments  Regular (full‐time and part‐time)496.94 117.09 614.03 Executive 2.00 2.00 Equity, Housing & Human Services 3.50 3.50 Finance 1.00 1.00 Public Works 5.00 1.00 6.00 Community & Economic Development 6.50 6.50 City Attorney 1.00 1.00 Police 0.60 0.60 Total Regular (full‐time and part‐time) 516.54 118.09 634.63 Authorized Limited Term Staffing 0.00 0.00 0.00 Human Resources & Risk Management 1.00 1.00 Parks & Recreation 1.00 1.00 Total Limited Term Staffing 2.00 0.00 2.00 Total 2022 Authorized Staffing (Regular + Limited Term)518.54 118.09 636.63 Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1-26 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Staffing (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees – FTE) Comparison by Department (1 of 2)    See Budget by Department (3‐1) for details.   2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Department Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Legislative Services City Council Members 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.00 City Council Liaison 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 0.00 0.00 Executive Mayor's Office 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 Executive Services Admin 1.00 1.00 0.60 1.00 0.60 0.74 0.74 ‐0.26 0.00 City Clerk 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 0.00 0.00 Information Technology 20.00 20.00 21.00 20.00 22.00 22.53 22.53 2.53 0.00 Organizational Development 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 Communications 6.63 5.63 6.03 5.63 6.03 7.73 7.73 2.10 0.00 Emergency Management 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 40.63 39.63 40.63 39.63 41.63 44.00 44.00 4.37 0.00 Court Services Municipal Court 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 0.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 0.00 0.00 City Attorney City Attorney 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 1.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 1.00 0.00 Community and Economic Development Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 Economic Development 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 6.00 0.00 Planning 15.50 15.50 15.50 15.50 14.00 14.00 14.00 ‐1.50 0.00 Development Services 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 21.00 21.00 1.00 0.00 Development Engineering 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 2.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 56.50 56.50 56.50 56.50 63.00 64.00 64.00 7.50 0.00 Equity, Housing & Human Services Administration 0.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 0.00 Housing 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 Community Outreach 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 Neighborhood Programs 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 Human Services 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.00 4.00 4.00 ‐0.50 0.00 Total Regular FTE 7.50 7.50 10.50 7.50 11.00 12.00 12.00 4.50 0.00 Finance  Administration 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 Operations 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 0.00 0.00 Tax & Licensing 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 Grant Administration 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 Utility Billing 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 0.00 0.00 Budget & Accounting 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 7.00 7.00 1.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 23.00 23.00 24.00 23.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 2.00 0.00 Human Resources/Risk Management Admin/Employee Relations 8.00 7.70 7.70 7.70 7.70 8.20 8.20 0.50 0.00 Benefits 1.75 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 0.00 0.00 Risk Management 3.25 2.75 2.75 2.75 3.75 3.75 3.75 1.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 14.00 14.50 14.50 1.50 0.00 Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1-27 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Staffing (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees – FTE) Comparison by Department (2 of 2)     See Budget by Department (3‐1) for details.        2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Department Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Parks and Recreation Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 Parks & Trails 34.85 34.85 34.85 34.85 34.85 37.85 37.85 3.00 0.00 Recreation 18.75 18.25 19.00 18.25 19.25 18.25 18.25 0.00 0.00 Museum 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 Golf Course 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 0.00 0.00 Parks Plan and Nat Res 7.40 6.40 6.40 6.40 6.40 5.40 4.40 ‐1.00 ‐1.00 Total Regular FTE 76.00 74.50 75.25 74.50 75.50 76.50 75.50 2.00 ‐1.00 Public Works Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 Maintenance Services 92.00 92.00 92.00 92.00 94.00 94.00 94.00 2.00 0.00 Transportation Services 31.00 31.00 31.00 31.00 31.50 31.50 31.50 0.50 0.00 Utility Systems 28.50 28.50 28.50 28.50 26.50 26.50 26.50 ‐2.00 0.00 Sustainability & Solid Waste 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 0.00 Airport 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.00 Facilities 35.00 35.00 35.00 35.00 35.00 35.00 35.00 0.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 197.50 197.50 197.50 197.50 203.50 203.50 203.50 6.01 0.00 Police Administration 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 0.00 0.00 Patrol Operations 67.00 67.00 66.00 67.00 69.00 73.00 73.00 6.00 0.00 Special Operations 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 ‐3.00 0.00 Patrol Services 16.00 16.00 17.00 16.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 1.00 0.00 Investigations 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 0.00 0.00 Administrative Services 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 16.00 16.00 1.00 0.00 Staff Services 17.40 17.40 18.00 17.40 18.00 20.00 20.00 2.60 0.00 Total Regular FTE 163.40 163.40 164.00 163.40 164.00 171.00 171.00 7.60 0.00 Total All Staffing (Regular FTE) 616.53 614.03 620.38 614.03 636.63 650.50 649.50 36.48 ‐1.00 Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1-28 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW   CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Property Tax 9% Sales Tax 12%Utility Taxes 6% B & O  Taxes 3% Other Taxes 4% Inter‐Gov 2% Dev Svc 2% Utility Service  Charges 33% Fines &  Forfeits 2% Misc 4% Interfund  Transaction 22% Capital Grants 1% 2021‐22 Citywide Revenue & Sources $494.2 million  Property Tax 9% Sales Tax 14% Utility Taxes 6% B & O  Taxes 6% Other  Taxes 4% Inter‐ Gov 1% Dev Svc 2% Utility Service  Charges 30% Fines & Forfeits 2% Misc 3% Interfund  Transaction 22% Capital Grants 1% 2023‐24 Citywide Revenue & Sources $584.5 million  Citywide Revenues and Sources         2020 2021 2022 2021 2022 2023 2024 2023‐24 vs. 2021‐22 Adp Citywide Revenue & Resources Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Revenue: Property Tax 21,874,241$       21,494,697$      21,709,653$        22,582,760$        22,709,653$      25,163,846$       25,898,761$         7,858,257$       18.2% Sales Tax 30,996,947    28,648,434   31,139,645    40,340,908    41,566,025   41,589,368   41,668,127     23,469,416      39.3% Utility Taxes 16,039,955    15,100,639   15,815,967    16,799,380    16,345,967   17,148,049   17,312,797     3,544,240    11.5% B&O Tax 7,615,650   6,500,000    9,500,000    12,613,673    13,500,000   15,400,000   17,600,000     17,000,000      106.3% Real Estate Excise Tax 6,606,980   4,500,000    4,600,000    10,087,876    4,600,000    4,600,000    4,600,000   100,000     1.1% Other Taxes 4,238,251   3,468,666    4,532,519    5,934,400    5,415,241    4,989,162    5,038,610   2,026,587    25.3% Sub‐total ‐ Taxes 87,372,025    79,712,436   87,297,784    108,358,997   104,136,885     108,890,425   112,118,295    53,998,500      32.3% Business License Fee 1,009,760   918,780    927,968     1,085,936    927,968    932,607    937,270    23,129      1.3% Licenses & Permits 102,280     140,674    140,674     110,165     140,674    110,674    110,674    (60,000)     ‐21.3% State Shared Revenue 4,320,508   4,627,277    4,632,277    5,179,642    5,537,517    4,252,635    4,261,464   (745,455)     ‐8.1% Development Services 4,608,588   3,676,588    4,642,706    4,986,031    6,481,584    4,924,923    4,928,223   1,533,852    18.4% Utility Service Charges 76,014,225    79,813,861   82,300,125    79,927,146    83,819,666   87,526,686   90,284,517     15,697,217      9.7% Other Charges for Services 2,624,112   3,224,372    3,303,652    4,960,872    5,843,662    6,108,675    6,254,865   5,835,516    89.4% Fines and Forfeits 4,647,437   5,543,507    5,751,054    6,674,704    6,001,793    5,558,429    5,558,429   (177,702)     ‐1.6% Interest Earnings 7,911,030   6,028,409    6,753,329    5,032,616    3,827,323    2,870,331    2,878,376   (7,033,031)    ‐55.0% Miscellaneous Revenue 1,340,968   298,722    298,722     751,828     6,729,336    180,922    180,922    (235,600)     ‐39.4% Subtotal Operating Revenue 189,950,933    183,984,626   196,048,291   217,067,937   223,446,408     221,356,307   227,513,036    68,836,427      18.1% Intergovernmental Grants 12,493,670    500,564    434,677     14,042,086    84,859,763   341,138    344,687    (249,416)     ‐26.7% Mitigation Fees/Capital Contri.4,005,545   1,168,500    1,168,500    5,767,582    16,975,256   3,214,500    3,214,500   4,092,000    175.1% Bond/Loan/Capital Proceeds 175,000     ‐     ‐     ‐     263,822    46,216     46,216    92,433      N/A Subtotal Capital Sources 16,674,215    1,669,064    1,603,177    19,809,668    102,098,841     3,601,854    3,605,403   3,935,017    120.3% Interfund Services 35,571,153    44,482,295   45,899,929    41,871,739    49,857,477   51,829,920   53,966,244     15,413,941      17.1% Interfund Transfers 21,918,839    11,772,387   8,719,459    20,676,724    44,202,306   10,573,632   12,017,984     2,099,771    10.2% Subtotal Interfund Transactions 57,489,992    56,254,682   54,619,388    62,548,464    94,059,782   62,403,553   65,984,228     17,513,711      15.8% Total Rev/Other Svcs 264,115,140$       241,908,372$      252,270,855$       299,426,068$       419,605,032$        287,361,714$       297,102,667$        90,285,155$         18.3% Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-29 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  General  Gov 9% CED 4% Parks & Rec 8%Police 17% EHHS 1% Public Works 44% Human  Resource &  Risk 8% Citywide 9% 2021‐22 Adopted Citywide Expenditure & Uses  $507.5 million  General  Gov 10% CED 5% Parks & Rec 7%Police 18% EHHS 1% Public  Works 44% Human Resource  & Risk 8% Citywide 7% 2023‐24 Citywide Expenditure & Uses  $581.2 million  Citywide Expenditures & Uses by Department                                            2020 2021 2022 2021 2022 2023 2024 2023‐24 vs. 2021‐22 Adp Citywide Expenditure & Uses Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Legislative 425,744$                          512,544$                         526,945$                          592,929$                          715,534$                         737,169$                          767,280$                         464,959$                         44.7% Court 2,440,873                        3,102,930                       3,215,462                        2,622,084                        3,645,369                       3,395,240                        3,563,092                       639,941                            10.1% Executive 17,060,009                     12,879,173                    13,123,407                     11,442,000                     22,689,850                    15,501,449                     15,762,205                    5,261,075                       20.2% Finance 4,222,728                        4,787,282                       4,932,463                        4,677,832                        6,135,015                       6,082,888                        6,310,029                       2,673,172                       27.5% City Attorney 2,207,330                        2,611,347                       2,700,512                        2,440,373                        3,165,139                       3,226,711                        3,333,592                       1,248,443                       23.5% Community & Eco Development 10,576,642                     10,808,262                    11,186,070                     10,491,001                     19,557,887                    14,144,228                     14,792,746                    6,942,641                       31.6% Parks & Recreation 23,453,466                     22,023,339                    21,481,400                     16,354,764                     46,150,761                    20,184,544                     21,230,834                    (2,089,360)                      ‐4.8% Police 37,097,626                     42,530,483                    43,642,136                     41,403,709                     47,893,860                    49,279,460                     51,322,888                    14,429,729                    16.7% Equity, Housing & Human Services 1,482,478                        1,493,644                       1,522,001                        3,298,257                        5,886,441                       3,668,897                        3,705,412                       4,358,664                       144.5% Public Works 103,255,270                  104,638,484                 117,134,515                  129,618,278                  285,986,410                 124,456,714                  132,348,374                 35,032,089                    15.8% Human Resource Risk Management 15,998,499                     18,877,237                    20,133,146                     18,181,055                     21,564,113                    23,393,336                     24,790,826                    9,173,779                       23.5% Other City Services*9,513,715                        12,958,012                    10,144,791                     10,372,203                     12,352,748                    8,361,677                        8,245,221                       (6,495,905)                      ‐28.1% Total Operating Expenditures 227,734,380                  237,222,737                 249,742,847                  251,494,485                  475,743,126                 272,432,313                  286,172,499                 71,639,227                    14.7% Subtotal Uses 227,734,380                  237,222,737                 249,742,847                  251,494,485                  475,743,126                 272,432,313                  286,172,499                 71,639,227                    14.7% Inter‐Fund Transfers/Loans (various)21,915,703                     11,772,387                    8,719,459                        20,678,861                     44,202,306                    10,573,632                     12,017,984                    2,099,771                       10.2% Total Exp/Other Uses 249,650,083$               248,995,124$              258,462,306$               272,173,346$               519,945,432$              283,005,945$               298,190,483$              73,738,998$                 14.5% In(De)crease in Fund Balance 14,465,058                     (7,086,753)                      (6,191,451)                       27,252,721                     (100,340,400)                4,355,769                        (1,087,816)                       Beginning FB 268,898,747                  151,432,872                 144,346,119                  283,363,805                  310,616,526                 210,276,126                  214,631,895                  Ending FB 283,363,805                  144,346,119                 138,154,668                  310,616,526                  210,276,126                 214,631,895                  213,544,079                  * Debt Service is reported under Other City Services Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-30 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Personnel 37% Supplies/  Small Eq 2% Services &  Utilities 30% Inter‐Gov 0% InterFund 20% Capital 7% Debt Service 4% 2021‐22 Citywide Expenditure & Uses by Line  Item $507.5 million  Personnel 38% Supplies/  Small Eq 2%Services &  Utilities 30% Inter‐Gov 0% InterFund 20% Capital 8% Debt Service 2% 2023‐24 Citywide Expenditure & Uses by Line  Item $581.2 million  Citywide Expenditures & Uses by Line Item                                          2020 2021 2022 2021 2022 2023 2024 2023‐24 vs. 2021‐22 Adp Citywide Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Expenditure by Line item Wages 54,235,425$     58,636,958$     60,504,765$     54,252,623$     67,266,523$     70,353,608$     74,160,386$     25,372,272$          21.3% Overtime 2,832,825           2,172,115           2,172,515           3,131,514           2,182,515           2,187,195           2,187,595           30,160                       0.7% Retirement 5,917,400           7,627,125           7,913,773           5,543,778           8,548,251           7,713,610           8,177,890           350,603                    2.3% Social Security 4,092,199           4,389,299           4,505,050           4,116,626           4,961,406           5,227,233           5,440,538           1,773,422                19.9% Medical 9,947,656           13,443,330        14,653,262        11,012,142        15,234,030        15,533,141        16,783,810        4,220,360                15.0% LEOFF Medical 1,591,684           2,591,684           2,591,684           2,591,684           2,591,684           1,792,000           1,917,000           (1,474,368)              ‐28.4% Payroll Taxes 1,783,464           2,301,287           2,348,761           1,570,039           2,218,046           2,337,113           2,363,548           50,613                       1.1% Intermittent Pay / Benefit 486,600               1,881,262           1,882,826           883,755               1,884,600           1,927,763           1,869,727           33,402                       0.9% Total Personnel Costs 80,887,254        93,043,059        96,572,636        83,102,162        104,887,054     107,071,663     112,900,494     30,356,463             16.0% Materials/Supplies & Small Eq 6,020,721           5,594,328           5,593,217           5,629,270           9,109,427           5,564,898           5,563,787           (58,860)                       ‐0.5% Services 74,340,962        75,645,045        76,673,176        77,783,879        99,439,572        84,265,676        88,282,401        20,229,856             13.3% Debt Service 10,986,174        10,773,594        7,929,644           10,227,836        7,673,466           6,598,690           6,591,044           (5,513,503)               ‐29.5% Interfund‐IDC & Services 4,232,487           4,373,267           4,499,582           3,414,314           3,938,895           5,309,214           5,535,535           1,971,900                22.2% IS‐IT 5,373,361           6,435,900           6,578,379           4,714,050           9,128,748           7,355,595           7,537,438           1,878,754                14.4% IS‐Communication 341,186               1,154,732           1,186,600           827,217               1,373,535           1,592,402           1,663,767           914,837                    39.1% IS‐ER M&O 3,037,444           2,890,489           2,940,243           3,040,489           3,134,995           3,256,782           3,337,615           763,665                    13.1% IS‐ER RR 604,778               3,502,287           3,263,371           3,410,907           3,212,202           3,173,217           3,056,588           (535,853)                    ‐7.9% IS‐Insurance 1,698,109           1,740,148           1,767,616           1,740,148           2,463,026           2,884,177           2,912,429           2,288,842                65.3% IS‐Facilities 4,149,775           5,992,730           6,179,470           5,025,802           6,493,654           6,816,627           7,060,179           1,704,607                14.0% IS‐EE Medical 11,415,939        13,924,752        15,056,476        12,668,792        15,056,476        16,925,534        18,197,602        6,141,907                21.2% Transfer out (capital/Reserves)21,915,703        11,772,387        8,719,459           20,918,249        45,014,426        10,826,632        12,261,984        2,596,771                12.7% Subtotal Non‐Personnel Cost 144,116,640     143,799,658     140,387,234     149,400,953     206,038,422     154,569,444     162,000,370     32,382,922             11.4% Exp Before Capital 225,003,893     236,842,717     236,959,869     232,503,114     310,925,476     261,641,107     274,900,864     62,739,385             13.2% Capital 24,646,190        12,152,407        21,502,437        39,670,232        209,019,956     21,364,838        23,289,619        10,999,613             32.7% Exp Before Interfund 24,646,190        12,152,407        21,502,437        39,670,232        209,019,956     21,364,838        23,289,619        10,999,613             32.7% Grand Total 249,650,083$  248,995,124$  258,462,306$  272,173,346$  519,945,432$  283,005,945$  298,190,483$  73,738,998$          14.5% Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-31 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW   CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Property Tax 21% Sales Tax 29% Utility Tax 15% B & O Taxes 8% Other Taxes 4%Intergovt 4% Dev. Svs 4% Svc Chrgs 4% Court Fines 4% Interfund 5% Misc. 2% 2021‐22 Adopted General Fund Revenue &  Sources $203.3 million  Property Tax 20% Sales Tax 30% Utility Tax 13% B & O Taxes 13% Other Taxes 4% Intergovt 3%Dev. Svs 4%Svc Chrgs 3% Court Fines 3% Interfund 5% Misc. 2% 2023‐24 Adopted General Fund Revenue &  Sources $254.9 million  General Fund Revenues and Sources 2020 2021 2022 2021 2022 2023 2024 2023‐24 vs. 2021‐22 Adp General Government Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Revenue: Property Tax 21,874,241$            21,494,697$  21,709,653$  22,582,760$  22,709,653$  25,163,846$  25,898,761$  7,858,257$          18.2% Sales Tax 30,176,151       28,448,434   30,939,645    36,891,360    37,876,025     37,889,368     37,968,127     16,469,416       27.7% Utility Taxes 16,039,955       15,100,639   15,815,967    16,799,380    16,345,967     17,148,049     17,312,797     3,544,240     11.5% Business & Occupation Tax 7,615,650     6,500,000      9,500,000       12,613,673    13,500,000     15,400,000     17,600,000     17,000,000       106.3% Other Taxes 4,158,108     3,410,992      4,474,845       5,862,141   5,357,567   4,931,488    4,980,936     2,026,587     25.7% Subtotal Taxes 79,864,105       74,954,762   82,440,110    94,749,316    95,789,211     100,532,751  103,760,621  46,898,500       29.8% Business License (GF portion)1,009,760     918,780   927,968    1,085,936   927,968     932,607      937,270       23,129     1.3% Building Permit/Development Services 3,949,659     3,460,637      4,426,190       4,753,302   5,352,391   4,627,840    4,630,570     1,371,583     17.4% Other Lic. and Permits 71,410     94,174      94,174       68,400   94,174    64,174     64,174     (60,000)       ‐31.9% InterGov 4,388,881     4,507,277      4,507,277       4,594,394   5,651,467   4,339,603    4,353,509     (321,442)    ‐3.6% Other Charges for Svcs 2,269,090     3,079,638      4,034,696       3,035,361   4,437,375   3,662,110    3,688,080     235,857       3.3% InterFund Service Charge 4,766,185     4,789,667      4,918,634       4,684,111   5,024,139   6,268,264    6,502,908     3,062,871     31.5% Court Fines 3,310,279     3,829,782      3,829,782       4,622,320   3,829,782   3,816,442    3,816,442     (26,680)       ‐0.3% Miscellaneous Revenue 1,640,186     1,132,122      1,132,122       597,580     548,086     522,822      522,822       (1,218,600)      ‐53.8% General Fund Operating Rev 101,269,556    96,766,839   106,310,953  118,190,721  121,654,593  124,766,614  128,276,396  49,965,218       24.6%  Transfer 1,386,192     117,900   117,900    82,198   554,187     ‐    ‐     (235,800)    ‐100.0% 1X Revenue 9,430,757     ‐      ‐      3,727,142   15,586,839     946,216      946,216       1,892,433     N/A Subtotal Other Sources 10,816,949       117,900   117,900    3,809,340   16,141,026     946,216      946,216       1,656,633     702.6% Total Rev/Other Svcs 112,086,505    96,884,739   106,428,853  122,000,061  137,795,618  125,712,830  129,222,613  51,621,851       25.4% Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-32 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW   CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  General Govt 17% Com Eco  Dvlpmt 10% Police 38% Court  Services 3% Public Works 13% Parks & Rec 14% Equity,  Housing, &  Human Svcs 1%1X  4% 2021‐22 Adopted General Fund Expenditure &  Uses $226.7 million  General Govt 19% Com Eco  Dvlpmt 10% Police 38% Court Services 3% Public Works 13% Parks & Rec 13% Equity,  Housing, &  Human Svcs 3% 1X  1% 2023‐24 Adopted General Fund Expenditure &  Uses $260.4 million  General Fund Expenditures by Department and Change in Fund Balance    2020 2021 2022 2021 2022 2023 2024 2023‐24 vs. 2021‐22 Adp General Government Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Expenditures by Dept: Legislative 425,744$           512,544$         526,945$         592,929$         715,534$         737,169$         767,280$         464,959$          44.7% Executive 4,156,176   5,201,222    5,274,694      4,217,087   5,853,407    5,723,981      5,787,678   1,035,743    9.9% Court Services 2,444,436   3,102,930$     3,215,462$     2,622,084$     3,646,622$     3,395,240$     3,563,092$     639,941      10.1% City Attorney 2,207,330   2,611,347    2,700,512      2,440,373   3,179,689    3,226,711      3,333,592   1,248,443    23.5% Community & Economic Devl.9,807,291   10,926,162     11,303,970   8,817,663   12,573,495     13,228,103   13,805,751    4,803,721    21.6% Finance 3,503,205   3,928,944    4,066,581      3,844,376   5,245,748    5,141,452      5,348,462   2,494,389    31.2% Human Resources 1,393,876   1,656,832    1,703,366      1,398,222   1,783,308    1,926,240      1,993,593   559,634      16.7% Police 37,771,599     42,530,483     43,642,136   41,028,982     47,399,397     49,328,345   51,334,423    14,490,149      16.8% Public Works 12,792,943     14,566,686     14,900,489   13,182,021     15,968,476     16,293,986   16,927,858    3,754,669    12.7% Parks & Recreation 11,996,122     16,002,907     16,386,672   12,108,221     17,636,366     16,696,179   17,062,758    1,369,358    4.2% Other City Services*6,835,723   5,133,270    5,131,148      4,938,448   11,251,271     7,945,494      7,081,900   4,762,976    46.4% Equity, Housing, & Human Svcs 1,482,478   1,493,644    1,522,001      2,218,857   4,069,264    3,672,672      3,706,897   4,363,924    144.7% General Fund Operating Exp 94,816,924     107,666,970  110,373,977  97,409,263     129,322,576  127,315,570  130,713,283  39,987,907      18.3% 1‐Time 10,968,846     5,192,098    3,434,823      9,944,718   14,654,426     1,178,850      1,179,350   (6,268,721)     ‐72.7% Subtotal Other Uses 10,968,846     5,192,098    3,434,823      9,944,718   14,654,426     1,178,850      1,179,350   (6,268,721)     ‐72.7% Total Exp/Other Uses 105,785,770      112,859,068  113,808,800  107,353,981  143,977,002  128,494,420  131,892,633  33,719,186      14.9% In(Decrease) in FB 6,300,734   (15,974,329)   (7,379,947)      14,646,080     (6,181,384)     (2,781,591)      (2,670,020)     Beginning Fund balance 48,155,847     38,669,441     22,695,112   54,456,582     69,102,662     62,921,277   60,139,686     Ending Fund Balance (EFB)54,456,581     22,695,112     15,315,165   69,102,662     62,921,277     60,139,686   57,469,666     *Includes Debt Service Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-33 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Personnel 61% Supplies/  Small Eq 2% Services &  Utilities 19% InterFund 15% Transfer/  Capital 3% 2021‐22 General Fund Expenditure & Uses by Line  Item $226.7 million  Personnel 62% Supplies/  Small Eq 1% Services &  Utilities 17% InterFund 16% Transfer/  Capital 4% 2023‐24 General Fund Expenditure & Uses by Line  Item $260.4 million  General Fund Expenditures by Line Item                                           2020 2021 2022 2021 2022 2023 2024 2023‐24 vs. 2021‐22 Adp General Fund Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Expenditure by Line item Wages 39,433,119$     42,565,430$     43,916,110$     38,764,578$     48,914,596$     51,494,070$     54,404,391$     19,416,920             22.5% Overtime 2,525,463           1,943,371           1,943,771           2,813,641           1,943,771           1,949,471           1,949,871           12,200                       0.3% Retirement 4,062,271           5,264,192           5,461,599           3,817,806           5,945,037           5,438,601           5,774,200           487,010                    4.5% Social Security 3,019,771           3,183,888           3,264,697           3,021,535           3,592,584           3,811,271           3,967,671           1,330,357                20.6% Medical 7,053,809           9,382,816           10,227,293        7,681,476           10,692,982        10,952,275        11,839,858        3,182,023                16.2% LEOFF Medical 1,591,684           2,591,684           2,591,684           2,591,684           2,591,684           1,792,000           1,917,000           (1,474,368)               ‐28.4% Payroll Taxes 1,156,231           1,598,533           1,641,853           1,155,603           1,699,592           1,785,386           1,805,067           350,068                    10.8% Intermittent Pay / Benefit 236,685               1,478,279           1,463,279           580,056               1,439,053           1,483,748           1,409,148           (48,662)                       ‐1.7% Total Personnel Costs 59,079,034        68,008,193        70,510,286        60,426,379        76,819,298        78,706,822        83,067,205        23,255,548             16.8% Materials/Supplies & Small Eq 1,568,146           1,669,377           1,668,266           1,414,728           1,757,844           1,673,106           1,671,995           7,458                          0.2% Services 21,663,207        21,531,940        21,485,738        20,304,129        27,540,165        22,440,828        22,450,126        1,873,276                4.4% Debt Service 175,000                ‐                            ‐                            ‐                           225,309                ‐                            ‐                            ‐                                N/A Interfund‐IDC & Services 12,160                  12,342                  12,342                   ‐                            ‐                            ‐                            ‐                           (24,684)                       ‐100.0% IS‐IT 4,225,539           5,044,242           5,157,664           3,683,911           7,143,675           5,762,094           5,891,692           1,451,880                14.2% IS‐Communication 275,888               926,117               954,543               650,171               1,121,374           1,319,570           1,384,607           823,517                    43.8% IS‐ER M&O 2,313,230           2,138,604           2,178,413           2,288,604           2,373,165           2,705,461           2,767,470           1,155,914                26.8% IS‐ER RR 385,380               2,172,004           2,052,011           2,172,004           2,092,222           2,220,511           2,197,710           194,206                    4.6% IS‐Insurance 1,364,300           1,373,629           1,395,537           1,373,629           1,921,148           2,261,777           2,284,465           1,777,076                64.2% IS‐Facilities 3,819,722           5,324,145           5,492,799           4,442,244           5,913,665           6,221,322           6,448,383           1,852,760                17.1% Subtotal Non‐Personnel Cost 35,802,571        40,192,400        40,397,313        36,329,420        50,088,566        44,604,669        45,096,448        9,111,403                11.3% Exp Before Capital 94,881,605        108,200,593     110,907,600     96,755,799        126,907,864     123,311,491     128,163,653     32,366,951             14.8% Transfer out (capital/Reserves)10,904,165        4,658,475           2,901,200           10,598,182        17,069,138        5,182,930           3,728,979           1,352,234                17.9% Exp Before Interfund 10,904,165        4,658,475           2,901,200           10,598,182        17,069,138        5,182,930           3,728,979           1,352,234                17.9% Grand Total 105,785,770$  112,859,068$  113,808,800$  107,353,981$  143,977,002$  128,494,420$  131,892,633$  33,719,186$          14.9% Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-34 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Change in Fund Balance       The 2023‐24 adopted budget will result in a net increase in fund balance of $3.3 million citywide. The change is a  combination of increases in tax revenues, capital project funding timing (all capital project related funds, as well  as enterprise funds), planned increase in reserves for replacements (Equipment Rental Fund), planned use of  reserve contingencies (Insurance Fund) and increases to employee benefits and wages.  Fund   Beginning  Fund Balance  2023‐2024  Revenue 2023‐2024  Expenditure 2023‐2024  Change $ 2023‐2024  Change % Ending Fund  Balance 000 GENERAL GOVERNMENT 62,921,276     254,935,443     260,387,053      (5,451,611)         ‐9% 57,469,666        110 SPECIAL HOTEL‐MOTEL TAX 335,214          400,000             ‐                    400,000             119%735,214             127 CABLE COMMUNICATIONS DEVELOPMENT 328,710          115,348            195,348             (80,000)              ‐24%248,710             130 HOUSING AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES 4,951,729       7,000,000          ‐                    7,000,000          11,951,729        135 SPRINGBROOK WETLANDS BANK 414,630          ‐                    80,000               (80,000)             ‐19%334,630             140 POLICE SEIZURE ‐                 ‐                    ‐                    ‐                    0%‐                     140 POLICE CSAM SEIZURE ‐                 ‐                    ‐                    ‐                    0%‐                     215 GENERAL GOVERNMENT MISC DEBT SVC 5,410,174       7,314,332         6,927,273          387,059             7%5,797,233          303 COMMUNITY SERVICES IMPACT MITIGATION 1,439,298       173,000            500,000             (327,000)           ‐23%1,112,298          304 FIRE IMPACT MITIGATION 2,759,099       800,000            1,001,270          (201,270)           ‐7%2,557,829          305 TRANSPORTATION IMPACT MITIGATION 6,352,476       3,560,000         850,000             2,710,000          43%9,062,476          308 REET 1 FUND 1,228,121       4,600,000         2,000,000          2,600,000          212%3,828,121          309 REET 2 FUND 4,152,027       4,600,000         7,587,050          (2,987,050)        ‐72%1,164,977          3XX SCHOOL IMPACT MITIGATION 12                   1,990,000         1,990,000          ‐                    0%12                      316 MUNICIPAL FACILITIES CIP 7,874              4,669,000         4,669,000          ‐                    0%7,874                 317 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT 1,182,366       5,851,000         5,851,000          ‐                    0%1,182,366          346 NEW FAMILY FIRST CENTER DEVELOPMENT 3,303,320       ‐                    ‐                    ‐                    0%3,303,320          4x2 AIRPORT 1,805,109       6,103,534         5,105,182          998,352             531% 2,803,461          403 SOLID WASTE UTILITY 2,601,354       50,827,123       52,298,398        (1,471,275)        ‐57%1,130,079          4X4 MUNICIPAL GOLF 996,675          6,623,515         6,176,062          447,452             67% 1,444,128          4X5 WATER 13,358,184     38,743,562       36,256,096        2,487,466          24% 15,845,650        4X6 WASTEWATER 7,157,569       24,547,894       24,438,223        109,671             3% 7,267,240          416 KING COUNTY METRO 3,764,012       39,933,357       39,933,357        ‐                    0%3,764,012          4X7 SURFACE WATER 16,256,314     26,720,798       34,331,411        (7,610,613)        ‐54% 8,645,701          501 EQUIPMENT RENTAL 9,328,855       13,227,332       10,564,930        2,662,402          29%11,991,257        502 INSURANCE 22,166,075     9,979,376         11,631,746        (1,652,369)        ‐7%20,513,705        503 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 2,909,609       17,079,953       16,303,302        776,652             27%3,686,261          504 FACILITIES 626,672          14,092,411       13,856,501        235,910             38%862,582             505 COMMUNICATIONS 134,168          3,258,169         3,274,566          (16,397)             ‐12%117,771             512 HEALTHCARE INSURANCE 6,478,458       32,644,234       31,642,535        1,001,699          15%7,480,157          522 LEOFF1 RETIREES HEALTHCARE 19,446,038     3,895,000         2,848,177          1,046,823          5%20,492,861        611 FIREMENS PENSION 8,460,708       780,000            497,950             282,050             3%8,742,758          ALL OTHER FUNDS 147,354,850   329,528,939     320,809,375      8,719,564          6% 156,074,413      TOTAL ALL FUNDS 210,276,126$ 584,464,382$   581,196,428$    3,267,953$        2% 213,544,079$    Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-35 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW   CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  (5.45) 0.40  (0.08) 7.00  (0.08) ‐ ‐ 0.39  (0.33) (0.20) 2.71  2.60  (2.99) ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ 1.00  (1.47) 0.45  2.49  0.11  ‐ (7.61) 2.66  (1.65) 0.78  0.24  (0.02) 1.00  1.05  0.28  ‐$10 ‐$5 $0 $5 $10 In Millions GENERAL GOVERNMENT SPECIAL HOTEL‐MOTEL TAX CABLE COMMUNICATIONS DEVELOPMENT HOUSING AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES SPRINGBROOK WETLANDS BANK POLICE SEIZURE POLICE CSAM SEIZURE GENERAL GOVERNMENT MISC DEBT SVC COMMUNITY SERVICES IMPACT MITIGATION FIRE IMPACT MITIGATION TRANSPORTATION IMPACT MITIGATION REET 1 FUND REET 2 FUND SCHOOL IMPACT MITIGATION MUNICIPAL FACILITIES CIP CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT NEW FAMILY FIRST CENTER DEVELOPMENT AIRPORT SOLID WASTE UTILITY MUNICIPAL GOLF WATER WASTEWATER KING COUNTY METRO SURFACE WATER EQUIPMENT RENTAL INSURANCE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FACILITIES COMMUNICATIONS HEALTHCARE INSURANCE LEOFF1 RETIREES HEALTHCARE FIREMENS PENSION Change in Fund Balance 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-36 OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET   $‐  $20.0  $40.0  $60.0  $80.0  $100.0  $120.0  $140.0  $160.0 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 Operating Revenue Base Operating Expenditure Ending Fund Balance General Fund Long Range Projection                                                                   2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 Summary ($ in Million)Actual Actual Actual Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Beginning Fund Balance 44.7$              48.2$              54.5$              69.1$              62.9$              60.1$              57.5$              54.0$              49.0$              40.1$               Operating Revenue 129.2$           102.7$           118.3$           122.2$           124.8$           128.3$           132.6$           136.0$           138.3$           140.6$            Base Operating Expenditure (118.1)            (94.8)              (97.4)              (129.3)            (127.3)            (130.7)            (135.8)            (140.8)            (146.0)            (151.6)             Operating Surplus (Deficit)11.1$              7.8$                20.9$              (7.1)$              (2.5)$              (2.4)$              (3.2)$              (4.7)$              (7.8)$              (11.0)$             1X Sources1 1.8$                9.4$                3.7$                15.6$              0.9$                0.9$                0.9$                0.9$                ‐$                ‐$                 1X Uses (9.5)                 (11.0)              (9.9)                 (14.7)              (1.2)                 (1.2)                 (1.2)                 (1.2)                 (1.2)                 (1.2)                  Net Resources ‐ Uses 3.5$                6.3$                14.6$              (6.2)$              (2.8)$              (2.7)$              (3.4)$              (5.0)$              (8.9)$              (12.2)$             Ending Fund Balance 48.2$              54.5$              69.1$              62.9$              60.1$              57.5$              54.0$              49.0$              40.1$              27.9$               Ending Bal as % of Opr Budget (Target=12%)40.77% 57.43% 70.94% 48.65% 47.24% 43.97% 39.81% 34.82% 27.43% 18.41% 12019 and 2020 includes a $900K from Annexation Sales Tax Reserve (Fund 502). Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-37 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW   CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  The city’s fiscal policy requires the city to prepare a long‐term projection for general governmental and other  funds as deemed necessary. The city prepares projections for tax‐supported governmental funds as well as rate‐ supported  utility funds. The purposes are similar: to ensure operations and maintenance of capital assets are  sustainable with tax and utility rate revenues. These plans allow the city to proactively manage and implement  corrective measures over time to avoid sudden drastic changes in service levels or in revenue/tax policies.   In addition, the city’s fiscal policy requires a balanced budget, with operating costs covered by operating revenues.  While the policy does not require a balanced budget in the projected period beyond the current budget years, the  intent is to adjust current operations to a sustainable level within the projected horizon.  Approximately 80% of general fund revenue is from taxes, 30% from sales tax, and 20% from property tax alone.  The  key  revenue  assumptions  shown  in  the  table  above  reflect  a  projection  that  will  generate  1.0%  of  new  construction  value  per  year  to  be  added  to  the  property  tax  roll  over  the  next  four  years  as  well  as  the  city’s  proposal to levy an additional $2 million in property taxes to help fund capital improvements. This increase  will be  about  10  cents  per  $1,000  assessed  value  (AV).  The  sales  tax  reflects  a  modest  growth  rate  as  recession  rumors continue to loom, and a B&O tax growth rate of 2% per year. Key expenditure growth drivers are  wages, employee healthcare  costs,  and  state  pension  costs.  It  is  assumed  that  wages  will  grow  as  inflation  increases,  employee healthcare  costs  will  grow  by  the  historical  average  along  with  an  actuarial  analysis,  and  state  pension  contributions will increase from 12.9% over the planning period. These underlying assumptions  cannot bring  the overall revenue growth to match the projected expenditure growth even with the projected tax  rate changes. This is  the  structural  deficit  that  local  governments  are  faced  with  and  have  revisited  again  and  again,  but  no  permanent fix is in sight. Unless the state legislature takes action to allow property tax to  grow by inflation and population growth, this issue will continue to persist into the future.  To help solve this problem locally, the city implemented the B&O tax effective January 1, 2016, discussed more  fully below in the “B&O Tax/Business License Fee” section.  MAJOR REVENUES  Property Tax (RCW 84.52)  Annexations and new construction have contributed to substantial growth in the city’s property tax base in the  past decade but was eroded by the 2008 Great Recession that lasted through 2013. Since then, the valuation  improved incrementally each year by an average of 11%. The city’s 2021 assessed value from the King County  Assessor’s office was $20.1 billion. Preliminary information for the city’s 2022 assessed value was not available at  the time of the printing of this document.  While the assessed value often increases or decreases by a large percentage from year to year, the city’s property  tax revenues do not. This is due to the manner in which Washington state’s property tax collection is determined  and the limitations placed on the amount that can be raised by a governmental entity as determined by state law.  Two basic limitations are the limitation on the tax rate and the limitation on the rate of growth in property tax  revenue.   1.The Tax Rate Limit: The state constitution establishes the maximum regular property tax levy increase for all taxing districts combined at 1%, or $10 per $1,000, of assessed value of the property. This limitation is further divided by the RCW to the various taxing districts. For cities served by library and/or fire districts, the tax rate limit is calculated by deducting the amount levied by the library district (up to $0.50 per thousand dollars AV) and Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-38 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  the fire district (up to $1.50 per thousand dollars AV) from the $3.60 local portion of the levy. For cities that  have a fire pension fund, as Renton does, an additional $0.225 may be levied. Based on this calculation,  Renton’s property tax rate is limited to $3.325 per $1,000 of assessed value.     2. The 1% growth limit in property tax revenue:   Before 2002, a taxing district could increase the property tax levy amount annually by 6% of the amount levied  in the previous year, up to the applicable tax rate limit discussed above. This growth limit was established in  1973 as the legislature responded to people's concerns that property taxes were rising too fast due to the real  estate boom occurring at that time.     Initiative 747, approved by voters in 2001 and taking effect in 2002, lowered the limit to the lesser of 1% or  inflation. Property tax growth resulting from new construction, changes in value of state‐assessed utility  property, and newly annexed property are exempt from this limit and may be added to the base tax levy. This  growth limit can be "lifted" by voters with a simple majority approval, and the amount can be added to the  levy base permanently for future years if the intent is clearly stated in the ballot measure.       Distribution of Property Tax  Most properties in Renton pay $10.65 per $1,000  AV in 2022, of which 10% goes to city services. The  remaining 90% goes to the Renton Regional Fire  Authority (7%), Sound Transit (2%), Renton School  District (33%), King County (12%) for regional  services, the state school fund (27%), King County  Library System (3%), Valley Medical (3%), Port of  Seattle (1%), and Emergency Medical Services  (2%). The city’s portion of property tax in 2022 on  an average home is $537.      Past and Projected Property Tax Revenue   The city has not always levied its full capacity  allowed per the rate limitations described above.  In those cases, the city is allowed to bank this  capacity to use in future years if needed. The  current budget includes using a small amount of  the banked capacity to levy an additional 10 cents  per $1,000 AV to fund capital improvements. This  slight increase will continue to keep the city rate  low in comparison to other city property taxes  while also meeting the financial needs for ongoing  service to a growing community.    Year Property Tax  Revenue  Median  Home Value   Total Tax  Rate   City Tax  Rate  City Tax/  Average  Home 2017 Actual 19,714,626      337,000        12.67       1.61            542                  2018 Actual 17,838,993      378,000        12.52       1.15            436                  2019 Actual 20,978,323      432,000        10.70       1.12            484                  2020 Actual 21,874,241      445,000        11.12       1.10            492                  2021 Actual 22,582,760      455,000        11.10       1.08            491                  2022 Est. 22,709,653      534,000        10.65       1.01            537                  2023 Adop. 25,163,846      555,360        10.34       1.08            598                  2024 Adop. 25,898,761      577,574        10.04       1.05            604                  2025 Proj. 26,675,724      600,677        9.75          1.02            610                  2026 Proj. 27,475,996      624,704        9.47          0.99            616                  2027 Proj. 28,025,515      649,693        9.20          0.96            622                  2028 Proj. 28,586,026      675,680        8.93          0.93            628                  Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-39 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Sales Tax (RCW 82.14)  Sales tax is the largest taxing source for the City of  Renton representing approximately 30% of general  fund revenue. The city’s economy generates  approximately $359 million in sales taxes, but similar  to property tax, the city only receives approximately  9.5% of the sales tax revenue generated within  Renton. The remaining 90.5% goes to other  government entities and to support public transit  and public facility agencies.     In addition to the local sales tax, the city also  receives a distribution of a voter‐approved criminal  justice sales tax. Up until mid‐2018, the city also  received a 0.1% annexation sales tax for the annexation of the Benson Hill area in 2008.        The slower and negative growth in 2019 reflects  the end of the distribution of annexation sales  tax credit (mid‐2018). In 2020 the sales tax  receipts were one of the hardest hit revenue  sources by the closures due to the pandemic;  although this tax recovered much faster than  expected with a marked increase beginning in  2021. Future years are projected to continue to  show a slight increase but anticipated to climb  at a much slower rate than in the past two  years.        Criminal Justice Sales Tax (RCW 82.14.340)  Criminal justice sales tax is a 0.1% voter‐approved optional sales tax in King County, collected countywide and  distributed based on population. Because it employs a more diverse tax base and different distribution formula  than regular sales taxes, this source is typically more stable and is projected to grow by the inflationary growth  plus population growth.      Housing and Supportive Services Sales Tax (RCW 82.14.530)  Beginning in 2021, council approved an increase in sales tax rate by 0.1% in support for housing and supportive  services (House Bill 1590). These funds are restricted to be used only for affordable housing and behavioral and  mental health support. This tax is a component of sales tax; therefore, future years are projected at only a slight  growth in 2023/2024. As retail sales increase, the amount of funds received for housing and supportive services  will also increase.             65%, State  9.5%, City 14%, Sound  Transit 9%, KC Transit 2.5%, KC  General 1%,  Criminal  Justice  Sales Tax Distribution   $10  $15  $20  $25  $30  $35  $40  $45  $50 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Est. 23 Adop. 24 Adop. 25 Proj. 26 Proj. 27 Proj. 28 Proj.MillionsPast and Projected Sales Tax Base Sales Tax Annexation Credit Criminal Justice  Affordable Housing Credit Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-40 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET    Composition and Projected Growth  The current year composition of the city’s sales tax is relatively diverse with general retail representing the largest  portion at 28%, followed by service industry at 25%, construction at 21%, manufacturing at 10%, automotive at  7%, and wholesaling and miscellaneous at 6% and 3%, respectively. This is relatively consistent with historical  averages, except for construction and auto sales sectors.     The sales tax receipts starting in 2020 were lower due to  closures from the pandemic but rebounded nicely in  2021. Many factors contributed to this increase such as:  an influx of funds into the economy through stimulus  payments, inflation and supply chain demands  increasing the price of goods resulting in an increase of  tax collected and changing general consumer spending  habits.   As a result of these unique circumstances and an  anticipated recession, the 2023‐2024 sales tax projections  are expected to be flat or show little growth.              Utility Taxes (RCW 82.16)  Cities and towns in Washington state are authorized to levy a tax on the gross income derived from sales of utility  services generated within the city or town; this is known as a utility tax. The tax rate for electric, phone, and gas  utilities are limited to 6% without voter approval, with no limitation on other public utilities. The city currently  levies a 6% utility tax on phone (both landline and cellular services), electric, natural gas, and cable services. City  utilities (water, sewer, storm drainage, and solid waste), pay an interfund utility tax. The current tax rates are 6%  for sewer and 6.8% for water, storm drainage, and garbage (both city operated, and franchise provider operated)  services. The additional 0.8% was added during the 2013‐14 budget to generate additional   revenue for general governmental capital projects.        Year Electric Natural Gas  Brokered  NG  City  Utilities Cable TV Phone Cell Phone Non‐City  Garbage Total % Change 2019 Actual      5,125,961   1,324,323       224,519  4,976,990   1,457,008         858,927        797,541     796,379  15,561,647 ‐4.9% 2020 Actual      5,497,851   1,583,721       123,787  4,967,380   1,447,676         661,593        787,466     970,481  16,039,955 3.1% 2021 Actual      5,783,016   1,606,373       135,207  5,708,636   1,422,996         826,519        571,889     744,745  16,799,380 4.7% 2022 Est.     5,574,163   1,729,124       112,055  5,699,416   1,201,215         762,756        530,516     736,722  16,345,967 ‐2.7% 2023 Adop.     5,931,394   1,654,925       200,000  5,793,915   1,599,113         700,000        500,000     768,702  17,148,049 4.9% 2024 Adop.     6,020,365   1,679,749       200,000  5,833,028   1,607,109         700,000        500,000     772,546  17,312,797 1.0% 2025 Proj.     6,110,670   1,688,148       201,000  5,920,523   1,623,180         665,000        505,000     776,409  17,489,930 1.0% 2026 Proj.     6,202,331   1,696,588       202,005  6,009,331   1,639,412         631,750        510,050     780,291  17,671,758 1.0% 2027 Proj.     6,295,365   1,705,071       203,015  6,099,471   1,655,806         600,163        515,151     784,192  17,858,234 1.1% 2028 Proj.     6,389,796   1,713,597       204,030  6,190,963   1,672,364         570,154        520,302     788,113  18,049,320 1.1% Retail 28%Manuf. 10% Services 25%Construction 21% Wholesale 6% Auto 7% Misc. 3% 2022 Projected Sales Tax Composition  Sector Average 2014‐2021 2022 Projected Difference Retail 29.1% 27.6%‐1.6% Manuf. 8.4% 10.4% 2.0% Services 23.4% 25.1% 1.7% Construction 16.0% 20.7% 4.7% Wholesale 5.4% 6.4% 1.0% Auto 15.0% 6.8%‐8.2% Misc. 2.7% 3.1% 0.4% Total 100.0% 100.0% Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-41 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET    Projections in revenues over the next few years anticipate a slight increase year over year from pre‐pandemic  figures. The tax revenues are sensitive to overall consumer consumption levels, weather conditions, and the  general overall economic conditions. The projections for future years are anticipated to grow by population except  for phone showing a projected decrease year over year as consumers move away from the standard land line.      B&O Tax and Business License Fee  The City of Renton first implemented a per employee business license fee in 1998, in response to transportation  infrastructure needs in Renton. Non‐profit and government organizations are required to obtain a license but are  exempt from paying this fee. Effective January 1st, 2018, the city repealed the per employee business license fee,  while concurrently decreasing the threshold for B&O tax from $1.5 million to $500,000. All businesses are required  to pay a $150 business license registration fee at the time of application. The business license fee is directly  attributed to the number of businesses choosing to do business within the city. The effects of the pandemic drove  many businesses to close, resulting in an 8% decrease in business licenses. As businesses have begun to recover  from the closures of the pandemic, the licenses have seen a slight increase.  B&O Tax   The adopted budget includes the B&O tax  implemented on January 1, 2016. The B&O  tax is based on gross receipts of a business.  The tax structure and rates were changed  in 2022 and 2023 to reflect an increase in  tax rates as well as a gradual increase in  the maximum amount paid by any one  taxpayer. The key provisions of the B&O  tax are:     Businesses with $500,000 or higher annual gross receipts are required to pay B&O tax.   The B&O tax maximum amount paid by any one taxpayer in a tax year will increase to $9 million in 2023,  and $11 million in 2024. Starting in 2025 and thereafter, once a taxpayer has reached $12 million in taxes,  the rates shall be discounted by 75% for the remaining proceeds.     The tax rate is 0.121% for all business activities other than retail, which has a rate of 0.07%.   Provides a three‐year, new employer tax credit for new businesses with 50 or more employees in Renton.     In 2020, there was a significant decrease in B&O tax revenues due to many local businesses closing because of  the COVID‐19 pandemic, as well as the grounding of the 737 Max whose production was halted at the local  Boeing plant in Renton. This tax has rebounded as the economy began to recover from the pandemic. The B&O  tax revenue is projected at $15.4 million and $17.6 million for 2023 and 2024 respectively. The B&O tax supports  general city operations and the changes in tax rates and maximum tax structure will help offset the increased  costs due to inflation. Without this funding source, the city would need to reduce services from general fund  operations, which would result in significantly reducing services to the community. The B&O tax and business  license fees are also used to partially pay for transportation and general governmental capital improvements.       $‐  $5  $10  $15  $20  $25 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Est. 2023 Adop. 2024 Adop. 2025 Proj. 2026 Proj. 2027 Proj. 2028 Proj.MillionsBusiness License and B&O Tax Collections Business License B&O Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-42 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Real Estate Excise Tax (REET) The State of Washington levies a real estate excise tax (REET) on all sales of real estate (measured by the full selling  price, including the amount of any liens, mortgages, and other debts given to secure the purchase) at a rate of  1.28%. Local governments are also authorized to impose REET. All cities and counties may levy a quarter percent  tax, described as "the first quarter percent of the real estate excise tax" or "REET 1". Cities and counties planning  under the Growth Management Act (GMA) have the authority to levy a second quarter percent tax (“REET 2”).  The statute further specifies that, if a county is required to plan under GMA or if a city is located in such a county,  the tax may be levied by a vote of the legislative body. If, however, the county chooses to plan under GMA, the  tax must be approved by a majority of the voters.     