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RES2547 CITY OF RENTON, WASHINGTON RESOLUTION NO. 2547 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF RENTON, WASHINGTON ADOPTING THE 1983 COMPREHENSIVE WATER SYSTEM PLAN WHEREAS the City Council was presented the 1983. Comprehensive Water System Plan, and WHEREAS said Plan was discussed at a meeting of the Utilities Committee of the City Council ; and WHEREAS the Plan is in harmony with the intent of the City' s comprehensive Plan, NOW THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RENTON DO RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS : SECTION I : The above facts and recitals are found to be true and correct . SECTION II : The 1983 Comprehensive Water System Plan is hereby adopted for the City of Renton. PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL this 11th day of June, 1984. Maxine E. Motor , City Clerk APPROVED BY THE MAYOR this 11th day of June, 1984. �OJL�QJ�4! •S�.l• OC� Barbara Y. S inpoc , Mayor Approved as to form: Lawrence J. 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"ra �", ��' � � � �,. �, ��.:'�a a.�,� �� .a'' r �� y��;. � «M '""''' � r� ��i: ^.1�,,�4r� ��,� �i;.;"� � � .,F,� < -� :+&t�� "�.� �„i'< .� 1,°. •,�"„�"��„ , '`�` ..�..�.��� � ;�%'4 �w 'I"`'�'F#� � ":;M-"a. � � .: �1�'� �;� � , �, r" .: � � ".�� � ^� ' � �±'l. , � � 3F< '� ;y. �� `� ��"��� �'� � ��'. � ' � � ��".,� �< , > _ � �. .._ , , � �, „ , . ��. �. � � , , �, � u a� � �, i1'�. .it y�. ,� '�.E�'C � °.cA-'. CITY OF RENTON COMPREHENSIUE WATER SYSTEM PLAN SUMMARY � The Cit of Renton's Com rehensive Water S stem Plan re ared b RH2 Y P Y P P Y Engineering, P.S., updates the p revious Comp rehensive Plan p repa red in 1965. The 1983 Plan identifies the most efficient method for resolving existing System concerns and deficiencies as well as identifying improvements necessary to accommodate anticipated growth. The City's System, as it exists today, contains approximately 165 miles (869,367 1 i neal feet) of steel , cast i ron, and ducti 1 e i ron pi pe rangi ng from 2" to 24" in diameter, approximately 3,600 valves, and 1,600 fire hydrants. Major existing facilities include four active wells, one artesian spring, nine booster pump stations, six reservoirs, and sixteen p ressu re reduci ng stati ons. The booster pump stati ons a nd p ressu re reducing stations a re necessary to serve the four hills in the City: West Hill , Talbot Hill , Scenic Hill , and the Highlands. The City's System serves in excess of 10,b00 service connections which represent in excess of 22, 500 equivalent single-family homes. This difference is primarily attributed to the number of commercial and i ndust ri al faci 1 i ti es served. The hi ghest use of water for any day i n the 1 ast fi ve yea rs occu rred on July 17, 1979, when 15.6 mi 11 i on gal l ons of water were consumed in the System. In contrast, it is projected that at satu rati on devel opment of the System, approximately 28.56 mi 11 i on gal l ons per day of water will be demanded within the City's corporate limits. It � has also been projected that maximum day demands in 1993 and 2003 will be 19.8 and 21.9 million gallons pe� day respectively. At saturation, the City's System will serve the equivalent of 41, 200 single-family residences. A detailed capital improvement program has been developed based on computer analyses of the City's System with increased demands based on growth projections developed by the City's Planning Department. The present day cost for constructing all improvements needed by saturation development is 36.4 million dollars. It is anticipated that funding sources for these improvements will include water rates, developer fees, grants, and others. Also recommended in the plan are staff additions necessa ry for performing maintenance as recommended by manufacturers and the American Waterworks Association. An evaluation of rate increases necessary in order to ' accommodate this capital improvement program indicates that an average increase of 13% per year fo� the next five