REET 1 (RCW 82.46.010):  Initially authorized in 1982, cities and counties can use the receipts of REET 1 for all capital purposes. An  amendment in 1992 states that cities and counties with a population of 5,000 or more planning under the GMA  must spend REET 1 receipts solely on capital projects that are listed in the capital facilities plan element of their  comprehensive plan. Capital projects are: “public works projects of a local government for planning, acquisition,  construction, reconstruction, repair, replacement, rehabilitation, or improvement of streets; roads; highways;  sidewalks; street and road lighting systems; traffic signals; bridges; domestic water systems; storm and sanitary  sewer systems; parks; recreational facilities; law enforcement facilities; fire protection facilities; trails; libraries;  administrative and judicial facilities.” Receipts pledged to debt retirement prior to April 1992 and/or spent prior  to June 1992 are grandfathered from this restriction.     REET 2 (RCW 82.46.035):  The second quarter percent of the real estate excise tax (authorized in 1990) provides funding for cities and  counties to finance capital improvements required to occur concurrently with growth under the Growth  Management Act. An amendment in 1992 defines the "capital project" as: "Public works projects of a local  government for planning, acquisition, construction, reconstruction, repair, replacement, rehabilitation, or  improvement of streets, roads, highways, sidewalks, street and road lighting systems, traffic signals, bridges,  domestic water systems, storm and sanitary sewer systems, and planning, construction, reconstruction, repair,  rehabilitation, or improvement of parks.” Because of this amendment, acquisition of park land was no longer a  permitted use of REET 2 after March 1, 1992.      Trend and Projection   The combined two quarter‐percent of the  REET is expected to generate $4.6 million  each year for 2023 and 2024. The significant  increase in REET revenues over the past  several years from sharp increases in the  housing market and several large  transactions cannot be expected to continue.  REET revenue is used for the General  Governmental Debt Service Fund (215),  Transportation CIP Fund (317) and General  Governmental CIP Fund (316).            $‐  $2.0  $4.0  $6.0  $8.0  $10.0  $12.0 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 22 Est. 23 Adop. 24 Adop. 25 Proj. 26 Proj. 27 Proj. 28 Proj. Past and Projected REET Revenue in millions Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-43 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Gambling Excise Tax (RCW 9.46.110 & 9.46.113)  The city levies gambling taxes as  follows:    5% on net receipts for bingo  and raffles    2% for amusement games    5% on net receipts of for‐profit  punchboards and pull‐tabs    10% on gross receipts for card  rooms    All rates are the maximum authorized  by state statute, except for the card  rooms, which has a maximum rate of  20%. The state legislature began  allowing the operation of "enhanced  card rooms" or mini casinos on non‐tribal land on a pilot basis in 1997 and on a permanent basis in the spring of  2000. This activity provided a significant revenue source for Renton, which generates about 81% of the city’s  gambling taxes. The remaining 19% are made up of pull‐tabs, amusement games, and bingo.      Revenues from these activities are required to be used primarily for the purpose of gambling enforcement (RCW  9.46.113). Case law has clarified that "primarily" means "first be used" for gambling law enforcement purposes to  the extent necessary for that city. The remaining funds may be used for any general government purpose. The city  designates gambling tax revenue as a law enforcement resource.     Gambling revenues remained relatively stable for many years until 2020 due to gambling establishments being  forced to close during the pandemic. However, this tax rebounded in 2021 almost doubling the amount received  in 2020. This tax is expected to stabilize and is projected at $2.9 million each year for the planning period.    The city’s current gambling tax also exempts raffles and bingos held by non‐profit organizations insofar as the  revenue received is used for charitable purposes. This modification has a negligible effect on gambling tax  revenue.    LICENSES AND PERMITS  Permit and Development Fees     Permit and development revenues  were another fee that was impacted  by the pandemic. Construction sites  were shut down and construction  material supplies were limited during  this time, adding to ongoing  construction delays or slower  construction overall. This revenue can  vary year to year depending on  planned construction projects, such  as the peak in 2015 and 2016 due to  $0.0 $0.5 $1.0 $1.5 $2.0 $2.5 $3.0 $3.5 $4.0 $4.5 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Est. 23 Adop. 24 Adop. 25 Proj. 26 Proj. 27 Proj. 28 Proj.MillionsGambling Tax  Card Room  Pull Tab $0 $1 $2 $3 $4 $5 $6 $7 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Est. 2023 Adop. 2024 Adop. 2025 Proj. 2026 Proj. 2027 Proj. 2028 Proj.MillionsPast and Projected Development Fees Building & Fire Permits Plan Review Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-44 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  large development in and around Lake Washington.     There was a small market rate fee adjustment in 2019 and again in 2022. After years of little to no adjustments,  the city changed its practice to maintain a more gradual, stable pattern of fee adjustments for the future. The  adopted 2023‐2024 budget project a decrease in development fees more consistant with those fees collected in  2021. Projections beyond the current budget reflect as stable or baseline as cyclical fluctuations and potential  economic changes could impact this revenue significantly.    Franchise Fees    Franchise fees are charges levied on private utility companies to recoup  the city’s costs for their use of city streets and other public properties.  The franchise fees on electric, natural gas, and telephone utilities are  limited by statute to the actual administrative expenses incurred by the  city directly related to receiving and approving permits, licenses, or  franchisees. Cable TV franchise fees are governed by the Federal Cable  Communications Policy Act of 1994 and are negotiated with cable  companies for an amount not to exceed 5% of gross revenues, which is  the primary source of the city’s franchise fee revenue. The increase in  2022 reflects the end of the utility moratorium in place during the  pandemic. Estimates for 2023 show a slight decrease to be more in line  with revenues experienced prior to the pandemic with a long‐term  projection of a relatively flat revenue increase.   Intergovernmental (State‐Shared Revenues)   Intergovernmental revenues include state‐ shared revenues, governmental grants, and  miscellaneous transfers. The following  information is primarily intergovernmental  revenues in the city’s operating funds. There  are also substantial grant revenues in the  capital project funds, particularly for  transportation and parks improvement  projects.     The state‐shared revenues are from taxes and  fees collected by the state and disbursed to  municipalities based on population or other  criteria. The primary sources of these state‐ shared revenues are fuel tax (tax on gasoline consumption), liquor sales profit and excise tax, marijuana excise  tax, and criminal justice. The amount of grant revenue fluctuates greatly from year to year. The past several years  represents grants to support economy recovery due to the pandemic through Coronavirus Aid, Relief and  Economic Security Act (CARES) and American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding.                 Year Franchise % change 2019 Actual       1,520,143 0.7% 2020 Actual       1,497,985 ‐1.5% 2021 Actual       1,598,057 6.7% 2022 Est.      1,659,950 3.9% 2023 Adop.      1,655,808 ‐0.2% 2024 Adop.      1,664,087 0.5% 2025 Proj.      1,672,407 0.5% 2026 Proj.      1,680,769 0.5% 2027 Proj.      1,689,173 0.5% 2028 Proj.      1,697,619 0.5% $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 17 18 19 20 21 22 Est. 23 Adop. 24 Adop. 25 Proj. 26 Proj. 27 Proj. 28 Proj.MillionsPast and Projected Intergovernmental Revenue State Shared Revenue Grants & Misc. Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-45 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Charge for Services  Charges for services include revenue  generated from services provided to the  public (including recreation fees, facility  rental fees), certain public safety  services, as well as services provided  internally between city departments  (Interfund Services) that are not  operated through internal service fund  structure. This source has been impacted  by the pandemic with required closures  of the city’s community centers. The  2023 and 2024 projections show  increased interfund income as inflation  continues to impact overall costs and a  gradual recovery in revenues of the  community centers.     Parks and Recreation Fees  Overall, recreation fees are generated from recreation classes, athletic programs, leagues and field rentals, senior  activity center, community center, and aquatic center fees and rentals. In 2020, this revenue source decreased  65% from prior years as the city was required to close its recreation centers due to the pandemic. A gradual  rebound in fees were recognized in 2021 as the restrictions of the pandemic began to lift; however, these revenues  have been slower to recover than other fees in the city. The projection shows only a slight increase of 1% ‐ 1.5%  per year over the next several years.     Public Safety Services   Public safety services revenue includes private security, electronic  home detention, passport processing, court cost recovery and  miscellaneous services. The revenue is projected to be $1.6 million for  both 2023 and 2024, a decrease over prior years as the opportunity to  offer private security has not been available because officers are  needed to fill the minimum staffing requirements with the large number  unfilled positions of commissioned police officers.    Interfund Services  In addition to activities accounted for in the internal service funds that are fully allocated to all operating  departments, the city also has two types of interfund transactions that are intended to reimburse service costs  incurred by one fund while services are consumed by another.     1) Indirect Cost: All enterprise funds are required to reimburse the general fund for overhead costs such as  accounting, human resources, records management, legal, and administrative expenses; and   2) Soft Capital Transfer: This is for staff time spent on capital projects for design, engineering, inspection,  project management, and sometimes small project construction.     The indirect cost is determined through a cost allocation model using transaction volume, number of full‐time  employees, and size of budget as determining factors. The “soft capital” transfers are based on actual labor and  material costs incurred. The revenue is projected to be $6.2 million for 2023 as inflation has impacted overall costs  and wages.  Year Public  Safety % change 2019 Actual     1,572,938 20.7% 2020 Actual     1,123,623 ‐28.6% 2021 Actual     1,716,956 52.8% 2022 Est.    1,845,507 7.5% 2023 Adop.    1,566,987 ‐15.1% 2024 Adop.    1,566,987 0.0% 2025 Proj.    1,590,492 1.5% 2026 Proj.    1,614,350 1.5% 2027 Proj.    1,638,565 1.5% 2028 Proj.    1,663,143 1.5% $0 $2 $4 $6 $8 $10 $12 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Est. 23 Adop. 24 Adop. 25 Proj. 26 Proj. 27 Proj. 28 Proj.MillionsPast and Projected Service  Fees Interfund Services Parks and Rec Public Safety Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-46 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW                                                                                                  CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET    Fines and Forfeits    Fines and forfeits account for civil and criminal penalties as authorized by the state and adopted by the city code  and collected through the Renton Municipal Court.     The city implemented the photo‐enforcement  system at high collision intersections and at  school zones during the fall of 2008. In 2018,  the city added eight more cameras which  resulted in an additional $1.1 million  projected revenue increase. The 2020  decrease of 30% from prior year was due to  the suspension of school zone cameras with  schools closed from the COVID‐19 pandemic.  These revenues are expected to continue to  be stable in future years with only modest  growth.         Miscellaneous Revenues  Miscellaneous revenues include interest  income, cellular tower site rentals,  donations, sales of documents, etc. Most  of the revenue is investment interest  income which has seen significant  fluctuations in the past several years.  Interest rates continue to increase after  historic lows in 2020; however, many of  the investments which matured in the  past several years were invested at  higher rates than today’s rate. Although  we expect to see improvement in the  return on city funds, minimum change in  this area is expected.         $0 $1 $2 $3 $4 $5 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Est. 23 Adop. 24 Adop. 25 Proj. 26 Proj. 27 Proj. 28 Proj.MillionsPast and Projected Fines and Forfeits $0.00 $0.20 $0.40 $0.60 $0.80 $1.00 $1.20 $1.40 $1.60 $1.80 $2.00 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Est. 23 Adop. 24 Adop. 25 Proj. 26 Proj. 27 Proj. 28 Proj.MillionsPast and Projected Miscellaneous Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-47 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW   CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Enterprise Funds   Utilities: Water, Sewer, Surface Water, and Solid Waste Rates   The water, sewer, surface water and solid waste rates fund all the costs associated with providing these services,  as well as necessary capital improvements to these utility systems. Other sources including hookup fees,  development charges, grants, etc., are also available but are limited, unpredictable, and primarily related to the  capital programs. Due to the increased costs of maintaining the systems, regulatory requirements, and higher  general operating costs, the city continuously reviews these rates and adjusts as needed.   Rate Related Fiscal Policy  During the summer of 2010, the city council adopted a set of fiscal policies to guide future rate setting for all city  utilities. These policies address minimum fund balances, as well as the financing of capital improvements in the  future. Specifically, the policies rely on rates to finance preservation of existing systems and only use bonding to  finance system capacity improvements. This capital financing policy required a substantial rate increase in 2011  and 2012 to provide for consistent system replacement/reinvestment. The rate model was updated in 2022  showing a rate increase for 2023 to include a 3% for sewer, a 4% for surface water and a 7.8% increase in  residential garbage rates. In addition to the adopted city rate increases, King County Metro (which provides sewer  treatment) is proposing a 5.75% rate increase in 2023.  Utility Revenue & Rate Increases 2019 2020 2021 2022 Est 2023  Adopted 2024  Adopted 2025  Projected 2026  Projected 2027  Projected 2028  Projected Water Rate Revenue 17,139,317     16,925,008    18,363,808   18,030,511  18,846,162    18,943,066   18,943,066  18,943,066    18,943,066   18,943,066   Rate Increase 0.0%2.0%2.0% 2.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% Sewer Rate Revenue 10,668,423     10,491,277    11,024,378   11,473,089  11,703,885    12,113,901   12,356,179  12,603,303    12,855,369   13,112,476   Rate Increase 0.0%2.0%2.0% 2.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% Storm Revenue 11,196,321     11,257,547    11,819,301   11,997,377  12,441,451    12,996,906   13,516,782  14,057,454    14,338,603   14,625,375   Rate Increase 0.0%2.0%2.0% 2.0% 4.0% 4.0% 4.0% 4.0% 2.0% 2.0% Garbage Revenue 20,305,164     20,591,690    20,814,239   23,810,444  25,163,891    25,643,848   27,618,425  29,745,043    32,035,412   34,502,138   Rate Increase (residential)4.0%4.0%4.0% 4.0% 7.8% 7.7%7.0%7.3%5.7%5.7% Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-48 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington OVERVIEW   CITY OF RENTON 2023‐2024 BIENNIAL BUDGET  Maplewood Golf Course  The city’s Maplewood Golf Course Fund was created by Ordinance 3884 in 1985. Maplewood Golf Course is owned  and operated by the city. The golf course is also a water utility resource as it is the location of city wells that  provide drinking water to our community. The use of this space as a golf course helps preserve the quality of the  well water for future generations.  The course is managed by the parks and  recreation department and is operated as a  separate enterprise fund of the city as a  fully self‐sustained operation. The golf  course revenues fared well during the  pandemic as golf courses were allowed to  stay open during much of the pandemic  shut down. Revenues are projected to level  off and continue to increase at  approximately 1% per year.    The green fees were updated this past year to be in line with other  municipal courses in neighboring communities.   $43  $48  $46  $46  $50   $35  $40  $45  $50  $55 Tukwila Renton Kent Bellevue Auburn 2022 Public Golf Course 18‐Hole Weekend  Rates (Summer) $0.0 $0.5 $1.0 $1.5 $2.0 $2.5 $3.0 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Est. 23 Adop. 24 Adop. 25 Proj. 26 Proj. 27 Proj. 28 Proj.MillionsPast and Projected Total Golf Course  Green Fee  Driving Range  Other Operating Executive Summary - Long Range Plan 1-49 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Financial Management Policies  I.Executive Summary The City of Renton is committed to maintaining the highest standards of responsible financial management. The city, including the city council, mayor and staff will work together to ensure that all financial matters of the city are addressed with care, integrity, and in the best interest of the city. The rules and procedures contained in this section are designed to: Protect the assets of the City of Renton; Ensure the maintenance of open and accurate records of the city’s financial activities; Provide a framework of operating standards, behavioral expectations, and performance measures; Ensure compliance with federal, state, and local legal and reporting requirements; and Provide a means for the city council to update and monitor these policies with the assistance and cooperation of the mayor’s office and the finance administrator. The following lines of authority are to enable the City of Renton to ensure its policies are meeting their goals   and promoting the financial wellness of the city.  1.The Renton City Council has the authority to execute such policies as it deems to be in the best interest of the city within the parameters of federal, state, and local law. 2.The finance committee has the authority to perform reviews of the organization’s financial activity, determine the allocation of investment deposits, and ensure adequate internal controls are in place. 3.The mayor and chief administrative officer (CAO) have the authority to oversee the development of the biennial budget, make spending decisions within the parameters of the approved budget, enter into contractual agreements, make capital asset purchase decisions and make decisions regarding the allocation of expenses within designated parameters.  Unless otherwise specified in this document, principal responsibility for complying with the directives enumerated herein shall be vested in the mayor. 4.Each Department Administrator has the authority to expend city funds within approved budget authority and in accordance with procedures prescribed by the mayor’s office, and to recommend spending requests within the parameters of the approved budget process to the mayor. II.Financial Management Policies 1.Investment Policy (210‐07): Applies to the investment of available city funds, excluding fire pension funds. a.The city has the responsibility to manage these invested funds through diversification of funds, attaining the highest interest rate available, and maintaining a sufficient level of liquidity to meet operating requirements that can be reasonably anticipated. This responsibility is delegated out to the fiscal services director who shall act as the city’s investment officer. The actions taken by the city’s investment officer will be reviewed quarterly by the city council’s investment committee, which is comprised of the mayor, the chief administrative officer, the finance administrator, and a member of the city council. Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-50 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   2. Purchasing, Bidding, and Contracting Requirements Policy (250‐02): Applies to selection, bidding,  leasing, and contracting requirements for goods, services and public works projects throughout the city.  a. The city encourages funds expended by the city be reinvested in the local economy whenever it is  possible and practical to do so. The city must also utilize uniform, efficient, and competitive bidding,  purchasing, quoting, Request for Proposals (RFPs), cooperative purchasing, and Statements of  Qualifications (SOQs) consistent with State law. This is to ensure that all public purchases and  contracts for services, equipment, materials, supplies, and public works are executed and managed  at the highest professional and ethical standard while achieving the greatest attainable level of  quality and value permitted by law.    3. Bad Debt Policy (220‐03): Applies to handling the collection of bad debt.  a. The city has designated the responsibility of formulating, implementing, and conducting the  collection of bad debt to the finance department. When accounts are determined to be  uncollectable by the finance department the accounts are then referred to the city’s designated  collection agent. The Renton Municipal Court is responsible for conducting their own collection  efforts and refer to their own designated collection agent.    4. Administration of Grants Policy (210‐09): Applies to the identification, application, administration, and  reporting of grants from various external sources.  a. Each department within the city will actively pursue opportunities to obtain grant resources,  maintain an active and diverse portfolio, and utilize grant funds to supplement and enhance the  long‐term goals and objectives of the city. The grant administration and applications shall be  coordinated through the grant analyst. This policy includes all government grants, regardless of  dollar amount, and all private grants over $30,000.    5. Surplus & Disposal of Surplus Personal Property Policy (250‐10): Applies to the efficient use and disposal  of surplus personal property.  a. The city’s surplus personal property that retains commercial value will be disposed of in the most  cost effective and efficient manner that achieves the highest value for the city. The surplus property  will first be transferred between departments as needed. After that the surplus property may be  traded in, sold, or donated. A donation of property can only occur if the organization receiving the  property serves or benefits the public in accordance with RCW 39.33.010.    6. Cash Control Policy (210‐05): Applies to the proper procedures for receipting and depositing cash and  checks received by city departments.  a. To facilitate citizens/customers doing business with the City of Renton, receipts will be written by  each department who accepts payments. The departments will then remit the payments to the  finance department to ensure the safety of cash deposits and to maximize the investment of cash to  its full potential. No checks shall be cashed or written for more than the amount of the purchase.    7. Purchasing Cards Policy (250‐18): Applies to the proper use of purchasing cards to procure goods or  services for official City business purposes.  a. Authorized cardholders can make purchases using a city issued purchasing card (“Card” or “Cards”)  to provide efficient, cost‐effective means to pay for goods and services for official city business.  b. The card is designed to be a cost‐effective alternative to the traditional invoice payment process; it  does not affect requirements to comply with State or local procurement laws, regulations, or  policies.  Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-51 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   c. The card is not intended to replace effective procurement planning which can result in quantity  discounts, reduced number of trips and more efficient use of city resources.  d. The finance administrator may establish additional rules and procedures from time to time  consistent with this policy and provide the appropriate forms and instructions.  e. Exceptions to the rules may be made under declared emergencies upon written directive of the  mayor, chief administrative officer, designated emergency management official or their designee.    8. Budget Preparation & Control Policy (220‐01): Applies to the budget preparation responsibility and  provides guidelines and procedures for expenditure control and budget amendments.    The goal of this policy is to provide a comprehensive process for financial planning, control and  evaluation of the city’s revenues and expenditures which complies with legal requirements and provides  adequate financial information and controls.  a. Budget Preparation: Department heads are required to prepare line‐item budgets requests, the  mayor and finance staff use the requests to prepare and submit a preliminary budget for city council  to consider. The city council will then adopt the final budget at the fund level by ordinance.  b. Budget development: The city shall prepare a biennial budget that is consistent with state law, the  long‐term financial planning model, the financial management policies, and industry best practices.  i. The City of Renton’s biennial budget shall be prepared using the following schedule and process  as a general guide:  (a) Review stakeholder input such as surveys, public forums, neighborhood meeting notes and  business community communication.  (b) The mayor, city council and chief administrative officer will conduct a goal‐setting retreat  with the department administrators updating the business plan and other policy guidance.  (c) The city council and administration will meet to review and discuss the prior year’s audited  results, current year budget status, next budget schedule, process, budget guidelines and  budget preparation items of interest.  (d) The finance administrator prepares the budget preparation instructions and meets with  department administrators to distribute budget instructions and discuss budget  preparation.  (e) The instructions will include policy priorities, estimates of compensation adjustments,  internal service and indirect charges.  (f) Departments will provide to the finance department budget estimates and requests  conforming to the budget instructions.  (g) The mayor submits a proposed balanced preliminary budget to the city council in  conformance with state law.  (h) A balanced budget should be comprised of funding recommendations for the operating and  capital budgets that do not exceed the estimated resources of the entity.  (i) The city council conducts public hearings on the proposed budget in conformance with state  law.  (j) The city council sets the city’s property tax levies.  (k) The city council adopts the final budget ordinance.  (l) The final budget document is published and posted to the city website.  ii. Budget amendments should be presented for consideration when the need arises.  (a) Budget authority shall be at the fund level.  Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-52 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   (b) Changes resulting in a need to revise the appropriation authority shall be presented as they  occur.  c. Revenues  i. Revenue forecasts shall assess the full spectrum of resources available to finance city programs  and services.   ii. The city shall consider the diversification of revenue as a strategy when developing its financial  plans.   iii. Should an economic downturn develop that results in (potential) revenue shortfalls or fewer  available resources, the city will make appropriate adjustments to its budget.   iv. Revenue estimates shall be based on forecasting methods recommended by the Government  Finance Officers Association (GFOA) and will typically be conservative rather than aggressive.  d. Expenditures: Priority shall be given to expenditures that will improve productivity.    In addition to the policies above the City of Renton also adheres to the following policies that are currently  adopted and reviewed on a biennial basis along with the budget document.  9. Accounting Records and Reports  a. Basis of Accounting  i. The city’s Annual Comprehensive Financial Report (ACFR) on its financial activity shall be  presented in compliance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) as defined by  the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB).  b. Basis of Budget  i. The city budget is presented on a GAAP basis of accounting.  c. Fund Accounting  i. The City of Renton’s accounting and budgeting systems use a fund accounting consistent with  guidance provided by the GASB and the Washington State Auditor’s Office.    ii. The funds are grouped into categories: General Fund, Special Revenue, Debt Service, Capital  Projects, Enterprise, Internal Service, and Fiduciary/Trust.  iii. The city council shall create and eliminate funds as appropriate by separate ordinance, or  through the budget ordinance.  iv. Funds shall either be “external” or “internal” for financial reporting purposes.    (a) Internal funds shall be separate sets of accounts for the purpose of enhancing internal  management control only.  These funds shall reside within an external fund.  For cash  management purposes, internal funds may rely on their related external fund without  payment of interest or violation of the city’s cash management policies. (See interfund loan  policy for further clarification).  v. The city’s financial accounting system shall ensure that the status and transactions of each  account and their relationship to budget authority is clear.  Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-53 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   d. Financial Reporting  i. The ACFR shall be timely and comprehensive and meet or exceed professional industry  standards.  ii. The city’s budget documents shall provide for comparison with prior years.  iii. Revenue and expenditure reports shall be prepared monthly and be available on the city’s  website.  iv. A written analysis of the city’s monthly report shall be prepared quarterly, coordinated with the  chief administrative officer and mayor, reviewed with the city council, and available on the city’s  website.  v. All budget amendments shall be included in the monthly report.  vi. Any outstanding interfund loans shall be disclosed in the quarterly report.  e. Audit  i. The city shall commission an annual audit of its financial reports and related records to be  conducted by the Washington State Auditor’s Office.  ii. At the conclusion of the audit, the auditor shall be available to brief the city council on the  results.   iii. The results of the audit shall be available to the public.     10. Financial Planning  a. The city shall maintain a long‐term (five year) financial planning model.    i. The financial planning model shall:   (a) be based on the currently adopted budget;  (b) utilize these policies;  (c) be based on assumptions and drivers realistically expected to occur;  (d) clearly document the assumptions and drivers used and the results of the use of such  assumptions and drivers;  (e) be designed in such a way to permit analysis of alternative strategies;  (f) relate to the related plans of the city to include service delivery plans, comprehensive plans,  master plans, etc.; and  (g) shall be prepared for the general government and such other funds as the deemed  necessary.  b. Capital Improvements  i. A comprehensive six‐year plan for city capital investments shall be prepared biennially and  adopted by the city council as part of the city budget.   (a) All projects included in the capital investment program (CIP) shall be consistent with the  city’s comprehensive plan.   (b) The capital investment program shall be prepared in consultation with council committees  for ongoing capital investments.  ii. All proposed capital improvement projects shall include a recommended or likely source of  funding.  iii. Private development (including residential, commercial and industrial projects) shall pay its fair  share of the capital investments that are necessary to serve the development in the form of  system development charges, impact fees, mitigation fees, or benefit districts.  Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-54 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   iv. Capital project proposals should indicate the project's impact on the operating budget,  including, but not limited to, long‐term maintenance costs necessary to support the investment.  v. Capital projects shall be budgeted for on a project life basis (rather than fiscal year).    11. Policy on Stabilization Funds: Sufficient fund balances and reserve levels are important in the long‐ term financial stability of the city.    a. The city shall maintain reserves required by law, ordinance and/or bond covenants. In addition, the  City of Renton has its own minimum requirements on reserve levels that are detailed below.    i. General Government  (a) The city shall maintain reserves in the general government funds at least 8% of total  budgeted operating expenditures with a target of 12%.  (b) In addition, the city shall maintain an additional reserve as a part of the city’s risk  management funds in a minimum amount of at least 8% of general fund operating  expenditures.   (c) In addition, the city shall maintain an “Anti‐Recessionary Reserve” in an amount of at least  4% of general government budgeted operating expenditures.  Expenditures utilizing the  “Anti Recessionary Reserve” require a two‐thirds majority vote of the city council and will be  replenished within three (3) years.  (d) In addition, the city shall accumulate reserves of $5,400,000 for the annexation sales tax  credit expiration/transition using year‐end savings, until fully funded.  Expenditures utilizing  the “annexation sales tax credit expiration/transition reserve” require a two‐thirds majority  vote of the city council.  (e) In addition, the city shall reserve $2,500,000 for the economic development revolving fund  using year‐end savings until funded.  Expenditures utilizing the “economic development  revolving fund reserve” require a two‐thirds majority vote of the city council.  ii. Debt Service  (a) The city shall maintain one‐year payments in voted general obligation debt service funds  and revenue bonds.  (b) In addition, a one‐year payment reserve will be established for all councilmanic general  obligation bonds issued after 2013.  iii. Enterprise Funds   (a) Water, wastewater, and surface water utility fund shall each maintain reserves of 12% of  total budgeted operating expenses or 30 to 45 days.  (b) King County wastewater treatment fund shall maintain reserves of $380,000 (approximately  3% of total operating expenses).  (c) Solid waste fund shall maintain reserves of $400,000.  (d) Golf fund shall maintain reserves of 25% of total budgeted operating expenses.  (e) All other enterprise funds shall maintain reserves of 10% ‐ 20% of total budgeted operating  expenses.  iv. Reserve balances of other funds shall be set through the budget process in an amount  consistent with the purpose and nature of the fund.  b. Replacement reserves shall be established for equipment, and computer software should the need  continue beyond the estimated initial useful life, regardless of whether the equipment is acquired  Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-55 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   via lease, gift or purchase. Service charges paid by city departments to the appropriate internal  service funds should include an amount to provide for replacements.  i. The city shall establish a public safety small equipment reserve as a sub‐fund to the equipment  rental fund.  Beginning 2015, the city shall contribute $200,000 a year to accumulate reserves  specifically for public safety small equipment items.  12. Policy on Fees and Charges  a. The city shall biennially review all fees for licenses, permits, fines, rates and other miscellaneous  charges as part of the budget process.    b. User charges and fees shall be established based on a percentage of the full cost of providing the  service, unless otherwise provided by statute or regulation.    i. Full cost incorporates direct and indirect costs, including operations and maintenance,  overhead, and charges for the use of capital facilities.    ii. Other factors for fee or charge adjustments may also include the impact of inflation, other cost  increases, the adequacy of the coverage of costs, and current competitive rates.    c. Proposed rate adjustments, user charges and fees shall be presented to the city council for approval  for each year as part of the mayor’s proposed preliminary biennial budget to the council.  d. The city shall rigorously collect all amounts due.    13. Policy on Utility Funds  a. The city shall establish and maintain separate utility operating and capital investment funds and  budgets for each of its utility operations.   b. Utility rate studies shall be conducted every six years to update assumptions and ensure the long‐ term solvency and viability of the city’s utilities.  c. Utility rates and capital fees shall be reviewed biennially, and necessary adjustments made to avoid  major rate increases.  d. The city shall use system development charges, grants and low interest loans to fund capital projects  where possible.  Overall, the utilities should maintain a debt‐to‐equity ratio of 60/40.    e. Each utility should fund an amount of the cost equal to the annual “depreciation expense” of capital  assets less debt service principal payments.  f. System Development Charges (SDCs) shall be established at levels to ensure that all customers  seeking to connect to the city’s utility systems shall bear their equitable share of the cost of both the  existing and future systems.  g. Debt financing of utility improvements will be consistent with the utility master plans, council rate  policies and other factors so as to smooth the effect of major improvements on utility rates.  h. The city shall strive to maintain minimum debt service “coverage” with the net revenue (gross  operating revenue of the utilities less operating and maintenance expenses) of the combined  utilities being 1.25 ‐ 1.5 times the actual debt and the net revenue of the individual Utility being at  least 1.25 times the actual debt.  Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-56 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   i. Capital Contingency as System Reinvestment and Debt Service:  i. Surface water:  1.25 DSC and approximately $3 million annual system reinvestment  ii. Wastewater:  1.25 DSC and approximately $3 million annual system reinvestment  iii. Water:  1.25 DSC and approximately $4 million annual system reinvestment  j. Bonds Versus Cash Funded Projects  i. All non‐CIP projects should be paid for using rates (programs, system plans, education materials,  etc.)  ii. All system reinvestment, maintenance, replacement and rehabilitation CIPs should be paid for  using rates.  iii. CIPs for new infrastructure, growth, or increased capacity can be paid for using bonds.    14. Policy on Debt Issuance and Management  a. Long‐term borrowing shall be confined to capital investments or similar projects with an extended  life when it is not practical to be financed from current revenues. The city shall not use long‐term  debt to finance current operations.  b. Debt payments shall not extend beyond the estimated useful life of the project being financed.  The  city shall keep the average maturity of general obligation bonds at or below fifteen years, unless  special circumstances arise warranting the need to extend the debt schedule.  c. The city shall work to maintain strong ratings on its debt including maintaining open  communications with bond rating agencies concerning its financial condition.  d. With council approval, interim financing of capital projects may be secured from the debt financing  market place or from other funds through an interfund loan as appropriate in the circumstances.   e. The city may issue interfund loans when appropriate and consistent with a separately adopted city  council policy on the subject.  f. When issuing debt, the city shall strive to use special assessment, revenue or other self‐supporting  bonds in lieu of general obligation bonds.   g. Long‐term general obligation debt shall be utilized when necessary to acquire land or capital assets  based upon a review of the ability of the city to meet future debt service requirements. The project  to be financed should also be integrated with the city’s long‐term financial plan and capital  investment program.  h. General obligation debt should be used when the related projects are of a benefit to the city as a  whole.   i. General Obligation Bond (Voted):   (a) Every project proposed for financing through general obligation debt should be  accompanied by a full analysis of the future operating and maintenance costs associated  with the project.  ii. Limited Tax General Obligation Bond (Non‐Voted):  (a) The city should avoid issuing general obligation (non‐voted) debt beyond eighty percent  (80%) of its general obligation debt capacity.  Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-57 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   i. The city shall use refunding bonds where appropriate when cost savings can be achieved of at least  4% (NPV), restructuring its current outstanding debt and/or improving restrictive bond conditions.    j. The city’s financial team for the issuance of debt shall consist of the council, mayor, CAO, finance  administrator, applicable department management (related to the projects to be financed), city  legal counsel, designated bond counsel, financial advisor and underwriter in order to effectively plan  and fund the city’s capital investment projects.  i. Through a competitive selection process conducted by the finance administrator with  consultation with the mayor, chief administrative officer and legal counsel, the city shall select  the most qualified financial advisor / underwriter and bond counsel.   ii. These services shall be regularly monitored by the finance administrator.   k. The city shall evaluate the best method of sale for each proposed bond issue.  i. When a negotiated sale is deemed advisable (in consultation with the mayor and city council)  the finance administrator shall negotiate the most competitive pricing on debt issues and broker  commissions in order to ensure the best value to the city.  ii. When a negotiated sale is used, the city shall use an independent financial advisor to advise the  city’s participants in matters such as structure, pricing and fees.  l. The city shall comply with IRS regulations concerning use of, and reinvestment of bond proceeds.   i. The city shall monitor and comply with IRS regulations with regard to potential arbitrage  earnings.  If arbitrage earnings are believed to be above amounts provided by IRS regulations,  the city will set aside earnings in order to pay the appropriate amount to the federal  government as required by IRS regulations.  m. The city shall provide full secondary market disclosure related to outstanding debt.    15. Policy on Post‐Issuance Compliance for Tax‐Exempt Bonds  a. Purpose  The purpose of these post‐issuance compliance policies and procedures ("Compliance Policy") for tax‐ exempt bonds issued by The City of Renton, Washington (the "City") is to ensure that the city will be in  compliance with requirements of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"), that  must be satisfied with respect to tax‐exempt bonds and other obligations ("bonds") after the bonds are  issued so that interest on the bonds will be and remain tax‐exempt.  b. Responsibility for Monitoring Post‐Issuance Tax Compliance.   The city council of the city has the overall, final responsibility for monitoring whether the city is in  compliance with post‐issuance federal tax requirements for the city's tax‐exempt bonds. However, the  city council assigns to the finance administrator of the city the primary operating responsibility to  monitor the city's compliance with post‐issuance federal tax requirements for the city's tax‐exempt  bonds.  c. Arbitrage Yield Restriction and Rebate Requirements.   The finance administrator shall maintain or cause to be maintained records of:  i. purchases and sales of investments made with bond proceeds (including amounts treated as  "gross proceeds" of bonds under section 148 of the Code) and receipts of earnings on those  investments;  Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-58 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   ii. expenditures made with bond proceeds (including investment earnings on bond proceeds) for  the governmental purposes of the bonds, such as for the costs of purchasing, constructing  and/or renovating property and facilities;   iii. information showing, where applicable for a particular calendar year, that the city was eligible  to be treated as a "small issuer" in respect of bonds issued in that calendar year because the city  did not reasonably expect to issue more than $5,000,000 of tax‐exempt bonds in that calendar  year;  iv. calculations that will be sufficient to demonstrate to the Internal Revenue Service ("IRS") upon  an audit of a bond issue that, where applicable, the city has complied with an available spending  exception to the arbitrage rebate requirement in respect of that bond issue;  v. calculations that will be sufficient to demonstrate to the IRS upon an audit of a bond issue for  which no exception to the arbitrage rebate requirement was applicable, that the rebate  amount, if any, that was payable to the United States of America in respect of investments  made with gross proceeds of that bond issue was calculated and timely paid with Form 8038‐T  timely filed with the IRS; and  vi. information and records showing that investments held in yield‐restricted advance refunding or  defeasance escrows for bonds, and investments made with unspent bond proceeds after the  expiration of the applicable temporary period, were not invested in higher‐yielding investments.  d. Restrictions on Private Business Use and Private Loans.   The finance administrator shall adopt procedures that are calculated to educate and inform the principal  operating officials of those departments, including utility departments, if any, of the city (the "users")  for which land, buildings, facilities and equipment ("property") are financed with proceeds of tax‐ exempt bonds about the restrictions on private business use that apply to that property after the bonds  have been issued, and of the restriction on the use of proceeds of tax‐exempt bonds to make or finance  any loan to any person other than a state or local government unit.  In particular, following the issuance  of bonds for the financing of property, the Finance Administrator shall provide to the users of the  property a copy of this compliance policy and other appropriate written guidance advising that:  i. "private business use" means use by any person other than a state or local government unit,  including business corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies, associations, nonprofit  corporations, natural persons engaged in trade or business activity, and the United States of  America and any federal agency, as a result of ownership of the property or use of the property  under a lease, management or service contract (except for certain "qualified" management or  service contracts), output contract for the purchase of electricity or water, privately sponsored  research contract (except for certain "qualified" research contracts), "naming rights" contract,  "public‐private partnership" arrangement, or any similar use arrangement that provides special  legal entitlements for the use of the bond‐financed property;  ii. under section 141 of the Code, no more than 10% of the proceeds of any tax‐exempt bond issue  (including the property financed with the bonds) may be used for private business use, of which  no more than 5% of the proceeds of the tax‐exempt bond issue (including the property financed  with the bonds) may be used for any "unrelated" private business use‐that is, generally, a  private business use that is not functionally related to the governmental purposes of the bonds;  and no more than the lesser of $5,000,000 or 5% of the proceeds of a tax‐exempt bond issue  may be used to make or finance a loan to any person other than a state or local government  unit;  iii. before entering into any special use arrangement with a nongovernmental person that involves  the use of bond‐financed property, the user must consult with the finance administrator,  Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-59 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   provide the finance administrator with a description of the proposed nongovernmental use  arrangement, and determine whether that use arrangement, if put into effect, will be consistent  with the restrictions on private business use of the bond‐financed property;   iv. in connection with the evaluation of any proposed nongovernmental use arrangement, the  Finance Administrator should consult with nationally recognized bond counsel to the City as may  be necessary to obtain federal tax advice on whether that use arrangement, if put into effect,  will be consistent with the restrictions on private business use of the bond‐financed property,  and, if not, whether any "remedial action" permitted under section 141 of the Code may be  taken by the city as a means of enabling that use arrangement to be put into effect without  adversely affecting the tax‐exempt status of the bonds that financed the property; and  v. the finance administrator and the user of the property shall maintain records of such  nongovernmental uses, if any, of bond‐financed property, including copies of the pertinent  leases, contracts or other documentation, and the related determination that those  nongovernmental uses are not inconsistent with the tax‐exempt status of the bonds that  financed the property.  e. Records to be Maintained for Tax‐Exempt Bonds.   It is the policy of the city that, unless otherwise permitted by future IRS regulations or other guidance,  written records (which may be in electronic form) will be maintained with respect to each bond issue for  as long as those bonds remain outstanding, plus three years. For this purpose, the bonds include  refunding bonds that refund the original bonds and thereby refinance the property that was financed by  the original bonds.  The records to be maintained are to include:  i. the official Transcript of Proceedings for the original issuance of the bonds;   ii. records showing how the bond proceeds were invested, as described in ci above;  iii. records showing how the bond proceeds were spent, as described in cii above, including  purchase contracts, construction contracts, progress payment requests, invoices, cancelled  checks, payment of bond issuance costs, and records of "allocations" of bond proceeds to make  reimbursement for project expenditures made before the bonds were actually issued;  iv. information, records and calculations showing that, with respect to each bond issue, the City  was eligible for the "small issuer" exception or one of the spending exceptions to the arbitrage  rebate requirement or, if not, that the rebate amount, if any, that was payable to the United  States of America in respect of investments made with gross proceeds of that bond issue was  calculated and timely paid with Form 8038‐T timely filed with the IRS, as described in ciii, civ and  cv above; and  v. records showing that special use arrangements, if any, affecting bond‐financed property made  by the city with nongovernmental persons, if any, are consistent with applicable restrictions on  private business use of property financed with proceeds of tax‐exempt bonds and restrictions on  the use of proceeds of tax‐exempt bonds to make or finance loans to any person other than a  state or local government unit, as described in 4 above.  The basic purpose of the foregoing record retention policy for the city's tax‐exempt bonds is to  enable the city to readily demonstrate to the IRS upon an audit of any tax‐exempt bond issue that  the city has fully complied with all federal tax requirements that must be satisfied after the issue  date of the bonds so that interest on those bonds continues to be tax‐exempt under section 103 of  the Code.  f. Identification and Remediation of Potential Violations of Federal Tax Requirements for Tax‐Exempt  Bonds.   Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-60 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington   i. So long as any of the Issuer’s tax‐exempt bond issues remain outstanding, the finance  administrator will periodically consult with the users of the issuer’s bond‐financed property to  review and determine whether current use arrangements involving that property continue to  comply with applicable federal tax requirements as described in these compliance procedures.   This may be accomplished, for example, by periodically meeting with users, providing  questionnaires to users about current use arrangements, or adopting other protocols  reasonable calculated to ensure compliance with applicable federal tax requirements on a  continuing basis.  This periodic review may be scheduled, for example, at or before the times  that the Issuer is required to file with Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board the annual  financial information and operating data pursuant to the Issuer’s undertaking, if any, to provide  continuing disclosure with respect to outstanding bond issues.  ii. If at any time during the life of an issue of tax‐exempt bonds, the Issuer discovers a violation of  federal tax requirements applicable to that issue may have occurred, the Finance Administrator  will consult with bond counsel to determine whether any such violation actually has occurred  and, if so, take prompt action to accomplish an available remedial action under applicable  Internal Revenue Service under the Voluntary Closing Agreement Program described under  Notice 2008‐31 or other future published guidance.  g. Education Policy with Respect to Federal Tax Requirements for Tax‐Exempt Bonds.   It is the policy of the city that the finance administrator and his or her staff, as well as the principal  operating officials of those departments of the city for which property is financed with proceeds of tax‐ exempt bonds should be provided with education and training on federal tax requirements applicable to  tax‐exempt bonds. The city recognizes that such education and training is vital as a means of helping to  ensure that the city remains in compliance with those federal tax requirements in respect of its bonds.  The city therefore will enable and encourage those personnel to attend and participate in educational  and training programs offered by, among others, the Washington Municipal Treasurers Association and  the Washington Finance Officers Association with regard to the federal tax requirements applicable to  tax‐exempt bonds.            Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-61 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington City Funds and Fund Structure  Key Report  000    General A E  001    Community Services A I (000)  003    Streets A I (000)  004    Community Development Block Grant A I (000)  005    Museum A I (000)   098    Economic Development Fund A I (000)  108    Leased City Properties A I (000)  125    One Percent for Art A I (000)  Total General Government  SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS:  110    Special Hotel‐Motel Tax E  127    Cable Communications Development E  130    Housing and Supportive Services  E  135    Springbrook Wetlands Bank E  140    Police Seizure Fund E  141    Police CSAM Seizure Fund E  304    Fire Impact Mitigation E  310    Renton SD Impact Mitigation E  311    Issaquah SD Impact Mitigation I (310)  312    Kent SD Impact Mitigation I (310)  DEBT SERVICE FUNDS:  215    Gen Govt Misc Debt Service E  CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS (CIP):  303    Community Services Impact Mitigation E  305    Transportation Impact Mitigation I (317)  308    REET 1 Fund  E  309    REET 2 Fund E  316    Municipal Facilities CIP E  317    Transportation CIP  E  336    New Library Development I (316)  346    Family First I (316)  A.General Government Funds share general revenues.  Therefore, no interest shall be charged for loans between funds. E.External Fund for Reporting Purposes I.Internal Fund for Management Purposes Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-62 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington City Funds and Fund Structure (continued)  ENTERPRISE FUNDS: Key External  Reporting  Internal  Reporting  402   Airport Operations E 403   Solid Waste Utility E 404   Municipal Golf Course System E 405   Water Operations B E 406   Wastewater Operations  B I (405) 407   Surface Water Operations B I (405) 416   King County Metro B I (405) (406)  422   Airport Capital Investment I (402) 424   Municipal Golf Course System CIP I (404) 425   Water CIP B I (405) (405)  426   Wastewater CIP B I (405) (406)  427   Surface Water CIP B I (405) (407)  471   Waterworks Rate Stabilization B I (405) (405)  INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS:  501   Equipment Rental E 502   Insurance  E 503   Information Technology I (501) 504   Facilities  I (501) 505   Communications I (501) 512   Healthcare Insurance I (502) 522   Leoff1 Retirees Healthcare I (502) FIDUCIARY FUNDS:  611   Firemen's Pension E B.Water Utility Funds shall be managed as a system such that balance sheet accounts are merged for management and reporting purposes. E.External Fund for Reporting Purposes  I.Internal Fund for Management Purposes Executive Summary - FInancial Management Policies 1-63 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 RENTON RESULTS  Budget Framework 2‐1  Renton Results Overview  2‐5  Safety and Health ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐8  Representative Government ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐10  Livable Community ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐12  Mobility ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐13  Utilities and Environment ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐14  Internal Services ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐15  Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area  2‐17  Reconciliation to Total Budget 2‐24      Renton Results      Introduction  Renton Results began as the City of Renton’s budget framework and performance improvement initiative that originated  in 2007. Our intent has been to clearly inform the community of the various services provided by the city, the costs of  those services, and the results of our efforts. The purpose was also to inform policy decisions and provide transparency  and accountability to our community.  