years is necessary in order to provi de the i nf rast ructu re requi red to accommodate growth and resol ve existing System concerns. It is simultaneously pointed out that the City has the lowest rates when compared with any of its ten municipal water system neighbors. This Comprehensive Plan is intended to serve as a guide for System improvements to be made during the next five years. In 1988, this Plan should be updated to reflect actual changes that have occurred. i INTRODUCTION This Comprehensive Water System Plan represents the first reevaluation of the City's System since 1965. Numerous changes have taken place since 1965 i n vi rtually every aspect of the System operation. These areas i nclude, as examples, (1) growth in both number of customers and demand for water, (2) an increase in the number of facilities and their condition, (3) reduction i r� the number of staff and tu rnover of the speci fic i ndi vidual s worki ng i n the City, (4) modifications in the financial characteristics of the utility, (5) an increase in legal constraints, (6) a gross change in energy management for the utility, (7) increase in adjacent systems' impacts on the City's System, and (8) environmental changes which affect the water quality as well as the quantity of water available, ul,timately reverting to the issue of water rights. Significant changes have occu rred in these areas since 1965, and each of these, as well as other issues, is discussed i n detai 1 i n thi s Report. A targe system size, the topography of the service area, and the unique demand characteristics of customers which the City serves are factors resulting in a very complicated System to understand and operate. Every attempt has been made to briefly document the current System condition and its operation as well as the need for improvements in a level of detail that will satisfy most readers. However, due to the sheer magnitude of the �' City System as well as the number of issues which must be addressed, this Report is lengthy and time-consuming to read in its entirety. Therefore, the Report is organized so that a reader may fi rst review a summary of the Plan results as stated in the section, "Conclusions and Recommendations", without readi ng the backg round or detai 1 ed i nfonnati on whi ch 1 ed to those results. Readers interested in a more detailed background should refer to the remai nder of the Plan or exami ne the specific chapter that addresses the i nformati on desi red. A revi ew of the Tabl e of Contents wi 11 i 11 ust rete that thi s P1 an goes wel l beyond the i nfonnati on requi red i n ful fi 11 i ng the Scope of Work whi ch was based on County and State requi rements as wel 1 as ori gi nal objecti ves of City Staff. Key members of the City Staff possessing an exceptional ' understanding of the System operation have provided an immense input to the i p repa rati on of thi s Report, enabl i ng the Comprehensi ve P1 an to su rpass standard levels of accuracy and detail . Mr. Ron O1sen, Mr. Larry Savaige, Mrs. Arlene Haight, Mr. Bob Bergstron, Mr. Dick Houghton, and Mr. Mike Mulcahy are sincerely thanked for the long hours of effort they provided in resolving issues and proposing direction. ii TABLE OF CONTENTS SUM/�AR Y i INIRODUCTION ii TABLE OF CONTENTS iii X1 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS CNAPTER 1 SYSTEM DESCRIPTION 1 ' Overall Systee and Major Facilities 3 Pressure Zones 4 Sou rce of Suppl y 6 Sp ri ngb rook Sp ri ngs 6 Acti ve Wel l s 7 Inactive Wells 14 Water Rights 14 Supply Water Quality 16 Ceda r/Sammami sh Basi n I nst ream Resources Protection Program 18 Areas Supplied by the City of Seattle 19 Storage Facilities 21 Equalizing Storage 21 Standby Storage 21 Existing Storage Facilities 22 196 Zone 22 Highlands 435 Zone Storage 22 ' iii Highlands 565 Zone Storage 22 Rolling Hills 590 Zone Storage 24 Trensmission and Distribution 24 Transmission 24 196 Zone 24 Highlands Zone 27 Kennydal e Area 28 Highlands 565 Zone 28 Talbot Hill A rea 29 Dist ribution System 29 Vulnerability Analysis 30 BOOSTER