Since then, the Renton Results effort has expanded beyond data collection to include organizational elements such as High  Performance Organization (HPO) development, Lean Six Sigma and process improvement, Results Based Accountability  (RBA), inclusive facilitation and engagement, and more. These elements are designed to equip and empower employees,  at all levels, to bring necessary change and innovation to their service of both internal and external customers. As the  business plan goals have changed over time, so has the focus of the Renton Results effort, demonstrating the city’s ability  to be responsive and resilient through change and our commitment to continuous learning and improvement.    How are we doing?  In the following pages you’ll see the metrics gathered by programs that may demonstrate their productivity and/or  effectiveness. While data alone cannot offer a complete picture of each program, it can help tell the story of the city’s  efforts to serve the community while reflecting the impact of events or circumstances over time.    Who is involved in Renton Results?  All levels of staff are involved in identifying and/or tracking performance measures and data.    City Goals  The City Council adopts a six‐year strategic plan to focus city efforts in the direction of the city’s vision to be the center of  opportunity in the Puget Sound Region where families and businesses thrive.     The city’s mission statement identifies the following goals towards which all city operations, in partnership and  communication with residents, businesses, and schools are aligned:    Provide a safe, healthy, vibrant community  Promote economic vitality and strategically position Renton for the future  Support planned growth and influence decisions to foster environmental sustainability  Build an inclusive informed city with equitable outcomes for all in support of social, economic, and racial justice  Meet service demands and provide high quality customer service    The complete Business Plan that includes the vision, mission, desired results, and strategies being used to work toward and  achieve these results can be found on the City of Renton website.  Renton Results - Budget Framework 2-1 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington City Service Areas  The city’s budget, through the Renton Results framework, is the mechanism in place to ensure the work performed and  the services provided by the city is aligned with the city’s vision, mission, and business plan goals. Because city  departments perform a wide variety of work, often partnering with other departments, the true cost of these services can  be difficult to identify in a traditionally presented budget, by fund and/or department, which requires citizens to piece  together the overall cost.  To solve this problem, we prepare our budget in a manner that allows us to present the full cost of the services provided  within each of our six service areas.  Per our adopted 2023‐2024 budget (operating plus capital):  Safety and Health: Multiple departments operate nearly 20 different programs in support of this city service area.  Program examples include but are not limited to: Police Administration; Patrol Operations; Investigations; Special  Operations; Electronic Home Detention; City Attorney Prosecution; Emergency Management; Building Inspection;  Code Enforcement; Court Services Probation; Business Licensing; Community Development; and Human Services  Housing Repair.  Representative Government: Multiple departments operate nearly 15 different programs in support of this city  service area. Program examples include but are not limited to: Mayor’s Office Operations; Legislative Operations;  Executive Services Administration; City Clerk; City Attorney Civil; Court Administration; Criminal Case Processing;  Infraction Processing; Volunteer Program; Citywide Communications; Hearing Examiner; and Intergovernmental  Relations.  Livable Community: Multiple departments operate nearly 20 different programs in support of this city service  area. Program examples include but are not limited to: CED Administration; Parks Administration; Aquatics;  Farmers Market; Education and Recreational Activities; Recreational Facilities; Cultural and Community  Engagement; Museum; Parks and Trails; Long Range Planning; Economic Development; and Arts and Culture.  Mobility: A single department operates more than 10 programs in support of this city service area. Program  examples include but are not limited to: Public Works Administration; Airport Operations; Transportation  Operations Engineering; Transportation Systems Administration; Building and Mobility Network; Transit  Coordination/Transportation Demand Management; and Street Maintenance.  Utilities & Environment: Multiple departments operate nearly 20 different programs in support of this city service  area. Program examples include but are not limited to: Utility Systems Administration; Development Engineering;  Parks Planning, Urban Forestry and Natural Resources; Solid Waste Collection; Litter Control; Surface Water  Engineering and Planning; Wastewater Engineering and Planning; Water Engineering and Planning; Surface Water,  Wastewater, and Water Maintenance; Utility Billing and Cashiering.   Internal Support: Multiple departments operate nearly 25 different programs in support of this city service area.  Program examples include but are not limited to: Information Technology Administration; Finance Administration;  City Attorney Administration; Finance Operations; Accounting and Auditing; Asset, Dept, and Treasury  Management; Budgeting and Financial Planning; Payroll; Human Resources and Risk Management Administration;  Benefits; Telecommunications; Application and Database Services; Enterprise GIS; Service Desk Support; System  Services; Communications Print and Mail Services; Organizational Development and Performance; Technical and  Property Services; Custodial Services; Fleet Services Operations and Maintenance; and Facilities Technical  Maintenance.  Renton Results - Budget Framework 2-2 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington     How much do these services cost per person annually?  The chart below shows a comparison of costs per person at the 2023‐2024 adopted service levels by city service area.  The total adopted cost in 2023‐2024 is about $2,091‐$2,199 per person based on current population count of 107,500.         Renton Results - Budget Framework 2-3 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington         Resource allocation by City Service Area versus traditional budget  Renton Results program expenses are presented by city service area as consolidated costs across departments and funds.  Within Renton Results, we have adjusted for transfers and inter‐fund transactions where double counting occurs in  traditional “fund” based budgeting. As a result, the dollar amounts for Renton Results and the traditional budget are not  the same.    For example, the costs of the city’s internal service funds are shown under the “Internal Support” city service area and are  also included in the direct service areas by those departments that use these internal services. To compensate for this, we  are deducting the amount that has been accounted for in direct services at the bottom‐line level to show the net operating  and capital budget only in the Renton Results section.    How much do these services cost in total?      2023 FTE 2023 Operating  Exp 2023 Capital  Exp 2024 FTE 2024 Operating  Exp 2024 Capital  Exp Safety & Health 219.00  59,152,716$     ‐$                  219.00              61,448,603$     ‐$                   Representative Government 45.00    10,944,283       ‐                        45.00                11,428,580       ‐                         Livable Community 82.90    22,581,260       990,000            82.90                23,362,338       1,729,000          Mobility 68.21    16,759,907       3,722,000         68.21                17,427,009       3,239,000          Utilities & Environment 129.49  86,605,627       13,627,131       128.49              89,962,078       15,803,912        Internal Support 105.90  8,584,776         1,807,000         105.90              8,617,700         3,357,000          Total City Service Areas 650.50  204,628,568$   20,146,131$     649.50              212,246,308$   24,128,912$      224,774,700$  236,375,220$   Other Budgeted Items Transfers and Interfund Transactions 56,176,842       59,995,859        City‐Wide Revenue Estimate 2,054,404         1,819,404          Total Other 58,231,246       61,815,263        283,005,945$   298,190,483$   Total Costs Adopted 2024 City Service Area 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Operating + Capital CostsOperating + Capital Costs Total Costs Adopted 2023 Renton Results - Budget Framework 2-4 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington         2023‐2024 Renton Results  Summary and Detail  Desired Results ‐ Strategies ‐ Key Performance  Indicators ‐ Metrics/Measures ‐ Targets    As described earlier, the city service areas are broad in nature and are supported by a number of city programs across  multiple city departments.    The following pages will provide summary and detailed information for each of our city service areas. Some of the terms  you will see are defined below.    Desired Results  Each city service area is best defined by the associated “I want” statement or the desired results.  Safety and Health: I want a safe and healthy community  Representative Government: I want a responsive and responsible government  Livable Community: I want access to high quality facilities, services and public resources that enrich the lives of  everyone in the community  Mobility: I want safe and efficient access to all desired destinations, now and in the future  Utilities and Environment: I want to live, learn, work, and play in a clean and green environment with  reliable, affordable utility service  Internal Support: I want City departments to have the means to operate efficiently and effectively in a safe and  sustainable manner    Strategies  Strategies answer the question: “How does the city plan to work toward and achieve these desired results?” You will find  these listed above each of the summary and performance measure sections of the city services.    This visual representation of the Safety and Health City Service Area, for example, illustrates the relationship between the  defined strategies and reaching the desired result. Programs within this service area are aligned with these strategies.    Encourage the community to       comply with local, state, and  federal laws  Encouragement of a self‐reliant  community through programs and  education  Timely responsiveness and  projection of effort when the     community cannot help itself    Recovery and restoration of the  community after a disaster      I want  Renton to be  a safe and  healthy  community  Renton Results - Renton Results Overview 2-5 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington             Key Performance Indicators  Program key performance indicators are tools put into place by the program staff and managers and reviewed by the  administrators and the executive services organizational development division to assure alignment of efforts across the  departments. These are typically a higher level of measurement, often representative of multiple departments or  programs, and used as the primary metric that help determine the achievement of the desired result.    Metrics/Measures  Program metrics/measures are also tools put into place by the program staff and managers that further reflect the results  of the work performed or service provided. These are often at a more focused level and department or program specific.  As stated before, not all work processes are captured within Renton Results but rather program metrics/measures are  select points of data that represent the work performed in a way that can be a useful illustration of effectiveness or impact  when tracked and monitored.    Targets  Program targets are a guideline or goal for each program metric/measure. We work hard to communicate that targets  are not to be used as a “hammer” but rather as a standard which staff can strive to achieve within the framework of their  resources. There are many factors that may influence the results for programs such as weather, the economy, staff  turnover and demand.    Conclusion  Renton Results is the framework of our budget process that allows for transparent, informed, and thoughtful consideration  in the allocation of our resources. It allows decision makers to see the cost of services in a meaningful way and allows  program prioritization and resource allocation to be based on the priorities established by the city’s vision, mission, and  goals. In addition, the Renton Results effort seeks to develop and support endeavors that will enable the city to quickly  identify and respond to opportunities for improvement in processes and service delivery. In 2023 a project involving all  departments is planned to reevaluate our key performance indicators, metrics/measures, targets, and tools utilized to  capture the data. This will ensure the availability, accuracy, transparency, and value of the information provided to  illustrate program and/or service effectiveness in achieving the desired results.      Renton Results - Renton Results Overview 2-6 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington      Renton Results - Renton Results Overview 2-7 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Programs, Resources and Results  Programs/services that support the City Service Area of Safety and Health have provided metrics/measures ("Results") to indicate the outcomes of their efforts.  Each metric is unique ‐ some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show efficiency  and effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked "no data" indicate a metric for which information is not available. This could be due to a number  of reasons including changes in staffing, programs and/or surveys not taking place (due to Covid‐19 or other impacting circumstances), and/or tools and technology not  available to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible.  Desired Result: I want a safe and healthy community.  Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve the desired results:   Encouragement of a self‐reliant community through programs and education. Adopted 2023 2024   Timely responsiveness and “projection of effort,” when the community cannot help itself. FTE’s 219.00 219.00   Recovery and restoration of the community after a disaster. Operating $59,152,716 $61,448,603   Encourage the community to comply with local, state, and federal laws. Percent of Operating Budget 29% 29%  Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents.  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Residents report feeling somewhat or very safe duringthedayintheirneighborhood. 90 next survey 2017 90 next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 90 percent  Residents report feeling somewhat or very safe duringthenight intheirneighborhood. 70 next survey 2017 73 next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 90 percent  Community report feeling somewhat or very safe duringthedayinthedowntownarea. 81 next survey 2017 84 next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 80 percent  Community report feeling somewhat or very safe duringthenightinthedowntownarea. 70 next survey 2017 73 next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 80 percent  Average response time (in minutes) to Priority I calls. 4.52 4.43 4.61 4.66 4.06 4.44 5.11 TBD less than 3.5 minutes  Number of Emergency Management Accreditation  Program (EMAP) standards that are met completely  or partially met and currently in progress, as a  measure of emergency management excellence and  indication of preparedness.  new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 25% 55% 86% TBD percent of total  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Average response time (in minutes) to Priority II calls. 90 8.13 7.62 7.35 6.80 6.59 6.13 TBD less than 8 minutes  Average response time (in minutes) to Priority III calls. 70 11.75 11.62 10.94 10.73 10.01 9.21 TBD less than 12 minutes  Average response time (in minutes) to Priority IV calls. 81 23.94 26.08 23.54 23.82 21.99 18.13 TBD less than 21 minutes  New Concealed Pistol Licenses will be completed within 30days. new 2016 1,293 1,220 1,176 1,206 923 1,278 TBD number of licenses  Number of public records requests (police specific). 2,359 2,504 2,686 2,855 3,596 3,409 3,740 TBD number of requests  Number of cases processed by staff. 15,517 16,665 16,367 16,179 14,643 13,223 12,909 TBD number of cases  Number of warrants processed by staff. 2,161 1,575 1,526 1,687 1,695 1,888 1,584 TBD number of warrants  Number of Citations processed by staff. 11,766 11,462 11,438 11,047 8,629 7,509 3,779 TBD number of citations  Number of orders process by staff. 1,438 1,630 1,644 1,679 1,587 1,263 1,281 TBD number of orders  Annual percent of successful resolution or clearance  of assigned cases. 83 88 56 68 82 68 68 TBD minimum of 80 percent  Percent of collision incidences resolved by Patrol  Services during regular hours of service to reduce  resources needed in Patrol Operations. 51 32 45 46 48 46 47 TBD minimum of 80 percent  Average percent of traffic safety camera notices of  violation are provided within fourteen days. 100 100 100 99 99 99 99 TBD minimum of 100 percent  Number of arrests due to Special Operations'  identification and investigation of repeat offenders  and/or trends of criminal activity. 51 44 95 46 73 58 52 TBD minimum of 50 count  Average number of training hours per commissioned  employee. 139 124 108 117 97.6 89 165 TBD minimum of 100 hours  Average number of training hours per non‐ commissioned employee. 16 24 57 18.3 32 15 21 TBD minimum of 24 hours  2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 budget 2022 budget 2023 adopted 2024 adopted FTE's: 179.83 179.83 196.33 196.33 202.50 203.50 202.90 202.90 219.00 219.00 Dollars: 36,336,698$ 37,824,001$ 40,485,130$ 42,636,579$ 48,205,345$ $49,645,700 49,347,522$ 50,684,751$ 59,152,716$ 61,448,603$  City Resources  budgeted to support the Safety and Health City Service Area City Service Area: Safety and Health  Key Performance Indicators  Performance Metrics/Measures  Renton Results - Safety and Health Programs, Resources and Results 2-8 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington City Service Area: Safety and Health  Desired Result: I want a safe and healthy community.  Provide Electronic Home Detention (EHD) services to  reduce jail costs. EHD referrals and revenue increases,  resulting in a cost savings to the inmate house  budget.  $2,038,155 $2,479,924 $2,871,132 $4,593,750 $5,199,250 $2,832,256 $2,522,880 TBD minimum of $600,000  Increase the scope and extent of electronic exchanges  of information, including discovery, to the Defense  Attorney. new 2015 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Be prepared for hearings and trials in all cases. new 2015 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Prepare complete and adequate discovery in all  cases, as measured by motions granted by the court  for inadequate discovery.  new 2015 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Number of hours Emergency Management Program employeesandvolunteers areengagedindeveloping and maintainingpublicandprivate partnerships. new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 TBD  Permit review for single family applications completedwithin 2weeks. 90 61 58 45 46 34 44 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Permit review for commercial applications within 4 weeks. 100 95 88 87 95 80 87 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Inspection requests receive response within 24 hours. 95 93 94 95 94 95 95 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Code compliance is achieved within 3 weeks of date ofinitial request. 88 80 81 81 89 87 87 TBD minimum of 70 percent  Composite of results from survey of probationer's  understanding of probation process reflected as  "Good" or better. 85 88 88 85 84 no data no data TBD minimum of 80 percent   Number of compliance audits performed annually. new 2017 new 2017 500 349 159 333 320 TBD    TBD  Business License renewals will be issued within one  day of receipt of payment. 95 87 89 92 82 89 no data TBD minimum of 95 percent  Increase the total number of Housing Repair services  provided.  985 no data no data no data 999 no data no data TBD number of services provided  Number of unduplicated Renton residents served by  agencies that are funded by City of Renton. 18,136 27,122 no data no data no data no data no data TBD number of residents  Percentage of unduplicated Renton residents served  by agencies that are funded by City of Renton. 19 27 no data no data no data no data no data TBD percentage of residents  Per capita spending for Human Services.  $5.54 $5.60 $5.67 $5.67 $5.67 no data no data TBD cost per capita  Number of unduplicated households served. 217 no data no data no data 186 no data no data TBD number of households   Performance Metrics/Measures  Renton Results - Safety and Health Programs, Resources and Results 2-9 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Programs, Resources and Results  Programs/services that support the City Service Area of Representative Government have provided metrics/measures ("Results") to indicate the outcomes of  their efforts. Each metric is unique ‐ some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to  show efficiency and effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked "no data" indicate a metric for which data is not available. This could be due to a  number of reasons including changes in staffing, programs and/or surveys not taking place (due to Covid‐19 or other impacting circumstances), and/or tools and  technology not available to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible.  Desired Result: I want a responsive and responsible government.  Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve the desired results:     Policy and program decisions reflecting community values.            Opportunities for the public to engage and influence City government     Open, accessible, and consistent (administrative and judicial) decision processes.     Advocate community interest in regional, state, and federal forums. Adopted 2023 2024     Clear and effective communications. FTE’s 45.00 45.00     Policy and fiscal accountability. Operating $10,944,283 $11,428,580     Partnership with community organizations to leverage resources. Percent of Operating Budget 5% 5%  Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents. 2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Cost of service per capita. $1,851 $1,851 $1,514 $1,548 $1,608 $1,644 $1,831 $1,966 TBD  Residents rating the value of services for the  taxespaidtoRenton as"good" orbetter. 51 next survey 2017 51 next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 51 percent  Residents rating the quality and accessibility of City servicesas“good”or better. no data next survey 2017 no data next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 60 percent  Percent of survey responses that rate the City's job ofkeepingresidentsinformedas"good"orbetter. 65 next survey 2017 67 next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 65 percent  Hours of service provided annually by volunteers. 40,698 43,733 51,079 54,708 43,766 17,213 17,806 TBD number of hours  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Information requests/concerns from residents are acknowledgedwithinthreedays. 100 100 100 100 100 98 98 TBD minimum of 90 percent  Information requests/concerns are resolved within twoweeks. 99 92 97 90 92 92 94 TBD minimum of 90 percent  Number of legislative documents (agenda, minutes, ordinances,resolutions,etc.)published&available. 148 121 140 173 204 155 114 TBD number of documents  Number of public records requests (City general requests/non‐police). 332 616 678 608 691 628 648 TBD number of requests  Number of internal documents (contracts including  lease agreements, MOU's, etc.) that are executed  and recorded. 722 725 714 874 693 740 655 TBD number of documents  Routine legislation review will be performed within  7 calendar days of receipt. 98 99 99 92 92 87 87 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Complete routine contract review within 7 calendar  days of receipt. new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 95 95 90 90 TBD minimum of 90 percent  Complete routine contract addendums, amendments  and change orders within 2 business days of receipt. new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 95 95 90 90 TBD minimum of 90 percent  Number of training hours per FTE provided to court  employees. 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 TBD minimum of 8 hours  Resident’s satisfaction with understanding the court  infraction process. 85 86 84 84 82 no data no data TBD minimum of 80 percent  Defendant's satisfaction with the ability to obtain  access to court record information related to  infraction processing is rated "Good" or better. 87 92 90 88 88 no data no data TBD minimum of 80 percent  Defendant satisfaction with their understanding of  the criminal case process is rated as "good" or better. 83 85 83 80 82 no data no data TBD minimum of 80 percent  Defendant’s satisfaction with the ability to obtain  access to court record information related to  criminal case processing is rated “Good” or better. 87 92 92 90 90 no data no data TBD minimum of 80 percent  Ongoing juror surveys reflect an approval rating  that indicates satisfaction and understanding of the  jury experience by non‐criminal citizens of Renton. 80 80 84 82 82 no data no data TBD minimum of 90 percent  Coordinate and leverage civic engagement  opportunities to conserve financial resources through  use of volunteers, resulting in annual  cost avoidance – Value of volunteer service.  $1,179,835 $1,267,820 $1,480,792 $1,586,000 $1,268,800 $499,028 $516,215 TBD minimum of $1,260,000  2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 budget 2022 budget 2023 adopted 2024 adopted FTE's: 38.7 38.7 40.18 40.18 42.00 42.00 43.00 43.00 45.00 45.00 Dollars: 6,319,972$ 6,576,090$ 7,281,264$ 7,461,413$ 7,973,392$ $8,195,173 9,227,611$ 9,495,456$ 10,944,283$ 11,428,580$  City Resources  budgeted to support the Safety and Health City Service Area City Service Area: Representative Government  Key Performance Indicators  Performance Metrics/Measures  Renton Results - Representative Government Programs, Resources and Results 2-10 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Desired Result: I want a responsive and responsible government.  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Composite increase in residents' rating for each of the  City's various information resources provided by the  Communications Department (e‐communication,  print, advertising, and media).  52 next survey 2017 no data next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 5 percent  Number of organizations in which CED staff  represents the City in local, regional, and statewide  organizations focused in areas such as land use,  economic development and building regulation.  29 no data 29 29 29 29 29 29 minimum of 8 count   Performance Metrics/Measures  Renton Results - Representative Government Programs, Resources and Results 2-11 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Programs, Resources and Results  Programs/services that support the City Service Area of Livable Community have provided metrics/measures ("Results") to indicate the outcomes of their  efforts. Each metric is unique ‐ some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show  efficiency and effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked "no data" indicate a metric for which data is not available. This could be due to a  number of reasons including changes in staffing, programs and/or surveys not taking place (due to Covid‐19 or other impacting circumstances), and/or tools and  technology not available to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible.  Desired Result: I want access to high quality facilities, services, and public resources that enrich the lives of everyone in the  community.  Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve the desired results:     Encourage and foster a vibrant and diverse economy.     Provide or make available diverse learning and enrichment opportunities. Adopted 2023 2024     Provide clean, safe, healthy, and well‐maintained places. FTE’s 82.90 82.90     Manage growth in a manner consistent with community values. Operating $23,571,260 $25,091,338     Encourage and foster a strong sense of community. Percent of Operating Budget 12% 12%  Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents.  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Residents rate livability of Renton as “good” or better. 66 next survey 2017 68 next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 65 percent  The City’s annual sales tax revenue growth rate  (excluding one‐time items). 9 7 ‐0.1 8 ‐0.4 ‐6.6 23.5 TBD minimum of 1 percent  Annual property tax revenue associated with new  construction increases. 2.8 ‐2.1 2.6 2.4 0.9 1.0 1.0 TBD greater than 1.5 percent  Overall customer satisfaction rating is “good” or  better in cleanliness and appearance of Parks and  Trail system. 84 next survey 2017 88 next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 80 percent  Maintain or increase the number of officially  recognized neighborhoods/ associations participating  in the program. 74 74 90 90 no data no data no data TBD minimum of 72 count  Total number of employees working in Renton  (measured by FTE) increases year over year. 61,185 62,451 61,920 66,208 68,057 67,806 60,723 TBD annual count increase  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Percentage of occupancy rate for swimming lesson registrations. 79 72 no data 95 98 no data no data TBD minimum of 80 percent  Henry Moses Aquatic Center customers rate their experienceandsatisfactionas“good”orbetter. 97 95 no data no data no data no data no data TBD minimum of 80 percent  Average Farmer’s Market booth space occupancy as percentageofavailablespace. 99 96 85 82 83 91 60 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Average daily attendance at the Senior Center. 401 394 400 400 400 150 150 TBD minimum of 250 count  Percent of attendees at 4th of July, Renton River Days,  and Holiday Lights events that report overall  experience satisfaction of 3 or better in a 1‐5 scale. 96 98 96 96 85 no data no data TBD minimum of 80 percent  Number of businesses/public/private relationships  engaged & providing support to produce 4th of July,  Renton River Days, and Holiday Lights events  maintained or increased.  82 78 58 58 60 no data no data TBD minimum of 60 count  Percentage of the total cost of Holiday Lights, RentonRiverDays,and 4thofJulythatisfunded by sponsors. 32 31 31 31 32 no data no data TBD minimum of 30 percent  Number of visitors and people served by outreach (Museum). 5,587 4,747 7,988 1,371 2,695 no data no data TBD minimum of 4,800 count  Renton Community Center customers rate their  satisfactionas “good”orbetter. 89 no data 99 99 90 no data no data TBD minimum of 80 percent  Process land use applications requiring a decision by the Hearing Examinerwithin12weeksofreceiptof completeapplication. 76 72 88 92 100 86 88 TBD minimum of 90 percent  Process land use applications requiring an  administrative decision within 8 weeks. 84 75 82 91 92 80 52 TBD minimum of 90 percent  City Service Area: Livable Community Key Performance Indicators  Performance Metrics/Measures  Renton Results - Livable Community Programs, Resources and Results 2-12 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Programs, Resources and Results  Programs/services that support the City Service Area of Mobility have provided metrics (“Results”) to indicate the outcomes of their efforts. Each metric is  unique – some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show efficiency and  effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked “no data” indicate a metric for which data is not available. This could be due to a number of reasons  including changes in staffing, programs and/or surveys not taking place (due to Covid‐19 or other impacting circumstances), and/or tools and technology not  available to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible.  Desired Result: I want safe and efficient access to all desired destinations, now and in the future.  Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve the desired results: Adopted 2023 2024     Provide a well‐maintained condition of the mobility infrastructure. FTE’s 68.21 68.21     Provide a comprehensive mobility network that connects the public to desired destinations. Operating $20,481,907 $20,666,009     Provide efficient and safe operation of mobility infrastructure. Percent of Operating Budget 10% 10%  Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents.  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Satisfaction with connectivity to local and regional  centers via transit, sidewalks, and trails. 56 next survey 2017 63 next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 next survey 2023 minimum of 60 percent  Reduce average arterial corridor travel time. 10 10 ‐9 ‐9 ‐9 no data no data TBD         annual reduction of 1 percent  Minimize signal downtime as measured by annual  count of failures of traffic signals and beacons. 60 37 52 52 50 52 no data TBD    reduce number of failures annually  Annual number of feet of sidewalk added or replaced. no data 2,950 7,900 7,900 7,900 3,672 6,200 TBD number of linear feet  Maintain a reasonable Overall Condition Index (Pavement)rating. no data no data 68 68 68 73 no data TBD     rating equal to or greater than 70  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  No takeoff or landing delay for any aircraft longer than30minutesduetoinclementweather,routine surfacemaintenanceoperations,thepresenceof ForeignObject Debris(FOD),orwildlife. 0 0 2 2 2 0 0 TBD maximum of 0 count  Maintain safe bridges by having no load‐restricted bridges. 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 TBD maximum of 0 count  Citizen requests referred to Public Works by the Mayor'sOfficewillberespondedtowithinthe requested timeframe. 95 95 95 95 98 98 no data TBD greater than 95 percent  Reduce or maintain the number of insurance claims  againsttheCityresultingfromroad damage. 3 18 15 15 15 6 no data TBD less than 10 count  Key Performance Indicators  Performance Metrics/Measures  City Service Area: Mobility  Renton Results - Mobility Programs, Resources and Results 2-13 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Programs, Resources and Results  Programs/services that support the City Service Area of Utilities and Environment have provided metrics ("Results") to indicate the outcomes of their efforts.  Each metric is unique ‐ some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show efficiency  and effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked "no data" indicate a metric for which data is not available. This could be due to a number of  reasons including changes in staffing, programs and/or surveys not taking place (due to Covid‐19 or other impacting circumstances), and/or tools and  technology not available to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible.  Desired Result: I want to live, learn, work, and play in a clean and green environment with reliable, affordable utility service.  Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve the desired results:     Well maintained neighborhoods, properties, and environment.     Manage solid waste.     Operate and maintain piped utility infrastructure. Adopted 2023 2024     Environmental conservation, education, and outreach. FTE’s 129.49 128.49     Compliance with environmental standards and laws. Operating $100,232,758 $105,765,990     Protection of open space/acquisition. Percent of Operating Budget 49% 50%  Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents.  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Water quality to meet or exceed federal and state  regulatory requirements. 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 minimum of 100 percent  Increase residential recycling annual tons collected  per capita. 0.5 1 20 7 ‐6 6 ‐3 TBD increase of 3 percent  Increase residential organics collection per capita. 1.9 5.8 29 ‐1.5 5 25 ‐12 TBD increase of 3 percent  Restore water service within 4 hours during  emergency shutdowns. 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD minimum of 98 percent  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Infrastructure project plan review is completed  within anaverage of3weeks. 75 90 47 54 44 33 31 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Development plans and permit reviews completed  within 5businessdaysofreceipt. 100 100 100 95 95 70 100 TBD minimum of 80 percent  Requests for wastewater system information  provided within 2 business days of receipt. 98 100 98 98 100 80 80 TBD minimum of 80 percent  Maintain a Community Rating System (CRS)  classification rating of 6 or better which results in a  20% or more discount on federal flood insurance  rates.  5 5 5 5 5 5 5 TBD       rating equal to or greater than 6  Reduce annual average per capita water  consumption. 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 TBD reduction of 1 percent annually  Average Utility Billing aged accounts receivable (over  90 days) as percent of annual billing. .08 .38 .0047 .0042 .0031 .62 1.02 TBD less than 1 percent  New Utility Billing accounts will be set up within 5  business days of notification (via final permit, email,  etc.). 99 98 100 100 97 95 94 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Customer satisfaction surveys rate the range/type of  park amenities offered as “good” or better. 80 no data 86 86 no data no data no data no data minimum of 75 percent  City Service Area: Utilities & Environment  Key Performance Indicators  Performance Metrics/Measures  Renton Results - Utilities and Environment Programs, Resources and Results 2-14 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Programs, Resources and Results  Programs/services that support the City Service Area of Internal Support have provided metrics ("Results") to indicate the outcomes of their efforts. Each metric  is unique ‐ some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show efficiency and  effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked "no data" indicate a metric for which data is not available. This could be due to a number of  reasons including changes in staffing, programs and/or surveys not taking place (due to Covid‐19 or other impacting circumstances), and/or tools and  technology not available to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible.  Desired Result: I want City departments to have the means to operate efficiently and effectively in a safe and sustainable manner.  Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve the desired results:     Highly qualified, healthy, well trained, and productive workforce.     Functional work environment. Adopted 2023 2024     Fiscal support and accountability. FTE’s 105.90 105.90     Safeguard public interests and assets. Operating $10,391,776 $11,974,700     Equipment and data that is reliable and accessible. Percent of Operating Budget 5% 6%  Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents.  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Maintain or improve the City’s credit rating of AA  (S&P’s) for general obligation bonds and AA+ (S&P’s)  for revenue bonds. AA+/AA+ AA+/AA+ AA+/AA+ AA+/AA+ AAA/AA+ AAA/AA+ AAA/AA+ TBD minimum of AA/AA+  Internal/external customers of Finance Department  rate overall customer satisfaction as “good” or better. new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 minimum of 80 percent  Average customer satisfaction rating of all IT  Department services per internal customer survey. new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 minimum of 80 percent  Percent of system availability (network "uptime") as  provided by System Services. 99 97 99 99 99 98 99 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Training hours/learning opportunities provided per  FTE will increase. new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 4,381 4,404 2,382 TBD increase of total hours  annually  Complete a safety inspection of each City‐owned  facility annually. 89 45 73 100 87 73 88 TBD minimum of 100 percent  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Vendors will be paid within 45 days of invoice date. 92 91 89 90 92 91 90 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Percent of average aged accounts receivable balances  over 90 days versus annual billing of non‐ intergovernmental customers. no data 2.5 2.8 8.2 9 2.2 0 TBD      less than 1 percent  Total dollar amount of accounts receivable balances writtenoffannually. no data $4,400 $4,050 $44,315 $123,0023 $40,194 $0 TBD less than $10,000  Percentage of chartered IT projects that are  completed within budget and on schedule. new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 new 2023 TBD  Internally provided training and development  opportunities are rated as “good” or better by  attendees. new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 90 97 97 TBD minimum of 80 percent  Percentage of new hires and promoted employees  who rate the hiring process as “good” or better. 83 25 97 89 93 no data 81 TBD minimum of 90 percent  Percentage of hiring managers who rate the hiring  process as “good” or better. 71 no data 16 86 82 no data 84 TBD minimum of 90 percent  Percentage of new hires or promotions retained past  their probationary period. 89 94 92 94 93 92 79 TBD minimum of 90 percent  Number of training courses provided by HR/RM. 9 10 12 9 8 12 5 TBD number of courses provided  Number of business days to recruit and fill non‐civil  service positions. 71 47 45 67 55 45 57 TBD number of days  Maintain or reduce the annual number of Workers  Compensation Claims. 98 72 36 55 42 36 30 TBD number of claims  Square feet of coverage per employee (IFMA 60th  percentile). 23,141 no data no data no data no data no data no data TBD maximum of 20,424 count  Number of Facilities Help Desk project completed. 2,756 no data no data no data no data no data no data TBD number of projects completed  Property and technical services review of  development proposals are processed within 2  weeks. 95 98 95 98 98 100 100 TBD minimum of 95 percent  Key Performance Indicators  Performance Metrics/Measures  City Service Area: Internal Support  Renton Results - Internal Services Programs, Resources and Results 2-15 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington  Desired Result: I want City departments to have the means to operate efficiently and effectively in a safe and sustainable manner.  2015  results  2016  results  2017  Results  2018  Results  2019  Results  2020  Results  2021  Results  2022  Results Target  Minimize Fleet “comeback” repairs, as a percentage of the totalrepairs. new 2015 4.6 5.4 5.4 5.4 0 no data TBD Less than or equal to 5 percent  Percentage of Fleet work orders completed in less than72hours. new 2015 71 71 71 71 73 no data TBD minimum of 80 percent   Performance Metrics/Measures  Renton Results - Internal Services Programs, Resources and Results 2-16 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area 2-17 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area 2-18 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area 2-19 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area 2-20 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area 2-21 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area 2-22 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area 2-23 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 219.00   59,152,716  8,461,600    219.00 61,448,603   8,461,600     45.00  10,944,283  4,949,998    45.00 11,428,580   5,011,126     82.90  22,581,260  3,430,907    82.90 23,362,338   3,459,607     68.21  16,759,907  3,435,199    68.21 17,427,009   3,445,199     129.49   86,605,627  79,601,757   128.49 89,962,078   80,522,127    105.90   8,584,776    2,291,521    105.90 8,617,700   2,027,928     650.50   204,628,568  102,170,982 649.50 212,246,308 102,927,587  FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ ‐    ‐  ‐     ‐   ‐  ‐     ‐    ‐  ‐     ‐   ‐  ‐     ‐    990,000  940,000   ‐   1,729,000   1,279,000     ‐    3,722,000    5,002,000    ‐   3,239,000   4,919,000     ‐    13,627,131  13,614,015   ‐   15,803,912   15,664,896    ‐    1,807,000    1,957,000    ‐   3,357,000   3,507,000     ‐    20,146,131  21,513,015   ‐   24,128,912   25,369,896    FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ ‐    56,176,842  54,493,188   ‐   59,995,859   56,374,415    ‐    2,054,404    109,184,530 ‐   1,819,404   112,430,769  ‐    58,231,246  163,677,718 ‐   61,815,263   168,805,184  Grand Totals 650.50   283,005,945  287,361,714 649.50 298,190,483 297,102,667  City‐Wide Revenue Estimate Total Other Other City Service Area 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Transfers and Interfund Transactions Total Capital FTE and $ Capital Programs City Service Area 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Safety & Health Representative Government Livable Community Mobility Utilities & Environment Internal Support Total Operating FTE and $ Operating Programs City Service Area 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Representative Government Livable Community Mobility Utilities & Environment Internal Support Safety & Health Reconciliation to Budget by Fund and Department Below will reconcile the Programs within Renton Results with the Total Adopted Budget Renton Results - Reconciliation to Total Budget 2-24 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 BUDGET BY DEPARTMENT  Legislative 3‐1  Executive 3‐9  City Attorney 3‐29  Court Services 3‐33  Community and Economic Development (CED) 3‐37  Equity, Housing, and Human Services (EHHS) 3‐53  Finance 3‐64  Human Resources and Risk Management (HR&RM) 3‐73  Police 3‐80  Parks and Recreation 3‐94  Public Works (PW) 3‐110  Other City Services 3‐139      Legislative  James Alberson Councilmember Carmen Rivera Councilmember Ryan McIrvin Councilmember Valerie O’Halloran Councilmember Ed Prince Councilmember Ruth Pérez Councilmember Kim‐Khánh Văn Councilmember Council Liaison 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-1Budget by Department - Legislative Legislative  Mission  The city council assesses the needs of the public and sets priorities; develops and adopts the annual budget, ordinances,  resolutions, and policy alternatives to meet those needs, consistent with city goals and objectives; and provides coordination  and evaluation of programs and service objectives.    City Councilmembers Names and Terms  Councilmember Position # Term Service  Began Term Expires  James Alberson 1 4 years 2022 12/31/2025  Carmen Rivera 2 4 years 2021 12/31/2025  Valerie O’Halloran 3 4 years 2019 12/31/2023  Ryan McIrvin 4 4 years 2016 12/31/2023  Ed Prince 5 4 years 2012 12/31/2023  Ruth Pérez 6 4 years 2014 12/31/2025  Kim‐Khánh Văn 7 4 years 2020 12/31/2023  List of Legislative Renton Results Decision Packages:  Legislative Performance Measures:  2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 425,744 512,544 592,929 526,945 715,534 737,169 767,280 39.9% 4.1% Position Summary 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #DescriptionFTETot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 200001.0013 Legislative Operations 8.00       737,169         ‐      8.00             767,280   ‐              Total 8.00          737,169$                  ‐$               8.00             767,280$      ‐$                City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 Results 2021 Results Residents surveyed rate the value of  services for the taxes paid to Renton as  "good" or better. 51%next survey  2019 survey  canceled survey  canceled next survey  2023 Information requests/concerns from  residents are acknowledged within  three days. 100% 100% 100% 98% 98% Information requests/concerns are  resolved within two weeks.97% 90% 92% 92% 94 Policy and fiscal  accountability.Cost of service per capita.$1,514 $1,548 $1,608 $1,644 $1,831  * Residential Surveys are  Representative  Government Policy and program decisions  reflecting community values. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-2Budget by Department - Legislative Highlight of Budget Changes:  Personnel benefits increased by $30 thousand in 2023 due to projected increased costs in medical/dental benefits. Regular salaries increased $11 thousand due to cost‐of‐living adjustments. Interfund payments increased by $170 thousand in 2023, previously the facilities cost for maintaining the council chambers were included with the mayor’s office division but are now charged directly to the legislative department.   2021/2022 Accomplishments   Adopted/Authorized the following:  Approval of an agreement with Murraysmith, Inc., in the amount of $1.597 million, for construction management services related to the Downtown Utility Improvement project. Ordinance effectuating the Graves Annexation. Approval of a franchise agreement with ExteNet System, Inc. as a purveyor of telecommunication transmission and distribution systems within city limits. Granting a private storm drainage easement to the Quadrant Corporation within unimproved NE 43rd Street right‐ of‐way for the purpose of conveying storm water from the Rhododendron Ridge plat to the city's existing storm drainage system within Lincoln Avenue NE. Approval of change orders with Cascade Civil Construction, LLC for work related to the Williams Avenue South and Wells Avenue South Conversion project. Approval of the Water Quality Grant Agreement WQC‐2021‐Renton‐00187 with the Department of Ecology, to accept $230 thousand in grant funds, for the Heather Downs Detention Pond Water Quality Retrofit project. Approval of an agreement with RH2 Engineering, Inc., in the amount of $350 thousand, for professional services during the construction of the Highlands Reservoir Phase 1 ‐ Offsite Improvements project. The 2021 Title IV Docket #16. Approval of a professional services agreement with Perteet, Inc., in the amount of $271 thousand, for construction management services for the Houser Way Intersection and Pedestrian Improvements project. Approval of Interagency Agreement for 2021 and 2022 CPA #6203499, with King County, to accept $200 thousand in non‐matching grant funds to implement waste reduction and recycling programs. Approval of a King County Conservation Futures grant interlocal agreement to accept $305 thousand in grant funds to reimburse approximately 50% of the purchase price of a parcel of land located east of Lake Washington Blvd on the south side of May Creek. Approval of a grant agreement with FitLot, in the amount of $11 thousand, for the purposes of hiring a fitness instructor to offer free classes for adults 18 and older at the new FitLot Outdoor Fitness Park located next to the North Highlands Community Center. Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Legislative 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 226,492 247,080 270,259 251,873 261,948 262,649 273,206 4.3% 4.0% Personnel Benefits 120,160 132,763 151,073 140,743 142,547 170,016 181,328 20.8% 6.7% Supplies 930 2,000 812 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 0.0% 0.0% Other Services & Charges 19,978 63,316 2,819 63,316 63,316 63,316 63,316 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 58,183 67,385 167,967 69,013 245,723 239,188 247,430 246.6% 3.4% Total 425,744 512,544 592,929 526,945 715,534 737,169 767,280 39.9% 4.1% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Legislative 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-3Budget by Department - Legislative Approval of a King County Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services (VSHSL) Transform Senior Center Grant, to accept $115 thousand, for the purpose of expanding outreach, engagement, and services to Latino and veteran seniors in the Renton community. Approval of the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance (JAG) Program agreement to accept grant funds to support police programs such as the domestic violence victim advocate services and training. Resolution pooling SHB 1406 sales tax credit funds with South King Housing and Homelessness Partners (SKHHP) and execution of SKHHP's Companion Agreement and Interlocal Agreement (ILA). Approval of a 4Culture Sustained Support Program, to receive $10 thousand in grant funds, for the Renton Municipal Arts Commission to provide opportunities for members of the Renton community to become engaged with each other through art. Approval of Amendment No. 1 to CAG‐20‐395, agreement with Gray & Osborne, in the amount of $684 thousand, for construction management services for the Duvall Avenue NE Roadway Improvement, NE 7th Street to Sunset Blvd NE project. Approval of an agreement with Northwest Hydraulic Consultants, in the amount of $458 thousand, for the Lower Cedar River Flood Risk Reduction Feasibility Study. Execution of Washington State Department of Transportation documents for a Temporary Construction Easement, Drainage Easement, Utility Easement and Quit Claim Deed related to the construction of the flyover ramp at I‐405 and SR 167. Approval of a professional services agreement with Gray & Osborne, Inc., in the amount of $162 thousand, for construction management services for the Lake Washington Loop Trail project. Adoption of an ordinance amending the 2021/2022 Biennial Budget and adoption of a resolution amending the 2021/2022 Fee Schedule. Approval of a Port of Seattle Economic Development Partnership Program agreement, to accept $60 thousand in grant funds and a Port of Seattle Tourism Marketing Program agreement, to accept $10 thousand in grant funds for the purpose of supporting a digital marketing and social media campaign to target visitors and investors outside of the state of Washington. Approval of a System Access Fund Project Agreement in an amount not to exceed $1 million, with Sound Transit, which includes $700 thousand in grant funding for project design, and approval of all subsequent amendments to the agreement, necessary to accomplish the S 7th Street Corridor Improvements project. Approval of an agreement with Landscape Structures, Inc., in the amount of $500 thousand, for the replacement of playground equipment at Liberty Park. Approval of an agreement with Alexander Codd, in the amount of $5 thousand, to design and install a mural celebrating the rich history of athletics in Renton over the past 120 years at Liberty Park. Execution of a restrictive covenant for the Fawcett ROFR property (part of the May Creek Greenway) acquired in 2020, which requires the parcel to be maintained as open space in perpetuity to receive $305 thousand in King County Conservation Futures Grant funding. Execution of the "Agreement and Acknowledgement" and "Permitted Facilities Agreement" between the City of Renton and Pulte Homes of Washington, Inc. (Developer) and Olympic Pipe Line Company, LLC (Olympic) to construct improvements that will service the city‐permitted Forest Terrace Subdivision that crosses an existing Olympic Pipe Line Easement. Execution of the Letter of Agreement, with King County's Department of Community and Human Services, to accept $25 thousand in non‐matching grant funds, to support Communities in Schools Renton‐Tukwila and the Sustainable Renton programs. Execution of the Local Agency Agreement, with the Federal Aviation Administration, for the obligation of $57 thousand in Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSAA) funds, to support airport operations and contract tower operational expenses. Approval of the Community Services Agreement 6218 EHS with Public Health Seattle and King County, to accept $112 thousand in non‐matching grant funds, for the 2021‐2022 Local Hazardous Waste Management Program. Adoption of a resolution to adopt the 2019 Water System Plan Update. Adoption of a resolution authorizing a sole source agreement with Peter Goetzinger, LLC, in the amount of $71 thousand, to paint an artistic mural on the new Kennydale Reservoir. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-4Budget by Department - Legislative Approval of an agreement with the U.S. Department of the Treasury, to accept a grant in the amount of $18.113 million in Coronavirus Recovery Funds. Approval of a 25‐year lease with King County, in the amount of $141 thousand, for space and upgrades required to house King County ‐ Puget Sound Emergency Radio Network equipment at Renton City Hall. Approval of a Multi‐Family Housing Property Tax Exemption agreement from Sunset Terrace, a 108‐unit multi‐family project, in the Sunset designated residential target area. Approval of a Local Agency Agreement, with the Federal Aviation Administration, to receive $172 thousand in non‐ matching grant funds for the purpose of updating the Airport Layout Plan and Narrative Update. Approval of a cost reimbursement agreement with the King County Sheriff's Office, to receive up to $16 thousand for reimbursement of overtime costs for verifying the addresses and residencies of registered sex and kidnapping offenders in Renton. Adoption of a resolution ratifying the 2021 WRIA 9 (Green/Duwamish and Central Puget Sound Watershed) Salmon Habitat Plan Update. Execution of an agreement with RH2 Engineering, Inc., in the amount of $216 thousand, for design and services during bidding of the West Hill Booster Pump Station Improvements project. Approval of a grant agreement with the Association of Washington Cities working in collaboration with the Washington Parks and Recreation Association and under the direction from the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, to accept $25 thousand in grant funds for the expansion and enhancement of the Recreation and Neighborhood Division's 2021 STREAM Team summer camp program, based at the Renton Community Center. Approval of a Letter of Understanding, with Flatiron‐Lane Joint Venture, to accept a contribution of $200 thousand for the city's Gateway Enhancement Project located at NE 44th Street and I‐405, as mitigation for design changes for the NE 44th Street Interchange project on I‐405. Execution of the Washington State Department of Commerce Grant ‐ 2019 Local and Community Project Grant, to accept $1.5 million for the purpose of reimbursing construction costs for the Family First Community Center. Execution of an agreement with Cascadia Consulting Group, LLC, in the amount of $186 thousand, for the purpose of updating the city's Clean Economy Strategy. Approval of a grant agreement with King County, to accept an additional $186 thousand in Community Development Block Grant ‐ Coronavirus Round 2 (CDBG‐CV2) funds which will be allocated to the Renton Housing Authority and Centro Rendu. Adoption of the Capital Facilities Plans for the Renton, Kent, and Issaquah School Districts and approval of the collection of the requested 2021 impact fees. Execution of a King County Get Active, Stay Active grant agreement (subject to approval as to form by the city attorney department), to accept $10 thousand in grant funds for the Gift of Play scholarship program to cover registration fees for nearly 150 participants. Approval of the 2022 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) grant agreement with King County to accept an estimated $423 thousand and allocating those funds for Planning and Administration and Public Facilities and Improvements Program. Approval of a five‐year contract with Axon Enterprises, Inc., in the amount of $3.403 million for the purpose of providing body worn cameras and other related equipment and services. Execution of the Rail Corridor Improvements and Funding Agreement with BSNF Railway Company, in the amount of $1.3 million, for the Park Avenue North Extension project. Approval of a two‐year Transportation Demand Management Implementation Agreement, with the Washington State Department of Transportation, for reimbursement of $81 thousand for the implementation of the city's Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) program. Execution of an Interagency Agreement with Washington Traffic Safety Commission, for the obligation of grant funding in the amount of $247 thousand, to be used for Safer Access to Neighborhood Destinations traffic safety project. Execution of an agreement with Parametrix, in the amount of $240 thousand, for assessing and prioritizing receiving waters and developing a stormwater management action plan for the Stormwater Management Action Planning project. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-5Budget by Department - Legislative Approval of a Multi‐Family Housing Property Tax Exemption Agreement for Solera, a 590‐unit multi‐family project located in the Sunset designated residential target area, which provides a partial tax exemption for 12 years upon completion of the project. Approval of a Federal Land and Water Conservation (LWCF) grant, administered by the State Recreation and Conservation Funding Board (RCFB) and the Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO), in the amount of $500 thousand, to be used for the Gene Coulon Memorial Beach Park Trestle Bridge project. Execution of Interagency Agreement (IAA No. C2200051) with the Department of Ecology, to receive $175 thousand in funding for Pollution Prevention Assistance between the state of Washington, the Department of Ecology, and the City of Renton. Adoption of an ordinance amending Renton Municipal Code (RMC) Chapters 5‐25 and 5‐26 which amends Business and Occupation Taxes by updates and phases out the current tax cap over the next several years and applying a discounted tax rate for those taxes due over $12 million. Approval of the Urban Forest Management Plan 2022‐2032. Execution of an agreement with ECOSS, in the amount of $170 thousand, for the provision of technical assistance, educational outreach, and training for Pollution Prevention Assistance. Approval of a grant agreement, with the Washington State Department of Commerce to accept $1.455 million in grant funds to be used to reimburse construction costs for the Family First Community Center. Adoption of the 2021 Surface Water Utility System Plan. Approval of change order agreement with contractor SCI Infrastructure, LLC, in the amount of $2.852 million, for additional and authorized work related to the installation of utilities for the Downtown Utility Improvement Project. Approval of a grant agreement, with the Renton Housing Authority, committing $1.5 million for their Sunset Gardens affordable housing project; a 76‐unit affordable rental housing unit that redevelops the Renton Housing Authority's current office building into a new four‐story mixed‐use building. Approval of an interagency agreement with the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, to receive up to $9 thousand in grant funds, for reimbursement of overtime costs related to conducting multi‐jurisdictional, high‐visibility enforcement traffic safety emphasis patrols in support of Target Zero priorities of reducing traffic related deaths and serious injuries. Execution of the Regional Mobility Capital Construction Grant Agreement with the Washington State Department of Transportation, to accept $2 million in grant funds, for the Rainier Avenue South Corridor Improvement ‐ Phase 4 project. Approval of an agreement with Northwest Playground Equipment, Inc., in the amount of $291 thousand, for the design, demolition of existing equipment, and the furnishing and installation of new playground equipment at Cascade Park. Execution of a contract agreement, with Main Street Renton dba Renton Downtown Partnership, in the amount of $260 thousand, to support efforts and to apply and obtain the designation of a Washington State Main Street community. Execution of an agreement with the Washington State Department of Commerce, to accept $490 thousand in grant funds, for services related to the Renton Trail Connector project, which extends a path in the heart of Downtown Renton separated from the roadway that connects with regional networks including the Lake to Sound and Cedar River trails to foster a more walkable and bikeable environment. Execution of an interagency agreement with the Washington State Department of Commerce, Growth Management Services, to accept $100 thousand in grant funds to implement an existing Housing Action Plan. Approval of a two‐year Therapeutic Courts grant, issued by the Administrative Office of the Courts, in the amount of $202 thousand, to assist with the costs associated with establishing a Renton Municipal Court Coordinator/Case Manager position to oversee the Community Court program. Approval of a Small Works Contract Agreement Using State Master Contract #03418, with Avidex Industries, LLC, in the amount of $297 thousand, for the provision and installation of Audio/Visual hardware, accessories, and required peripherals and services needed to upgrade the audio, visual, and broadcasting equipment in the council chambers and City Hall. Approval of an agreement with BHC Consultants, in the amount of $702 thousand, for design and related services for the development of plans and other documents for the Windsor Hills Utility Improvement project. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-6Budget by Department - Legislative Approval to accept a grant from the Washington State Department of Commerce, $250 thousand in grant funds, to be used for the development of the Rainier/Grady Junction TOD Subarea Plan and Rainier/Grady Junction Planned Action Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Approval of the targeted allocation of remaining ARPA (American Rescue Plan Act) related funds derived from pandemic revenue loss for expenditures in the amount of $11.65 million to be used for 1) Economic Recovery ‐ support for private sector businesses, 2) Community Response ‐ support for residents, focusing on disadvantaged and disproportionately impacted populations, 3) Health Precautions – COVID‐19 responses to reduce the spread of the virus, and 4) city Operations ‐ enhancement of services to increase efficiencies, sustain infrastructure, and provide improvement of city operations. Approval of the Fuel Tax Grant Agreement with the Washington State Transportation Improvement Board (TIB) to accept $5 million in grant funds for the construction of the Rainier Avenue South Corridor Improvements Project ‐ Phase 4. Approval of the Water Quality Grant Agreement with the Department of Ecology to receive $4.797 million for the Monroe Ave NE Storm System Improvement project. The 2022 Title IV Docket #17. Approval of the Water Quality Grant Agreement with the Department of Ecology to accept $202 thousand in grant funds for the Stormwater Management Action Planning project. Approval of an agreement with Carollo Engineers, Inc., in the amount of $443 thousand, for engineering services for the 2022 Sanitary Sewer Replacement project. Execution of an agreement with PND Engineers, Inc. in the amount of $138 thousand, for professional services associated with final design and permitting tasks and upcoming bidding, and construction administration phases for the Gene Coulon Memorial Beach Park North Water Walk Improvements project. Execution of grant agreements with the Port of Seattle to accept up to $130 thousand in grant funds for tourism development and small business assistance. The city's total match for the grants is $70 thousand. Approval of a professional services agreement with MIG, Inc., in the amount of $1.244 million, for preliminary and final design services for the Renton Connector Project. Approval of agreement amendment with Otak, Inc. in the amount of $1.145 million for design services for the Monroe Avenue NE Storm Improvement project. Approval of Local Agency Agreement with Washington State Department of Transportation to accept the amount of $9.293 million in grant funds for the construction phase of the Rainier Avenue South Corridor Improvements ‐ Phase 4 Project. Approval of supplement agreement with the Washington State Department of Transportation in the amount of $2.514 million for the construction phase of the Bronson Way Bridge ‐ Seismic Retrofit and Painting Project. Approval of a resolution to enter into a mitigation credit purchase agreement with the Renton School District, for the sale of 0.196 Springbrook Creek Wetland Mitigation Bank credits, in the amount of $230 thousand, to the district in compensation for anticipated 0.28 acres of permanent wetland impacts for the RSD Elementary School #16 project. Approval of a grant agreement with the Washington State Department of Commerce to accept $1.339 million in grant funds for the Coulon Park North Water Walk Repairs and Enhancements project. Approval to execute a contract with Northwest Playground Equipment, Inc., in the amount of $376 thousand, for the replacement of playground equipment at Philip Arnold Park. Approval of an ordinance amending Renton Municipal Code Chapters 5‐25 for Business and Occupation (B&O) which increases the B&O tax rates to 0.07% for retail sales and 0.121% for all other tax classifications, effective January 1, 2023 Award of the bid for the Philip Arnold Park Improvements Project. Approval of an agreement with Landscape Structures, Inc., in the amount of $248 thousand for the Renton Senior Activity Center Outdoor Improvements project, and to adjust the budget accordingly. Award the bid for the Bronson Way Bridge ‐ Seismic Retrofit and Painting Project. Execution of an agreement with United Way of King County, to accept $8 thousand in grant funds for the 2022 Summer Meals Program. Approval of an agreement with Perteet, Inc., in the amount of $3.442 million, for construction management services for the Rainier Avenue South Corridor Improvements ‐ Phase 4 project. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-7Budget by Department - Legislative Execution of a grant agreement with the Department of Commerce, to accept $316 thousand in grant funding, for the Connecting Housing to Infrastructure Program (CHIP). Approval of a grant agreement with 4Culture, to accept $13 thousand in grant funds that will support opportunities for residents to become engaged in the community through art. Position Listing ‐  Legislative 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Authorized Adopted Authorized Adopted Authorized Adopted Adopted Legislative Services/City Council E09 City Council Members (Elected) 7.007.007.007.007.007.007.00 M19 City Council Liaison 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M17 City Council Liaison 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 Grade Title Total Legislative Services  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-8Budget by Department - Legislative MAYOR Armondo Pavone 44 FTEs CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER Ed VanValey 1 FTE DEPUTY CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE  OFFICER Kristi Rowland 41 FTEs Organizational Development  and Performance Ryan Spencer 1 FTE Employee Training &  Development Organizational Performance Information Technology Director Young Yoon 22 FTEs Client Services Network Systems Services Application Services GIS Services Administrative Support Communications and  Engagement Director Vacant 7 FTEs City Communications Digital Engagement Print & Mail Channel 21 (contracted) City Clerk & Public Records  Officer Jason Seth 6 FTEs Records Management Legislative & Administrative  Support Voter Registration and Elections Hearing Examiner (contracted) Emergency Management Director Deborah Needham 3 FTEs Emergency Preparedness &  Training Community Readiness Interagency Emergency  Coordination & Grants Administrative Support 1 FTE Public Defender Oversight (contracted) Intergovernmental Relations (contracted) Mayor Support 1 FTE Executive Services Department 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-9Budget by Department - Executive Executive Services  Mission  We leverage and build upon the strengths of our team to optimize the work of the city while making it visible and accessible  to all.    The executive services department includes seven divisions with aligned purposes and overlapping services: information  technology; communications and engagement; emergency management; city clerk and public records; organizational  development and performance; mayor’s office operations; and intergovernmental relations.    List of Executive Services Decision Packages:  2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 17,102,432 12,879,173 11,488,000 13,123,407 22,730,413 15,520,224 15,764,650 18.3% 1.6% Position Summary 40.63 39.83 40.63 39.83 41.63 44.00 44.00 10.5% 0.0% 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100003.0002 Emergency Management for the COR 3.00    733,139   ‐   3.00   772,463    ‐    200003.0050 Intergovernmental Relations ‐    166,000   ‐   ‐   166,000    ‐    200003.0051 Mayor's Office Operations 3.00    1,613,518   ‐   3.00   1,678,609     ‐    200003.0052 Citywide Communications 4.00    762,281   1,081,264    4.00   799,652    1,142,392    200003.0053 Court Public Defenders ‐    883,000   ‐   ‐   873,000    ‐    200003.0054 Cable Communication Fund ‐    97,674   57,674    ‐   97,674     57,674    200003.0055 Hearing Examiner ‐    40,000   ‐   ‐   40,000     ‐    200003.0056 City Clerk 6.00    1,578,006   ‐   6.00   1,633,634     ‐    200003.0058 Executive Services Administration 2.00    372,371   ‐   2.00   401,700    ‐    250003.0017 New Position - Communications Specialist II 1.00    176,401   ‐   1.00   172,621    ‐    250003.0018 Citywide communications increase professional svs ‐    36,000   ‐   ‐   36,000     ‐    250003.0019 City Clerk Election Costs & Text Capuring software ‐    149,000   ‐   ‐   139,000    ‐    250003.0020 Mayor's Office Operations ‐    11,454   ‐   ‐   16,454     ‐    250003.0021 Court Public Defenders ‐    22,000   ‐   ‐   90,000     ‐    600003.0017 Organizational Development and Performance 1.00    256,441   ‐   1.00   221,620    ‐    600003.0018 Communication ‐ Print and Mail Services 1.63    479,478   511,138   1.63   488,503    521,375      600003.0019 System Services 4.00    944,896   944,896   4.00   987,497    987,497      600003.0020 Telecommunications 1.00    625,133   625,133   1.00   634,258    634,258      600003.0021 Service Desk Support 4.00    848,400   848,400   4.00   899,128    899,128      600003.0022 Applications and Database Services 7.00    3,045,731   3,409,007    7.00   3,048,495     3,378,521    600003.0023 Enterprise GIS 3.00    568,043   558,023   3.00   595,834    585,345      600003.0024 IT Administration 2.00    366,179   365,999   2.00   395,874    395,687      600003.0025 IT Capital ‐    1,357,000   1,507,000    ‐   1,357,000     1,507,000    650003.0006 Executive Services Administration Increases ‐    125,000   ‐   ‐   ‐     ‐    650003.0007 Increase Print & Mail Assistant to 1.0 0.38    31,660   ‐   0.38   32,872     ‐    650003.0008 503 ISF Charges for New FTEs ‐    ‐   51,150    ‐   ‐     21,730    650006.0003 New Case Management System ‐    68,000   ‐   ‐   3,000   ‐    650004.0034 ERP Transition 1.00    163,418   163,418   1.00   183,761    183,761      Total 44.00   15,520,224$      10,123,102$       44.00     15,764,650$       10,314,368$           2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-10Budget by Department - Executive Executive Performance Measures:  Highlight of Budget Changes:  Increase the information technology budget by $163 thousand in 2023 to support the finance ERP Transition project with one limited term employee for project management and information technology support. Increase the communications & engagement budget by $212 thousand with one full time employee and additional funds for contracted services to expand the capacity of the division. Increase the city clerk budget by $149 thousand to accommodate the King County election costs and software applications necessary for public records administration. Add one‐time funding of $125 thousand for executive services administration for support in data report writing services and contracted services to support the reduction of work backlog created by long‐term vacancies and pandemic‐related disruptions and program improvements throughout the department. Transfer of $30 thousand in discretionary city‐wide training dollars to organizational development from the human resources budget to support the training and development efforts now led by the organizational development manager. City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 Results 2021 Results Safety and Health Encouragement of a self  reliant community through  programs and education. Number of Emergency Management  Accreditation Program (EMAP)  standards that are met completely or  partially met and currently in progress,  as a measure of emergency  management excellence and indication  of preparedness. new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 25%55%86% Residents rating the quality and  accessibility of City services as "good"  or better. no data next survey  2017 no data next survey  2019 survey  canceled survey  canceled next survey  2023 Percent of survey responses that rate  the City's job of keeping residents  informed as "good" or better. 65%next survey  2017 67%next survey  2019 survey  canceled survey  canceled next survey  2023 Opportunities for the public  to engage and influence City  government. Number of Legislative documents  (agenda, minutes, ordinances,  resolutions, etc) published &  available. 148 121 140 173 204 155 114 Number of Public Records Requests  (City general requests/non‐police)332 616 678 608 691 628 648 Number of internal documents  (contracts including lease agreements,  MOU's, etc.) that are executed and  recorded. 722 725 714 874 693 740 655 Training hours/learning opportunities  provided per FTE will increase.new 2019 new 2019 299 1,203 hours 4,381 hours 4,404 hours 2,382 hours Internally provided training and  development opportunities are rated  as "good" or better by attendees. new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 90%97%97% Functional work environment. Percent of system availability (network  "uptime") as provided by System  Services. 99%97%99%99%99%98%99% Highly qualified, healthy,  well trained, and productive  workforce. Representative  Government Internal Support Policy and fiscal  accountability. Policy and program decisions  reflecting community values. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-11Budget by Department - Executive Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Executive 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Mayor's Office 1,976,455 2,575,833 2,123,284 2,623,310 2,635,180 2,695,972 2,824,063 2.8% 4.8% Executive Services Admin 91,997 97,454 105,706 100,102 94,897 271,423 156,897 171.1%‐42.2% City Clerk 1,179,642 1,473,840 1,297,333 1,517,120 1,785,084 1,767,006 1,812,634 16.5% 2.6% Information Technology 6,256,443 6,427,451 5,874,656 6,566,316 14,413,705 8,088,332 8,214,969 23.2% 1.6% Organizational Development 207,995 272,480 156,684 228,960 366,433 256,441 221,620 12.0%‐13.6% Communications 1,423,556 1,250,500 1,396,257 1,282,396 2,463,301 1,707,911 1,762,003 33.2% 3.2% Emergency Management 5,966,342 781,615 534,079 805,202 971,813 733,139 772,463 ‐8.9% 5.4% Total 17,102,432 12,879,173 11,488,000 13,123,407 22,730,413 15,520,224 15,764,650 18.3% 1.6% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Executive 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 6,430,209 4,377,650 3,867,933 4,527,084 4,851,935 5,276,978 5,581,669 16.6% 5.8% Part‐Time Salaries 0 54,716 4,272 61,716 61,716 95,216 61,716 54.3%‐35.2% Overtime 85,670 53,535 51,645 53,535 53,535 52,135 52,135 ‐2.6% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 1,553,471 1,948,188 1,514,755 2,065,180 2,169,888 2,119,325 2,250,187 2.6% 6.2% Supplies 924,492 619,358 574,867 618,247 3,130,608 565,898 564,787 ‐8.5%‐0.2% Other Services and Charges 7,034,474 4,427,907 4,508,499 4,377,169 6,378,045 5,190,589 5,064,983 18.6%‐2.4% Capital Outlay 436,562 374,000 237,995 365,000 4,971,797 1,080,000 1,015,000 195.9%‐6.0% Interfund Payments 595,131 1,023,818 682,034 1,055,475 1,072,325 1,121,309 1,171,728 6.2% 4.5% Transfer Out 42,423 0 46,000 0 40,563 18,775 2,445 100.0%‐87.0% Total 17,102,432 12,879,173 11,488,000 13,123,407 22,730,413 15,520,224 15,764,650 18.3% 1.6% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Executive 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Mayor's Office 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.0% 0.0% Executive Services Admin 1.00 0.30 0.60 0.30 0.60 0.74 0.74 146.7% 0.0% City Clerk 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 0.0% 0.0% Information Technology 20.00 20.00 21.00 20.00 22.00 22.53 22.53 12.7% 0.0% Organizational Development 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% 0.0% Communications 6.63 5.83 6.03 5.83 6.03 7.73 7.73 32.6% 0.0% Emergency Management 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 40.63 39.13 40.63 39.13 41.63 44.00 44.00 12.4% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.00 1.44 0.12 1.61 1.61 3.84 1.61 139.2%‐58.2% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$     59,813$         4,870$      66,813$      66,813$      159,813$      66,813$      139.2%‐58.2% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-12Budget by Department - Executive Mayor’s Office  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Supported the mayor and council, with input from departments, in continuous refinement of the city’s business plan. Addressed resident concerns in an accurate, sensitive, and timely manner. Ensured achievement of the city’s goals and objectives by appropriately placing authority, assigning accountability, and monitoring performance. Provided strategic leadership and oversight for the city’s annual budget, comprehensive plan, and business and operational plans. Assessed the character of city services and programs and prepared recommendations to city council to guide decisions on level of effort and resource allocation. Strengthened relationships with senior elected and appointed leadership of King County and suburban cities. 2023/2024 Goals  Support the mayor and council, and coordinate input of department administrators in continuous refinement of the city’s business plan. Ensure achievement of the city’s goals and objectives by appropriately placing authority, assigning accountability, and monitoring performance. Provide strategic leadership and oversight for the city’s annual budget, comprehensive plan, and business and operational plans through 2024. Assess the character of city services and programs and prepare recommendations to city council to guide decisions on level of effort and resource allocation. Ensure that resident concerns are addressed accurately, sensitively, and in a timely manner. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-13Budget by Department - Executive Intergovernmental Relations  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Successfully advocated for Renton’s regional, state, and federal priorities, ensuring partnerships and new funding across all levels of government. Coordinated productive and collaborative relationships with regional groups such as Sound Cities Association (SCA); Puget Sound Regional Council; Sound Transit; King County and King County Council; King County Regional Homelessness Authority; King County Flood Control Zone District; Subarea Transportation Boards (ETP, SCATBd); and many others. Worked with statewide associations such as Association of Washington Cities (AWC) and state representatives and senators. Maintained regular communications with the offices of U.S. Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell and Congressman Adam Smith and others within the Washington Congressional Delegation. Key accomplishments include: Renton Specific – Regional  o $1.5 million in King County housing funds toward the Sunset Gardens project. o $481 thousand for Coulon Park picnic floats and ADA access. o $100 thousand for Henry Moses Aquatics Center expansion feasibility analysis. o $55 thousand Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services Levy funds for Renton rental assistance, secured through King County Councilmember Dave Upthegrove’s office. o $25 thousand in federal CARES Act funding, secured from King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn’s office, to be split between Sustainable Renton ($12.5 thousand) and Communities In Schools of Renton‐Tukwila ($12.5 thousand). o Successful progress with Sound Transit ensuring that interim parking at the Sound Ford site (321 spaces) and a Term Sheet for a park‐and‐ride facility at 405/44th can move forward despite a 10‐to‐12‐year delay in parking facilities for most areas within the Sound Transit taxing district. Renton‐Specific – State  o $250 million for funding of the Interstate 405/North 8th Direct Access Ramp, as well as fill‐the‐gap sustainable funding and tax deferral status for the 405 corridor overall. (2022) o $6 million for an extension of the Eastrail, a 42‐mile‐long bicycle‐and‐pedestrian trail connecting South, East, and North King County to the south end of Snohomish County, into South Coulon Park/Southport area of Renton. (2022) o Insertion of a 1/10th of 1 cent “councilmanic” new sales tax authority for local roadway needs in the 2022 “Move Ahead Washington” package. (2022) o $19 million in additional “state‐shared revenues” in the 2022 Supplemental Operating Budget, in addition to a new $20 million allocation in the 2021‐23 Operating Budget to help cities cover the cost of implementing new criminal justice legislation ($425 thousand estimated for Renton). (2022, 2021) o $1.339 million in 2021‐23 capital funding for the extension of the North Coulon Park walkway. (2021) o $3.029 million for the Family First Community Center from the “Building Communities Fund” in the 2021‐23 capital budget through a partnership with City of Renton and HealthPoint. (2021) o Adoption of a 1/10th of 1 cent sales tax authority (“1590” authority), ensuring a permanent stream of $3‐4 million per year for Renton to devote to affordable housing and mental health service needs in the local community. (2021) o $500 thousand toward the 168th Street SE connected walkway and bikeway project in the Cascade/Benson Hill Neighborhood, with funding in the 2021‐23 Capital Budget. (2021) o $250 thousand for a May Creek Trail extension and boardwalk to connect pedestrians and bicyclists from the future 405/44th park‐and‐ride area to a “Seahawk Station” Bus Rapid Transit hub due to open in 2026. (2022) o Helped lead a successful lobbying effort for three additional class slots at the Basic Law Enforcement Academy (BLE) in the 2021‐23 operating budget, followed by an additional 8.5 classroom slots in the 2022 budget; in addition to $823 thousand toward the establishment of an online training app. (2021, 2022) o Successfully applied for two “Connecting Housing to Infrastructure Program” (CHIP) grants through funding in the 2021‐23 and 2022 Capital budgets. Renton has already secured over $2 million toward the Sunset Gardens and Watershed affordable housing developments. (2021, 2022) o Secured $2.5 million in Housing Trust Fund grant money for the Sunset Gardens project in partnership with Renton Housing Authority. (2021‐22) 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-14Budget by Department - Executive o Passage of two important police‐reform clarification bills—ESHB 2037 and SHB 1735—that restore law enforcement authority to apprehend offenders leaving a crime scene, and to apprehend those amid a mental health crisis. (2022) o Supported and assisted with several 2021‐23 and 2022 operating and capital budget allocations for rental assistance, the Governor’s Office of Equity, monies for 988 crisis‐response hotline, and more as part of Renton’s Racial Justice & Equity priority platform. (2021, 2022) o Enactment of new Tax Increment Financing (TIF) authority for cities in the 2021 Session, along with extended and expanded authority around the multi‐family tax exemption program. (2021) o Passage of a manageable, compromise version of ESHB 1220 regarding cities’ responsibilities to accommodate permanent supportive housing and shelters for low‐ and very‐low‐income people. (2021) o Headed off “missing middle housing” and Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) bills in the 2022 Session that included heavy‐handed mandates for placement of missing middle housing types on a single‐family lot and elimination of tools such as owner‐occupancy requirements that Renton builds into its ADU ordinance. (2022) Renton‐Specific – Federal  o March 2021 passage of the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), providing direct federal funding distributions to cities and counties for the first time in decades, with Renton receiving $18.1 million in ARPA funds. o $2.5 million in “Congressionally Directed Spending” through U.S. Senator Patty Murray toward the Sunset Gardens affordable housing project. o $1.5 million (pending) for the Renton Pavilion upgrade and renovation into a “Logan Place Market,” working with Senator Murray’s “Congressionally Directed Spending” and Congressman Adam Smith’s “Community Project Funding.” 2023/2024 Goals  •Develop, adopt, and advocate funding and policy priorities for the City of Renton at the federal, state, and regional levels. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Mayor's Office 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 364,050 475,616 461,178 494,104 550,117 536,268 557,632 8.5% 4.0% Personnel Benefits 115,494 176,277 133,324 186,776 196,621 162,270 170,398 ‐13.1% 5.0% Supplies 766 1,850 193 1,850 1,600 500 500 ‐73.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 1,247,395 1,365,846 1,163,598 1,365,846 1,277,596 1,302,150 1,365,150 ‐4.7% 4.8% Interfund Payments 248,751 556,244 364,992 574,734 608,683 694,785 730,383 20.9% 5.1% Total 1,976,455 2,575,833 2,123,284 2,623,310 2,635,180 2,695,972 2,824,063 2.8% 4.8% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Mayor's Office 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 3.003.003.003.003.003.003.000.0%0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.00 0.38 0.12 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$     16,000$         4,870$      16,000$      16,000$      16,000$      16,000$      0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-15Budget by Department - Executive Executive Services Administration  The deputy chief administrative officer serves as the administrator of the executive services department, providing strategic  direction and coordination of efforts across five divisions, and aligned with the city’s business plan and goals, with the support  of an administrative assistant. In addition to strategic direction, operational oversight, and administrative support, executive  services administration supports the mayor’s office and council operations and coordinates city‐wide efforts and projects.  The department was expanded in August of 2021 by reorganization, moving information technology from the former  administrative services department (now finance), the neighborhood program from the former community services  department (now parks & recreation). Adding to the city clerk’s office, emergency management division, and the  organizational development program to form the current executive services department. In July of 2022, the neighborhood  program was moved to the equity, housing, and human services department by reorganization.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Coordinated reopening efforts during the pandemic in partnership with the mayor’s office, the municipal court, chief administrative officer, department administrators and directors, emergency management, and an ad‐hoc team including facilities, human resources, and information technology. This included developing guidance, tools, and resources for employees for the stages of reopening, coordinating staffing in the city hall lobby, and communicating information through Renton 101’s, SharePoint and website information, and signage. During the vacancy of the organizational development manager, maintained the coordination and facilitation of Renton 101’s and other training opportunities for employees. Supported the development, proposal, and execution of the reorganization that modified the executive services department and subsequent transitional outcomes and leadership that resulted. Contracted with a provider for oversight of the public defense contract. Developed a customer service reception area in the Renton City Hall lobby to both welcome customers and gather data from visitors to Renton City Hall, people who call the main phone line, and other avenues of requests to inform the needs of the planned remodel of the 1st floor for safety, health, and improved customer service. 2023/2024 Goals  Seek and secure funding opportunities in support of our efforts. Continued integration of the work of executive services divisions around organizational and operational excellence including data reporting, dashboards, and communication of the city’s work both internally and externally. Continued refinement of hybrid workplace practices to optimize team performance and continue piloting innovative tools and technologies as a model for other departments. Continued investment in the development of staff to ensure that we offer the highest level of expertise and customer service to the city. Develop a unified, intuitive, and transparent customer service portal for work order requests from city departments to executive services department divisions. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-16Budget by Department - Executive Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Executive Services Admin 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 68,902 71,145 78,930 72,565 68,766 93,552 101,524 28.9% 8.5% Part‐Time Salaries 0000040,5000100.0%‐100.0% Personnel Benefits 23,095 26,309 26,776 27,537 26,131 42,748 35,750 55.2%‐16.4% Other Services and Charges 0000094,62319,623100.0%‐79.3% Total 91,997 97,454 105,706 100,102 94,897 271,423 156,897 171.1%‐42.2% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Executive Services Admin 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 1.001.000.601.000.600.740.74‐26.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.20 0.00 100.0%‐100.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$     ‐$       ‐$       ‐$       ‐$       50,000$         ‐$       100.0%‐100.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-17Budget by Department - Executive Information Technology  Mission   Information technology (IT) division, in support of the city’s priorities, provides comprehensive IT solutions and services to all  departments, enabling optimal city operations and services. IT’s core services include supporting customers through technology innovations and maintenance in support of network  infrastructure, cybersecurity, business applications systems, geographic information systems, equipment such as computers,  copier/printers, scanners, mobile devices, etc., and business and operations administration.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Developed a capital improvement plan that will secure funding for aging IT investments. Implemented a body camera and in‐car video system for police. Implemented a background investigation system for police. Upgraded to Microsoft 365 Applications including Teams for the city. Implemented a system to track NPDES (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) permit activities for public works surface water. Implemented a system to track Fats, Oil, and Grease inspection activities for public works wastewater. Implemented an airport management system for the Renton Municipal Airport. Implemented an online application for Veterans Memorial Park. Implemented an online grants application system for neighborhood grants. Implemented a risk management information system. Streamlined and automated the warrant process through the document management system for courts and police. Configured the permitting system to accept online rental registrations. Reconfigured the Land Use Action system configuration for current planning. Reconfigured the Code Compliance system configuration. Reconfigured the permitting system to accept online utility and right‐of‐way permits. Upgraded the structured query language server database environment. Improved and expanded public Wi‐Fi at our community centers. Upgraded core network components, including security improvements. Completed disaster recovery assessment and recommendation. Deployed new city geographic information system platform. Deployed new version of the City of Renton Maps application. Developed numerous CAD (Computer Aided Dispatch) and crime dashboards to support internal reporting and analysis. Implemented technology solutions to improve hybrid work. 2023/2024 Goals  Complete the IT Strategic plan and begin implementing recommendations. Establish a framework for data‐driven dashboards. Replace the phone system. Continue to expand and implement cybersecurity improvements. Migrate SharePoint to Microsoft 365. Develop achievable service level agreements using disaster recovery assessment and business impact analysis. Implement disaster recovery infrastructure. Begin the process for ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) replacement. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-18Budget by Department - Executive Replace the Content Management System in partnership with the communications division to update the city’s website. Expand public Wi‐Fi to the downtown core area. Improve audio/visual systems at community centers. Develop and deploy a central geographic information system hub for applications, data, services, and statistics. Improve integration of external (cloud‐based) data sources with the geographic information system and other city enterprise platforms. Redesign transportation geodatabase to better support multi‐modal transportation modeling, equity‐based analysis, and field asset capture. Significantly expand the use of dedicated geographic information system web applications and dashboards to provide better information to both city staff and the public. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Information Technology 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 2,018,917 2,224,846 1,986,946 2,305,089 2,476,367 2,684,924 2,846,668 16.5% 6.0% Part‐Time Salaries 0 38,716 0 45,716 45,716 38,716 45,716 ‐15.3% 18.1% Overtime 65,802 30,000 38,714 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 787,147 993,063 794,242 1,053,685 1,096,168 1,102,962 1,178,563 4.7% 6.9% Supplies 525,907 540,755 537,837 540,755 2,685,580 488,395 488,395 ‐9.7% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 2,420,304 2,266,071 2,273,316 2,266,071 3,148,077 2,696,799 2,643,931 19.0%‐2.0% Capital Outlay 436,562 334,000 237,601 325,000 4,931,797 1,040,000 975,000 220.0%‐6.3% Interfund Payments 1,80400006,5376,696100.0%2.4% Total 6,256,443 6,427,451 5,874,656 6,566,316 14,413,705 8,088,332 8,214,969 23.2% 1.6% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Information Technology 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 20.00 20.00 21.00 20.00 22.00 22.53 22.53 12.7% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.00 1.05 0.00 1.22 1.22 1.05 1.22 ‐13.8% 16.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$     43,813$         ‐$       50,813$      50,813$      43,813$      50,813$      ‐13.8% 16.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-19Budget by Department - Executive City Clerk  Mission  The office of the city clerk is dedicated to supporting governance and the legislative process, maintaining and preserving the  city’s official records, assisting and informing the public, coordinating elections, and carrying out the official duties and  sovereign authority of the city clerk with integrity, as required by law and policy, and to meet the needs of the citizens, the  elected officials, and city administrative staff.  The primary roles of the city clerk’s office include legislative support, compliance with the Public Records Act, records  management, official functions and administration, elections and voter registration, public information services, and  enterprise content management.   2021/2022 Accomplishments  Using PEG (Public, Educational, and Governmental) Funds, and in partnership with IT, communications, and facilities, upgraded the council chambers’ audio, visual, and broadcasting equipment to improve the reliability and quality of hybrid public meetings that are broadcast to Channel 21 for public access, both in response to the pandemic restrictions and to increase public participation. Using ARPA related funds derived from pandemic revenue loss, purchased equipment to digitize long‐term microfiche files that currently require staff to be physically onsite to view; doing so will remove this barrier to access the files from offsite locations, eliminating work interruptions and delays. Supported departments by creating paperless processes and electronic forms that eliminate the requirement for employees to be physically onsite to process paperwork, making operations safer and more efficient. Automated digital records‐keeping processes via Laserfiche for several additional key lines of business across the city. Submitted the 2020 and 2021 Joint Legislative Audit & Review Committee reports, used to inform the state of the city’s compliance with the Public Records Act, two months prior to the state annual deadline. Enhanced digital recording procedures for certain document types with the King County Recorder’s Office. Enhanced electronic contract routing procedures for city contracts. Enhanced city clerk policy and procedures including records management and public records processing policies. Trained volunteer board and commission members on the Public Records Act, the Open Public Meetings Act, and records retention requirements. 2023/2024 Goals  Develop and implement a five‐year strategic plan for the city clerk division. Scan all permanent, vital, and historical records into Laserfiche for long‐term maintenance. Fully implement the Records Management System (RMS) functionality of Laserfiche by the end of 2023. Enhance the city clerk division’s Records and Information Management (paper records) program by developing and implementing a 10‐step program that reduces costs and improves the efficiency of record keeping, establishes criteria for digitizing records to reduce storage costs, provides adequate protection for city records, and preserves city records that have historical value. Continually upgrade Laserfiche in the pursuit of improving internal and external access to city records, while at the same time reducing the number of public records requests received annually. Enhance hearing examiner calendaring to simplify the process for staff and residents. Continually update all city clerk policies to remain aligned with city, state, and federal law, as well as city internal practices. In partnership with the finance and legal departments, finalize the city’s purchasing and contracting policy using the Renton Equity Lens. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-20Budget by Department - Executive Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ City Clerk 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 500,198 597,292 523,923 617,013 641,694 670,386 701,270 8.7% 4.6% Personnel Benefits 224,645 313,896 231,040 333,435 337,853 301,411 320,735 ‐9.6% 6.4% Supplies 1,259 6,994 2,508 5,883 5,883 6,994 5,883 18.9%‐15.9% Other Services and Charges 296,876 342,620 366,784 341,882 577,882 568,620 557,882 66.3%‐1.9% Interfund Payments 156,665 213,038 173,079 218,906 221,772 219,594 226,864 0.3% 3.3% Total 1,179,642 1,473,840 1,297,333 1,517,120 1,785,084 1,767,006 1,812,634 16.5% 2.6% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ City Clerk 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 6.006.006.006.006.006.006.000.0%0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-21Budget by Department - Executive Organizational Development and Performance  Mission  To provide leadership, direction, training, and expertise to facilitate systemic, team, and individual improvement throughout  the organization.  Organizational development and performance’s core services focus on employee engagement and development, process  improvement, data analysis and metrics, and project management. In support of the city’s vision, mission, and business plan,  the desired outcome is to create a culture of continuous learning, improvement, and an engaged, collaborative, and highly  skilled workforce across all departments.   2021/2022 Accomplishments  The organizational development manager position was vacant from August 2021 through June 2022. The position was filled  July 1, 2022. Despite the vacancy for nearly a year, the executive services department, in collaboration with other  departments, continued to provide many educational and networking opportunities for employees.  Over 2,300 staff hours of in‐house training and development were provided in 2021 and over 1,600 at mid‐year 2022 in the  following areas:    Leadership o High Performing Organization (HPO) training: ongoing continuing education for 2019 cohorts (over 70 attendees including administrators, directors, and managers) and formation of pilot teams. o Workshops on mentorship, leadership, self‐awareness, and emotional intelligence: regular, facilitated ad hoc learning and peer‐to‐peer mentoring opportunities at all levels of the organization. Specialized coaching skills workshop for police field training officers to address emotional intelligence development of new officers in alignment with Renton values and social expectations. o Renton Results Library provided self‐service resources, available to all staff in support of self‐directed and team learning on a variety of leadership, culture, race, equity, and self‐development topics. o Expanded emphasis in equity, inclusion, and antiracism in 2021 in response to the updated business plan: centralized and accessible location for online resources and learning opportunities, guided learning, and self‐directed learning opportunities available to all staff, and regional engagement in conversations about race and equity. o Mental health: provided resources and workshops to aid in coping with the stress of multiple crises and to identify and support those requiring intervention. Facilitation and Engagement Practices o Liberating structures in support of creative and inclusive problem solving. o International Association for Public Participation public engagement basics. o Virtual facilitation training to support new methods of engagement and collaboration. o Formed a cross‐departmental team to improve community engagement efforts citywide. o Formed a cross‐departmental team to implement an online platform designed to assess perceptions of city services, community priorities, concerns, and impact of our engagement practices. Process Improvement o Project management basics in support of effectively leading or participating in project work. o Lean belting program to expand our capacity for process improvement efforts in all departments. o Cross‐departmental group now available to work together as a team capable of tackling systemic processes and problems of varying size and complexity. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-22Budget by Department - Executive Organizational Awareness o Centralized information and resources made easily accessible on the Renton Results SharePoint site for all employees. o Internal training (Renton 101) designed to increase staff competency in use of our internal processes, tools, and systems: one to three trainings offered per week; these sessions are available to all employees and are made possible by coordinating with subject matter experts (primarily our internal support teams) to provide the content; sessions are often recorded and available for self‐directed learning. This model proved to be a critical support during our rapid shift to teleworking and innovation necessitated by the COVID‐19 pandemic. o Internal Communications (Renton 101): Renton 101 venue was used to share critical information to all employees during the COVID‐19 pandemic. o Ad hoc group facilitation: multiple teams and groups meet regularly (monthly, weekly, quarterly) for discussion, information exchange, and relationship building across departments and levels of the organization. o Employee orientation: an all‐department effort that introduces new employees to our history, values, expectations, and aspirations while demonstrating our commitment to supporting their success as an employee and making a connection between their work and our business plan. 2023/2024 Goals  Expand upon innovations that improve accessibility and inclusivity of our city services, many developed during the pandemic, in support of each goal of our business plan. Lead and support collaborations that will result in improvements, innovations, and efficiencies to build resilience during challenging economic times. Partner with IT division to augment the training on tools and communications provided while continued adaptation of a more remote workforce occurs; increasing virtual management skills that will support this model for those employees where it will continue as a possibility and beneficial to balance/quality of life while reducing traffic congestion and physical office space requirements. Expand leadership development deeper into the organization, building upon the HPO model for collaborative leadership, inclusive engagement, data literacy, and process improvement. Increase visibility of an equity lens in our process improvement, project management, and engagement efforts. Improve the effectiveness of our cross‐departmental teams through mastery of data literacy, storytelling, inclusive and creative facilitation, and engagement efforts that invite dialogue and will result in transformative change. Lead and support results‐based accountability philosophy and practices to enhance the city’s ability to measure, evaluate, and modify processes and programs to improve service delivery. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Organizational Development 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 128,962 132,024 82,507 135,130 140,535 133,037 145,374 ‐1.5% 9.3% Personnel Benefits 51,553 58,806 34,038 62,180 63,148 30,277 33,120 ‐51.3% 9.4% Supplies 880 5,250 0 5,250 10,500 5,500 5,500 4.8% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 26,600 76,400 40,140 26,400 152,250 87,627 37,627 231.9%‐57.1% Total 207,995 272,480 156,684 228,960 366,433 256,441 221,620 12.0%‐13.6% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Organizational Development 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.000.0%0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-23Budget by Department - Executive Communications & Engagement Division  Mission  The communications and engagement division supports the City of Renton’s Business Plan and strategic goals through  collaboration and coordination of communication efforts with all departments to inform and engage with the community.   The communications division’s core services are designed to provide Renton residents, customers, businesses, and visitors  with relevant information in a timely manner that creates opportunities for participation and encourages engagement as a  member of a thriving community.  2021/2022 Accomplishments   Assessed city‐wide communication platforms, tools, and practices to inform a strategic plan for the division that will involve policy and procedure development, increased customer service capacity of the division, and enhanced opportunities for engagement with the city. Assessed city‐wide engagement strategies to inform the division’s strategic plan as well as provide a toolkit of standardized best practices for communication and engagement for all departments. Launched a pilot digital engagement platform to expand opportunities for two‐way dialogue to determine if it is an enhancement to our communications and engagement efforts and can be expanded more broadly. Worked on projects or campaigns citywide, varying from simple to extensive. These projects included press releases, copywriting, photography, videography, social media graphics for multiple platforms, website graphics, newsletters, posters, banners, flyers, rack cards, promotional items, and more. Gathered access to city‐wide social media accounts for records retention purposes. Filled a long‐vacant digital communications position. Initiated a cross‐departmental social media content group to improve awareness of tools available through communications, for general coordination of messaging, and problem‐solving. In partnership with organizational development, rebooted a cross‐departmental community engagement and outreach workgroup to share information on events and find opportunities to collaborate and coordinate efforts. Provided successful communications support for city celebrations and events. Initiated an internal communication strategy in partnership with other executive services divisions and other participating departments that coordinate the use of visual display monitors, internal website messaging, and an internal newsletter. Worked with departments hosting events such as ribbon cuttings, dedications, groundbreakings, and other events. Modernized and coordinated social media practices that benefit all departments, including providing metrics for analysis. 2023/2024 Goals   Finalize a five‐year strategic plan that will modernize the city’s communication and engagement with the public to align with the mission of the division, department, and city. Develop policies and procedures that support and standardize practices for communication and engagement for the city. In partnership with organizational development, provide training to city staff on communication and engagement standards, policies, and best practices. In partnership with IT, upgrade and redesign the city’s website with full stakeholder participation. In partnership with IT and organizational development, display and share data and metrics that are available within the city’s information systems that speak to the goals of the business plan. Expand the digital engagement platform if pilot is successful. Utilize data analytics to regularly inform effective communications. Enhance media relations to achieve regional and local coverage on key issues. Enhance Channel 21 productions with more robust programming. Continue to prepare and train for possible large‐scale emergencies in partnership with emergency management. Support staff development to ensure strategies will remain fresh and modern. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-24Budget by Department - Executive Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Communications 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 569,752 546,601 458,400 563,754 621,450 810,776 857,364 43.8% 5.7% Part‐Time Salaries 0 16,000 4,272 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 0.0% 0.0% Overtime 002410000N/AN/A Personnel Benefits 233,074 248,281 198,684 262,990 308,961 357,646 381,365 36.0% 6.6% Supplies 28,372 61,734 34,229 61,734 424,269 61,734 61,734 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 546,687 335,884 658,037 335,884 1,010,586 398,284 398,284 18.6% 0.0% Capital Outlay 0 40,000 394 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 3,941 2,000 2,000 2,034 2,034 4,696 4,811 130.9% 2.4% Transfer Out 41,729 0 40,000 0 40,000 18,775 2,445 100.0%‐87.0% Total 1,423,556 1,250,500 1,396,257 1,282,396 2,463,301 1,707,911 1,762,003 33.2% 3.2% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Communications 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 6.635.836.035.836.037.737.7332.6%0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.20 0.00 100.0%‐100.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$     ‐$       ‐$       ‐$       ‐$       50,000$         ‐$       100.0%‐100.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-25Budget by Department - Executive Emergency Management   Mission  Emergency management fosters a culture of preparedness and community self‐sufficiency by working inclusively with our  diverse community to coordinate effective disaster response while preparing our whole community to be uniquely resilient  through adversity and recovery.  The core functions of the emergency management division are emergency preparedness planning, training, and exercising  for employees, volunteers, and the community; coordination of city employees, volunteers, and community partners for  emergency response; interdepartmental and interagency coordination before, during, and after emergencies; and federal,  state, and county grant administration in collaboration with all departments.  2021‐2022 Accomplishments  Maintained 24/7 Emergency Operations Center (EOC) duty officer response capability, with EOC activation as needed. Responded to and supported incident activities at 12 significant weather emergencies, an ongoing pandemic, and one transportation emergency that impacted the city. Performed COVID‐19 response and recovery coordination duties, including advocacy for Renton testing and vaccination opportunities, and procurement and distribution of COVID‐19 tests for essential employees. Established a new format for the revision of the comprehensive emergency management plan, with partial revisions completed for one‐third of the emergency support functions and annexes (to be completed in 2023‐24). Initiated continuity of operations plan review and partial revision (ongoing in 2023‐24). Secured support from the Washington State Auditor’s Office to conduct a Lean process improvement on communication flow related to city damage assessment and continuity of operations in an emergency. Completed a revision of the inclusive emergency communication plan to better communicate with our diverse community. Coordinated the Cedar Falls Dam Failure Evacuation Planning team to generate tactical plans for an emergency evacuation of the Maple Valley Highway corridor and downtown Renton. Contributed to regional planning related to community points of distribution for distribution of vital supplies during an emergency to segments of the community cutoff in a disaster. Reviewed the hazard mitigation plan projects and updated information on strategies to prevent damages. Provided policy group training materials in preparation for the integrated emergency management course. Expanded and revised EOC standard operating procedures to provide clear guidance to department staff working in the EOC. Conducted EOC training and began development of a video training library for EOC position‐specific training. Integrated information sharing in the EOC with the WebEOC platform, and trained employees in its use. Coordinated city participation in the Cascadia Rising Exercise. Designed and conducted a functional amateur radio exercise component in conjunction with Cascadia Rising. Designed and coordinated participation in the integrated emergency management course training and exercise, recruiting 60 participants that included elected officials, city staff, and community partners. Conducted outreach to relaunch the Active in Disaster organizations within in the City of Renton community. Recruited community members for community emergency response team training. Conducted an annual public preparedness campaign, Ready in Renton. Provided emergency preparedness training to employees. Funded disaster recovery assessment and planning consultant services for information technology. Coordinated procurement and installation of amateur radio capabilities at fire station 15. Funded a transportation solution to restore emergency vehicle access to the closed Lind Avenue bridge. Managed the ongoing public assistance grant worth approximately $8 million in federal and state funds to repair damages from the 2020 flood. Actively contributed to regional emergency management efforts. Maintained national incident management system compliance, retaining grant eligibility. Met all requirements for and maintained professional certifications and memberships for staff. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-26Budget by Department - Executive 2023/2024 Goals   Relaunch and expand the Renton Emergency Preparedness Academy to include virtual options. Renew the city’s StormReady designation by meeting all requirements for that distinction. Complete revision and formal adoption of the comprehensive emergency management plan, including the recovery framework. Complete revision and formal adoption of the continuity of operations plan. Conduct an annual review of the hazard mitigation plan. Conduct an EOC functional exercise. Migrate EOC training to online platform delivery to increase accessibility and participation (continued from 2022). Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Emergency Management 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 2,779,427 330,126 276,049 339,429 353,006 348,035 371,837 2.5% 6.8% Overtime 19,869 23,535 12,690 23,535 23,535 22,135 22,135 ‐5.9% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 118,462 131,557 96,652 138,576 141,007 122,011 130,256 ‐12.0% 6.8% Supplies 367,307 2,775 100 2,775 2,775 2,775 2,775 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 2,496,612 41,086 6,625 41,086 211,654 42,486 42,486 3.4% 0.0% Interfund Payments 183,971 252,536 141,963 259,801 239,836 195,697 202,974 ‐24.7% 3.7% Total 5,966,342 781,615 534,079 805,202 971,813 733,139 772,463 ‐8.9% 5.4% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Emergency Management 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 3.003.003.003.003.003.003.000.0%0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-27Budget by Department - Executive Executive Department Position Listing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Authorized Orig Budget Authorized Orig Budget Authorized Adopted Adopted Mayor’s Office E10 Mayor (Elected)1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M53 Chief Administrative Officer 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M19 Executive Assistant 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Executive Services ‐ Admin M49 Deputy Chief Administrative Officer 0.000.000.300.000.300.340.34 N16 Executive Assistant 0.000.000.300.000.300.400.40 N09 Admin Secretary 1 1.001.000.001.000.000.000.00 1.00 1.00 0.60 1.00 0.60 0.74 0.74 City Clerk M38 City Clerk/Public Records Officer 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M27 Enterprise Content Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M24 Deputy City Clerk/Public Records Officer 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A17 Public Records Specialist 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A15 City Clerk Specialist 2 2.002.002.002.002.002.002.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Communications M49 Deputy Chief Administrative Officer 0.000.000.200.000.200.330.33 M45 Deputy Public Affairs Administrator 1.001.000.001.000.000.000.00 M38 Communications & Engagement Director 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M26 Communications Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to ESD 0.000.000.200.000.200.400.40 A21 Communications Specialist II 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 A17 Digital Communications Specialist 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A13 Print & Mail Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A12 Communications Specialist I 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A03 Print & Mail Assistant 0.630.630.630.630.631.001.00 M27 Censuse Program Manager 1.000.000.000.000.000.000.00 6.63 5.63 6.03 5.63 6.03 7.73 7.73 Emergency Management M38 Emergency Management Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A21 Emergency Management Coordinator 2.002.002.002.002.002.002.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Information Technology Division M49 Deputy Chief Administrative Officer 0.000.000.500.000.500.330.33 M41 Information Technology Director 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M38 Information Technology Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M37 Application Support Manager 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 M34 Network Systems Manager 0.000.001.000.001.001.001.00 M30 Application Support Manager 1.001.001.001.000.000.000.00 M30 GIS Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to ESD 0.000.000.500.000.500.200.20 A32 Network Systems Manager 1.001.000.001.000.000.000.00 A30 Client Technology Services and Support Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A29 Senior Systems Analyst 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A28 Senior Network Systems Specialist 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A27 Senior Business Systems Analyst 3.003.003.003.003.004.004.00 A26 GIS Analyst 3 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 A26 Systems Analyst 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A24 Network Systems Specialist 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A23 GIS Analyst 2 2.002.002.002.001.001.001.00 A19 Client Technology Services Specialist 2 0.000.000.000.002.002.002.00 A17 Senior Service Desk Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A15 Client Technology Services Specialist 1 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 A13 Service Desk Technician 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A09 Administrative Secretary 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Information Technology Division 20.00 20.00 21.00 20.00 22.00 22.53 22.53 Organizational Development M34 Organizational Development Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Executive Department 40.63 39.63 40.63 39.63 41.63 44.00 44.00 1Organizational Development Manager was originally added to Administrative Services and then moved to Executive 2Emergency Management division moved to Executive department following the formation of the Renton Regional Fire Authority in mid‐2016 Grade Title Total Mayor’s Office Total Communications Division Total Emergency Management Division Total Organizational Development Division Total City Clerk Division Total Executive Services ‐ Admin 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-28Budget by Department - Executive CITY ATTORNEY Shane Moloney 15 FTEs Civil 4 FTEs Prosecution Iva Clark 9 FTEs Legal Analyst 1 FTE                                       City Attorney  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-29Budget by Department - City Attorney City Attorney  Mission  Provide quality legal representation to the city in a timely, effective, and positive manner.  Description  The city attorney department provides legal advice to the city council, city administration, and city boards and commissions,  prepares legislation, brings and defends lawsuits, and prosecutes misdemeanor criminal cases in the Renton Municipal Court.  List of City Attorney Renton Results Decision Packages:  City Attorney Performance Measures:  Highlight of Budget Changes:  Regular Salaries increased by $320,083 in 2023 due to: o Cost of Living Adjustments (COLA) o 1 FTE promoted from assistant city attorney to senior assistant city attorney o 1 FTE added in 2022 after the 2021‐22 budget was adopted Interfund Payments increased by $237,527 in 2023 due to: o Increased facility costs of about $115,000 o Increased self‐insurance services of about $33,000 o IT support for higher technology costs of about $90,000, including a new case management software totaling $65,000 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 2,207,330 2,611,347 2,440,373 2,700,512 3,179,689 3,226,711 3,333,592 19.5% 3.3% Position Summary 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 7.1% 0.0% 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTETot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100006.0009 City Attorney Prosecution 9.00   1,454,178   ‐    9.00   1,550,347   ‐     150006.0009 Training and Licensing Costs ‐   2,000    ‐    ‐    2,000    ‐     200006.0009 City Attorney Civil 4.00   876,807   ‐    4.00   919,192    ‐     600006.0010 City Attorney Administration 2.00   893,725   ‐    2.00   862,052    ‐     Total 15.00    3,226,711$       ‐$      15.00   3,333,592$       ‐$      City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 Results 2021 Results Increase the scope and extend of  electronic exchanges of information,  including discovery, to the Defense  Attorney. 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Complete routine contract review  within 7 calendar days of receipt.new 2018 95% 95% 90% 90% Routine legislation review will be  performed within 7 calendar days of  receipt. 99% 92% 92% 87% 87% Timely responsiveness and  “projection of effort,” when  the community cannot help  itself. Safety and Health Representative  Government Policy and fiscal  accountability. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-30Budget by Department - City Attorney 2021‐2022 Accomplishments  Continued to assist and advise the city in its provision of services to residents, businesses, and visitors. Successfully processed a large backlog of criminal trials from COVID‐19 court closures and restrictions. Worked with the Renton Municipal Court and the public defense firm to develop methods for safely conducting jury trials during COVID‐19, including conducting virtual jury selection. Implemented the Renton Community Court program with the Renton Municipal Court and public defense firm, with first successful program graduates. Successfully assisted the city with risk management and defense of claims. Transitioned to a successful hybrid in person and remote work model. Implemented a department reorganization to provide services more effectively and efficiently. Implemented available technology resources to improve internal processes and efficiencies. 2023‐2024 Goals  Increase training attendance and opportunities for city attorney staff. Increase trainings provided by city attorney staff to other city departments, both prosecution specific and city wide. Continue to assist the city in adapting to changing laws surrounding public safety and the criminal justice system. Continue to increase efficiencies through increased use of technology already available, and explore procurement of legal case management software, as budget allows. Remain flexible and capable of redirecting resources when dynamic challenges arise. Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ City Attorney 2020202120212022202220232024ChangeChange Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 City Attorney 2,207,330 2,611,347 2,440,373 2,700,512 3,179,689 3,226,711 3,333,592 19.5% 3.3% Total 2,207,330 2,611,347 2,440,373 2,700,512 3,179,689 3,226,711 3,333,592 19.5% 3.3% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ City Attorney 2020202120212022202220232024ChangeChange Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,415,559 1,582,487 1,538,584 1,622,729 1,817,938 1,942,812 2,051,675 19.7% 5.6% Part‐Time Salaries 0 16,560 0 16,560 16,560 16,560 16,560 0.0% 0.0% Overtime 80000000N/AN/A Personnel Benefits 584,097 751,539 639,004 794,829 877,335 761,418 811,342 ‐4.2% 6.6% Supplies 1,155 3,550 473 3,550 3,550 3,550 3,550 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 24,021 49,450 24,239 49,450 50,500 51,450 51,450 4.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 182,418 207,761 238,074 213,394 399,255 450,921 399,014 111.3%‐11.5% Transfers Out 000014,55000N/AN/A Total 2,207,330 2,611,347 2,440,373 2,700,512 3,179,689 3,226,711 3,333,592 19.5% 3.3% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ City Attorney 2020202120212022202220232024ChangeChange Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 7.1% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.00 0.43 0.00 0.43 0.43 0.43 0.43 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$           18,049$      ‐$        18,049$      18,049$      18,049$      18,049$      0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-31Budget by Department - City Attorney City Attorney Department Position Listing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized  Adopted Adopted Administration Division M49 City Attorney 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M17 Legal Analyst 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to Legal 1.001.001.001.000.000.000.00 Total Administration Division 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Civil Division M42 Senior Assistant City Attorney 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 M35 Assistant City Attorney 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A22 Senior Paralegal 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 A17 Paralegal 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Civil Division 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Prosecution Division M46 Prosecution Division Director 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M38 Chief Prosecuting Attorney 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M38 Lead Prosecutor 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M29 Prosecuting Attorney 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A17 Paralegal 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A10 Legal Assistant 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Total Prosecution Division 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 Total City Attorney Department 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 Grade Title 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-32Budget by Department - City Attorney MUNICIPAL COURT  JUDGES Jessica Giner &             Kara Murphy Richards 17 FTEs COURT SERVICES Bonnie Woodrow 15 FTEs Infraction Processing   7 FTEs Criminal Case  Processing 4 FTEs Office of Court  Services and  Supervision 2 FTEs Court Security Officer 1 FTE Renton Municipal Court  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-33Budget by Department - Court Services Renton Municipal Court   Mission  The mission of the Renton Municipal Court, as an independent and impartial branch of our community’s government, is to  resolve matters fairly and impartially, ensure the protection of rights and liberties of all individuals, deliver accessible and  inclusive justice, and ensure a dignified forum to build public confidence and trust in the court system.    Description  The Renton Municipal Court is a court of limited jurisdiction that handles parking citations, traffic and non‐traffic infractions,  photo enforcement citations, and misdemeanor and gross misdemeanor cases charged within the city limits, in addition to  providing court resources to contribute to the vitality and safety of our community, including Renton Municipal Community  Court; Renton Youth Traffic Court; mental health calendars; and providing community connections for court system  education.  List of Court Services Renton Results Decision Packages:  Municipal Court Performance Measures:   Performance measure surveys were discontinued during COVID‐19 and restarted in 2022.  2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 2,444,436 3,102,930 2,622,084 3,215,462 3,646,622 3,395,240 3,563,092 5.6% 4.9% Position Summary 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #DescriptionFTETot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100002.0017 Office of Court Services and Supervision 2.00       286,102         60,000   2.00             307,033   60,000           200002.0030 Criminal Case Processing 4.00       628,444         132,060     4.00             652,263   132,060             200002.0031 Infraction Processing 7.00       920,958         3,664,000          7.00             970,816   3,664,000     200002.0032 Court Administration 4.00       1,559,736              15,000   4.00             1,632,980       15,000           Total 17.00        3,395,240$              3,871,060$              17.00          3,563,092$              3,871,060$               City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 Results 2021 Results Safety and Health Encourage the community to  comply with local, state and  federal laws. Composite of results from survey of  probationer's understanding of  probation process reflected as "good" or  better.  88% 85% 84% no data no data Defendant satisfaction with their  understanding of the criminal case  process is rated as "good" or better. 83%80% 82% no data no data Defendant’s satisfaction with the ability  to obtain access to court record  information related to criminal case  processing is rated “good” or better. 92% 90% 90% no data no data Ongoing Juror Survey's reflect an  approval rating that indicates  satisfaction and understanding of the  jury experience by non‐criminal citizens  of Renton.  84%82%82%no data no data Defendant's satisfaction with the ability  to obtain access to court information  related to infraction processing is rated  "good" or better. 90% 88% 88% no data no data Resident's satisfaction with  understanding the court infraction  process. 84% 84% 82% no data no data Open accessible and  consistent (administrative and  judicial) decision process. Representative  Government 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-34Budget by Department - Court Services Highlight of Budget Changes:  Regular salaries increased by $165 thousand in 2023 due to cost‐of‐living adjustments and the addition of one full time employee in the offices of court services & supervision division. Part‐time salaries budget was moved to protem contracted services to cover judicial vacations, meetings, and other obligations. Interfund payments increased by $99 thousand due to overall citywide increased information technology and facilities costs. Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Court Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Court Services 2,444,436 3,102,930 2,622,084 3,215,462 3,646,622 3,395,240 3,563,092 5.6% 4.9% Total 2,444,436 3,102,930 2,622,084 3,215,462 3,646,622 3,395,240 3,563,092 5.6% 4.9% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Court Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,390,418 1,552,614 1,468,793 1,604,988 1,899,809 1,769,682 1,865,754 10.3% 5.4% Part‐Time Salaries 0 109,000 0 109,000 49,000 0 0 ‐100.0% N/A Overtime 168 0 487 0 0 1,500 1,500 100.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 567,693 727,473 589,699 772,165 805,677 742,508 790,914 ‐3.8% 6.5% Supplies 3,282 7,700 5,723 7,700 14,948 7,700 7,700 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 93,410 149,716 111,906 149,716 149,716 202,716 202,716 35.4% 0.0% Interfund Payments 385,902 556,427 445,476 571,893 726,219 671,135 694,508 17.4% 3.5% Transfer Out 3,5640001,25300N/AN/A Total 2,444,436 3,102,930 2,622,084 3,215,462 3,646,622 3,395,240 3,563,092 5.6% 4.9% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Court Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.002.750.002.751.310.000.00‐100.0% N/A Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$        114,500$    ‐$        114,500$    54,500$      ‐$        ‐$         ‐100.0% N/A 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-35Budget by Department - Court Services 2021/2022 Accomplishments  Improve use of Zoom for virtual hearing process. Continue ongoing staff training to keep pace with changes in laws, ordinances, and court rules, and justice initiatives. Upgrade OCourt programs to enhance digital process for filing and hearing requests online. Expand online public portal with additional interactive forms and e‐filing ability. Address case manager department staffing needs and explore community court benefits. 2023/2024 Goals  Expand court programs to improve accessibility to court and services, including therapeutic programs. Increase availability and access to jail alternatives. Implement procedural justice initiatives. Develop additional opportunities for community inclusion. Court Services Department Position Listing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Authorized Adopted Authorized Adopted Authorized Adopted Adopted Court Services E11 Municipal Court Judge (Elected)2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 M49 Judicial Administrative Officer 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M38 Court Services Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M22 Court Services Supervisor 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A21 Case Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A18 Probation Officer 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A15 Judicial Specialist (Lead)1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A10 Judicial Specialist/Trainer 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A12 Judicial Specialist II 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 A08 Judicial Specialist 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 A04 Court Security Officer 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00Total Court Services Division Grade Title 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-36Budget by Department - Court Services ADMINISTRATOR Chip Vincent 64 FTEs Development Services Rob Shuey             21 FTEs Building Inspection Code Compliance Permit Services Planning                        Vanessa Dolbee 14 FTEs Current Planning Long Range Planning Economic Development  Amanda Askren (Interim)                                           10 FTEs Economic Development Property and Technical  Services Development Engineering Brianne Bannwarth 17 FTEs Development Engineering Construction Engineering Administrative Support 1 FTE Planning Commission Municipal Arts Commission City Center Community Plan  Advisory Board Benson Hill Community  Plan Advisory Board Community and Economic Development  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-37Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Community and Economic Development  Mission   Enhance the vitality and livability of the Renton community by promoting a prosperous economy and quality neighborhoods  through economic development, sound urban planning, and streamlined land use regulation.   Core Businesses and Services  The department of community & economic development (CED) initiates and leads economic development, land use planning  and permitting, and regulation of all aspects of the development process, while working with residents, the business  community, and other community organizations to enhance the economic prosperity, vitality, and livability for the Renton  community.  In addition, CED manages the city’s intergovernmental relations, advocating for Renton’s interests at the county, regional,  state, and federal levels, coordinates the Renton Community Marketing Campaign, which is funded in part by the city’s  lodging tax, and provides staff support for the city’s Planning and Municipal Arts Commissions.   Coordination and collaboration amongst the four CED divisions ‐ economic development, planning, development engineering  and development service ‐ and its 12 programs is essential, as each has an important role to play in achieving the vision,  mission, and goals of the city. CED plays a leadership role in the fulfillment of a significant number of the city's business plan  goals and action items. Most of the five business plan goals are directly related to the work of CED's programs.   List of Community and Economic Development Renton Results Decision Packages:   2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 14,256,801 10,926,162 10,494,131 11,303,970 19,559,287 14,223,103 14,800,751 25.8% 4.1% Position Summary 56.50 56.50 56.50 56.50 63.00 64.00 64.00 13.3% 0.0% 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100007.0018 Building Inspection 15.50   2,554,827   4,393,467    15.50   2,674,828   4,393,467     100007.0019 Code Enforcement program 4.50   708,695   ‐    4.50    755,194    ‐     150007.0010 New Code Compliance Inspector 1.00   227,929   ‐    1.00    174,749    ‐     300007.0062 Economic Development 6.30   1,362,199   ‐    6.30    1,428,409   ‐     300007.0063 Current Planning 10.00   1,598,549   218,292     10.00   1,682,658   221,022      300007.0065 CED Administration 2.00   2,088,921   ‐    2.00    2,168,213   ‐     300007.0066 Long Range Planning 4.00   828,630   ‐    4.00    870,877    ‐     300007.0067 Municipal Art Fund Program ‐    117,900   117,900     ‐    117,900    117,900      500007.0010 Development Engineering 17.00   3,173,415   757,754     17.00   3,335,336   757,754      600007.0009 Technical and Property Services 3.70   567,038   ‐    3.70    597,587    ‐     700007.0003 School Impact Mitigation Fund ‐    995,000   995,000     ‐    995,000    995,000      Total 64.00    14,223,103$       6,482,414$       64.00   14,800,751$      6,485,144$          2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-38Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Community and Economic Development Performance Measures:  City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 Results 2021 Results Permit review for single family  applications completed within 2  weeks. 58% 45% 46% 34% 44% Permit review for commercial  applications within 4 weeks.88% 87% 95% 80% 87% Inspection requests receive response  within 24 hours.94% 95% 94% 95% 95% Encourage the community to  comply with local, state and  federal laws. Code compliance is achieved within 3  weeks of date of initial requst.81%81%89%87%87% Representative  Government Advocate community interest  in regional, state, and  federal forums. Number of organizations in which CED  staff represents the City in local,  regional, and statewide organizations  focused in areas such as land use,  economic development , building  regulation. 29 29 29 29 29 The City's annual sales tax revenue  growth rate (excluding one‐time items).‐0.1%8%‐0.4%‐6.6% 23.5% Annual property tax revenue associated  with new construction increases. 2.6%2.4%0.9%1.0%1.0% Process land use applications  requiring a decision by the Hearing  Examiner within 12 weeks of receipt of  complete application. 88%92%100%86%88% Process land use applications  requiring an Administrative Decision  within 8 weeks. 82%91%92%80%52% Utilities and  Environment Compliance with  environmental standards and  laws. Infrastructure project plan review is  completed within an average of 3  weeks. 47%54%44%33%31% Internal Support Functional work environment. Property and Technical Services review  of development proposals are  processed within 2 weeks.  95%98%98%100% 100% Safety and Health Timely responsiveness and  “Projection of effort” when  the community cannot help  itself. Livable Community Encourage and foster a  vibrant and diverse economy. Manage growth in a manner  consistent with community  values. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-39Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Highlight of Budget Changes:  Housing division moved to equity, housing, and human services department in 2021. Regular salaries increased by $1,340,822 in 2023 due to the addition of 6.5 FTEs in 2022, wage increase due to additional cost of living adjustments in 2022, and addition of 1 FTE in 2023. Personnel benefits increased by $307,684 in 2023 due to increase in employer‐paid taxes as a direct result of the increase in salaries, in addition to projected increase in medical and dental rates. Other services and charges increased by $635,276 in 2023 due to addition of budget for school impact fees, offset by the elimination of CDBG grant placeholder budget for development activities. Budget for the grant will be added during the year when the grant contract is finalized. Interfund payments increased by $667,376 due to increase in insurance charges, facilities, and equipment rental costs. Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Community & Economic Development 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 2,462,045 1,619,213 1,839,944 1,659,266 6,759,988 3,162,796 3,171,218 90.6% 0.3% Economic Development 5,653,837 2,104,522 2,264,521 2,158,937 3,451,865 1,940,324 2,031,218 ‐10.1% 4.7% Planning 1,846,095 2,099,509 1,880,867 2,184,131 3,447,186 2,533,993 2,666,213 16.0% 5.2% Development Services 2,454,062 2,885,532 2,453,006 2,994,321 3,117,723 3,412,575 3,596,767 14.0% 5.4% Development Engineering 1,840,763 2,217,386 2,055,793 2,307,315 2,782,525 3,173,415 3,335,336 37.5% 5.1% Total 14,256,801 10,926,162 10,494,131 11,303,970 19,559,287 14,223,103 14,800,751 25.8% 4.1% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Community & Economic Development 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 5,323,225 5,841,245 5,010,382 6,038,395 6,532,471 7,379,217 7,772,902 22.2% 5.3% Part‐Time Salaries 12,124 0 2,040 0 0 0 0 N/A N/A Overtime 31,771 52,117 72,253 52,117 52,117 58,117 58,117 11.5% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 2,035,800 2,560,974 1,955,672 2,712,632 2,937,359 3,020,316 3,216,083 11.3% 6.5% Supplies 13,741 34,750 11,017 34,750 30,733 35,750 35,750 2.9% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 1,588,446 1,060,036 1,200,218 1,060,036 7,126,196 1,695,312 1,694,812 59.9% 0.0% Capital Outlay 504,559 15,000 1,083,891 15,000 996,805 15,000 15,000 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 1,066,978 1,244,140 1,155,529 1,273,140 1,882,207 1,940,516 2,000,082 52.4% 3.1% Transfer Out 3,680,159 117,900 3,130 117,900 1,400 78,875 8,005 ‐33.1%‐89.9% Total 14,256,801 10,926,162 10,494,131 11,303,970 19,559,287 14,223,103 14,800,751 25.8% 4.1% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Community & Economic Development 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% 0.0% Economic Development 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 150.0% 0.0% Planning 15.50 15.50 15.50 15.50 14.00 14.00 14.00 ‐9.7% 0.0% Development Services 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 21.00 21.00 5.0% 0.0% Development Engineering 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 13.3% 0.0% Total FTE 56.50 56.50 56.50 56.50 63.00 64.00 64.00 13.3% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.330.000.060.000.000.000.00N/AN/A Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 13,934$      ‐$        2,310$        ‐$        ‐$        ‐$        ‐$        N/A N/A 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-40Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Administration Division  Mission   Provide leadership, resources, and regional influence to enable the department to meet its responsibilities in a manner that  is responsive to the needs of its customers and consistent with the city's business plan goals.  2021/2022 Accomplishments   Maintained extremely high level of service and exceeded most performance goals. Participated in numerous state, countywide, and regional policy boards, and commissions. Reorganization of the department allowed staff to be place in positions to effect positive change and provide effective support internally and externally. Encourage staff to explore new and innovative options to exceed customer service expectations in a technology rich environment. Provided framework for department divisions to work interchangeably within CED and within the city as a whole, allowing CED to be awarded the Governor’s Smart Cities awards in multiple categories: Smart Partnerships Award for the Willowcrest Townhomes (2021), a Vision Award for the Rainer/Grady Junction TOD Subarea Plan (2022). Provided support for our divisions to collectively earn an award‐winning nomination for the Permit Ready Accessory Dwelling Unit (PRADU) program for a Puget Sound Regional Council’s Vision 2050 award. 2022/2023 Goals  Continue to work within CED and all city departments to maximize employee satisfaction and performance, and find additional organizational and system improvements, innovations, and efficiencies. Continue to build partnerships with community members and contractors to strengthen CED objectives throughout the city. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Administration 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 270,347 273,696 225,983 278,940 290,098 293,727 310,322 5.3% 5.6% Personnel Benefits 111,203 126,700 84,649 133,815 135,813 109,989 117,261 ‐17.8% 6.6% Other Services and Charges 556 0 513,876 0 4,595,000 995,000 995,000 100.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 976,439 1,100,917 1,012,306 1,128,611 1,737,678 1,685,206 1,740,630 49.3% 3.3% Transfer Out 1,103,500 117,900 3,130 117,900 1,400 78,875 8,005 ‐33.1%‐89.9% Total 2,462,045 1,619,213 1,839,944 1,659,266 6,759,988 3,162,796 3,171,218 90.6% 0.3% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Administration 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-41Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Economic Development Division  Mission   Enhance the vitality and livability of the Renton community by promoting a prosperous and diverse economy.  2021/2022 Accomplishments   Continued work on the adopted Civic Core Vision and Action Plan to include completion of Streetscape Phase 1, wayfinding signage, the creation of a downtown manager, and supporting the efforts of becoming Main Street designated. Continued focus and oversight of lodging tax fund and new opportunities for tourism promotion and the Renton Community Marketing Campaign including $777,280 in grant awards to support events and activities to attract visitors from over 50 miles away and generate overnight stays. Successfully partnered with the Port of Seattle to advance local economic development projects throughout the region including the implementation of a digital tourism campaign that highlights the city’s diverse visitor offerings, support for local businesses through shop local initiatives and efforts focused on COVID‐19 relief and recovery through workforce retention and development efforts. Continued to strengthen ongoing business recruitment working with many companies to locate or expand and collaborating with local and regional partner to identify high potential business sectors, accelerate the growth of the region’s unique industry clusters and market to the interest of business prospects. Strengthened working relationship with the Renton Downtown Partnership in promoting downtown revitalization through Downtown clean‐up efforts, community events, and small business support through active participation on the board of directors and event committees. Supported the development of a robust, community‐focused ecosystem on the eastside through collaboration with Startup425 that served to help entrepreneurs and small businesses in three areas – customer discovery, financial literacy, and professional network development. Formed (re)Startup425 in collaboration with the eastside partners to provide small business owners, nonprofits, sole‐proprietors, and gig workers with available business support through one‐on‐one technical assistance during the COVID‐19 pandemic. Arts & Culture (Activities of the Renton Municipal Arts Commission)  •Activated and enhanced public buildings and civic spaces through the acquisition, stewardship, and presentation of the city’s art collection, including the Renton Athletes mural at Liberty Park, the Color of Flight installation at Sunset Park, and the community‐created tile project at the Renton Community Center. Supported efforts to bring art into the neighborhoods and parks with the installation of utility box wraps in Sunset and downtown, multiple murals including three community‐driven projects in the Benson‐Cascade neighborhood, the Highlands neighborhood, and under the trestle bridge on Houser. Also supported the popular Renton Roadshow program hosting pop up musical events across the city. •Collaboration with regional partners to promote and preserve culture in the vibrant communities south of Seattle. •Participation and membership in the South King County Cultural Coalition and King County Local Arts Agency meetings to encourage sharing and the promotion of best practices in building leaders and resources in and for the arts. •Supported Renton’s arts institutions with $20,580 distributed to local nonprofits offering free or reduced‐price programming and instruction in the arts to the public. •Supported a diversity of cultural arts programming throughout Renton with more than $189,000 distributed to local artists and arts organizations for arts and culture projects and events that serve the general public in Renton. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-42Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Property/Technical Services  Provided development reviews and achieved excellent customer service within established timelines. Updated the city’s GIS land Info data source and continue to add requested information for the staff and public. Continued to improve function, process, and training associated with EnerGov permit tracking software and newer applications for our department and others within the city. Continued to provide project management and technical support for electronic plan submittal for staff and applicants. The overall project name is CED Electronic Roadmap and is a three‐year process with over 25 projects to support the realization of fully electronic permitting and review. Supported staff and public during the transition of working remotely for online permitting and finding new ways to meet our new expectations. Worked with various city departments to find ways to provide CED information electronically which allowed easier access for the public and other interest groups. 2023/2024 Goals   Evaluate and launch a business outreach and recruitment program to understand the gaps, resources, and opportunities throughout the city. Establish and implement a workplan for the Civic Core Action Plan to evaluate timelines, resources, finances, and to secure the commitments to move forward. Continue to work with public works on projects and help execute effective business outreach and problem solving during the construction phase in the downtown area. Attract new businesses and new development to Renton to increase employment opportunities, sales, and property tax revenue, and continue to promote Renton as a top location for investment. Continue to foster redevelopment efforts in the South Lake Washington area, including working with the property owners and other city departments in this emerging district. Work to stimulate additional development adjacent to The Landing. Participate in the interdepartmental team to help complete the Rainier/Grady Junction Subarea Plan and promote quality mixed‐use and commercial redevelopment in the area with property owners and potential developers. Arts & Culture  •Support the city’s arts and culture programming as ambassadors and information providers (sending out regular e‐ newsletters and growing the audience on social media channels through regular posts and engagement with the community). •Motivate and ignite creativity and encourage artistic production through social media, using Facebook and other relevant platforms and presenting art opportunities throughout the year, establishing the Arts Commission as the go‐to for art‐related activities in Renton. • Bringing people together and inspiring civic pride and neighborhood identity through art by continuing to collaborate with the neighborhood program and neighborhood associations in the installation of art at a local level. •Expand and grow the city’s public art programs with diverse artists participating (facilitating storefront art walks and rotational window displays to celebrate and provide opportunities for local artists). •Provide educational workshops to featuring topics such as grant writing for artists, how to curate an exhibit/solo show, resources for filming in Renton. •Connect the dots between local artists and art organizations through the creation of an inventory of the groups and organizations providing art classes and instruction; performances and exhibits and when/where they meet to best serve the community as an art resource. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-43Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Continue to collaborate with economic development division and the downtown partnership to revitalize downtown Renton and support the creation of an arts and culture center. Advocate for and support art and placemaking projects in downtown Renton, Sunset Area, and Benson Hill. Property/Technical Services  Work on establishing a plan to maintain current and accurate survey network as we prepare for the 2025 National Datum change. Provide GIS mapping support to CED and other customers to present citywide data to the public in accurate, usable, and easy to understand methods. Continue working with various groups to determine data that can be communicated to the public in a spatial or map‐ based product. Meet or exceed department goals for timely review of development applications and customer service response. Develop and maintain GIS databases and other data/information sources to support ongoing operations within CED and other city departments. Provide project management and technical support for electronic plan submittal for city staff, applicants, and the public by way of technical expertise, support, and training to reviewers. Realize the CED Electronic Roadmap through the combined efforts of various departments within CED to be fully electronic and accessible to the public. 1The 2020/2021 actual expenditures and 2021/2022 original budget include expenditures for 2.0 FTEs that are reflected in EHHS department, 2.0 FTEs that  are reflected in planning division, and 1.0 FTE reflected in development engineering division.   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Economic Development 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 915,323 1,036,099 660,069 1,072,315 968,709 1,174,092 1,240,674 9.5% 5.7% Part‐Time Salaries 6,499000000N/AN/A Overtime 45 2,000 0 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 270,879 331,086 176,648 349,285 332,017 382,619 406,930 9.5% 6.4% Supplies 7,823 9,700 2,768 9,700 5,683 9,700 9,700 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 1,372,050 710,637 341,145 710,637 1,636,650 356,913 356,913 ‐49.8% 0.0% Capital Outlay 504,559 15,000 1,083,891 15,000 506,805 15,000 15,000 0.0% 0.0% Transfer Out 2,576,659 0 0 0 0 0 0 N/A N/A Total 5,653,837 2,104,522 2,264,521 2,158,937 3,451,865 1,940,324 2,031,218 ‐10.1% 4.7% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Economic Development 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE1 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 150.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.180.000.000.000.000.000.00N/AN/A Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 7,597$        ‐$        ‐$        ‐$        ‐$        ‐$        ‐$        N/A N/A 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-44Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Planning Division  Mission   Direct Renton’s growth based on community values, promoting a high quality of life for residents and prosperity for  businesses through sound planning, zoning, and development, while ensuring predictability for customers.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Long Range Planning  Worked with the Planning Commission both virtually and in‐person, who held 32 meetings, including 13 public hearings, to review and make recommendations regarding development regulations, policies, and goals of the city. Adopted policies and regulations for 43 docket items, including the Rainier/Grady Junction Transit Oriented Development Subarea Plan, improved standards to incentivize cottage housing projects, and expansion of the Multi‐ Family Tax Exemption incentive to two new eligible areas. Submitted a winning nomination for a Governor’s Smart Communities Smart Partnerships Award for the Willowcrest Townhomes (2021), a Governor’s Smart Communities Vision Award for the Rainer/Grady Junction TOD Subarea Plan (2022). Submitted a winning nomination for the Permit Ready Accessory Dwelling Unit (PRADU) program for a Puget Sound Regional Council’s Vision 2050 award. Initiated the required update to the city’s Comprehensive Plan, which must be adopted by December 31, 2024. Continued to manage and be responsible for compliance with the Growth Management Act and to ensure the city’s land use and development regulations implement the Growth Management Act. Provided ongoing oversight and support to the Planning Commission, City Center Community Plan Advisory Board, and Benson Hill Community Plan Advisory Board. Staffed the interjurisdictional team (IJT) to the growth management planning council as work to update the countywide planning policies and the land capacity analysis was being conducted. Participated on various local and regional committees, such as King County Climate Collaboration Committee (K4C). Current Planning  Met established timeline performance measures for: pre‐application requests, new commercial and residential building permit reviews, administrative land use decisions, and land use decisions requiring Hearing Examiner review and public hearings. Maintained our excellent reputation for expedited land use permit review, one of the fastest jurisdictions in King County. Continued to engage the community on large development projects such as Longacres redevelopment, Southport West, Logan Six Mixed Use, Park 5 Apartments, and Kennydale Gateway. Conducted 123 development pre‐ application meetings with applicants. Conducted 25 Pre‐Approved ADU meetings. Staffed 20 land use public hearings for large development projects. Processed 67 SEPA (environmental review) and land use permits, including a planned urban development for Watershed Apartments; conducted site plan review for Renton Housing Authority’s Sunset Gardens, Renton School District’s Elementary #16, Park 5 Apartments, Home Depot, Brotherton Cadillac Expansion, Bezos Academy, UW Medicine Testing Lab, Blue Origin, and various applications for single family subdivisions, non‐profit organizations, religious institutions, and wireless communication permits throughout the city. Successfully implemented virtual customer service appointments for permit center inquiries providing a convenient option for customers seeking assistance from the city. In addition to phone calls, email, and in‐person visits, customers can schedule appointments to meet with staff virtually via MS Teams. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-45Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Continued to conduct on‐site field inspections of completed projects such as Top Golf, Chick‐fil‐A, Penny Lofts, Willowcrest Townhomes, Earlington Townhomes, and Elliott Farms to ensure compliance with permit conditions. Continued to provide excellent customer service with the various planning customer service platforms, assisting an average of 386 customers per month via phone calls, email, in‐person visits, and virtually. Continued advancing permit review and submittal from in‐person to electronic submittal options and online payments. Continued to provide remote preapplication meetings, permit intake, project review, public hearings, and customer service to ensure all our services were maintained and provided to the public during the COVID‐19 pandemic. Continued emergency ordinance to allow businesses to temporarily expand into portions of the right‐of‐way and parking areas to comply with the Governor’s Safe Start order, and to allow for the display of certain temporary signs through the remainder of 2022. 2023/2024 Goals  Long Range Planning  Amend city development regulations to implement the Comprehensive Plan. Continue to refine and streamline development regulations to ensure they are easier to understand and administer. Process annexations as residents and property owners express a desire to become a part of Renton. Complete the Comprehensive Plan Update and meet the state deadline of 2024. Complete the work on grants for Housing Action Plan Implementation (HAPI Grant), Middle Housing Grant, and Rainer/Grady TOD Plan Planned Action. Continue to implement the Civic COR Plan, collaborating with economic development, public works, and parks and recreation. Continue to implement the sunset area community investment strategy. Continue to provide support to the Planning Commission, City Center Community Plan Advisory Board, and Benson Hill Community Plan Advisory Board. Current Planning  Meet or exceed department goals for timely review of pre‐application requests, permit applications, and land use decisions. Provide high quality development review to reduce impacts to the community and ensure new development adds value, quality, and character to the city. Collaborate with long range planning in the implementation of regulations adopted from the Rainier/Grady Junction TOD Subarea Plan and its forthcoming Planned Action EIS. Continue to engage the community on large‐scale development projects. Continue to provide excellent customer service to internal and/or external customers. Continue to provide convenient and timely customer service via virtual meeting platforms, expanding access to the community. Continue to provide the convenient and sustainable options for virtual preapplication meetings, neighborhood meetings, and public hearings. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-46Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Planning 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,238,468 1,319,526 1,178,707 1,367,213 1,552,725 1,674,067 1,762,282 22.4% 5.3% Overtime 7,700 7,030 6,329 7,030 7,030 7,030 7,030 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 488,782 613,972 471,759 650,907 713,304 693,915 737,920 6.6% 6.3% Supplies 1,944 6,200 2,971 6,200 6,200 6,200 6,200 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 109,201 152,781 221,101 152,781 677,927 152,781 152,781 0.0% 0.0% Capital Outlay 0000490,00000N/AN/A Total 1,846,095 2,099,509 1,880,867 2,184,131 3,447,186 2,533,993 2,666,213 16.0% 5.2% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Planning 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 15.50 15.50 15.50 15.50 14.00 14.00 14.00 ‐9.7% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-47Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Development Services Division  Mission   Create and maintain a safe and pleasant physical environment by ensuring compliance with codes and land use regulations  and assisting the public and the development community through the regulatory process.   2021/2022 Accomplishments  Building Permit Review and Inspection  Building inspectors have responded to an average of 80 inspection requests per day. Permit staff are completing an average of 18 building permit applications for new residential projects each month. Permit staff are completing an average of 179 building permit applications for new construction, additions, alterations, tenant improvements, demolitions, and signs each month. The development services division is issuing an average of 400 permits each month resulting in a total construction valuation of over $33.7 million per month, or $396 million per year. Number of inspections requested through our CSS Portal is currently at 64%. Online permit applications applied for through our CSS Portal is now at 100% Continuing to educate the public how to use the city CSS and online applications. Successfully implemented virtual customer service appointments for permit center inquiries providing a convenient option for customers seeking assistance from the city. In addition to phone calls, email, and in‐person visits, customers can schedule appointments to meet with staff virtually via MS Teams. The division has successfully made the transition to Laserfiche as a document storage database for all plans. The department has completed the transition from paper to electronic plan review with all reviews being performed on Bluebeam, while continuing to educate the public how to submit plans electronically. Developed an electronic submittal process to provide customers a path to submit applications that require review without needing to apply in person or make an appointment. The permit counter added the option of a virtual meeting to better serve our customers. Screened 99% application submittals within the target of five business days. Staff continue to monitor the city website and update all forms and instructional materials as necessary. Submitted a winning nomination for the Permit Ready Accessory Dwelling Unit (PRADU) program for a Puget Sound Regional Council’s Vision 2050 award. Code Compliance  The team has inspected and processed an average of over 600 code cases annually. The inspectors contact the customer requesting assistance from code enforcement within one working day of receiving the request 80% of the time. The team continues to exceed department goals by achieving resolution to code compliance requests through voluntary action more than 80% of the time. Code compliance resolution was achieved within 15 days from complaint on average. The continued use of Renton Responds (SeeClickFix) to enable citizens to easily report violations. Requests from Renton Responds account for approximately 75% of complaints. Code compliance inspectors conducted complaint‐based inspections from private citizen requests. All sites with verified code compliance violations in the last year were checked at least once to verify continued compliance. Entering 100% of cases into EnerGov database. •Code compliance inspectors work with other city departments regarding homeless camps, illegal dumping, fire damaged structures, and other violations that require multiple department collaboration. Working with King County, 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-48Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Department of Ecology, Burlington Northern Railroad, Washington State Department of Transportation, and other  outside agencies as needed.  •Reviewed and processed and average of 652 business license applications per year in 2021/2022. Adapted quickly to remote permit intake, review, and customer service as well as maintained permit inspections to ensure all our services were maintained and provided to the public during the COVID‐19 Pandemic Stay Home, Stay Healthy Order and Safe Start Order. 2023/2024 Goals  Building Permit Review and Inspection  Strive to meet or exceed departmental goals for timely review of building applications. Streamline Renton’s permitting system using EnerGov and the city CSS to allow for more efficient permit processing. These systems allow for improved online permitting, improved inspection request capability, and status inquiry for customers. Work with economic development and IT staff to utilize the e‐review functionality of EnerGov. Continue to refine and update forms and instructional materials for website. Transfer existing permit records that are not currently in LaserFiche to provide a method for our customers to self‐ serve when obtaining permit records. Encourage additional education, trainings, and certifications of permit technicians, plan reviewers, building inspectors, and code compliance inspectors. Continue to streamline building permit application, plan submittal, and screening process for online permitting. Code Compliance  •Strive to meet or exceed departmental goals for timely response to customer violation reports. •Work to meet or exceed departmental goals for timely resolution of code compliance concerns and obtaining voluntary compliance. •Adding new code compliance Inspector positions in mid‐2022 and early‐2023 will allow for pro‐active code enforcement of typical violations. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Development Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,657,183 1,803,835 1,601,003 1,861,815 1,926,970 2,162,227 2,278,971 16.1% 5.4% Part‐Time Salaries 5,62502,0400000N/AN/A Overtime 1,144 10,000 17,658 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 652,787 847,185 669,791 897,424 935,672 989,011 1,055,523 10.2% 6.7% Supplies 2,854 12,250 2,639 12,250 12,250 12,250 12,250 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 75,654 157,018 104,631 157,018 177,018 158,018 157,518 0.6%‐0.3% Interfund Payments 58,814 55,244 55,244 55,814 55,814 81,069 82,504 45.2% 1.8% Total 2,454,062 2,885,532 2,453,006 2,994,321 3,117,723 3,412,575 3,596,767 14.0% 5.4% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Development Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 21.00 21.00 5.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.150.000.060.000.000.000.00N/AN/A Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 6,337$        ‐$        2,310$        ‐$        ‐$        ‐$        ‐$        N/A N/A 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-49Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Development Engineering Division  Mission   Direct Renton’s growth based on community values, promoting a high quality of life for residents and prosperity for  businesses through sound engineering and development, while protecting public health and safety, providing sustainable  public and private infrastructure, increasing mobility, and ensuring predictability for customers.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Development Engineering  Completed engineering review for construction permits associated with development projects in a timely manner resulting in over $50 million in permitted civil improvements from projects such as Solera (redevelopment of the Greater Hi‐Lands Shopping Center), Chick‐Fil‐A, Top Golf, Family First Community Center, Stoneway Redevelopment (Cedar River Apartments), affordable housing facilities including Sunset Gardens; La Fortuna; and Watershed Apartments, and many assisted living facilities throughout the city. Participated in and met established timeline performance measures for: pre‐application requests, new commercial and single‐family building permit reviews, and land use reviews including public hearings. Created and implemented small cell permit application, review, and issuance procedures resulting in 80 small cell permit applications and over 56 small cell permits issued within the first year of implementation. Continued to expand coordination between the city and the franchise permit holders to better facilitate construction work within the city for both public and private projects. Successfully implemented virtual customer service appointments for permit center inquiries providing a convenient option for customers seeking assistance from the city. In addition to phone calls, email, and in‐person visits, customers can schedule appointments to meet with staff virtually via MS Teams. All site, franchise, utility, and right of way permits can be submitted, reviewed, and paid for electronically either through the Civic Access Self‐Service Portal or through other electronic options. Provided high quality coordination between the city and external applicants and agencies such as Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) on the ongoing I‐405 Renton to Bellevue project. Participate in the interdepartmental team to help complete the Rainier/Grady Junction Subarea Plan and promote quality mixed‐use and commercial redevelopment in the area with property owners and potential developers. Submitted a winning nomination for the Permit Ready Accessory Dwelling Unit (PRADU) program for a Puget Sound Regional Council’s Vision 2050 award. Construction Engineering  Completed engineering inspections for construction permits associated with development projects in a timely manner resulting in over $30 million in completed civil improvements from projects such as Solera (redevelopment of the Greater Hi‐Lands Shopping Center), Chick‐Fil‐A, Top Golf, Family First Community Center, affordable housing facilities including Sunset Gardens; La Fortuna; and Watershed Apartments, and many assisted living facilities throughout the city. Increased coordination between the city and the franchise permit holders to better facilitate construction work within the city for both public and private projects. Ensured timely and thorough inspections of all private development projects. Provided inspection‐related documentation for the projects in compliance with city standards resulting in over 5,800 permit inspections (up 30% from the previous two years) with over 1,300 hours of afterhours inspections to meet the needs of the customers. Successfully provided thorough construction inspection services for over 15 capital improvement projects including Wells Avenue South and Williams Avenue South Conversion, Downtown Utility Improvements, Downtown Core 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-50Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Streetscape Improvement, NE 16th Street‐Jefferson Avevenue NE Stormwater Green Connection, and Family First  Community Center among others. More than 8,500 inspections hours were spent on the capital improvement  projects ensuring the public interests were protected throughout the projects.   