PIMP STATIONS 34 Function and Capacity 34 Desc ri pti ons 34 Mt. Olivet Pump Station 34 Windsor Hills Pump Station 35 Monroe Avenue Pump Station 35 Highlands Pump Station 45 North Talbot Hill Pump Station 45 Hospital Pump Station 45 Tiffany Park Pump Station 45 Fred Nelson Pump Station 46 Kent Intertie Pump Station 46 Pressu re Reducing Stations 46 Function and Capacity 46 I nst rvAer�ati on and Cortt rol 47 Hi story 50 Syste� Canputer Model 52 iv � CHAPTER 2 SERVICE AREA AND ADJACENT SYSTEMS 55 Senrice Area 55 Location 56 To o ra h 58 p 9 P Y Existing Land Use 58 Planned Land Use 59 Southeast Renton Comprehensive Plan 62 Central Renton Comprehensive Land Use Plan 64 Northeast Renton Comprehensive Land Use Plan 65 Green River Valley Comprehensive Plan 68 � I Adjace�rt Systens Pl ans 69 I Water Di st ri ct No. 101 70 Di st ri ct No. 90 71 Water Di st ri ct No. 108 11 Water Di st ri ct No. 58 72 City of Kent 72 Wasmeta Pa rk Water System 73 City of Tukwila 73 Independent Water Company 74 Water Di st ri ct No. 128 74 Water District No. 14 75 Water Di st ri ct No. 63 75 City of Seattl e 75 CHAPTER 3 SYSTEM DEMANDS 77 Past Five Years 77 Pressure Zone Denands 82 D�and Caa�pone�rts 83 Fire Conditions 84 v Future De�nands 86 Satu ration Levels Considerations 86 Interis De�nand Levels 87 Satu rati on Fi re Demands 89 CHAPTER 4 ENER6Y CONSUNPTION 91 . Electrical Ener�gp Cons�ption 91 Fossil Fuel Consuwption 93 CHAPTER 5 SYSTE�! IMPROVEMENTS 95 Perfon�ance Criteria 95 P ressu re 95 Velocities 96 Source of Supply 96 Storage 97 Transmission and Distribution 98 Booster Pump Stations 99 Pressure Reducing Stations 100 Co�t rol a nd I nst rumentati on 100 Facilities 102 Sou rce of Supply 102 Well No. 9 102 Alternatives 102 Impoundment/Middle Fork of Snoqualmie River 102 Other Basins 103 Treatment 103 vi y _ � ' Seattle 103 Other Wel l s 103 Existing Wells 104 Booster Pump Stations 105 Proposed Pump Stations 105 Proposed Improvements to Existing Pump Stations 107 Storage Facilities 109 Quantity 109 196 Zone Proposed Storage 113 West Hill Proposed Storage 113 Kennydale 320 Zone Proposed Storage 113 Highlands 435 Zone Proposed Storage 113 Highlands 565 Zone Proposed Storage 114 Talbot Hill 350/300 Zone Proposed Storage 114 Rolling Hills 490 Zone Proposed Storage 114 Rolling Hills 590 Zone Proposed Storage 114 Location 114 Transmission and Dist ribution Pipelines 115 Downtown 196 Pressure Zone 115 Kennydale 320 Zone 116 Highlands 435 Zone 117 Highlands 465 Zone 117 Talbot Hill Zone 117 Scenic Hill Zone 118 Pressure Reducing Stations 118 Tel enet ry and Supervi sory Co�rol 122 Recent System Improvements 122 Proposed Improvements 122 Systen Improvement Plan 123 vii CHAPTER 6 OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE 135 Norwal Operations 135 Staff and Responsibility 135 Equipment Available 135 Automatic/Manual Operation 137 Routine Water Quality Sampling � 137 Communications - Personnel 137 Facilities Operations and Maintenance Manuals 138 E�ergency Operations 138 Capabilities 138 Reserve Supplies and Emergency Disinfection 139 Preverttive Maintenance 140 Supply Sources 140 Storage Facilities 140 Dist ribution System 140 Tools and Equipment 141 Staffi ng - Mai ntenance and Operati ons 142 Cu rrent Staff 142 Additions Necessa ry 144 �' Trai ni ng Programs 147 Reconds 147 CHAPTER 7 FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS 148 Past Financial Operation 148 Projected Revenues and Expenses 158 viii FI6URES FIGURE 1 EXISTING SYSTEM 2 FIGURE 2 HYDRAULIC PROFILE 23 FIGURE 3 SERVICE AREA/ADJACENT SYSTEMS EXISTING BOUNDARIES 57 FIGURE 4 LAND USE 61 FIGURE 5 PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS 119 FIGURE 6 PROPOSED HYDRAULIC PROFILE 120 FIGURE 7 ORGANIZATONAL FLOWCHART 143 TABLES TABLE 1-1 PRESSURE ZONES 5 �, WELL DATA SHEETS - ACTIVE WELLS 8-11 I WELL DATA SHEETS - INACTIVE WELLS 12-13 TABLE 1-2 WATER RIGHTS 15 TABLE 1-3 WATER QUALITY COMPARISON 17 TABLE 1-4 SEATTLE SUPPLY METERS 20 TABLE 1-5 WATER SYSTEM PIPE INVENTORY 31 BOOSTER STATION DATA SHEETS 36-44 TABLE 1-6 PRESSURE REDUCING