Assisted property and technical services group locate and verify all City of Renton survey monuments. Provided high quality coordination between the city and external applicants and agencies such as Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) on the ongoing I‐405 Renton to Bellevue project. 2023/2024 Goals  Development Engineering  Provide excellent customer service to internal and/or external customers. Meet or exceed departmental goals for timely review of engineering plan review of construction permits, and land use and pre‐application submittals. Provide high quality development review to reduce impacts to the community and ensure new development maintains public health and safety, provides sustainable public and private infrastructure, and increases mobility. Continue to refine customer service documents and City of Renton website to increase clarity and ease of obtaining permits. Construction Engineering  Provide excellent customer service to internal and/or external customers. Ensure timely and thorough inspections of all private development and city capital improvement projects. Provide inspection‐related documentation for the projects in compliance with grant reporting requirements. Standardize construction management and inspection tools and procedures in coordination with other divisions and departments. Continue to refine customer service documents and City of Renton website to increase clarity and ease of obtaining successful inspections. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Development Engineering 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,241,904 1,408,089 1,344,620 1,458,112 1,793,969 2,075,104 2,180,653 42.3% 5.1% Overtime 22,882 33,087 48,266 33,087 33,087 39,087 39,087 18.1% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 512,148 642,031 552,825 681,201 820,554 844,782 898,448 24.0% 6.4% Supplies 1,119 6,600 2,639 6,600 6,600 7,600 7,600 15.2% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 30,984 39,600 19,465 39,600 39,600 32,600 32,600 ‐17.7% 0.0% Interfund Payments 31,724 87,979 87,979 88,715 88,715 174,241 176,948 96.4% 1.6% Total 1,840,763 2,217,386 2,055,793 2,307,315 2,782,525 3,173,415 3,335,336 37.5% 5.1% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Development Engineering 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 13.3% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-51Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Community & Economic Development Position Listing Grade Title 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized  Orig Bdgt Authorized  Adopted  Adopted Administration Division M49 Community & Economic Development Administrator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to CED 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Administration Division 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Economic Development Division M38 Economic Development Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M36 Economic Development Assistant Director 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M36 Redevelopment Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M33 Community Development and Housing Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M32 Economic Development Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M27 Housing Programs Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A24 Sr. Economic Development Specialist 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A23 Property Services Specialist 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A23 GIS Analyst 2 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A20 Economic Development Specialist 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A15 Planning Technician 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A09 Administrative Secretary 1 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Economic Development Division 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 Planning Division M38 Planning Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M36 Current Planning Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M36 Long Range Planning Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M33 Long Range Planning Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M33 Current Planning Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M33 Property & Technical Services Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A31 Principial Planner 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A28 Senior Planner 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.00 4.00 4.00 A23 GIS Analys II 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A21 Associate Planner 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A17 Assistant Planner 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A15 Planning Technician 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A09 Administrative Secretary 1 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Planning Division 15.50 15.50 15.50 15.50 14.00 14.00 14.00 Development Engineering Division M38 Development Engineering Director 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M36 Construction Engineering Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M36 Development Engineering Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M33 Development Engineering Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M30 Assistant Development Engineering Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A33 Civil Engineer III 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 A29 Civil Engineer III 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A26 Civil Engineer II 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A24 Lead Construction Engineering Inspector 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A23 Engineering Specialist III 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A21 Construction Engineering Inspector 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 A18 Dev Services Representative 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A13 Engineering Specialit I 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A09 Administrative Secretary 1 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Development Engineering Division 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 Development Services Division M38 Development Services Director 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M33 Building Official 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M28 Permit Services Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A33 Structural Plan Examiner 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A24 Lead Code Compliance Inspector 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A24 Lead Building Inspector 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A23 Building Plan Reviewer 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A22 Lead Code Compliance Inspector 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A21 Code Compliance Inspector 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 A21 Building Inspector/Electrical 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A21 Building Inspector/Combination 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A19 Code Compliance Inspector 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A13 Permit Services Specialist 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 A09 Administrative Secretary 1 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Building Division 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 21.00 21.00 Total Community & Economic Development 56.50 56.50 56.50 56.50 63.00 64.00 64.00 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-52Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Housing 2 FTEs Human Services  4 FTEs Community Outreach 1 FTE Neighborhood Programs  1 FTE Administrative Support  2 FTEs ADMINISTRATOR Maryjane Van Cleave 12 FTEs Equity and Inclusion 1 FTE Equity, Housing, and Human Services  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-53Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services Equity, Housing, and Human Services Mission  The equity, housing, and human services department (EHHS) works towards supporting the infrastructure that is necessary  to building an inclusive, informed city with equitable outcomes for all in support of social, economic, and racial justice through  community outreach and engagement. The department promotes health and safety to those with insecurities and  participates in regional efforts to bring affordable housing to our community.  Core Businesses Services  The department manages the city’s equity and inclusion, neighborhood, housing repair assistance, and community  development block grant development programs. In addition, the department supports programs that create and achieve  affordable housing in the city, those with health and safety insecurities, and the winter inclement weather shelter.  List of Equity, Housing, and Human Services Renton Results Decision Packages:  Equity, Housing, and Human Services Performance Measures:  2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 1,482,478 1,493,644 3,298,257 1,522,001 5,322,865 3,672,672 3,706,897 141.3% 0.9% Position Summary 7.50 7.50 10.50 7.50 11.00 12.00 12.00 60.0% 0.0% 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTETot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100010.0001 Human Services Housing Repair 4.00   1,346,371   20,000     4.00   1,379,746   20,000      100010.0002 CDBG Administration ‐   63,133    63,133     ‐    63,133    63,133      100010.0003 EHHS Administration 4.00   1,006,117   ‐    4.00   1,055,670   ‐     100010.0004 Housing Program 2.00   505,569   ‐    2.00   523,077    ‐     150010.0006 Human Services Funding Increase ‐   250,000   ‐    ‐    250,000    ‐     150010.0008 Housing Opportunity Fund ‐   100,000   ‐    ‐    ‐   ‐     250010.0001 Equity Manager 1.0 FTE 1.00   124,705   ‐    1.00   147,263    ‐     250010.0002 EHHS Admin Professional Services Increase ‐   45,000    ‐    ‐    45,000    ‐     300010.0001 Neighborhood Program 1.00   231,778   ‐    1.00   243,008    ‐     Total 12.00    3,672,672$       83,133$         12.00   3,706,897$       83,133$         2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-54Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services Highlight of Budget Changes:  In 2021, the housing division moved to EHHS from CED. In addition, the human services division moved to EHHS from parks and recreation, and the neighborhood programs division moved from executive. Regular salaries increased by $947,684 due to the addition of 3.0 FTEs as a result of the citywide reorganization in 2022, and addition of 1.0 FTE in 2023. Personnel benefits increased by $348,830 as a direct result of the increase in salaries. Other services and charges increased by $528,392 and $428,342 in 2023 and 2024 respectively from the 2022 budget, due to increased funding in human services and affordable housing. Interfund payments increased by $298,311 due to additional insurance charges, facilities, and equipment rental costs. Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Equity, Housing, & Human Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 0 0 325,453 0 907,698 951,477 1,003,220 100.0% 5.4% Housing 0 0 1,223,668 0 576,193 605,569 523,077 100.0%‐13.6% Community Outreach 0 0 0 0 163,837 129,973 141,939 100.0% 9.2% Neighborhood Programs 13,698 75,000 158,629 75,000 245,831 231,778 243,008 209.0% 4.8% Human Services 1,468,780 1,418,644 1,590,507 1,447,001 3,429,306 1,753,875 1,795,652 21.2% 2.4% Total 1,482,478 1,493,644 3,298,257 1,522,001 5,322,865 3,672,672 3,706,897 141.3% 0.9% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Equity, Housing, & Human Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 424,479 435,085 825,242 448,708 1,214,224 1,396,392 1,479,405 211.2% 5.9% Part‐Time Salaries 0 0 0 0 0 7,430 7,430 100.0% 0.0% Overtime 001,3940000N/AN/A Personnel Benefits 187,141 211,052 319,809 223,892 526,151 572,722 612,506 155.8% 6.9% Supplies 8,254 15,650 15,975 15,650 20,325 31,900 31,900 103.8% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 780,137 709,943 1,875,618 709,943 3,121,133 1,238,335 1,138,285 74.4%‐8.1% Interfund Payments 82,467 121,913 260,218 123,807 426,846 422,118 435,885 240.9% 3.3% Transfer Out 0 0 0 0 14,187 3,775 1,485 100.0%‐60.7% Total 1,482,478 1,493,644 3,298,257 1,522,001 5,322,865 3,672,672 3,706,897 141.3% 0.9% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Equity, Housing, & Human Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 7.50 7.50 10.50 7.50 11.00 12.00 12.00 60.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.21 0.21 100.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$                ‐$                ‐$                ‐$                ‐$                8,576$           8,576$           100.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-55Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services Administration Division  Mission   Provide leadership, resources, and regional influence to enable the department to meet its responsibilities in a manner that  is responsive to the needs of the community and consistent with the city’s business plan goals in a fiscally responsible manner.   2021/2022 Accomplishments  Executed the creation of the equity, housing, and human services department. This reorganization consolidated services lines and roles that were spread amongst three different departments to emphasis the priority and transparency necessary for the vital work conducted in the department. Created the Equity Commission at the will of the mayor and council approval. Interviewed over 30 applicants for the creation of a 9‐member Equity Commission. The commission held its first meeting in April 2022, approved its bylaws, and commenced efforts in creating a mission and vision statement. Executed the in‐person two‐day Multicultural Festival following two years of the COVID‐19 pandemic. Onboarded a community outreach coordinator to cultivate and expand relationships with community partners and residents that reflect the city’s diverse population. 2023/2024 Goals  Expand the neighborhood program to create a partner program that will serve and support the nearly 50% of Renton residents that are renters. Refresh the mayor’s inclusion task force and onboard new members who expand the outreach efforts to cultural groups not currently represented on the task force. Facilitate and provide administrative support to the Equity Commission through Roberts Rule of Order and liaison with city departments and executive on behalf of the commission. Create an action plan for the completed human services needs assessment plan. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Administration 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 0 0 92,104 0 317,076 442,504 473,179 100.0% 6.9% Personnel Benefits 0 0 24,990 0 86,715 173,246 186,677 100.0% 7.8% Supplies 007730000N/AN/A Other Services and Charges 0 0 52,911 0 251,133 76,550 76,550 100.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 0 0 154,675 0 259,843 255,401 265,330 100.0% 3.9% Transfer Out 0 0 0 0 0 3,775 1,485 100.0%‐60.7% Total 0 0 325,453 0 914,768 951,477 1,003,220 100.0% 5.4% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Administration 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 0.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 100.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-56Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services Housing Division  Mission   Lead the city’s effort relating to affordable, accessible, and quality housing choices by cultivating partnerships to advocate  for and leverage resources for the construction and preservation of affordable housing through project management,  technical assistance for housing policy, planning, and programs  2021/2022 Accomplishments   Adopted the city’s first Housing Action Plan (HAP); subsequently, applied for and received a $100,000 Housing Action Plan Implementation grant (HAPI) from the Washington State Department of Commerce to proceed with three implementation actions. In conjunction with six south King County cities, developed a subregional housing action framework to develop a common housing planning framework for the south King County subregion prior to the development of each city’s individual Housing Action Plan; this intermunicipal project was awarded a 2022 PSRC VISION 2050 award in the working together category. A portion of HAPI grant dollars contributes to a joint implementation project to develop a south King County monitoring database. Provided technical assistance and program management for projects at the intersection of housing and human services, including overseeing professional services to develop the HB 1590 housing and human services needs assessment (completed in 2021) and the human services assessment and plan (ongoing). Enhanced rental registration program efficiency for landlords and streamlined internal processes by advancing changes with finance to remove the requirement for a city business license and to migrate applications and database management into the city’s existing platform with online application capabilities. Partnered with the Renton Housing Authority (RHA) to secure $9.5 million in public funds for the 75‐unit Sunset Gardens affordable rental housing project, including $1.5 million of City of Renton HB 1590 funding allocated by the city council in 2021. An additional $1,768,000 “Connecting Housing to Infrastructure Program” (CHIP) grant was received by the city from the Department of Commerce that benefited the project. Partnered with South King Housing and Homelessness Partners (SKHHP) to establish the South King County Housing Capital Fund, which released its inaugural application cycle in 2022. Renton contributed $337,319.53 in pooled SHB 1406 dollars to the housing capital fund, with a commitment to continue to pool through 2024. Partnered with Homestead Community Land Trust to advocate for state legislative changes and additional resources for permanently affordable homeownership and to fund phase two of the Willowcrest Townhomes which is anticipated to be a 19‐unit affordable homeownership project. As part of the overall administration of the multi‐family tax exemption program, issued two final certificates of exemption for the Merrill Gardens at Renton addition and Penny Lofts. An additional two projects have agreements with the city for exemptions pending successful completion (Sunset Terrace and Solera). Represented the city in county, regional, and state housing forums and advised on issues related to the multi‐family tax exemption, countywide planning policies, and HB 1220 legislative changes to the Growth Management Act (GMA) housing requirements. 2023/2024 Goals  Continued focus on execution of recommendations in the HAP in coordination with the community and economic development department. Establish a long‐term plan on the use of House Bill 1590 funds for support of affordable housing and behavioral and mental health supportive services. Continue efforts to advocate and secure funding for housing related services through public, private, philanthropic, and non‐profit partnerships. Continue outreach and communication on the city’s rental registration program and continue coordination with code compliance for enforcement of properties. Continue to actively represent the city in county, regional, and state housing forums. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-57Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services 1 These positions resided in CED prior to the creation of EHHS in 2021. The 2020 actual expenditures and 2021/2022 original budget for these positions are reflected in CED’s department  budget.   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Housing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 0 0 229,270 0 248,325 270,470 280,967 100.0% 3.9% Personnel Benefits 0 0 64,952 0 78,688 99,889 105,458 100.0% 5.6% Supplies 002902,61700N/AN/A Other Services and Charges 0 0 913,285 0 203,100 197,617 97,617 100.0%‐50.6% Interfund Payments 0 0 16,133 0 43,463 37,593 39,035 100.0% 3.8% Transfer Out 0000000N/AN/A Total 0 0 1,223,668 0 576,193 605,569 523,077 100.0%‐13.6% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Housing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE1 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-58Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services Community Outreach  Mission  Increase the level of engagement with the city’s diverse communities reflected in our most recent census data and develop  systems that foster dialog, transparency of city’s operations, and increased access in order to build an inclusive and informed  community that strives for equitable outcomes for all in support of social, economic, and racial justice.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Onboarded a new community outreach coordinator. Connected with those holding similar positions in other city departments to begin building a collaborative approach to coordinated outreach efforts working toward achieving the city’s business plan. Established contacts and regular interaction with the city’s diverse community members and stakeholders. Commenced development and implementation engagement strategies to attract participants who reflect the city’s diversity. Began to develop baseline and periodic metrics for community engagement. 2023/2024 Goals   Continue to develop community outreach efforts and training and educational materials that promote equity and inclusion in city programs based on Title VI criteria. Create a program that will coordinate with the neighborhood program resources that serves residents that reside in apartments, townhomes, condominiums, or homes that do not fall within recognized neighborhoods. Nearly half of the Renton community are renters, and this will expand the opportunity to create community and connection to local government. Create forums and opportunities to gather community input and perspectives, including digital spaces from residents that reflect the census demographics. Collect and analyze data collected measuring metrics for community engagement through the city’s existing tools and resources. Support with the execution of the human services needs assessment when it comes to engagement and outreach. Support the Housing Action Plan needs when it comes to engagement an outreach. Participate and support the mayor’s inclusion task force. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Community Outreach 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 0 0 0 0 104,379 98,920 108,108 100.0% 9.3% Personnel Benefits 0 0 0 0 59,458 31,054 33,831 100.0% 8.9% Transfer Out 0000000N/AN/A Total 0 0 0 0 163,837 129,973 141,939 100.0% 9.2% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Community Outreach 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 100.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-59Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services Neighborhood Programs  Mission  Promote and support a more livable, vibrant, and cohesive community by providing opportunities for the public to access city  guidance and resources which connect and engage residents, neighborhoods, businesses, and the city through diverse  opportunities for partnerships, volunteerism, and programs.   2021/2022 Accomplishments  Leveraged technology to utilize Energov to create online application and communication portals for neighborhood program grants. Expand the neighborhood program’s grant opportunities to create a partnering program that serves our renting community members and asses the current grant process for the neighborhood program to ensure funding is providing the most impact to the community. Created a plan to re‐establish the neighborhood program’s staff liaison group which will offer residents city resources, in addition to the neighborhood program coordinator. Re‐established the neighborhood gatherings after a two‐year hiatus resulting from the COVID‐19 pandemic. 2023/2024 Goals   Launch Bang the Table software program to provide a digital space for engagement and communication for the neighborhood program. Launch the neighborhood program online grant portal using Energov. Survey participating neighborhoods annually to understand their interest, needs, and evolve the program’s processes and structure. Analyze grant and reimbursement process through an equity lens. Coordinate four city hosted events for the neighborhood program annually. 1 This position resided in parks and recreation prior to moving to executive as part of the citywide reorganization in 2021. In 2022, neighborhood programs transferred to EHHS. The 2020 actual expenditures and 2021/2022 original budget for this position is reflected in parks and recreation’s department budget.   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Neighborhood Programs 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 0 0 91,519 0 102,477 98,129 107,263 100.0% 9.3% Part‐Time Salaries 0 0 0 0 0 7,430 7,430 100.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 0 0 48,404 0 59,870 24,138 26,097 100.0% 8.1% Supplies 0 0 3,905 0 0 16,250 16,250 100.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 13,698 75,000 8,978 75,000 75,000 77,800 77,750 3.7%‐0.1% Interfund Payments 0 0 5,823 0 8,483 8,031 8,218 100.0% 2.3% Transfer Out 0000000N/AN/A Total 13,698 75,000 158,629 75,000 245,831 231,778 243,008 209.0% 4.8% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Neighborhood Programs 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE1 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.21 0.21 100.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$                 ‐$                 ‐$                 ‐$                 ‐$                8,576$           8,576$           100.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-60Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services Human Services  Mission  Provide information and referrals to resources and services through community partnerships that promote safety, health,  and security and are inclusive, integrated, that are respectful of cultural and linguistic differences, foster equity and dignity,  and provide emotional support for vulnerable and marginalized residents in the City of Renton.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  •Successfully  implemented  the  monthly  pop‐up  lunch  events  with  community  partner  Emergency  Feeding Program/SOS, providing fresh prepackaged food items to vulnerable residents with food insecurities. Pop‐up lunch events occurred on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Pop‐up locations rotated around the city to ensure highest impacts were made to those areas in need. •Worked in conjunction with the community economic and housing division to enhance the human services element of the comprehensive assessment plan. •Coordinated  with the King County Regional Homelessness Authority and  community  organizations  serving  the homeless  on  the  One  Night  Count event. These organizations included Coordinated Entry, Renton Ecumenical Association of Churches, and Renton Chamber of Commerce. •Completed multiple manufactured home siding replacement program projects with Habitat for Humanity. •Established additional community partners, like Rotary and Club 21, on the repair or replacement of appliances for low‐income residents. •Provided application review and technical assistance via virtual meetings to multiple agencies requesting in‐depth assistance with funding applications. •Completed  Renton‐specific  eligibility  reviews  on  over  100  applications  for  funding,  while  financial  reviews  were completed on 97 Renton‐specific applications for funding. •Completed administrative review on over 200 applications as part of the work needed for the South King County funding cycle. •Continued to meet federal guidelines on spending of the 2019 CDBG funds. Submitted documents and reports for reimbursement, including the Housing Repair Assistance Program’s (HRAP) completion of the CDBG contract with King County using Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) funding. •Partnered  with  Rod  Kirkwood  to  provide  over  100  low‐income  Renton  homeowners  with  a  new  installed  home appliance. Approximately $55,000 was spent over the past two years. 2023/2024 Goals  Consult with the IT division to create a more intuitive database for the housing repair program. Create HRAP brochures in various languages to build new partnerships with ethnic communities where English is a second language. Continue to build on recruiting, training, and workshops on inclusion and equity, to build capacity with the Human Services Advisory Committee to be informed of community needs and resources available. Ensure that 90% of all 2023‐2024 contracts are completed and signed by April 10, 2023. Establish a working timeline with the community and economic development department to use Community Development Block Grants to fund economic development projects for façade improvements. Create a new bi‐annual survey of contracted agencies for the regional funding application in 2024. Complete the human services needs assessment and create an implementation plan to execute recommendations. Merge seamlessly with all EHHS department divisions to provide quality service to internal and external stakeholders. Develop partnerships with local nonprofit agencies to establish an ongoing contract to operate the severe weather shelter. Create a contracted engagement specialist position with a community agency to support vulnerable populations and provide services and resources at point‐of‐contact. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-61Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services Develop a community outreach program to support residents needing social services, mental health assistance, or experiencing food insecurities. Establish the first behavioral health center in Renton, providing mental health services and homelessness resources including showers, housing navigation, and mail in post/out post services. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Human Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 424,479 435,085 412,349 448,708 441,967 486,369 509,889 8.4% 4.8% Overtime 001,3940000N/AN/A Personnel Benefits 187,141 211,052 181,463 223,892 241,418 244,395 260,443 9.2% 6.6% Supplies 8,254 15,650 11,269 15,650 17,708 15,650 15,650 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 766,439 634,943 900,444 634,943 3,155,475 886,368 886,368 39.6% 0.0% Interfund Payments 82,467 121,913 83,587 123,807 115,057 121,093 123,302 ‐2.2% 1.8% Transfer Out 0 0 0 0 14,187 0 0 N/A N/A Total 1,468,780 1,418,644 1,590,507 1,447,001 3,985,812 1,753,875 1,795,652 21.2% 2.4% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Human Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 4.504.504.504.504.004.004.00‐11.1% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-62Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services   Equity, Housing, & Human Services Position Listing Grade Title 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized  Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted  Adopted Administration Division M49 Equity, Housing & Human Services Administrator 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M37 Equity Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to EHHS 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A09 Administrative Secretary 1 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Administration Division 0.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 Housing Division M33 Community Development and Housing Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M27 Housing Programs Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Housing Division 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Human Services Division M29 Human Services Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A20 Human Services Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A20 Housing Repair Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A13 Housing Maintenance Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A09 Administrative Secretary 1 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Human Services Division 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.00 4.00 4.00 Community Outreach Division M22 Community Outreach Coordinator 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Community Outreach Division 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Neighborhood Programs Division A22 Neighborhood Programs Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Neighborhood Programs Division 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Equity, Housing & Human Services 7.50 7.50 10.50 7.50 11.00 12.00 12.00 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-63Budget by Department - Equity, Housing, and Human Services *The Utility Billing positions (4 FTEs) are funded by utility rate revenues (vs. General Fund). ADMINISTRATOR Kari Roller 24 FTEs Fiscal Services  Director Kristin Trivelas Finance Operation 6 FTEs Accounts  Receivable Accounts Payable Payroll Utility Billing* 5 FTEs Tax & Licensing 3 FTEs Budget &  Accounting 6 FTEs Budget Financial  Reporting General  Accounting Grant  Administration 1 FTE Administrative  Support 1 FTE Finance  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-64Budget by Department - Finance Finance Department  Mission  A collaborative partnership empowering customers with timely, accurate, and transparent financial services.  Core Businesses Services  The finance department is responsible for a broad range of services and information for both internal and external customers.  Core operational services include cash receipting, utility billing, business tax and licensing, payroll, accounts payable and  accounts receivable. Additionally, the finance department is responsible for grant management, including regulatory  compliance, and for accounting and financial reporting, including the development of the biennial budget and preparation of  the city’s annual financial statements, which are audited by the Washington State Auditor’s Office.  List of Renton Results Decision Packages:  Performance Measures:  2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 4,222,728 4,787,282 4,677,832 4,932,463 6,135,015 6,086,663 6,311,514 23.4% 3.7% Position Summary 23.00 23.00 24.00 23.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 8.7% 0.0% 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100004.0011 Tax & Licensing 3.00   466,312   ‐    3.00    485,940    ‐     500004.0009 Utility Billing and Cashiering 5.00   772,186   ‐    5.00    802,920    ‐     600004.0123 Finance Operations 6.00   817,669   ‐    6.00    857,514    ‐     600004.0126 Budget and Accounting 6.00   1,172,973   ‐    6.00    1,225,026   ‐     600004.0128 Asset, Debt, and Treasury Management ‐    971,650   100,000     ‐    983,500    100,000      600004.0130 Finance Administration 3.00   1,290,502   ‐    3.00    1,343,355   ‐     600004.0132 Grants Program 1.00   146,476   ‐    1.00    155,744    ‐     650004.0034 ERP Transition 1.00   165,419   ‐    1.00    183,041    ‐     650004.0035 Bank Merchant Fee ‐    30,000    ‐    ‐    30,000    ‐     700005.0017 Fire Pension ‐    210,475   400,000     ‐    200,475    380,000      750005.0002 Increase Fire Pension Annual Expenditures ‐    43,000    ‐    ‐    44,000    ‐     Total 25.00    6,086,663$       500,000$        25.00   6,311,514$      480,000$         City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 Results 2021 Results Business License renewals will be  issued within one day of receipt of  payment.   89% 92% 82% 89% no data Number of compliance audits  performed annually.500 349 159 333 320 Average Utility Billing aged accounts  receivable (over 90 days) as percent of  annual revenue. 0.0047% 0.0042% 0.0031% 0.6200% 1.02% New Utility Billing accounts will be set  up within 5 business days of  notification (via final permit, email,  etc.). 100% 100%97%95%94% Safeguard public interests  and assets. Maintain or improve the City's credit  rating of AA (S&P's) for General  Obligation Bonds and AA+ (S&P's) for  Revenue Bonds.   AA+/AA+ AA+/AA+ AAA/AA+ AAA/AA+ AAA/AA+ Safety and Health Encourage the community to  comply with local, state and  federal laws. Internal Support Operate and maintain  utilities. Utilities and  Environment 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-65Budget by Department - Finance Highlight of Budget Changes:  Reorganization of administrative services department. IT and city clerk moved to executive services department and administrative services department renamed to finance department. Increased merchant fees due to increased volume, demand, and service. Added $162,000 for one new limited term senior finance analyst to support new enterprise resource planning (ERP) software transition beginning in 2023; additional staffing for this effort will support the research, analysis, implementation, and testing of the new program. Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Finance 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 3,716,364 2,907,130 2,017,274 2,976,882 2,580,021 2,549,402 2,602,815 ‐14.4% 2.1% Operations 15 821,733 676,778 861,403 886,588 898,119 941,856 4.3% 4.9% Tax & Licensing 0 410,556 493,361 428,770 652,937 466,312 485,940 8.8% 4.2% Grant Administration 0 0 25,054 0 176,010 146,476 155,744 100.0% 6.3% Utility Billing 506,349 647,862 594,076 665,407 688,791 691,736 718,577 4.0% 3.9% Budget & Accounting 0 0 871,288 0 1,150,668 1,334,617 1,406,582 100.0% 5.4% Total 4,222,728 4,787,282 4,677,832 4,932,463 6,135,015 6,086,663 6,311,514 23.4% 3.7% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Finance 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,661,811 1,949,375 1,789,463 2,017,396 2,401,239 2,611,964 2,739,918 29.5% 4.9% Overtime 419 21,000 172 21,000 21,000 21,000 21,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 950,004 1,214,473 1,022,572 1,278,547 1,438,215 1,370,980 1,444,743 7.2% 5.4% Supplies 2,850 11,975 13,523 11,975 11,975 24,975 15,975 108.6%‐36.0% Other Services and Charges 1,232,284 1,121,698 1,415,761 1,123,548 1,573,548 1,376,698 1,388,548 22.5% 0.9% Interfund Payments 375,361 468,761 436,341 479,997 689,037 677,271 699,846 41.1% 3.3% Transfer Out 000003,7751,485100.0%‐60.7% Total 4,222,728 4,787,282 4,677,832 4,932,463 6,135,015 6,086,663 6,311,514 23.4% 3.7% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Finance 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.00 0.0% Operations 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 0.00 0.0% Tax & Licensing 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.00 0.0% Grant Administration 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Utility Billing 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 0.00 0.0% Budget & Accounting 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 7.00 7.00 0.17 0.0% Total FTE 23.00 23.00 24.00 23.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 8.7% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-66Budget by Department - Finance Finance Administration  1The 2020 actual include expenditures for 6.0 FTEs reflected in the finance operations division.  Financial Operations  Mission  Partner with city departments and the business community to provide timely, effective, and legal procurement of and  payment for goods and services; manage the city’s billing and collection functions; provide accurate payment of salaries and  benefits to city personnel, including external regulatory reporting and compliance of payroll taxes.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Expanded the use of Laserfiche electronic filing of payroll records. Developed a standard operating procedure (SOP) library to document and track desktop procedures for use as a job aid in cross‐training, onboarding, and backfilling due to attrition. Conducted citywide training on city processes to ensure ongoing internal controls in key financial areas. Transitioned to a new collection agency to better address the needs of the city when it comes to delinquent accounts. 2023/2024 Goals  Automate accounts receivable (AR) workflow utilizing Laserfiche to process department requests more efficiently. Update stale policies to account for economic changes, such as inflation, and incorporate new procedures with streamlined operations developed as a result of hybrid work model. Update emergency protocols to ensure continued operations. 1The 2020 actual expenditures for these positions are reflected in finance administration division.    Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Finance Administration 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries1 869,469 281,976 248,713 287,397 472,305 433,022 454,994 50.7% 5.1% Overtime 419000000N/AN/A Personnel Benefits 592,357 293,305 320,197 297,160 398,844 384,349 392,655 29.3% 2.2% Supplies 2,850 11,975 13,079 11,975 11,975 24,975 15,975 108.6%‐36.0% Other Services and Charges 1,147,878 953,055 998,945 954,905 1,007,860 1,026,010 1,037,860 7.4% 1.2% Interfund Payments 375,361 468,761 436,341 479,997 689,037 677,271 699,846 41.1% 3.3% Transfer Out 000003,7751,485100.0%‐60.7% Total 2,988,333 2,009,072 2,017,274 2,031,434 2,580,021 2,549,402 2,602,815 25.5% 2.1% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Finance Administration 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.0% 0.0% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Finance Operations 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 0 514,628 455,906 534,031 555,392 599,454 624,841 12.3% 4.2% Overtime 0 1,000 172 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 0 301,954 217,953 322,221 326,044 293,513 311,863 ‐8.9% 6.3% Supplies 003950000N/AN/A Other Services and Charges 15 4,152 2,352 4,152 4,152 4,152 4,152 0.0% 0.0% Total 15 821,733 676,778 861,403 886,588 898,119 941,856 4.3% 4.9% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Finance Operations 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE1 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-67Budget by Department - Finance Utility Billing  Mission  To keep customers connected to essential services through timely and accurate billing, communication, and excellent  customer service.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Implemented successful remote work policies and procedures to ensure uninterrupted utility billing, cashiering, and customer service operations for emergencies and hybrid work environments. Developed new collection practices to assist customers through pandemic crisis while adhering to RCW mandates. Collaborated with IT to create Laserfiche library for electronic filing of required utility billing records, per state retention schedules. 2023/2024 Goals  Thoroughly review and audit various internal controls and continue to create an SOP library to ensure city utility billing and cashiering operational procedures are documented. Continue to streamline processes and reporting options that benefit internal and external customers. Update various Renton Municipal Codes pertaining to Renton utility services. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Utility Billing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 274,347 314,887 315,054 320,954 338,791 357,206 371,927 11.3% 4.1% Overtime 0 20,000 0 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 147,612 183,975 168,667 195,453 201,000 185,530 197,650 ‐5.1% 6.5% Other Services and Charges 84,391 129,000 110,355 129,000 129,000 129,000 129,000 0.0% 0.0% Total 506,349 647,862 594,076 665,407 688,791 691,736 718,577 4.0% 3.9% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Finance ‐ Utility Billing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-68Budget by Department - Finance Tax and Licensing  Mission  Working in partnership with businesses with integrity, service, excellence, and equity to administer Renton’s tax and license  regulations while delivering high‐quality customer service.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Completed a metadata cleanup in Laserfiche to label imaged documents for ease of access. Implemented an email notification process prior to mailing license renewals and delinquent notices. 2023/2024 Goals  Administer changes to the business & occupation tax effective January 1, 2023. Continue to work with Washington State Employment Security Department to finalize data sharing agreement to build resources that will assist in detections and audits of unregistered businesses in Renton. Enhance commitment and focus on external customer service through ongoing business workshops. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Tax & Licensing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 129,870 250,772 216,564 260,642 282,797 296,641 308,354 13.8% 3.9% Personnel Benefits 60,075 124,293 100,507 132,637 149,649 129,181 137,095 ‐2.6% 6.1% Supplies 00490000N/AN/A Other Services and Charges 0 35,491 176,241 35,491 100,491 40,491 40,491 14.1% 0.0% Total 189,945 410,556 493,361 428,770 532,937 466,312 485,940 8.8% 4.2% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Finance ‐ Tax & Licensing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-69Budget by Department - Finance Budget and Accounting  Mission  Provide financial analysis, accounting, and budget services, including preparation of the Annual Comprehensive Financial  Report (ACFR) and biennial budget, as well as adherence to financial and budgetary compliance with governing regulations  and city policies.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Performed a general ledger (GL) system cleanup to better align GL accounts with the Budgeting, Accounting, Reporting System manual; standardized GL account structure across the city due to citywide reorganization; and prepare our ERP system for transition to future new system. Received awards for excellence in financial reporting and budgeting from the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA). Organized a vendor fair to provide training and information on contracting opportunities and government bidding processes with a focus on disadvantaged businesses. 2023/2024 Goals  Thoroughly review and audit various internal controls throughout the city and create specialized training and user manuals to ensure city assets and resources are properly protected. Implement a new ERP system due to upcoming software expiration of existing system. Re‐analyze city’s banking needs to ensure best pricing and appropriate service level. Evaluate and implement cost allocations of internal support departments. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Budget & Accounting 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 517,995 587,112 535,032 614,372 638,947 813,050 860,297 32.3% 5.8% Personnel Benefits 210,036 310,946 208,622 331,076 299,676 344,523 369,240 4.1% 7.2% Other Services and Charges 0 0 127,634 0 212,045 177,045 177,045 100.0% 0.0% Total 728,031 898,058 871,288 945,448 1,150,668 1,334,617 1,406,582 41.2% 5.4% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Finance ‐ Budget & Accounting 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 7.00 7.00 16.7% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-70Budget by Department - Finance Grants  Mission  A citywide grant program that effectively meets the needs of the city for centralized, compliant, grant administration.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Created a new grants division to support grant management functions citywide. Onboarded a grants program manager. Provided research and guidance to administration regarding the American Rescue Plan Act eligible uses and compliance requirements. Increased procurement of new grant awards for unique citywide programs. 2023/2024 Goals  Continue to educate departments on granting best practices and compliance measures. Identify citywide funding needs to maximize grant opportunities. Develop resources and tools to assist staff with grant applications and management. Update internal controls to meet federal grant regulations. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Grant Administration 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 0 0 18,194 0 113,007 112,591 119,504 100.0% 6.1% Personnel Benefits 0 0 6,626 0 63,003 33,885 36,240 100.0% 6.9% Other Services and Charges 0 0 235 0 0 0 0 N/A N/A Total 0 0 25,054 0 176,010 146,476 155,744 100.0% 6.3% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Finance ‐ Grant Administration 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 100.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-71Budget by Department - Finance Finance Department Position Listing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Grade Title Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Finance Administration Division M49 Administrative Services Administrator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M38 Fiscal Services Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to ASD 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 N16 Administrative Asssistant to Finance 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Finance Administration Division 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Finance Operations Division M28 Financial Operations Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M18 Payroll Technician III 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N13 Payroll Technician II 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A09 Accounting Assistant IV 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Total Finance Operations Division 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Budget & Accounting Division M33 Budget & Accounting Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M25 Senior Finance Analyst 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 M25 Limited Term Senior Finance Analyst 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 N16 Finance Analyst III 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Budget & Accounting Division 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 7.00 7.00 Utility Billing Division A22 Utility Account Supervisor 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A19 Accounting Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A07 Accounting Assistant III 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Tax & Licensing Division M28 Tax & Licensing Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N16 Tax & Licensing Auditor II 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N13 Tax & Licensing Auditor I 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A09 Accounting Assistant IV 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Grants Program Division M27 Grants Program Manager 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Finance Department 23.00 23.00 24.00 23.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 Total Utility Billing Division Total Tax & Licensing Division Total Grants Program Division 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-72Budget by Department - Finance Human Resources and Risk Management  ADMINISTRATOR Ellen Bradley‐Mak 14.5 FTEs EMPLOYEE RELATIONS 4.5 FTEs Recruitment and Selection  Classification and  Compensation  Investigations and  Compliance Employee/Labor Relations Unemployment BENEFITS 4 FTEs Personnel Benefits Retiree Benefits Wellness Program Protected Leave & ADA Accommodation Workers' Compensation  Claims RISK MANAGEMENT 3 FTEs Property and Casualty  Programs Subrogation Claims Workplace Health and Safety  ADA Facilities Compliance Administrative Support 2 FTE Employee Training and  Development  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-73Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Human Resources and Risk Management Mission  The human resources and risk management (HRRM) department works in partnership with administrators and their teams,  with individual employees and groups, and with employee representatives and the community to provide programs and  services that create a positive, inclusive, and productive work environment that empowers all employees to serve the needs  of our residents.  Description  The department provides a comprehensive array of programs, including recruitment and selection, classification and  compensation, employee/labor relations, employee training and development, property/liability, workplace health and  safety, and employee benefits.  Services are provided primarily to internal customers (i.e. all city departments). For a more  detailed description, see our program descriptions.  Additionally, in response to the COVID‐19 pandemic, HRRM continues to develop programs and procedures to support staff  in continuing operations and maintaining a safe working environment.  List of Human Resources and Risk Management Renton Results Decision Packages:  Human Resources and Risk Management Performance Measures:   2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 15,998,499 18,877,237 18,233,923 20,133,146 21,366,980 24,349,979 25,692,311 20.9% 5.5% Position Summary 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 14.00 14.50 14.50 11.5% 0.0% 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #DescriptionFTETot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 600014.0044 HR/RM Administration 7.70       1,777,809              ‐      7.70             1,844,543       ‐              600014.0045 Risk Management 3.75       5,852,619              4,975,328          3.75             5,783,599       4,960,048     600014.0046 Benefits 2.55       16,573,292   17,547,716            2.55             17,917,271          18,911,518       650014.0014 Cost Increases for Services ‐     15,130       ‐      ‐           15,130             ‐              650014.0015 Employee Accommodation ‐     10,000       ‐      ‐           10,000             ‐              650014.0016 Temporary employee for Laserfiche data transfer ‐     9,600     ‐      ‐           ‐    ‐              650004.0034 ERP Transition 0.50       111,528         ‐      0.50             121,768   ‐              Total 14.50        24,349,979           22,523,044       14.50          25,692,311    23,871,566               2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-74Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Highlight of Budget Changes:  Regular salaries increased by $307,639 in 2023 due to the addition of 1.0 FTE in 2022 after the 2021/2022 budget was adopted, and addition of 0.5 FTE in 2023/2024 to assist in the Enterprise Resource Planning system transition. Personnel benefits increased by $1.9 million in 2023 due to projected increases in overall medical/dental claims and premiums. Other services and charges increased by $952,182 in 2023 due to increase in insurance premiums. Interfund payments increased by $55,438 in 2023 due to increased payments for facilities and indirect costs. Transfer out increased by $956,000 and $901,000 in 2023 and 2024 respectively, due to re‐establishing budget for the annexation sales tax reserves transfer to the general fund. Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Human Resources and Risk Management 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Employee Relations 1,393,876 1,656,832 1,398,222 1,703,366 1,783,308 1,926,240 1,993,593 13.1% 3.5% Benefits 11,884,870 13,943,516 12,955,280 15,127,856 15,195,785 16,573,363 17,917,348 9.6% 8.1% Risk Management 2,719,753 3,276,889 3,880,421 3,301,923 4,387,888 5,850,375 5,781,370 77.2%‐1.2% Total 15,998,499 18,877,237 18,233,923 20,133,146 21,366,980 24,349,979 25,692,311 20.9% 5.5% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Human Resources and Risk Management 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,335,271 1,376,998 1,377,419 1,420,825 1,622,860 1,728,464 1,769,923 21.7% 2.4% Part‐Time Salaries 3,475 25,102 7,338 25,102 25,102 34,702 25,102 38.2%‐27.7% Personnel Benefits 11,915,672 14,499,564 13,193,843 15,665,062 15,751,263 17,590,393 18,891,798 12.3% 7.4% Supplies 10,282 36,284 9,885 36,284 36,284 46,284 46,284 27.6% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 2,441,785 2,573,157 3,332,849 2,609,576 3,480,578 3,561,758 3,605,477 36.5% 1.2% Intergovernmental Services0000000N/AN/A Interfund Payments 292,015 366,132 259,721 376,297 398,026 431,735 452,242 14.7% 4.7% Transfer Out 0 0 52,868 0 52,868 956,643 901,485 100.0%‐5.8% Total 15,998,499 18,877,237 18,233,923 20,133,146 21,366,980 24,349,979 25,692,311 20.9% 5.5% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Human Resources and Risk Management 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Employee Relations 8.007.707.707.707.708.208.206.5%0.0% Benefits 1.75 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 0.0% 0.0% Risk Management 3.25 2.75 2.75 2.75 3.75 3.75 3.75 36.4% 0.0% Total FTE 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 14.00 14.50 14.50 11.5% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.100.600.200.600.600.830.6038.2%‐27.7% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 3,953$        25,102$      8,376$     25,102$      25,102$      34,702$      25,102$      38.2%‐27.7% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-75Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Employee Relations Division   Mission  Provide a broad range of candidate and employee services in a timely, responsive, and reliable manner to attract and retain  an effective and inclusive workforce necessary to provide services to our community members.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Negotiated and finalized successor union contracts with two bargaining groups. Revised and created personnel policies, procedures, and job descriptions to address and adapt to the changing needs of our workforce. Completed a market study of non‐represented positions and implemented a 1st phase of adjustments. Recruited a record number of new hires to the city, in response to turnover and coming out of the hiring slowdown of 2020. Began the transition to an electronic system for personnel files, eliminating the need for paper files. Continued to implement strategies as laid out in the 2021 HR Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Tactical Plan and monitored progress. 2023/2024 Goals  Streamline processes to positively affect the employment experience for Renton staff. Continue to build an inclusive, informed, and hate‐free city by recruiting and retaining a qualified workforce and implementing strategies laid out in the 2021 HR Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Tactical Plan. Complete the transition to electronic records and maintain the Laserfiche system. Negotiate successor bargaining agreements. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Employee Relations Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 785,318 779,787 786,803 800,597 839,333 938,046 982,671 17.2% 4.8% Part‐Time Salaries 3,475 25,102 7,338 25,102 25,102 34,702 25,102 38.2%‐27.7% Personnel Benefits 301,789 336,496 304,418 355,611 362,850 387,523 413,021 9.0% 6.6% Supplies 2,951 21,828 7,680 21,828 21,828 31,828 31,828 45.8% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 68,759 207,663 97,642 207,663 229,838 214,968 214,968 3.5% 0.0% Interfund Payments 231,585 285,956 194,342 292,566 304,357 315,398 324,518 7.8% 2.9% Transfer Out 0 0 0 0 0 3,775 1,485 100.0%‐60.7% Total 1,393,876 1,656,832 1,398,222 1,703,366 1,783,308 1,926,240 1,993,593 13.1% 3.5% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Employee Relations Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 8.00 7.70 7.70 7.70 7.70 8.20 8.20 6.5% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.10 0.60 0.20 0.60 0.60 0.83 0.60 38.2%‐27.7% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 3,953$        25,102$      8,376$        25,102$      25,102$      34,702$      25,102$      38.2%‐27.7% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-76Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Benefits Division  Mission  Provide a comprehensive, cost‐effective employee benefit package and wellness program that serves to attract and retain a  qualified staff and promote a healthy, productive workforce. Encourage full and appropriate utilization of benefits through  employee outreach and training. Manage the programs and ensure efficient, consistent, and accountable service by city staff  and vendors, and compliance with all applicable laws and policies.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Updated and communicated procedures to support a hybrid workplace, including accommodating high‐risk workers and those requiring leave for illness or childcare in response to the COVID‐19 pandemic. Reviewed city policies related to benefits and updated as needed. Conducted required third‐party audit of self‐funded insurance plans claims administration and took corrective follow up action. Implemented new VEBA benefit for AFSCME employees, per adopted collective bargaining agreement. Due to retirement of HR benefits manager, hired a new senior benefits analyst to replace senior benefits analyst who was promoted to the HR benefits manager position. 2023/2024 Goals  Conduct a compliance audit of the self‐funded insurance plans with insurance broker, taking any corrective action that is necessary. Utilize existing software technology to convert paper process and streamline procedures for initiating self‐funded workers’ compensation claims. Utilize existing software technology to file backlog of documents into electronic format. Provide training for managers and supervisors on protected leave, i.e. FMLA, Washington state PFML, and workers’ compensation. Review city policies related to benefits and update as needed. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Benefits Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 216,683 301,131 295,648 308,058 352,395 327,769 350,543 6.4% 6.9% Personnel Benefits 11,090,376 13,047,361 12,088,659 14,184,800 14,198,454 15,481,678 16,747,783 9.1% 8.2% Supplies 6,930 7,500 1,669 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,500 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 510,450 507,348 503,925 543,767 543,767 640,079 683,798 17.7% 6.8% Interfund Payments 60,430 80,176 65,379 83,731 93,669 116,337 127,724 38.9% 9.8% Total 11,884,870 13,943,516 12,955,280 15,127,856 15,195,785 16,573,363 17,917,348 9.6% 8.1% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Benefits Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 1.75 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-77Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Risk Management Division  Mission  Provide a safe environment for our employees and community members, minimize the city’s risk of unexpected financial  losses, and protect the city’s assets by identifying, analyzing, and implementing loss prevention and safety programs and  developing effective channels of communication through excellent customer service.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Provided safety and risk management support to City of Renton departments to proactively identify, assess, and mitigate risks, ultimately reducing asset losses, including prevention of injury and contagion. Support to departments included addition of one limited‐term FTE, funded through ARPA‐related funds derived from pandemic revenue loss. Protected the city from catastrophic losses through the purchasing and managing of excess insurance through the city’s property and liability insurance broker, Alliant. Collected funds owed to the city from responsible third parties for damage to city property. 2023/2024 Goals   Provide safety and risk management support to City of Renton departments to proactively identify, assess, mitigate risks, and ultimately save the city from human and monetary asset losses. Protect the city from catastrophic losses through the purchasing and managing of excess insurance through the city’s property and liability insurance broker, Alliant. Continue collecting funds owed to the city from responsible third parties for damage to city property. Review and update safety and risk management‐related policies and procedures. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Risk Management Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 333,269 296,080 294,968 312,171 431,132 462,649 436,710 48.2%‐5.6% Personnel Benefits 523,507 1,115,707 800,766 1,124,651 1,189,959 1,721,191 1,730,993 53.0% 0.6% Supplies 401 6,956 536 6,956 6,956 6,956 6,956 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 1,862,576 1,858,146 2,731,282 1,858,146 2,706,973 2,706,711 2,706,711 45.7% 0.0% Transfer Out 0 0 52,868 0 52,868 952,868 900,000 100.0%‐5.5% Total 2,719,753 3,276,889 3,880,421 3,301,923 4,387,888 5,850,375 5,781,370 77.2%‐1.2% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Risk Management Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 3.252.752.752.753.753.753.7536.4%0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-78Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Human Resources and Risk Management Position Listing 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted  Adopted  Employee Relations M49 Human Resources/Risk Management Administrator 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 M38 HR Labor Relations & Compensation Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M36 HR Labor Relations & Compensation Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M25 Senior Employee Relations Analyst 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.50 3.50 M25 Senior Benefits Analyst 0.50 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 N16 Administrative Assistant to Human Resources 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N13 Human Resources Specialist 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N01 Office Specialist 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Employee Relations 8.00 7.70 7.70 7.70 7.70 8.20 8.20 Benefits M49 Human Resources/Risk Management Administrator 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 M34 Human Resources Benefits Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M30 Human Resources Benefits Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M25 Senior Benefits Analyst 0.50 1.30 1.30 1.30 1.30 1.30 1.30 Total Benefits 1.75 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 2.55 Risk Management M49 Human Resources/Risk Management Administrator 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 M34 Risk Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M30 Risk Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M25 Senior Benefits Analyst 1.00 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 M25 Senior Risk Analyst 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M23 Risk Management Analyst 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M22 Employee Health & Safety Coordinator 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M20 Risk Management Analyst 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Risk Management 3.25 2.75 2.75 2.75 3.75 3.75 3.75 Total Human Resources and Risk Management 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 14.00 14.50 14.50 Grade Title 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-79Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management POLICE CHIEF Jon Schuldt 171 FTEs Deputy Chief Vacant 51 FTEs Patrol Services 17 FTEs Traffic Animal Control Parking  Enforcement Graffiti Abatement  Coordinator Special  Operations 17 FTEs Directed  Enforcement  Team Special  Enforcement  Team Administrative  Services 16 FTEs Training School Resource  Officers Communications  & Engagement Electronic Home  Detention Professional  Standards Volunteer  Program Deputy Chief Jeff Hardin 118 FTEs Patrol Operations 73 FTEs Patrol Officers Investigations 24 FTEs Detectives Evidence  Technicians Domestic Violence  Victim Advocate Crime Analyst Staff Services 20 FTEs Front Counter Records Administrative  Support 1 FTE Chaplains Police  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-80Budget by Department - Police Police   Mission  Working together to provide professional and unbiased law enforcement services to our community.   Description  The department assumes a leadership role in the community in addressing crime and safety‐related concerns. This role  involves implementing proactive and reactive measures to reduce both the fear of crime and actual crime in our community.  List of Police Renton Results Decision Packages:  2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 37,940,889 42,530,483 41,412,792 43,642,136 48,626,347 49,328,345 51,334,423 13.0% 4.1% Position Summary 163.40 163.40 164.00 163.40 164.00 171.00 171.00 4.7% 0.0% 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTETot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100008.0120 Auxiliary Services ‐ Jail ‐     4,700,000    ‐    ‐   4,935,000     ‐    100008.0121 Patrol Operations 69.00     15,306,963     ‐    69.00   16,186,466   ‐    100008.0122 Staff Services 18.00     2,384,622    ‐    18.00   2,532,270     ‐    100008.0123 Police Administration 4.00   9,165,279    ‐    4.00     9,355,747     ‐    100008.0124 Investigations 24.00     4,714,429    ‐    24.00   4,983,724     ‐    100008.0125 Administrative Services 13.00     2,858,395    225,000    13.00   2,991,162     225,000      100008.0126 Patrol Services 17.00     4,544,492    ‐    17.00   4,720,307     ‐    100008.0127 Special Operations 17.00     3,549,864    ‐    17.00   3,722,736     ‐    100008.0128 Electronic Home Detention Program 2.00   541,807   200,000    2.00     560,869    200,000      150008.0040 Comunications and Community Engagement Manager‐FTE 1.00   180,570   ‐    1.00     200,120    ‐    150008.0042 Valley Communications ‐ Increase ‐     ‐   ‐    ‐   176,000    ‐    150008.0043 Police ‐ Public Records Request Additions 2.00   262,359   ‐    2.00     263,968    ‐    150008.0044 Police ‐ New Equipment ‐     500,000   ‐    ‐   ‐     ‐    150008.0045 Police ‐ Additional Police Officers 4.00   619,564   ‐    4.00     706,052    ‐    Total 171.00   49,328,345$        425,000$       171.00     51,334,423$      425,000$         2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-81Budget by Department - Police Police Performance Measures:  City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 Results 2021 Results Average response time (in minutes) to  Priority I calls.4.61 4.66 4.06 4.44 5.11 Average response time (in minutes) to  Priority II calls.7.35 6.80 6.59 6.13 7.06 Average response time (in minutes) to  Priority III calls.10.94 10.73 10.01 9.21 9.96 Average response time (in minutes) to  Priority IV calls.23.54 23.82 21.99 18.13 20.69 Residents report feeling somewhat or  very safe during the day in their  neighborhood.  90%next survey  2019 survey  canceled survey  canceled next survey  2023 Residents report feeling somewhat or  very safe during the night in their  neighborhood.  73%next survey  2019 survey  canceled survey  canceled next survey  2023 Community report feeling somewhat or  very safe during the day in the  downtown area. 84%next survey  2019 survey  canceled survey  canceled next survey  2023 Community report feeling somewhat or  very safe during the night in the  downtown area. 73%next survey  2019 survey  canceled survey  canceled next survey  2023 Annual percent of successful resolution  or clearance of assigned cases.56% 68% 82% 68% 68% Number of cases processed by staff. 16,367 16,179 14,643 13,223 12,909 Number of warrants processed by staff. 1,526 1,687 1,695 1,888 1,584 Number of citations processed by staff. 11,438 11,047 8,629 7,509 3,779 Number of public records requests  processed by staff (police specific).2,686 2,855 3,596 3,409 3,740 Timely responsiveness and  “Projection of effort” when  the community cannot help  itself. Encourage the community to  comply with local, state and  federal laws. Safety and  Health Encouragement of a self  reliant community through  programs and education. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-82Budget by Department - Police Highlight of Budget Changes:  Interfund payments increased by $1.78 million in 2023 due to city‐wide increases from all internal service funds as well as adjustments to cost drivers. Personnel benefits increased by $614 thousand in 2023 due to projected increases in medical and dental benefit costs and the addition of seven full time employees Regular salaries increased by $2.409 million in 2023 due to cost‐of‐living adjustments and the addition of seven full time employees. Other services and charges increased by $394 thousand & $805 thousand in 2023 and 2024 respectively due to anticipated increases in SCORE and Valley Communications costs. Capital outlay increased by $500 thousand in 2023 to pay for new equipment for the police department. Transfers out increased by $49 thousand in 2023 to pay for new equipment for the seven full time employee positions added. Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Police 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 11,928,357 12,174,530 12,188,218 12,286,692 14,069,524 14,417,664 14,481,782 17.3% 0.4% Patrol Operations 9,549,667 12,847,927 13,466,249 13,277,670 14,608,441 15,631,469 16,585,097 17.7% 6.1% Special Operations 4,457,793 3,835,102 3,319,733 3,984,393 4,889,870 3,838,322 4,025,957 ‐3.7% 4.9% Patrol Services 3,528,090 4,175,438 3,745,613 4,276,359 4,573,547 4,544,492 4,720,307 6.3% 3.9% Investigations 4,002,606 4,180,672 3,954,029 4,322,631 4,725,430 4,710,929 4,980,224 9.0% 5.7% Administrative Services 2,626,262 3,158,548 2,824,277 3,226,702 3,416,509 3,576,038 3,749,707 10.8% 4.9% Staff Services 1,848,112 2,158,266 1,914,675 2,267,688 2,343,027 2,609,431 2,791,349 15.1% 7.0% Total 37,940,889 42,530,483 41,412,792 43,642,136 48,626,347 49,328,345 51,334,423 13.0% 4.1% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Police 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 14,891,984 17,970,465 16,579,745 18,548,230 20,578,204 20,957,196 22,320,228 13.0% 6.5% Part‐Time Salaries 3,150 8,000 6,215 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 0.0% 0.0% Overtime 1,613,289 1,281,397 2,039,963 1,281,797 1,281,797 1,281,397 1,281,797 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 6,320,697 7,494,646 6,561,373 7,988,673 8,294,813 8,602,779 9,189,151 7.7% 6.8% Supplies 371,082 539,541 473,500 539,541 844,169 479,541 479,541 ‐11.1% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 9,236,288 9,223,625 9,930,646 9,223,225 9,460,308 9,617,324 10,027,924 4.3% 4.3% Capital Outlay 20,886 0 227,308 0 0 500,000 0 100.0%‐100.0% Interfund Payments 4,640,249 6,012,809 5,584,959 6,052,670 7,426,569 7,833,222 8,016,246 29.4% 2.3% Transfer Out 843,263 0 9,083 0 732,488 48,885 11,535 100.0%‐76.4% Total 37,940,889 42,530,483 41,412,792 43,642,136 48,626,347 49,328,345 51,334,423 13.0% 4.1% Staffing Levels by Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 0.0% 0.0% Patrol Operations 67.00 67.00 66.00 67.00 69.00 73.00 73.00 9.0% 0.0% Special Operations 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 ‐15.0% 0.0% Patrol Services 16.00 16.00 17.00 16.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 6.3% 0.0% Investigations 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 0.0% 0.0% Admin Services 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 16.00 16.00 6.7% 0.0% Staff Services 17.40 17.40 18.00 17.40 18.00 20.00 20.00 14.9% 0.0% Total FTE 163.40 163.40 164.00 163.40 164.00 171.00 171.00 4.7% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.08 0.23 0.17 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Salaries and Ben 3,476$           9,400$           6,876$           9,400$           9,400$           9,400$           9,400$           0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-83Budget by Department - Police Administration Division  Mission  Provide leadership and guidance that allows the divisions within the department to perform their respective functions in  accordance with our vision, mission, and goals, and to meet the needs of the public we serve while maintaining fiscally  responsible practices.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Successfully transitioned leadership, continuing the momentum and success of the department as a regional leader. Continued our goal of transparency to the community through several initiatives, including body worn cameras, community council to advise on police procedures, and publishing of significant police data and analytics to our webpage for review. Strengthened outreach efforts through personal interaction and social media, reinforcing our commitment to the community. Planned for future internal promotions within the department by providing growth opportunities for current leaders and identifying and developing future leaders through mentorship and training. Implemented the Axon body‐worn camera program to include upgrade of in‐car camera system. 2023/2024 Goals   Recruit and retain a highly qualified and motivated workforce to meet the diverse needs of our community. Continue to meet the needs of the public we serve, maintaining a safe and healthy community for all. Increase engagement and outreach with the goal of interacting with a broader spectrum of the community. Evaluate department effectiveness through polling of populous to be more efficient at identifying their needs and building confidence and trust in our organization.   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Administration Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 648,080 627,255 498,600 639,703 639,703 672,957 699,634 5.2% 4.0% Personnel Benefits 182,812 195,467 168,051 205,122 205,122 239,288 252,922 16.7% 5.7% Supplies 1,993 4,390 10,061 4,390 4,390 4,390 4,390 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 7,756,947 7,438,964 8,021,818 7,438,964 7,468,964 7,862,663 8,273,663 5.7% 5.2% Capital Outlay 0 0 0 0 0 500,000 0 100.0%‐100.0% Interfund Payments 3,332,375 3,908,454 3,480,604 3,998,513 5,319,414 5,089,480 5,239,638 27.3% 3.0% Transfer Out 6,150 0 9,083 0 431,932 48,885 11,535 100.0%‐76.4% Total 11,928,357 12,174,530 12,188,218 12,286,692 14,069,524 14,417,664 14,481,782 17.3% 0.4% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Administration Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Commissioned 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.0% 0.0% Non‐Commissioned 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-84Budget by Department - Police Patrol Operations Division  Mission  The patrol operations division is a 69‐member team responsible for the safety and security of City of Renton residents,  businesses, and visitors. Through 24‐hours‐a‐day, 7‐days‐a‐week coverage, officers respond to all 911 calls for service within  the city, proactively patrol problem areas, and work with the community to improve relationships, resolve issues, and educate  the public.    2021/2022 Accomplishments   Maintained and staffed 24/7 patrol coverage and sustained excellent response to in progress calls for service during and post COVID‐19 era. Effectively used de‐escalation techniques to ensure a safe resolution in a number of incidents using minimum or no force. Continued building relationships with members of the public through community events, programs, and educational opportunities. Re‐activated quarterly patrol training that focuses on tactics and building cohesive response squads. Initiated a patrol centric stand‐by pay system to assist in maintaining minimum staffing levels division wide. 2023/2024 Goals  Increase patrol minimum staffing to address criminal activity and to enhance both officer and public safety in response to calls for service and management of critical incidents. Utilize available technology such as drone, GPS, and cell pings to assist officers in resolving crimes/threats at the safest level possible. Integrate officer wellness and mental health support as regular training curriculum and assist employees in utilizing additional resources. Provide additional training to newer patrol officers yet to receive formal training on the topic of response to an active shooter event.   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Patrol Operations Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 5,163,277 7,593,649 7,707,102 7,841,392 8,979,763 9,284,358 9,947,579 18.4% 7.1% Overtime 759,397 550,473 1,089,253 550,473 550,473 550,473 550,473 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 2,717,302 3,074,128 3,016,444 3,298,430 3,450,619 3,654,824 3,913,837 10.8% 7.1% Supplies 13,476 23,000 10,856 23,000 23,000 23,000 23,000 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 43,689 35,845 63,162 35,845 35,845 35,845 35,845 0.0% 0.0% Capital Outlay 008,6000000N/AN/A Interfund Payments 852,527 1,570,832 1,570,832 1,528,530 1,568,741 2,082,969 2,114,363 36.3% 1.5% Total 9,549,667 12,847,927 13,466,249 13,277,670 14,608,441 15,631,469 16,585,097 17.7% 6.1% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Patrol Operations Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Commissioned 66.00 66.00 66.00 66.00 69.00 73.00 73.00 10.6% 0.0% Non‐Commissioned 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 ‐100.0% N/A Total FTE 67.00 67.00 66.00 67.00 69.00 73.00 73.00 9.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-85Budget by Department - Police Special Operations Division  Mission  The special operations division is comprised of two units that work independently to proactively address quality of life issues  within the city. The Special Enforcement Team (SET) is a plain clothes unit that specializes in long term investigations,  targeting/arresting repeat criminal offenders involved in various crimes. The Directed Enforcement Team (DET) is a uniformed  unit that works in conjunction with citizens, businesses, and other department work groups to proactively address issues that  negatively impact the community. DET primarily specializes in short term investigations, utilizing community outreach and  proactive methods to address criminal activity and promote safety.    2021/2022 Accomplishments  Successfully investigated and participated in a regional effort to reduce criminal activity associated with the sexual exploitation of minors, which resulted in numerous arrests and asset forfeiture. Successfully investigated several large‐scale narcotics investigations. These investigations resulted in the seizure of tens of thousands of fentanyl tablets as well as large quantities of methamphetamine, cocaine, heroin, and marijuana. Successfully targeted numerous repeat offenders to reduce crime, with the assistance of crime analysis information. Successfully participated in numerous community outreach and engagement events. 2023/2024 Goals   Continue working with community groups and other city departments to address quality of life issues regarding the homeless population and nuisance abatement. Increase investigation of sexual predators who target minors. Reduce the impact of drugs in our community by targeting all levels of drug use and distribution. Continue targeting prolific criminal offenders using long term and covert investigation methods. Continue participation in community engagement and outreach events. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Special Operations Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 2,207,593 2,431,609 1,838,376 2,505,418 2,658,912 2,432,482 2,565,345 ‐2.9% 5.5% Part‐Time Salaries 3,150 8,000 6,215 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 0.0% 0.0% Overtime 241,509 207,124 240,932 207,124 207,124 207,124 207,124 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 834,687 1,044,792 718,337 1,109,000 1,099,516 987,449 1,049,369 ‐11.0% 6.3% Supplies 136,837 40,500 122,346 40,500 371,469 40,500 40,500 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 148,951 50,900 142,644 50,900 168,055 50,900 50,900 0.0% 0.0% Capital Outlay 20,8860198,7080000N/AN/A Interfund Payments 153,079 52,177 52,177 63,451 76,238 111,867 104,719 76.3%‐6.4% Transfer Out 711,102 0 0 0 300,556 0 0 N/A N/A Total 4,457,793 3,835,102 3,319,733 3,984,393 4,889,870 3,838,322 4,025,957 ‐3.7% 4.9% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Special Operations Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Commissioned 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 ‐15.0% 0.0% Total FTE 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 ‐15.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.08 0.23 0.17 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 3,476$           9,400$           6,876$           9,400$           9,400$           9,400$           9,400$           0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-86Budget by Department - Police Patrol Services Division  Mission  The mission of the patrol services division is to provide a safer city and increase quality of life for all residents and visitors  through traffic education, enforcement, and engineering. The division also operates animal control services throughout the  city. The primary goal of the division is the reduction of traffic related deaths, personal injury, and property damage due to  traffic collisions.  2021/2022 Accomplishments   Utilization of unmanned air systems (drones) for investigation and reconstruction of fatality and serious collisions, reducing road closure times and overtime hours. Utilization of the Trimble crime scene processing system to aid in investigation and reconstruction of fatality and serious injury collisions. Despite staffing challenges, the patrol services division investigated more than half of all reported collisions. Creation of a foster‐a‐pet program to effectively reduce costs of sheltering animals. Verified 100% of all photo enforcement violations within the required 14‐day time frame. 2023/2024 Goals   Investigate 75% of all reported collisions during service hours. Maintain a 100% clearance rate for all major collision investigations. Effectively respond to all traffic, parking, and animal control complaints. Consistently enforce traffic laws with a concentration on empirically validated problem areas. Continue to verify 100% of all photo enforcement violations within the required 14‐day time frame. Continue high visibility and enforcement action regarding animal control complaints within City of Renton parks.   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Patrol Services Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,564,732 1,711,017 1,424,005 1,764,164 2,000,784 1,989,290 2,109,588 12.8% 6.0% Overtime 246,295 154,859 194,720 155,259 155,259 154,859 155,259 ‐0.3% 0.3% Personnel Benefits 625,297 753,945 582,727 800,124 860,692 831,928 884,292 4.0% 6.3% Supplies 35,161 28,500 21,245 28,500 28,500 28,500 28,500 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 927,261 1,327,400 1,323,197 1,327,000 1,327,000 1,327,400 1,327,000 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 129,343 199,717 199,717 201,312 201,312 212,516 215,668 5.6% 1.5% Total 3,528,090 4,175,438 3,745,613 4,276,359 4,573,547 4,544,492 4,720,307 6.3% 3.9% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Patrol Services Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Commissioned 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 0.0% 0.0% Non‐Commissioned 4.00 4.00 5.00 4.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 25.0% 0.0% Total FTE 16.00 16.00 17.00 16.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 6.3% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-87Budget by Department - Police Investigation Division  Mission  The investigations division is a 24‐member team made up of commissioned and non‐commissioned personnel who have  specialized skills related to the investigation and follow‐up of most felony cases, as well as those cases that may be complex  or sensitive. The investigations division is also responsible for the collection, preservation, and dissemination of evidence.  The division collects, analyzes, and distributes crime information for the city. The division also advocates for the rights of  victims of domestic violence. Members of the division work with the prosecutor’s office and other law enforcement agencies  to ensure successful prosecution of offenders.      2021/2022 Accomplishments  Maintained a case clearance ratio of 68%. Invested in cutting edge crime scene technology (Trimble) which allows reconstruction of crime scenes and major vehicle collisions. Obtained artificial intelligence software that can quickly sort through images related to child sex crimes, saving time and mental health of the sexual assault unit. Built strong relationships with the special operations division who assisted in arrests and warrants of violent offenders. Continued working with Seattle Internet Crimes Against Crimes (ICAC) Taskforce, which is a national network of 61 coordinated task forces representing over 4,500 federal, state, and local law enforcement and prosecutorial agencies who are engaged in proactive and reactive investigations and prosecutions of persons involved in child abuse and exploitation involving the Internet. 2023/2024 Goals  Clear a minimum of 75% of the cases assigned, with efforts to progressively increase that rate through added technologies. Identify and train an additional detective in forensic technology. Train a detective to fill a major crimes investigator position. Fully staff the division and adjust workloads to allow all cases to be fully investigated. Remain fiscally responsible while seeking advanced training to keep detectives up to date on technology that improves case solvability. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Investigation Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 2,537,864 2,625,555 2,423,671 2,707,934 3,040,514 2,991,963 3,180,584 10.5% 6.3% Overtime 262,229 204,510 324,926 204,510 204,510 204,510 204,510 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 864,352 1,053,345 909,055 1,114,815 1,153,136 1,187,471 1,264,244 6.5% 6.5% Supplies 47,135 46,000 53,074 46,000 73,029 46,000 46,000 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 43,139 63,836 55,877 63,836 68,704 33,836 33,836 ‐47.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 121,877 187,426 187,426 185,536 185,536 247,149 251,050 33.2% 1.6% Transfer Out 126,011000000N/AN/A Total 4,002,606 4,180,672 3,954,029 4,322,631 4,725,430 4,710,929 4,980,224 9.0% 5.7% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Investigation Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Commissioned 19.00 19.00 19.00 19.00 19.00 19.00 19.00 0.0% 0.0% Non‐Commissioned 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-88Budget by Department - Police Administrative Services Division  Mission  The administrative services division strives to create a culture that supports a highly skilled and educated workforce, high  performing teams, an environment that supports safety, wellness, innovation, and growth, educating and positively engaging  with our community, and high‐quality service to each other, other divisions, and our community.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Hired and on‐boarded 18 commissioned employees and three non‐commissioned employees during 2021‐2022. Facilitated 16,607.25 hours of training for all department members in 2021, compared to 13,355.65 in 2019. Grow the department’s peer support program in 2021, assisting a number of employees. Facilitated a consulting contract for peer support program specific training with psychologist, Dr. Alex Crampton. This includes a department health/wellness assessment and recommendations from Dr. Crampton. Continued the department’s mentorship program, assigning tenured employees to new hires to assist them through the hiring and training process. Conducted a commander promotional process in 2021 and a sergeant promotional process in 2022, with a partnership with human resources and Aperture EQ. Implemented a new cloud‐based background investigation software, eSOPH (Miller Mendel). This moved the department away from a paper/binder process, increasing efficiency by approximately 50%. Started the accreditation process through Washington Association of Sheriffs & Police Chiefs. Utilized electronic home detention services, generating over $324,744.88 in revenue in 2021. The City of Renton Police Department’s volunteer program provided opportunities coming out of the COVID‐19 pandemic such as the shred‐a‐thon, catalytic converter event, fingerprinting, and pop‐up events. Expanded the department’s social media presence by moving into several social media platforms and increasing the number of people involved with building social media content. Implemented a public information officer (PIO) team structure that consists of three primary PIOs responsible for responding to various media inquiries. Command duty officer – PIO notification communication improved. For more effective communication between divisions, the administrative services division and PIO’s were advocates of creating a process where chiefs, command staff, and PIO’s are notified of command duty officer notifications. This keeps everyone up to date on activity around the city and responding to media inquiries in a timely manner. Completed departmentwide COHORT training (Community Organizers Helping Officers Restore Trust) – meeting the community where they are, building positive relationships. Using the COHORT model, the department started a Cops and Barbers program with a partnership with Major League Barbershop. Officers are expected to stop by on the first Thursday afternoon of each month. This has grown into including off‐duty basketball games on the first Sunday of the month. Valley Law Enforcement (LE) agency diversity recruiting workshop. The city’s Police Department has taken the lead to coordinate a full day recruiting workshop scheduled for November 5, 2022. All Valley LE agencies are expected to participate in the event, focusing on four workshops discussing testing process, interviews, background investigation process, and training. The goal is to bring in more qualified candidates into the LE profession and help take the mystery out of the lengthy hiring process. Briefing training implemented – training arranged around patrol briefings with the purpose of squads/teams training together. Another benefit is not taking officers off the street for training as often, helping with staffing levels. This training concept has allowed the training division to add more training hours than in previous years. School resource officer (SRO) specific training for active shooters/incidents. A three phased training plan was created and completed by all SRO’s. This training was requested by SRO’s to be completed each year. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-89Budget by Department - Police 2023/2024 Goals   Recruit, hire, and train department employees with a goal of being fully staffed by the end of 2023. Complete Washington Association of Sheriffs & Police Chiefs accreditation in 2023. Sergeant Trader transitioning back to the patrol division in 2023, train, support, inspire the incoming sergeant. Eventually shift roles between the two administrative services division sergeants by 2024. The two sergeant roles would include one training sergeant (training team, quartermaster, EHD) and one sergeant for recruiting and background investigations (SROs), potentially adding a background investigator to this team once staffing levels improve by the end of 2024. Continue growing the officer wellness and peer support program trainings. Focus efforts on recruiting – research and implement new technologies to connect with candidates. Through diligent and continual research of the latest industry standards, provide cutting edge training and equipment to all City of Renton Police Department members. Evaluate new platforms for engagement opportunities to reach a broader spectrum of our population.   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Administrative Services Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,546,727 1,630,136 1,477,335 1,676,490 1,813,574 1,972,599 2,088,719 17.7% 5.9% Overtime 48,909 76,594 96,562 76,594 76,594 76,594 76,594 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 545,336 696,834 581,222 737,509 758,543 836,823 892,805 13.5% 6.7% Supplies 130,665 384,151 250,920 384,151 330,780 324,151 324,151 ‐15.6% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 303,577 276,630 304,036 276,630 361,690 276,630 276,630 0.0% 0.0% Capital Outlay 0020,0000000N/AN/A Interfund Payments 51,048 94,203 94,203 75,328 75,328 89,241 90,808 18.5% 1.8% Total 2,626,262 3,158,548 2,824,277 3,226,702 3,416,509 3,576,038 3,749,707 10.8% 4.9% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Administrative Services Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Commissioned 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 0.0% 0.0% Non‐Commissioned 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 7.00 7.00 16.7% 0.0% Total FTE 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 16.00 16.00 6.7% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-90Budget by Department - Police Staff Services Division  Mission  The staff services division provides 24‐hours‐a‐day, 7‐days–a‐week support to City of Renton police officers and the citizens  of Renton. As the police department’s information gateway, staff services strives to provide excellent customer service by  processing all police reports, managing public records requests, and responding to questions from the public in an accurate  and timely manner.   2021/2022 Accomplishments  Developed a process for review and elimination of expired jail records. Eliminated over 18,000 expired records to date. Trained three specialists to process concealed pistol licenses (CPL) and firearm transfer requests, reducing wait times and improving the denial review process. On‐boarded and trained two new specialists. 2023/2024 Goals   Select and train front counter and records specialists to complete staffing. Develop multiple subject matter experts in body‐worn camera video and audio redaction for public records requests. Reduce the need for supervisors to process public records requests by increasing juvenile records training for records staff. Complete process for elimination of expired jail records. Purchase and implement GovQA Court Order module to streamline court order entry and management process.   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Staff Services Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,223,711 1,351,244 1,210,656 1,413,129 1,444,954 1,613,548 1,728,780 14.2% 7.1% Overtime 54,951 87,837 93,571 87,837 87,837 87,837 87,837 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 550,910 676,135 585,537 723,672 767,186 864,996 931,682 19.5% 7.7% Supplies 5,817 13,000 4,998 13,000 13,000 13,000 13,000 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 12,724 30,050 19,912 30,050 30,050 30,050 30,050 0.0% 0.0% Total 1,848,112 2,158,266 1,914,675 2,267,688 2,343,027 2,609,431 2,791,349 15.1% 7.0% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Staff Services Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Non‐Commissioned 17.40 17.40 18.00 17.40 18.00 20.00 20.00 14.9% 0.0% Total FTE 17.40 17.40 18.00 17.40 18.00 20.00 20.00 14.9% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-91Budget by Department - Police Police Department Position Listing (1 of 2) 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2022 2023 2024 Grade Title Authorized Adopted Authorized Adopted Adj Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Administration Commissioned Officers M49 Police Chief 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M46 Police Deputy Chief 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Total Commissioned Officers 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Non‐Commissioned Personnel N16 Administrative Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Non‐Commissioned 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Administration Division 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Patrol Operations Commissioned Officers M38 Commander 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 PC61 Sergeant 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 PC60 Police Officer – Patrol 56.00 56.00 56.00 56.00 58.00 58.00 62.00 62.00 Total Commissioned Officers 66.00 66.00 66.00 66.00 69.00 69.00 73.00 73.00 Non‐Commissioned Personnel PN51 Police Secretary 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Non‐Commissioned 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Patrol Operations Division 67.00 67.00 66.00 67.00 69.00 69.00 73.00 73.00 Special Operations Commissioned Officers M38 Commander 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 PC61 Sergeant 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 PC60 Police Officer – Patrol 16.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 Total Commissioned Officers 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 Total Special Operations Division 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 Patrol Services Commissioned Officers M38 Commander 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 PC61 Sergeant 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 PC59 Police Officer 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 Total Commissioned Officers 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 Non‐Commissioned Personnel PN52 Animal Control Officer 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 PN51 Police Secretary 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 PN51 Parking Enforcement Officer 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 PN50 Parking Enforcement Officer 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Non‐Commissioned 4.00 4.00 5.00 4.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Total Patrol Services Division 16.00 16.00 17.00 16.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-92Budget by Department - Police Police Department Position Listing (2 of 2) 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2022 2023 2024 Authorized Adopted Authorized Adopted Adj Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Investigations Commissioned Officers M38 Commander 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 PC61 Sergeant 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 PC59 Police Officer 16.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 Total Commissioned Officers 19.00 19.00 19.00 19.00 19.00 19.00 19.00 19.00 Non‐Commissioned Personnel PN61 Domestic Violence Victim Advocate 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 PN54 Crime Analyst 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 PN53 Evidence Technician 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 PN51 Police Secretary 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Non‐Commissioned 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Total Investigations Division 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 Administrative Services Commissioned Officers M38 Commander 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 PC61 Sergeant 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 PC59 Police Officer 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Total Commissioned Officers 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 Non‐Commissioned Personnel M30 Communications and Community Engagement Manager 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 PN54 Police Community Program Coordinator 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 PN51 Police Secretary 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 PN56 Electronic Home Detention Jailer 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Total Non‐Commissioned Personnel 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 7.00 7.00 Total Administrative Services Division 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 16.00 16.00 Staff Services Commissioned Officers Total Commissioned Officers 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Non‐Commissioned Personnel M30 Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 PN58 Police Service Specialist Supervisor 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 PN57 Police Service Specialist Lead 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 PN62 Police Service Specialist 13.40 13.40 14.00 13.40 14.00 14.00 16.00 16.00 Total Non‐Commissioned 17.40 17.40 18.00 17.40 18.00 18.00 20.00 20.00 Total Staff Services Division 17.40 17.40 18.00 17.40 18.00 18.00 20.00 20.00 Total Commissioned Officers 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 133.00 133.00 Total Non‐Commissioned Personnel*34.40 34.40 35.00 34.40 35.00 35.00 38.00 38.00 Total Police Department 163.40 163.40 164.00 163.40 164.00 164.00 171.00 171.001 Added SRO officers to Renton High Schools with school district paying a portion of salary * Non‐commissioned positions grade subject to change upon approval of union contract Grade Title 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-93Budget by Department - Police Parks and Recreation  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-94Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Parks and Recreation   Mission  Promote and support a more livable Renton community by providing recreation, museum, special events opportunities, golf  course and modern parks, and undisturbed natural areas.  Core Businesses and Services  Golf Course  The golf course division provides a safe, clean, attractive, accessible, and well‐maintained environment for the public’s  enjoyment of active and passive recreational golfing opportunities along with preserving our natural resources, wildlife  preservation, and environmental stewardship.  Parks and Trails  The parks and trails division provides a safe, clean, attractive, accessible, and well‐maintained environment for the public’s  enjoyment of active and passive recreational opportunities along with natural resource and wildlife preservation and  stewardship.  Parks Planning and Natural Resources  The parks planning and natural resources division provides a comprehensive and interrelated system of parks, recreation,  open spaces, and trails that respond to locally based needs, values, and conditions; provide an appealing and harmonious  environment and protect the integrity and quality of the surrounding natural systems; and create a sustainable and  exemplary urban forest.  Recreation   The recreation division promotes and supports a more livable community by providing opportunities for the public to  participate in diverse recreational, cultural, athletic, and aquatic programs and activities.  Renton History Museum  The Renton History Museum is the city’s only organization dedicated to the preservation, documentation, and education  about the city’s heritage. With the support of the Renton Historical Society, the museum cares for a collection of over  90,000 objects and 14,000 historic photos. The museum also provides changing and permanent exhibits, programs,  publications, and classroom outreach about local history.  2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 14,342,039 18,568,906 14,734,916 19,025,438 20,621,296 19,571,438 20,071,128 2.9% 2.6% CIP Budget Summary 11,604,986 3,838,533 6,913,791 2,528,162 30,941,906 1,071,216 1,940,216 ‐57.6% 81.1% Position Summary 76.00 74.50 75.25 74.50 75.50 76.50 75.50 2.7%‐1.3% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-95Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation List of Parks & Recreation Renton Results Decision Packages:  Parks and Recreation Performance Measures:  2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTETot Exp $Tot Rev $ 200020.0012 Volunteer Program 1.00   143,758   ‐    1.00   149,443    ‐     300020.0154 Museum 1.00   312,495   ‐    1.00   324,050    ‐     300020.0155 Administration/Parks and Recreation 2.00   787,160   ‐    2.00   816,716    ‐     300020.0156 Aquatics 1.40   957,343   406,805    1.40   975,842    406,805      300020.0158 Cultural & Community Engagement 2.90   696,945   290,623    2.90   731,458    246,479      300020.0159 Parks and Trails Program 32.60   6,449,926   10,000     32.60   6,706,799   10,000      300020.0160 Education and Recreational Activities 7.15   2,000,041   425,161    7.15   2,083,240   469,305      300020.0161 Senior Activity Center 4.90   1,262,241   128,000    4.90   1,301,959   128,000      300020.0162 Farmers Market 1.25   185,850   9,955     1.25   193,850    34,404      300020.0163 Recreational Facilities 1.90   1,307,002   278,221    1.90   1,351,561   278,221      350020.0058 Add Three (3) Fleet Vehicles to Parks Maintenance ‐    75,000    ‐    ‐    150,000    ‐     350020.0059 Add One Lead and Two Parks Maintenance Position 3.00   545,083   ‐    3.00   426,543    ‐     500020.0026 Golf Course 12.00   2,748,248   2,833,175    12.00   2,875,457   2,912,455     500020.0027 Parks Planning, Urban Forestry and Na Res 4.40   1,796,603   241,357    4.40   1,843,871   249,680      550020.0023 Increase Golf Course Fees ‐    127,012   328,850    ‐    132,912    408,735      550020.0025 PPNR ‐ Capital Project Manager Conversion 1.00   176,731   ‐    ‐    7,427    ‐     Total Operating 76.50   19,571,438     4,952,147    75.50   20,071,128   5,144,084     360020.0051 CIP ‐ General Gov't ‐    940,000   940,000    ‐    1,279,000   1,279,000     560020.0015 Golf Course MM ‐    81,216    68,100     ‐    211,216    72,200      760020.0005 Parks Impact Mitigation Fund ‐    50,000    ‐    ‐    450,000    ‐     Total CIP ‐    1,071,216   1,008,100    ‐    1,940,216   1,351,200     Total 76.50    20,642,654$         5,960,247$       75.50   22,011,344$       6,495,284$          City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 Results 2021 Results Safety and Health Timely responsiveness and  “projection of effort,” when  the community cannot help  itself. Percent of contracts completed with  agencies by the end of the first quarter  of the first year of the two year funding  cycle. 80% 80% 80% 80% no data Hours of service provided annually by  volunteers.43,733 51,079 54,708 43,766 17,213 17,806 Coordinate and leverage civic  engagement opportunities to conserve  financial resources through use of  volunteers, resulting in annual cost  avoidance ‐ Value of volunteer service. $1,267,820 $1,480,792 $1,586,000 $1,268,800 $499,028 $516,215 Daily Attendance at Senior Center 394 400 400 400 150 150 Percent of attendees at 4th of July,  Renton River Days, and Holiday Lights  events that report overall experience  satisfaction of 3 or better in a scale of  1‐5. 98%96%96%85% no data no data Averge Farmer's Market booth space  occupancy as percentage of available  space. 96 85 82 83 91 60 Number of Museum visitors and people  served by outreach 4,747 7,988 no data no data 7,988 no data Renton Community Center customers  rate their experience and satisfaction  as Good to Excellent N/A 84% no data no data 84% no data Henry Moses Aquatics Center  customers rate their experience and  satisfaction as Good to Excellent N/A N/A no data no data N/A no data Overall customer satisfaction rating is  good to excellent In cleanliness and  appearance of Parks and Trails Systems N/A N/A no data no data N/A no data Utilities and  Environment Protection of open  space/acquisition. Overall customer satisfaction rating is  "good" or better in cleanliness and  appearance of Parks & Trail System next survey 2017 88%next survey 2019 survey canceled survey canceled next survey 2023 Representative  Government Partnership with community  organizations to leverage  resources. Provide or make available  diverse learning and  enrichment opportunities Encourage and foster a strong  sense of community. Provide clean, safe, healthy  and well‐maintained places Livable Community 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-96Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Highlight of Budget Changes:  The community services department went through a re‐organization in August of 2021 now named parks and recreation department. The reorganization had the following impacts: o Human services division was moved and incorporated in the new equity, housing and human services department o Facilities division was moved to the public works department o The neighborhoods portion of the recreation division was moved to the executive department Regular Salaries increased by 6.7% due to adding 3 new parks maintenance positions, cost‐of‐living adjustments, and series promotions. Transfers Out increased to $408,110 from the 2022 original budget due to the golf course increasing the transfer out to its capital investment project fund, and golf course transfers to fleet for new vehicles. Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Parks and Recreation 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 502,089 592,057 658,822 606,402 767,413 800,270 823,226 32.0% 2.9% Parks & Trails 4,819,600 6,783,681 5,497,733 6,980,785 7,128,366 7,331,857 7,563,020 5.0% 3.2% Recreation 4,362,272 6,319,894 4,130,236 6,459,037 6,719,396 6,229,524 6,449,879 ‐3.6% 3.5% Museum 221,057 289,701 229,454 297,273 322,190 312,495 324,050 5.1% 3.7% Golf Course 2,345,917 2,566,000 2,453,144 2,638,766 3,546,523 2,875,260 3,008,369 9.0% 4.6% Parks Plan and Nat Res 2,091,103 2,017,574 1,765,529 2,043,175 2,137,408 2,022,033 1,902,584 ‐1.0%‐5.9% Operating Total 14,342,039 18,568,906 14,734,916 19,025,438 20,621,296 19,571,438 20,071,128 2.9% 2.6% CIP 11,604,986 3,838,533 6,913,791 2,528,162 30,941,906 1,071,216 1,940,216 ‐57.6% 81.1% Total 25,947,025 22,407,439 21,648,708 21,553,600 51,563,202 20,642,654 22,011,344 ‐4.2% 6.6% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Parks and Recreation 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 5,554,227 6,355,645 5,261,918 6,547,380 6,776,078 6,985,820 7,278,877 6.7% 4.2% Part‐Time Salaries 344,516 1,249,472 672,661 1,234,472 1,270,246 1,309,074 1,294,074 6.0%‐1.1% Overtime 35,189 21,596 47,004 21,596 21,596 30,576 30,576 41.6% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 2,229,005 3,376,814 2,265,684 3,549,795 3,614,908 3,459,796 3,639,452 ‐2.5% 5.2% Supplies 583,328 783,749 710,466 783,749 899,739 760,579 760,579 ‐3.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 2,282,272 2,201,101 2,179,507 2,198,551 2,527,034 2,137,321 2,134,821 ‐2.8%‐0.1% Capital Outlay 4,541 20,000 173,552 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 3,226,418 4,492,429 3,307,697 4,597,695 4,643,548 4,460,162 4,582,239 ‐3.0% 2.7% Transfer Out 82,544 68,100 116,427 72,200 848,149 408,110 330,510 465.2%‐19.0% Operating Total 14,342,039 18,568,906 14,734,916 19,025,438 20,621,296 19,571,438 20,071,128 2.9% 2.6% CIP 11,604,986 3,838,533 6,913,791 2,528,162 30,941,906 1,071,216 1,940,216 ‐57.6% 81.1% Total 25,947,025 22,407,439 21,648,708 21,553,600 51,563,202 20,642,654 22,011,344 ‐4.2% 6.6% Staffing Levels by Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% 0.0% Parks & Trails 34.85 34.85 34.85 34.85 34.85 37.85 37.85 8.6% 0.0% Recreation 18.75 18.25 19.00 18.25 19.25 18.25 18.25 0.0% 0.0% Museum 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% 0.0% Golf Course 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 0.0% 0.0% Parks Plan and Nat Res 7.406.406.406.406.405.404.40‐15.6%‐18.5% Total FTE 76.00 74.50 75.25 74.50 75.50 76.50 75.50 2.7%‐1.3% Intermittent FTE 10.63 37.03 19.18 36.67 38.16 38.44 38.08 4.8%‐0.9% Temp/Intermit Salaries and 442,099$    1,540,483$ 797,695$    1,525,483$ 1,587,257$ 1,598,939$ 1,583,939$ 4.8%‐0.9% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-97Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Administration Division  Mission  Provide leadership, guidance, and resources to allow the various divisions within the department to perform their  respective functions in accordance with the city business plan, administration and council policy directives, and the general  needs of the populations they serve.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Reviewed capital projects to meet community needs and budget opportunities. Worked through department transition and services provided. Hired/trained new recreation director, parks planning and natural resources director, and golf course manager. Ongoing, continue to build stronger intra‐departmental partnerships to ensure and improve efficiency, collaboration and responsible use of time, funds, and resources. Completed development and implementation of the community services marketing plan. Began to review and update annual divisional customer satisfaction surveys. Began construction of Family First Community Center in 2022. Began implementation of council approved bond funding ($14.5 million) to address parks maintenance projects backlog. Continued to identify alternate funding opportunities through grants, partnerships, and sponsors. 2023/2024 Goals  Complete construction of the Family First Community Center. Complete identified bond projects. Assess opportunity to continue new round of bond projects to meet the growing community needs. Complete division revision to surveys/process supporting Renton Results. Continue to provide opportunities of engagement throughout the city’s diverse communities. Continue to work through the ‘new normal’ to provide innovative, creative, efficient processes, programs, and events. Update/revise the interlocal agreement with Renton School District for field and facility use. Hold management team retreat on leadership development – 2023. Continue to identify alternative funding opportunities through grants, partnerships, and sponsors. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Administration Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 268,863 272,232 272,191 277,407 288,503 300,979 313,078 8.5% 4.0% Personnel Benefits 93,673 105,974 95,617 110,992 112,978 107,282 113,153 ‐3.3% 5.5% Supplies 1,753 7,200 1,048 7,200 7,200 7,200 7,200 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 12,076 35,544 5,878 35,544 35,544 35,544 35,544 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 121,876 171,107 235,761 175,259 308,832 336,154 347,740 91.8% 3.4% Transfer Out 3,849 0 48,327 0 14,356 13,110 6,510 100.0%‐50.3% Operating Total 502,089 592,057 658,822 606,402 767,413 800,270 823,226 32.0% 2.9% CIP 11,582,362 3,770,433 6,860,445 2,455,962 30,291,428 1,036,216 1,775,216 ‐57.8% 71.3% Total 12,084,451 4,362,490 7,519,267 3,062,364 31,058,841 1,836,486 2,598,442 ‐40.0% 41.5% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Administration Division 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-98Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Parks and Trails Division  Mission  Enhance the quality of life in the City of Renton by providing exceptional park and trail environments, opportunities to build  community through volunteering, stewardship, and access to healthy food choices.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Automated the ordering process for engraved tiles at Veteran’s Memorial Park. Continued interdepartmental efforts to establish and maintain irrigation networks in city right‐of‐way areas. Customized reports and charts to tell our story with data from Cityworks work management software. Implemented dynamic COVID‐19 protocols in parks and programs in compliance with state guidelines. Increased participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program/Market Bucks match at Renton Farmers Market. Installed an AARP outdoor fitness area as part of Renton’s Age‐Friendly city designation. Led interdepartmental efforts to patrol, post, and clear encampment sites on city‐owned properties. Partnered with United Way of King County and Renton School District to facilitate the Summer Meals Program. Provided interdepartmental support for city‐hosted events such as Arbor Day/Earth Day, July 4 Celebration, and Renton River Days. Provided training and opportunities for staff to stay current with certifications and licensing. Updated informational signage and kiosks at Coulon Park and Earlington Park.  2023/2024 Goals  Collaborate with King County and partner agencies to complete a wayfinding plan for the Eastrail. Complete FEMA project to stabilize erosion from a cedar river embankment next to the cedar river trail. Customize reports to tell our story with CERVIS software for city‐sponsored volunteer activities. Determine park attendance and trends using mobile data and applied demographic information. Increase participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program/Market Bucks incentive at Renton Farmers Market. Install one new TRACK trail in the Renton Parks system. Lead interdepartmental efforts to patrol, post, and clear encampment sites on city‐owned properties. Participate in one new regional/national park promotion, such as BioBlitz (National Recreation and Park Association) or National Trails Day (American Hiking Society). Partner with United Way of King County and Renton School District to facilitate the Summer Meals Program. Perform farm visits at Renton Farmers Market vendors growing locations to ensure farm integrity. Provide interdepartmental support for city‐hosted events such as Arbor Day/Earth Day, July 4 Celebration, and Renton River Days. Provide training and opportunities for staff to stay current with certifications and licensing. Refine reports and charts to tell our story with data from Cityworks work management software. Secure a location for a long‐term parks maintenance operations facility to replace the shop at 1100 Bronson Way N. Update informational kiosk and monument signage at parks and along trails. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-99Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Park & Trails 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,973,529 2,585,707 2,146,311 2,677,435 2,796,211 3,046,439 3,232,430 13.8% 6.1% Part‐Time Salaries 5,201 45,023 30,574 45,023 51,097 45,023 45,023 0.0% 0.0% Overtime 20,127 13,076 10,167 13,076 13,076 13,076 13,076 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 772,295 1,415,797 873,313 1,494,835 1,516,030 1,437,700 1,534,184 ‐3.8% 6.7% Supplies 161,980 238,874 207,406 238,874 273,543 238,874 238,874 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 679,537 742,709 935,748 742,709 765,814 710,709 710,709 ‐4.3% 0.0% Interfund Payments 1,206,931 1,742,495 1,294,213 1,768,833 1,712,594 1,600,037 1,629,724 ‐9.5% 1.9% Transfer Out 0 0 0 0 0 240,000 159,000 100.0%‐33.8% Total 4,819,600 6,783,681 5,497,733 6,980,785 7,128,366 7,331,857 7,563,020 5.0% 3.2% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Park & Trails 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 34.85 34.85 34.85 34.85 34.85 37.85 37.85 8.6% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.15 2.22 0.85 2.22 2.37 2.22 2.22 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 6,421$        92,493$      35,216$      92,493$      98,567$      92,493$      92,493$      0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-100Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Recreation Division  Mission  Develop and build an active, vibrant, and socially connected community through programming, opportunities, and well‐ managed resources, to help strengthen the well‐being of our community.  2021‐2022 Accomplishments  Leveraged technology to improve the following business processes and customer experience: o Converted boat launch permitting to an online process. o Developed and implemented online and mobile check‐in processes for patrons and recreation building usage, to better quantify numbers served and enhance safety for patrons. o Utilized existing technology (Energov) to create online application and communication portal for temporary event permits. o Quickly adapted operations and programs to COVID‐19 restrictions by activating virtual, drive‐thru, and human service programs. Equity and inclusivity goals: o Finalized Age‐Friendly Renton action plan. Implementation of action plan to start in 2023. o Updated sports field and gymnasium allocation process to ensure equitable access with Renton residency as a priority, and opportunity for emerging sports and organizations who serve youth and vulnerable populations. Executed the following grants: o AARP FitLot Senior Fitness Programming Grant; King County Best Starts for Kids, STREAM Team, out‐of‐school program grant; veterans, seniors, human services levy funded grant to conduct outreach, engagement, and program development with diverse and isolated seniors. 2023/2024 Goals  Activate Liberty Park building with environmental and other recreation programming. Focusing on programs that create experiences and learning opportunities to foster environmental sustainability. Transition Renton River Days to a city advisory board, and update and re‐energize event format and offerings for current community needs and interests. Develop ongoing funding source for Gift of Play Scholarship program. Pilot an intervention from the Center for Disease Control’s Community Guide Get Active! Increase Physical Activity through Park, Trail, and Greenway Interventions. Expand Henry Moses Aquatic Center season by offering targeted programming in spring and fall. Hold annual community forum regarding recreation programs and opportunities to solicit feedback to best meet the needs of the community. Revise recreational facility rental process and procedures to provide equitable access, appropriate priority, and maintain a balance between revenue goals, recreational opportunities, and individual benefit. Work with facilities division and consultants to secure funding to maintain and enhance Henry Moses Aquatic Center. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-101Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation 1The 2020 actual expenditures and 2021/2022 original budget include expenditures for 1.0 FTE reflected in EHHS Neighborhood Programs division. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Recreation 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 1,643,202 1,715,702 1,225,670 1,764,969 1,790,693 1,778,706 1,891,812 0.8% 6.4% Part‐Time Salaries 156,131 1,014,160 424,398 999,160 1,028,860 1,032,730 1,017,730 3.4%‐1.5% Overtime 6,467 7,500 7,113 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,500 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 691,410 1,028,641 578,762 1,077,430 1,071,627 1,091,551 1,155,223 1.3% 5.8% Supplies 123,440 211,348 134,166 211,348 292,464 197,178 197,178 ‐6.7% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 312,637 329,335 331,288 326,785 632,163 298,455 295,955 ‐8.7%‐0.8% Interfund Payments 1,424,444 2,013,208 1,255,286 2,071,844 1,896,089 1,823,404 1,884,481 ‐12.0% 3.3% Total 4,362,272 6,319,894 4,130,236 6,459,037 6,719,396 6,229,524 6,449,879 ‐3.6% 3.5% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Recreation  2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Recreation Services 18.75 18.25 19.00 18.25 19.25 18.25 18.25 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE1 18.75 18.25 19.00 18.25 19.25 18.25 18.25 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 4.56 28.80 11.79 28.44 29.15 29.22 28.86 2.7%‐1.2% Temp/Intermit Salaries and 189,743$    1,198,026$ 490,401$    1,183,026$ 1,212,726$ 1,215,450$ 1,200,450$ 2.7%‐1.2% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-102Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Renton History Museum    Mission  The Renton History Museum is the city’s only organization dedicated to the preservation, documentation, and education  about the city’s heritage in ways that are accessible to diverse people of all ages. With the support of the Renton Historical  Society, the museum cares for a collection of over 10,000 objects, 15,000 archival documents, and over 20,000 historic  photos. The museum also provides changing, traveling, and permanent exhibits, classroom curricula, programs,  publications, and research assistance for those interested in local history. Staff at the museum also serve as resources for  historic preservation and interpretation projects in Renton, as well as assisting city staff with historical research.   2021/2022 Accomplishments   Organized and mounted seven temporary exhibits, on topics ranging from a history of marriage in Renton to  refugees’ experiences in South King County to life on the black and cedar rivers.    Expanded and enhanced online offerings during COVID‐19 closure, including 11 new study guides for 7th graders  and above; five new family‐friendly videos; and our first‐ever online exhibit about distinguished Renton women.   Hosted two environmental history exhibits: Facing the Inferno, about wildfire in the west, and Sap in Their Veins,  about loggers during the Spotted Owl Controversy.   Partnered with the Brain Injury Alliance of Washington to host their Annual Brain Injury Art Show in autumn 2021.   Participated with the Division of Urban and Community Forestry in the creation of the new online Historic Renton  Tree Tour.   Assisted the Renton Downtown Partnership with a downtown walking tour.   Accepted the donation of 1139 historic objects and photographs, including a collection of rare glass plate  negatives.   Renovated the north gallery as dedicated programming space with assistance from 4Culture and the facilities  division.   Obtained new collection storage unit to house expanding collection.   Implemented new donor management software, enabling online donations and membership renewals.   Applied for and received grants from 4Culture, King County Council, and CARES Act Paycheck Protection Program  and Economic Injury Disaster Loan.   Partnered with Renton Downtown Partnership, the Renton Municipal Arts Commission, South King County Cultural  Coalition, Washington Historical Society’s “Votes for Women” Initiative, Washington Museum Association  (WaMA), and the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH).   Expanded social media presence to include Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.   Provided the museum manager as a special commissioner to the King County Landmarks Board to further historic  preservation work in Renton.    2023/2024 Goals   Participate in the renewal of the Museum Management Agreement between the City of Renton and the Renton  Historical Society.    Rebuild volunteer program after pandemic losses.   Host a community‐based Black History Month exhibit in winter 2023.   Host Art of the Aloha Shirt exhibit in summer 2023.   Complete collections move into new storage.   Assist parks division in expanding historic interpretation about parks.   Revise the museum’s photo reproduction policy.  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-103Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Museum 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 98,607 99,287 99,247 101,413 105,470 110,027 114,450 8.5% 4.0% Part‐Time Salaries 4,500 15,821 1,500 15,821 15,821 15,821 15,821 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 30,626 35,669 29,759 37,082 37,809 36,028 37,817 ‐2.8% 5.0% Interfund Payments 87,324 138,924 98,948 142,957 163,091 150,619 155,962 5.4% 3.5% Total 221,057 289,701 229,454 297,273 322,190 312,495 324,050 5.1% 3.7% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Museum 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.13 0.44 0.04 0.44 0.44 0.44 0.44 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 5,541$        18,496$      1,822$        18,496$      18,496$      18,496$      18,496$      0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-104Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Golf Course Division – Maplewood Golf Course  Mission  Provide a safe, clean, attractive, accessible, and well‐maintained environment for the public’s enjoyment of active and  passive recreational opportunities along with natural resource and wildlife preservation and stewardship.  2021 / 2022 Accomplishments  Added an electronic tee sheet to the point‐of‐sale system to allow for online tee time booking in 2021. Updated building fire and security alarm systems and controls pads. Added fly over videos and new aerial photos to the website and promotional signage. Remained open daily with low staffing during the COVID‐19 pandemic; processed over 56,000 rounds in 2021. Replaced a large section of fire suppression dry system piping in the driving range. Re‐lamped the driving range light poles with an LED retrofit ensuring more energy efficient lighting. Secured the purchase of 60 new golf carts to replace the aging cart fleet; carts arrived March 2022. Reconditioned the upper hitting stall heaters and added 15 new timers for the heaters Re‐lamped the parking lot light poles with energy efficient LED fixtures. Replaced the protective netting around the perimeter of the driving range. 2023 / 2024 Goals  Fire protection re‐piping: replace exposed sprinkler pipe in the cart storage area. Replace ball washing and dispensing machine in the driving range. Renovate tee boxes (#6, #9, #12, #18). Continue to build marketing programs in conjunction with concessionaire. Achieve a minimum 85% good to excellent rating for golf course conditions, value of driving range, and level of service in the pro‐shop. Provide timely updates to website and lobby signage to include activities, projects, events, and promotions. Provide multiple junior golf camps throughout each year. Establish Junior Academy Program. Purchase new mowers and equipment to replace aging golf maintenance equipment. Upgrade HVAC controls at the clubhouse. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Golf Course 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 837,213 943,357 830,234 972,233 1,011,122 1,012,882 1,087,234 4.2% 7.3% Part‐Time Salaries 178,683 174,468 216,189 174,468 174,468 215,500 215,500 23.5% 0.0% Overtime 8,595 1,020 29,445 1,020 1,020 10,000 10,000 880.4% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 410,096 554,247 467,830 583,745 590,706 548,895 585,587 ‐6.0% 6.7% Supplies 290,986 321,500 366,441 321,500 321,704 312,500 312,500 ‐2.8% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 200,945 133,050 110,395 133,050 133,050 132,150 132,150 ‐0.7% 0.0% Capital Outlay 0 20,000 0 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 340,704 350,258 364,509 360,550 460,660 468,333 480,398 29.9% 2.6% Transfer Out 78,695 68,100 68,100 72,200 833,793 155,000 165,000 114.7% 6.5% Operating Total 2,345,917 2,566,000 2,453,144 2,638,766 3,546,523 2,875,260 3,008,369 9.0% 4.6% CIP 22,624 68,100 53,346 72,200 650,479 35,000 165,000 ‐51.5% 371.4% Total 2,368,541 2,634,100 2,506,490 2,710,966 4,197,001 2,910,260 3,173,369 7.4% 9.0% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Golf Course 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 5.255.566.315.565.566.556.5517.7%0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 218,480$    231,468$    262,436$    231,468$    231,468$    272,500$    272,500$    17.7% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-105Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Parks Planning and Natural Resources Division    Mission  Provide a comprehensive and connected system of parks, recreation, open spaces, and trails that respond to locally based  needs, demand, and conditions. Provide an engaging environment, protect the integrity and quality of the surrounding  natural systems, and create a sustainable and exemplary urban forest.    2021/2022 Accomplishments   Completed play equipment replacements at Coulon, Liberty, Kennydale Beach, and Cascade parks.   Completed senior activity center paving repairs and initiated outdoor exercise equipment improvements at current  bocce court location.   Secured $1.3M state Legislative Direct Appropriation Grant and $481,050 King County Parks Capital and Open  Space Grant for Coulon North water walk improvements.   Initiated structural reviews for Coulon Park and system‐wide park bridges.   Renovated Teasdale Park basketball court.   Secured $305,181 grant agreement and reimbursement from King County Conservation Futures Program for a May  Creek acquisition and $500,000 Federal Land Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) Grant through the state Recreation  and Conservation Office (RCO) for the Coulon trestle bridge replacement.   Completed design and construction documents, secured permits, and bid four bond projects (Coulon North water  walk, Coulon trestle bridge, Philip Arnold Park, and Kiwanis Park).   Initiated construction of bond projects.   Initiated system‐wide park entry signage improvements through Kiwanis and Philip Arnold Park bond projects.    Submitted $350,000 state RCO grant application for tennis/pickleball court and parking lot improvements at Talbot  Hill Reservoir Park.    Updated citywide GIS tree inventory database.    Created training manual for in‐house forestry crew.   Renewed 10‐year Urban Forest Management Plan (UFMP) for 2022‐2032.   Designation of Tree City USA for 14th year.   Created Historic Tree Tour and Story Map in downtown Renton in partnership with the Renton History Museum.   Implemented a Risk Tree Management program      2023/2024 Goals   Replace play equipment at Maplewood, Glencoe, and Windsor Hill parks.   Complete structural review report for Coulon Park and system‐wide park bridges and identify capital improvement  priorities based on results.   Complete Coulon swim beach and northern shoreline erosion analysis/feasibility studies, begin design/permitting,  and grant application efforts.   Design, permit, and begin construction on Talbot Hill tennis/pickleball court and parking lot improvements project.    Complete structural review of Cedar River trestle bridge.    Complete repairs to the Liberty Park sports courts and skate park.   Initiate Parks, Recreation and Natural Areas Plan   Continue inter‐agency coordination with WSDOT on Renton to Bellevue Project, Seattle Public Utilities Broodstock  Collection Facility, King County Parks Soos Creek Trail, King County Eastrail, and the WA DNR Sam Chastain Trail  easement.   Implementation of new urban forestry management plan (UFMP) with enhanced tree planting and tree  maintenance.   Continued pursuit of Tree City USA designations and Growth awards   Complete an urban forest tree canopy cover assessment    Commence design development for May Creek Trail South trail; apply for grant funding to support construction  phase.  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-106Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Parks Planning and Natural Resources 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 732,814 739,360 688,265 753,922 784,079 736,787 639,872 ‐2.3%‐13.2% Overtime 002780000N/AN/A Personnel Benefits 230,904 236,487 220,404 245,711 285,758 238,340 213,487 ‐3.0%‐10.4% Supplies 5,169 4,827 1,404 4,827 4,827 4,827 4,827 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 1,077,077 960,463 796,197 960,463 960,463 960,463 960,463 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 45,140 76,437 58,980 78,252 102,281 81,616 83,935 4.3% 2.8% Total 2,091,103 2,017,574 1,765,529 2,043,175 2,137,408 2,022,033 1,902,584 ‐1.0%‐5.9% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Parks Planning and Natural Resources 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 7.406.406.406.406.405.404.40‐15.6%‐18.5% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-107Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Parks & Recreation Position Listing (1 of 2)2020.0 2021.0 2021.0 2022.0 2022.0 2023.0 2024.0 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Grade Title Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Administration Division M49 Community Services Administrator 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 N16 Administrative Assistant 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 Total Administration Division 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Parks & Trails Division M38 Parks and Trails Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M31 Parks Maintenance Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A21 Park Maintenance Supervisor 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A16 Lead Park Maintenance Worker 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 A12 Park Maintenance Worker III 8.00 8.00 10.00 8.00 11.00 11.00 11.00 A09 Administrative Secretary I 0.600.600.600.600.600.600.60 A08 Park Maintenance Worker II 8.00 8.00 7.00 8.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 A04 Park Maintenance Worker I 4.004.003.004.003.005.005.00 A03 Parks Maintenance Assistant II 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 A18 Recreation Program Coordinator 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A16 Program Assistant 0.250.250.250.250.250.250.25 A18 Farmers Market Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Parks & Trails Division 34.85 34.85 34.85 34.85 34.85 37.85 37.85 Golf Course Division   Golf Course Administration M29 Golf Course Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A09 Golf Course Operations Assistant 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 Total Golf Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00     Golf Course Maintenance M22 Golf Course Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A16 Lead Golf Course Maintenance Worker 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A15 Grounds Equipment Mechanic 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A04 Golf Course Maintenance Worker I 1.001.001.001.000.000.000.00 A08 Golf Course Maintenance Worker II 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A12 Golf Course Maintenance Worker III 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Golf Maintenance 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00     Pro‐Shop/Driving Range M25 Golf Professional 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N11 Assistant Golf Professional 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A01 Golf Course Associate 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A04 Pro Shop Assistant 2.002.002.002.002.002.002.00 Total Pro‐Shop/Driving Range 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Total Golf Course Division 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.00 Parks Planning and Natural Resources Division M38 Parks Planning & Natural Resources Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M32 Urban Forestry and Natural Resources Mgr 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M32 Parks Planning Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M32 Capital Projects Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.000.00 A09 Administrative Secretary I 0.400.400.400.400.400.400.40 A28 Capital Project Coordinator 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A28 Capital Project Coordinator LT 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 Total Parks Planning and Natural Resources Division 7.40 6.40 6.40 6.40 6.40 5.40 4.40 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-108Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation Parks & Recreation Position Listing (2 of 2) Recreation Services Division M38 Recreation Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M29 Recreation Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M23 Recreation Supervisor 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A18 Recreation Program Coordinator 6.006.006.006.006.006.006.00 A09 Administrative Secretary I 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A16 Program Assistant 0.500.500.500.500.500.500.50 A14 Recreation Systems Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A11 Recreation Specialist 1.250.751.500.751.750.750.75 A09 Recreation Assistant 3.003.003.003.003.003.003.00 M22 Community Events Coordinator 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A09 Administrative Secretary I 0.000.000.000.000.000.000.00 Total Recreation Services Division 18.75 18.25 19.00 18.25 19.25 18.25 18.25 Museum Division M22 Museum Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 Total Museum Division 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Department Regular Staffing 76.00 74.50 75.25 74.50 75.50 76.50 75.50 Total Parks & Recreation Department 76.00 74.50 75.25 74.50 75.50 76.50 75.50 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-109Budget by Department - Parks and Recreation *Utility systems division funds the four (4) FTE’s that are managed by the finance department. See finance department page for FTE count and budget. Utility systems division also contributes funding for one and a half (1.5) FTEs that are managed by the sustainability section of public works department. ADMINISTRATOR Martin Pastucha 203.5 FTEs AIRPORT Steven Gleason 9 FTEs FACILITIES Jeff Minisci 35 FTEs Leased City Properties Capital Investment  Properties Facilities Maintenance  Services MAINTENANCE  Michael Stenhouse 94 FTEs Street Solid Waste Water Wastewater Surface Water Fleet TRANSPORTATION  SYSTEMS Jim Seitz 31.5 FTEs Maintenance Operations Planning and  Programming Design UTILITY SYSTEMS* Ronald Straka 26.5 FTEs Water Wastewater Surface Water Administrative Support 1 FTE SUSTAINABILITY &  SOLID WASTE Linda Knight 5.5 FTEs Sustainability Solid Waste Public Works  2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-110Budget by Department - Public Works Public Works  Mission  The public works department manages and maintains the City of Renton’s utility and transportation systems and municipal  facilities in a skillful, professional, and caring manner to improve the lives of our residents and business customers.    Description  The department develops, builds, and maintains streets and sidewalks; develops, builds, and maintains water, wastewater,  and surface water utility infrastructures; coordinates the collection of garbage, maintains municipal buildings, the airport,  and the city’s vehicle fleet.  List of Public Works Renton Results Decision Packages: 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Operating Budget Summary 88,168,516 97,596,185 89,464,954 99,085,345 107,447,007 107,570,719 111,626,298 8.6% 3.8% CIP Budget Summary 17,670,154 7,242,299 40,314,156 18,249,170 186,093,807 17,717,915 20,831,696 ‐2.9% 17.6% Position Summary 197.50 197.50 197.50 197.50 203.50 203.50 203.50 3.0% 0.0% 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #DescriptionFTETot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 150015.0001 City Parking Garage Security Contract ‐          120,000       ‐               ‐               120,000         ‐  300015.0001 Leased Facilities 1.50      779,196       550,950              1.50        794,256         552,471                 400015.0008 Public Works Administration 2.00      553,953       ‐               2.00        582,516         ‐  400015.0010 Airport Operations 9.00      2,348,994    2,791,767           9.00        2,439,188      2,801,767              400015.0011 Transportation Maintenance 11.30    2,227,393    ‐               11.30      2,322,368      ‐  400015.0012 Transportation Systems Admin 3.00      1,378,521    ‐               3.00        1,427,295      ‐  400015.0013 Building the Mobility Network 9.57      1,808,654    360,000              9.57        1,914,588      360,000                 400015.0014 Trans Operations Engineering Section 4.95      1,536,753    ‐               4.95        1,597,096      ‐  400015.0015 Bridges 0.53      102,903       ‐               0.53        107,492         ‐  400015.0016 Active Transportation Program 0.25      100,226       ‐               0.25        104,490         ‐  400015.0017 Trans it Coordination/Transportation Demand 0.70      218,800       40,000                0.70        223,997         40,000   400015.0018 Public Works Maintenance Administration 5.45      1,450,042    ‐               5.45        1,516,483      ‐  400015.0019 Street Maintenance 21.46    4,940,169    243,432              21.46      5,097,996      243,432                 450015.0017 Airport Operations Increase ‐          28,500         ‐               ‐               28,500           ‐  450015.0018 Traffic Signal Supply Increase ‐          15,000         ‐               ‐               15,000           ‐  450015.0019 Traffic Sign Supply Increase ‐          15,000         ‐               ‐               15,000           ‐  450015.0020 Comm Supply Account Increase ‐          10,000         ‐               ‐               10,000           ‐  450015.0021 Marking Supply Account Increase ‐          15,000         ‐               ‐               15,000           ‐  450015.0022 Lighting Supply Account Increase ‐          10,000         ‐               ‐               10,000           ‐  500015.0012 Utility Systems Administration 3.50      1,997,640    ‐               3.50        2,071,470      ‐  500015.0013 Water Engineering and Planning 7.00      4,256,479    13,586,575         7.00        4,476,872      14,620,444            500015.0014 Wastewater Engineering and Planning 6.00      3,925,776    8,540,831           6.00        4,078,653      6,725,877              500015.0015 Surface Water Engineering and Planning 8.80      4,314,582    5,231,012           8.80        4,498,323      5,896,789              500015.0016 Surface Water NPDES Education 1.20      266,005       ‐               1.20        275,286         ‐  500015.0019 Waterworks Revenue Bond Debt ‐          2,811,152    ‐               ‐               2,809,493      ‐  500015.0020 King County Metro Fund ‐          18,407,838            18,407,838         ‐               18,495,877    18,495,877            500015.0021 Public Works Trust Fund Loan Debt ‐          275,374       ‐               ‐               274,010         ‐  500015.0022 Solid Waste Collection 1.00      23,008,564            23,348,127         1.00        23,771,035    23,815,444            500015.0023 Water Maintenance 26.12    7,191,920    10,078                26.12      7,409,691      10,078   500015.0024 Wastewater Maintenance 10.73    2,582,354    19,740                10.73      2,685,942      19,740   500015.0025 Surface Water Maintenance 17.24    3,825,265    10,700                17.24      3,884,576      10,700   500015.0026 Solid Waste Litter Control 4.00      636,377       4,692  4.00        672,448         4,692     500015.0027 Public Works Sustainability 4.50      992,484       ‐               4.50        1,028,390      ‐  550015.0025 2024 Comprehensive Rate Study ‐          ‐        ‐               ‐               160,000         ‐  550015.0026 Solid Waste Litter Control Increase ‐          118,000       ‐               ‐               45,700           ‐  550015.0027 Public Works Sustainability Increase ‐          29,653         ‐               ‐               29,653           ‐  550015.0028 NPDES Permit Fee Increase ‐          30,000         ‐               ‐               30,000           ‐  550015.0030 Water Engineering and Planning Increase ‐          200,197       1,970,815           ‐               78,059           945,572                 550015.0031 Wastewater Engineering and Planning Incr ‐          113,640       648,479              ‐               183,391         674,616                 550015.0032 Surface Water Engineering and Planning Incr ‐          76,084         889,878              ‐               90,777           1,061,719              550015.0033 King County Metro Fund Increase ‐          951,091       951,091              ‐               2,078,551      2,078,551              2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-111Budget by Department - Public Works 2023 Adopted 2024 Adopted Package #DescriptionFTETot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 550015.0034 Solid Waste Collection Increase ‐          1,760,960    1,820,764           ‐               1,795,956      1,833,404              600015.0002 Trans Operations Internal Support Services 1.20      155,813       ‐               1.20        163,820         ‐  600015.0003 Fleet Services Operation & Maintenance 9.00      3,113,129    6,349,694           9.00        3,188,801      6,305,738              600015.0004 Fleet Services Capital Recovery ‐          2,183,000    ‐               ‐               2,080,000      ‐  600015.0006 Custodial Services 22.50    2,655,525    2,692,359           22.50      2,801,018      2,788,527              600015.0007 Facilities Technical Maintenance 11.00    4,032,715    4,190,739           11.00      4,127,240      4,339,107              650015.0003 504 ISF Charges for New FTEs ‐          ‐        65,040                ‐               ‐          8,640     650015.0004 501 ISF Charges for New FTEs ‐          ‐        376,700              ‐               ‐          171,200                 Total Operating 203.50    107,570,719          93,101,300         203.50    111,626,298          93,804,385            460015.0001 Airport Capital Improvement Program ‐          10,000         260,000              ‐               250,000         250,000                 460015.0002 T Transportation CIP ‐          2,962,000    2,962,000           ‐               2,889,000      2,889,000              560015.0001 W Water CIP ‐          3,750,000    3,750,000           ‐               3,850,000      3,850,000              560015.0002 SW Surface Water CIP ‐          6,940,000    6,940,000           ‐               6,680,000      6,680,000              560015.0003 WW Wastewater CIP ‐          2,855,915    2,855,915           ‐               5,062,696      5,062,696              660015.0011 CIP General Gov't ‐          450,000       450,000              ‐               2,000,000      2,000,000              760015.0015 Transportation Impact Mitigation Fund ‐          750,000       1,780,000           ‐               100,000         1,780,000              Total CIP ‐          17,717,915            18,997,915         ‐               20,831,696    22,511,696            Total 203.50    125,288,634$        112,099,215$        203.50         132,457,994$        116,316,081$         2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-112Budget by Department - Public Works Public Works Performance Measures:  Highlight of Budget Changes:  Sustainability and solid waste section created and moved from utility systems to public works administration. Integrated the facilities division into public works department. Airport’s capital budget anticipates grant funding of $18,878,000. Facilities’ capital budget anticipates grant funding of $3,468,000. Transportation’s capital budget anticipates grant funding of $7,465,000. Utility systems’ capital budget anticipates grant funding for the water utility of $1,472,000 and the surface water utility of $2,547,000. Capital improvement projects decreased from 2022 to 2023 due to project completions and a lower number of new projects. 2023/2024 capital improvement project spending includes: o $510,000 – airport division improvements o $5,851,000 – transportation division improvements o $29,139,000 – utility division improvements 2023/2024 capital outlay spending includes vehicle/equipment replacements for 2023 and 2024. Interfund payments includes increases to different internal service funds to account for increases in operation costs to support public work functions. City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 Results 2021 Results Comprehensive mobility  network that connects the  public to desired  destinations. No takeoff or landing delay for any  aircraft longer than 30 minutes due to  inclement weather, routine surface  maintenance operations, the presence  of Foreign Object Debris (FOD), or  wildlife. 22200 Maintain a reasonable Overall  Condition Index (Pavement) rating.68 68 68 73 no data Minimize signal downtime as  measured by annual count of failures  of traffic signals and beacons. 52 52 50 52 no data Maintain safe bridges by having no  load‐restricted bridges.00022 Reduce average arterial corridor travel  time.‐9%‐9%‐9% no data no data Increase residential recycling annual  tons collected per capita.20%7%‐6%6%‐3.1% Increase residential organics  collection per capita.29%‐1.5%5%25%‐12% Restore water service within 4 hours  during emergency shut downs.100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Development Plans and permit reviews  completed within 5 business days of  receipt. 100%95%95%70%100% Requests for Wastewater system  information provided within 2 business  days. 98%98%100%80%80% Maintain a Community Rating System  (CRS) classification rating of 6 or better  which results in a 20% or more discount  on federal flood insurance rates. 55555  Minimize Fleet “comeback” repairs, as  a percentage of the total repairs.5.4%5.4%5.4%0.0% no data Percentage of Fleet work orders  completed in less than 72 hours. 71%71%71%73% no data Equipment and data that is  reliable and accessible. Internal Support Mobility Utilities and  Environment Well‐maintained condition of  the mobility infrastructure. Efficient and safe operation  of mobility infrastructure. Manage solid waste. Operate and maintain piped  utility infrastructure. Compliance with  environmental standards and  laws. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-113Budget by Department - Public Works Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Public Works 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 400,739 497,991 446,262 511,941 621,219 553,953 582,516 8.2% 5.2% Maintenance Services 38,917,645 42,801,392 39,654,330 42,698,107 46,772,930 45,319,185 47,148,364 6.1% 4.0% Facilities 5,784,615 7,018,047 5,902,413 7,217,741 7,783,538 7,587,436 7,842,514 5.1% 3.4% Transportation Services 6,769,072 6,638,464 6,192,119 6,775,702 7,545,522 7,594,064 7,926,146 12.1% 4.4% Utility Systems 34,662,789 38,472,451 35,436,245 39,631,621 42,300,341 43,116,451 44,601,027 8.8% 3.4% Sustainability & Solid Wast 0 0 645 0 4,875 1,022,137 1,058,043 100.0% 3.5% Airport 1,633,655 2,167,840 1,832,940 2,250,234 2,418,582 2,377,494 2,467,688 5.7% 3.8% Operating Total 88,168,516 97,596,185 89,464,954 99,085,345 107,447,007 107,570,719 111,626,298 8.6% 3.8% CIP 17,670,154 7,242,299 40,314,156 18,249,170 186,093,807 17,717,915 20,831,696 ‐2.9% 17.6% Total 105,838,670 104,838,484 129,779,111 117,334,515 293,540,813 125,288,634 132,457,994 6.8% 5.7% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Public Works 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 15,371,440 17,061,840 15,546,561 17,590,683 18,910,433 20,105,961 21,140,354 14.3% 5.1% Part‐Time Salaries 37,228 102,924 62,475 112,488 132,488 137,293 146,857 22.1% 7.0% Overtime 317,339 259,580 354,070 259,580 269,580 259,580 259,580 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 6,712,925 8,637,640 6,999,204 9,155,139 9,535,387 9,439,714 10,039,721 3.1% 6.4% Supplies 3,072,708 3,539,771 3,648,279 3,539,771 4,049,967 3,619,721 3,619,721 2.3% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 47,960,127 51,088,258 49,721,836 52,128,072 55,368,778 56,429,438 58,756,014 8.3% 4.1% Capital Outlay 2,098,575 2,165,923 508,276 1,528,340 4,205,897 2,291,923 2,188,923 50.0%‐4.5% Debt Service 3,796,499 3,620,575 3,102,362 3,587,724 3,067,724 3,086,526 3,083,503 ‐14.0%‐0.1% Interfund Payments 8,030,262 11,119,674 9,463,895 11,183,548 11,765,004 12,118,643 12,382,006 8.4% 2.2% Transfer Out 771,414 0 57,996 0 141,748 81,920 9,620 100.0%‐88.3% Operating Total 88,168,516 97,596,185 89,464,954 99,085,345 107,447,007 107,570,719 111,626,298 8.6% 3.8% CIP 17,670,154 7,242,299 40,314,156 18,249,170 186,093,807 17,717,915 20,831,696 ‐2.9% 17.6% Total 105,838,670 104,838,484 129,779,111 117,334,515 293,540,813 125,288,634 132,457,994 6.8% 5.7% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Public Works 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% 0.0% Maintenance Services 92.00 92.00 92.00 92.00 94.00 94.00 94.00 2.2% 0.0% Transportation Services 31.00 31.00 31.00 31.00 31.50 31.50 31.50 1.6% 0.0% Utility Systems 25.13 25.13 25.13 25.13 26.50 26.50 26.50 5.5% 0.0% Sustainability & Solid Wast 3.38 3.38 3.38 3.38 5.50 5.50 5.50 63.0% 0.0% Airport 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 0.0% 0.0% Facilities 35.00 35.00 35.00 35.00 35.00 35.00 35.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 197.50 197.50 197.50 197.50 203.50 203.50 203.50 3.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 1.08 2.07 1.00 2.07 2.70 2.07 2.07 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 45,053$      86,221$      41,623$      86,221$      112,221$    86,221$      86,221$      0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-114Budget by Department - Public Works Administration Division  Mission  Provide leadership, resources, and regional influence to enable the department to meet its responsibilities in a manner that  is responsive to the needs of customers and community consistent with the city’s business plan goals in a fiscally responsible  manner.  2021/2022 Accomplishments   Continued to partner with sound transit and WSDOT to implement regional transportation projects that benefit the City of Renton’s residents and the region. Successfully integrated the facilities division into public works department. Completed staff reorganization for the creation of the sustainability and solid waste section with a staff of 5.5 FTE. 2023/2024 Goals  Provide for successful implementation of the sustainability and solid waste section program. Develop performance measurements to document work efforts. Reorganize airport management structure to reflect being a division. Manage budget preparations and monitoring. Manage personnel administration and work on providing effective resolution of human resource issues in support of department divisions. Continue the pursuit of grants and advocate for state and federal dollars to enhance our transportation system. Complete effort of partnering with the federal aviation administration on the update of airport layout plan. Successful implementation of utility master plans for the water, wastewater, and surface water utilities and review of financial challenges to plan implementation. Migration of work orders and GIS systems into integrated asset management system to better track performances and system conditions, more data‐driven infrastructure investments. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Administration 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 225,818 273,720 258,342 278,941 337,192 297,176 313,078 6.5% 5.4% Personnel Benefits 78,780 104,109 88,989 109,139 142,168 116,449 124,081 6.7% 6.6% Supplies 1,488 800 1,021 800 800 800 800 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 26,900 1,650 795 1,650 1,650 1,650 1,650 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 67,753 117,712 97,115 121,411 139,410 137,878 142,907 13.6% 3.6% Total 400,739 497,991 446,262 511,941 621,219 553,953 582,516 8.2% 5.2% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Administration 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Total FTE 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-115Budget by Department - Public Works Airport Division  Mission  Operate the City of Renton’s municipal airport in a safe and fiscally responsible manner in support of general, business, and  manufacturing aviation users through the administration of leases, fees, and user charges, the implementation of capital  improvement programs, and in accordance with the federal aviation administration policies and procedures.   2021/2022 Accomplishments  Completed staff reorganization and hired new positions to improve processes. Applied for funding to upgrade air traffic control tower. Completed office design for airport administration due to seismic concerns with current office space. Began negotiation of arbitration process for Boeing leaseholds. Initiated a rates and fees study to increase revenue and better align associated operating costs. Submitted airport layout plan to the federal aviation administration for final approval. Continued federal funding advocacy for the staff at the City of Renton’s air traffic control tower as needed. 2023/2024 Goals  Secure funding and initiate construction of the control tower seismic retrofit and first floor remodel projects. Complete preliminary engineering for the taxiway alpha rehabilitation project. Complete repair and mitigation for the cedar river flood event. Complete construction of the Lake Washington shoreline mitigation project. Adoption of update to the airport layout plan. Complete the annual reporting for the sustainability management plan. Hold quarterly City of Renton airport advisory committee meetings. Complete the plans and specifications for the creation of additional general aviation tie‐downs in the northwest corner of the airport property. Continue federal funding advocacy for the staff at the City of Renton’s air traffic control tower as needed. Complete a request for information or request proposal for the development of the southeast corner of the airport. Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Airport 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 590,282 803,443 690,238 847,467 920,140 938,486 989,059 10.7% 5.4% Part‐Time Salaries 7,625 17,680 11,134 17,680 17,680 17,680 17,680 0.0% 0.0% Overtime 38,226 40,000 47,648 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 248,908 437,214 318,325 467,350 479,445 433,852 461,621 ‐7.2% 6.4% Supplies 35,564 35,630 41,704 35,630 39,471 47,630 47,630 33.7% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 366,526 440,150 363,667 440,150 472,850 454,150 454,150 3.2% 0.0% Capital Outlay 30,650000000N/AN/A Interfund Payments 314,510 393,723 344,095 401,957 448,996 445,696 457,549 10.9% 2.7% Transfer Out 1,363 0 16,130 0 0 0 0 N/A N/A Operating Total 1,633,655 2,167,840 1,832,940 2,250,234 2,418,582 2,377,494 2,467,688 5.7% 3.8% CIP 278,674 827,000 1,208,625 677,000 6,974,577 10,000 250,000 ‐98.5% 2400.0% Total 1,912,329 2,994,840 3,041,565 2,927,234 9,393,160 2,387,494 2,717,688 ‐18.4% 13.8% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Airport 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% 0.0% Operation 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.23 0.64 0.31 0.64 0.64 0.64 0.64 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 9,522$        26,458$      12,802$      26,458$      26,458$      26,458$      26,458$      0.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-116Budget by Department - Public Works Maintenance Services Division  Mission   Support the operating sections of the public works maintenance division. Provide planning, budgeting, goal setting,  and management. Provide purchasing and inventory support. Establish effective liaison and project coordination and  perform administrative, customer service contact, and record systems management.   2021/2022 Accomplishments  Street Maintenance  85% of the citizens contacting the division rate our service as satisfactory. A street overall condition index (OCI) rating of 70 or above was maintained. Within the resources provided, kept the City of Renton’s rights‐of‐way as clean as possible. Continued increased litter collection along city streets. Water Maintenance High‐quality water is provided in sufficient quantity. Ensure security, maintain reservoirs, valves, pressure‐reducing valves, etc. Wastewater Maintenance Surface water flooding and sewer overflows are minimized. Maintain ponds, pipes, and culverts, effect repairs, and CCTV of pipes to develop repair and replacement plans. Fleet Maintenance Ensure safe, available, and reliable vehicles and equipment. Replace vehicles annually that have reached the end of their useful life. 2023/2024 Goals  Street Maintenance  Within the resources provided, keep the City of Renton’s rights‐of‐way as clean as possible. 85% of the citizens contacting the division rate our service as satisfactory. A Street overall condition index (OCI) rating of 70 is maintained through preventative maintenance and asphalt repairs. Additional resources to increase cleaning the City of Renton’s right of way. Water Maintenance High‐quality water is provided in sufficient quantity. Reduce the amount of water loss due to system issues. Wastewater and Surface Water Maintenance Surface water flooding and sewer overflows are minimized. Identify and reduce the amount of inflow and infiltration to the sewer system. Meet annual inspection and maintenance requests of the NPEDS permit. Fleet Maintenance Ensure safe, available, and reliable vehicles and equipment for the city’s use. Begin integration of electric vehicle into the city’s fleet. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-117Budget by Department - Public Works Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Maintenance Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 6,834,663 7,316,404 6,597,947 7,539,112 7,861,445 8,298,366 8,713,687 10.1% 5.0% Part‐Time Salaries 0 27,694 0 37,258 37,258 27,694 37,258 ‐25.7% 34.5% Overtime 161,269 160,011 180,326 160,011 160,011 160,011 160,011 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 3,111,330 3,850,509 3,119,768 4,079,769 4,138,610 4,235,325 4,499,795 3.8% 6.2% Supplies 2,373,552 2,921,033 2,767,793 2,921,033 3,071,205 2,926,033 2,926,033 0.2% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 20,496,549 19,965,964 21,516,483 20,054,003 21,178,475 22,021,657 23,237,156 9.8% 5.5% Capital Outlay 1,902,622 2,165,923 446,550 1,528,340 4,194,852 2,291,923 2,188,923 50.0%‐4.5% Interfund Payments 4,032,849 6,393,854 5,007,030 6,378,581 5,998,040 5,358,176 5,385,501 ‐16.0% 0.5% Transfer Out 4,811 0 18,434 0 133,033 0 0 N/A N/A Total 38,917,645 42,801,392 39,654,330 42,698,107 46,772,930 45,319,185 47,148,364 6.1% 4.0% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Maintenance Services 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Administration 5.45 5.45 5.45 5.45 5.45 5.45 5.45 0.0% 0.0% Street/Solid Waste 23.46 23.46 23.46 23.46 25.46 25.46 25.46 8.5% 0.0% Water 26.12 26.12 26.12 26.12 25.79 25.79 25.79 ‐1.3% 0.0% Wastewater/Surface Water 27.97 27.97 27.97 27.97 28.30 28.30 28.30 1.2% 0.0% Fleet 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 92.00 92.00 92.00 92.00 94.00 94.00 94.00 2.2% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-118Budget by Department - Public Works Sustainability and Solid Waste Section  Mission  Provide leadership, planning, resources, and programs that enable the department to advance zero waste, prevent pollution,  reduce carbon emissions, and conserve natural resources in a manner that is responsive to the needs of customers and the  community, delivers value, and is consistent with the city’s business plan.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Solid Waste Utility  In collaboration with Republic Services, provided comprehensive and reliable recycling, organics, and garbage collection and account management services to the city’s residents and businesses thereby improving overall sanitation of the city in addition to reducing the city’s overall contribution of waste to landfill. Provided expanded recycling at city facilities that included printer cartridges, styrofoam, and food waste composting; public drop boxes for household batteries; and organics collection at city‐sponsored events and programs, including the city community gardens, and the farmer’s market. Implemented three special recycling events to provide opportunities for residents to recycle materials not collected at the curb including scrap metal & large appliances, mattresses, cardboard, tires, styrofoam, documents for shredding, and collected donated food for the salvation army and Renton food bank. Collected over 53 tons for recycling, keeping valuable material in the economy and out of the landfill. Initiated the shift green program that partners with Renton auto supply and service retailers including O’Reilly’s, AutoZone, Gary’s Quick Lube, Brown Bear, and mobile service providers to promote recycling of used motor oil and oil filters. Developed retailer and customer information and marketing materials, a longitudinal data collection methodology for measuring changes in the collection of used oil and oil filters, and a do it yourself (DIY) oil generation model. Promoted the program through social media, city newsletters, and public engagement, including outreach at the return to Renton car show. Implemented a pilot residential recycling anti‐contamination program to improve the quality of recyclables processed at the local material recovery facility and increase the recycling of materials that retain value in the market. Provided cart‐tagging to inform customers of contaminates in their recycle cart, and “Recycle Right” guidelines. Collaborated with regional recycling partners to develop and implement strategies to decrease contamination in recycling and organics collection programs. Updated residential and commercial recycling guidelines to reflect changes in regional recycling practices to discourage contamination of collection container materials. In 2021, provided critical education and outreach to customers related to COVID‐19 via social media channels, city Republic Services websites, and contributions to newsletters to communicate changes in material preparation and collection safety standards. Completed a solid waste rates and financial policy review that resulted in the adoption of rates and policies that stabilize and restore more equitable rates between customers for the long‐term sustainability of the fund, while preserving service standards and programs that continue to deliver results for the city’s environmental stewardship commitments. Advocated for expansion of King County cedar hills landfill to provide disposal options through 2046 and the selection of one of two onsite locations for the development of its support facilities. Provided written comment to King County addressing significant adverse impacts of potential selection of the City of Renton offsite location for the development of the landfill support facilities. 2023/2024 Goals  Sustainability & Solid Waste  Lead, support, and serve as a department resource for the development of strategies, actions, and plans that contribute to the city’s commitment to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and enhance climate resiliency. Inventory existing programs, activities, and applications to document current efforts that address sustainability and build climate resiliency. Research successful programs and new innovations applicable to a public works environment. 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-119Budget by Department - Public Works Co‐lead the clean economy strategy update and steward the plan’s adoption. Lead an electric vehicle (EV) action plan and program development that identifies EV infrastructure and policy needs, and current gaps in service, and makes recommendations for strategies and actions to expand and enhance EV access across the city through public and private collaboration and investment. Increase building energy savings through a variety of strategies including implementation of a public energy conservation education campaign, support of city and community solarization and green energy investments, and implementation of other energy efficiency and weatherization efforts. Bring our sustainability stories to life for our community through the communication of successes and illustrate the value sustainability and conservation projects provide to their lives. Provide opportunities for the community to engage with sustainability through hands‐on conservation programs and events. Build capacity within the city to increase and effectively implement sustainability, climate action, and environmental programs that benefit the community by initiating and supporting a city cross‐departmental staff “Green Team” that increases knowledge and awareness, develop skills and tools, and promotes best management practices. In collaboration with the saving water partnership, develop, implement, and increase residential and youth water quality and conservation education and outreach programs and presentations. In coordination with Republic Services, continue to provide comprehensive recycling, organics, and garbage collection, the clean sweep, no fee junk collection program, and account management services to city residents and businesses to improve livability and overall sanitation of the city. Adopt a zero‐waste plan that provides strategies to eliminate waste, prevent pollution, encourages product durability and reuse, and conserves natural resources. Continue to represent the city through participation in regional forums such as K4C, metropolitan solid waste advisory committee (MSWAC), the RE+ task force, and other opportunities that arise. 1The 2022 estimated budget is reflected in various other public works divisions’ budgets.   Beginning 2023,   the budget is consolidated under the new  sustainability & solid waste section.  Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Sustainability & Solid Waste 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Regular Salaries 0 0 0 0 0 488,590 507,093 100.0% 3.8% Personnel Benefits 0 0 0 0 0 268,218 284,128 100.0% 5.9% Supplies 0 0 0 0 0 2,999 2,999 100.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 0 0 645 0 4,875 211,158 211,158 100.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 0 0 0 0 0 49,252 50,744 100.0% 3.0% Transfer Out 0 0 0 0 0 1,920 1,920 100.0% 0.0% Total 0 0 645 0 4,875 1,022,137 1,058,043 100.0% 3.5% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Sustainability & Solid Waste 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2024 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2022‐2023 2023‐2024 Sustainability 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.50 5.50 5.50 100.0% 0.0% Total FTE1 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.50 5.50 5.50 100.0% 0.0% 2023/2024 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3-120Budget by Department - Public Works Transportation Systems Division  Mission  To plan, design, construct, operate, and maintain the city’s transportation system to assure the health and safety of the  general public in a skillful, professional, and caring manner that enhances the lives of its residents and business customers.  The division aggressively pursues mobility improvements that benefits the City of Renton and the region consistent with the  city’s business plan goals.  2021/2022 Accomplishments  Design  Completed design and construction documents, right‐of‐way acquisition, completed the construction obligation process, advertised the project for bids, evaluated bids and awarded a construction contract for the Rainier Avenue North phase 4 project. Completed design and construction documents, right‐of‐way acquisition, a