STATIONS 48 TABLE 1-7 EXISTING CONTROL SYSTEM FUNCTIONS 49 . TABLE 2-1 EXISTING SERVICE AREA LAND USE 59 TABLE 2-2 SOUTHEAST PLANNING AREA LAND USE 63 TABLE 2-3 CENTRAL PLANNING SECTOR LAND USE 65 TABLE 2-4 NORTHEAST PLANNING AREA LAND USE 67 TABLE 2-5 GREEN RIVER PLANNING AREA 68 TABLE 3-1 DEMAND RECORDS FOR THE PAST FIVE YEARS 78 TABLE 3-2 ESTIMATION OF MAXIMUM DAY DEMAND BY CUSTOMER CLASS 81 TABLE 3-3 MAXIMUM DAY DEMAND BY PRESSURE ZONE AREA 83 � TABLE 3-4 AVERAGE FIREFLOW REQUIREMENTS 86 TABLE 3-5 SATURATION DEMANDS BY PLANNING AREA 88 TABLE 3-6 INTERIM DEMAND PROJECTIONS 89 TABLE 3-7 � PROJECTED DEMANDS BY SECTOR 90 TABLE 4-1 FACILITIES POWER CONSUMPTION AND COST 92 ix i i � � i TABLE 5-2 STANDBY STORAGE REQUIREMENTS AT SATtIRATION � DEVELOPMENT SASED ON FAILURE PROBA6ILITY CRIT£RIA I10 TABLE 5-2 TOTA� STORAGE RfQUIREMENTS AT SATt1RATI0N DEVE�OPMENT 112 7ABLE 5-3 RENTON CAPITAl. IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS 126-134 TABLE 6-1 STAFFING TIME FOR PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE 145 I TABLE 6-2 MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS TASKS 146 TAB�E 7-1 STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENSE 15p TABIE 7-2 WATER RATE COMPARISON STUDY 1�� TABLE 7-3 MONTNLY WATER RATES 152 TABIE 7-4 CITY 4F RENTQN SCliEDU�E OF CAPITA� IMPROVEMENT PRQJECTS 153-155 TABLE 7-5 PROJECTfD REVENUE AND EXPENSES � 156 ' APPENDICES APPENDIX A PRQJECT BIB�IOGRAPHY APPENDIX B SEPA CHECKLIST APPENDIX C SPRING8R40K WATERSHED MAP AND 4RDINANCE N0. 1557 APPENDIX D � CITY OF KENT WATER SUPPLY CONTRACT APPENDIX E CITY OF SEATTLE TRANSMISSION PIPELINE FRANCHISE APPENDIX F CITY OF RENTONjDISTRICT b3 JOINT FACILITiES AGREEMENT — -- x CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS The following conclusions and recommendations were made during the development of this Comprehensive Plan. They are presented in order based on specific topics addressed in this Plan. Support for the Conclusions and Recommendations m d h i n ' n i n d i n h i h f thi P1 n. The reader a e ere is c• t� e t e �'�r�'r ate c a'ters • s � is encouraged to examine specific sections where additional information is desi red. ' SUPPLY 1. The City's source of supply which is provided from an alluvial fan of � the Ceda r River, provides the best water quality when compared with any of the City's 12 adjacent water syste+ns. I 2. The existing well supplies are somewhat vulnerable to contamination ' f rom su rface spi 11 s. I n devel opment of futu re water suppl i es, the ' City should take steps to minimize this vulnerability. 3. A recently enacted law, the Ceda r/Sammami sh I nst ream Resou rces Protection Program, significantly limits the amount of water that the City can obtain f rom the Ceda r River. The City's Attorney should prepare the best legal stategy to deal with this statute in order that the City be allowed to develop future supplies necessary to accommodate growth. 4. The City should vigo rously develop new water supplies in addition to Well No. 9, which is cu rrently being developed. Development of additional wells should occur not only in the existing well field, but al so fu rther upstream i n the Mapl e Val l ey and May Val l ey areas. The degree of success in developing additional wells will determine the need to pursue other alternatives identified in this Plan. 5. The City should continue negotiations with the City of Seattle for renewal of the pipeline franchise and, as a condition of renewal , reserve an emergency supply, quantity, and rate at a level sufficient to meet domestic and commercial demands. S TORAGE 1. The majority of storage in the City's System is located in the lowest pressure zone in the System. This is ideal for the lowest pressure zone, but results in a higher degree of vulnerability in the upper pressure zones. X1 2. Increases i n storage capacity are necessary i n the next few years i n order to meet current storage requirements as well as to accommodate growth. The new storage should be located at higher elevations to provide service to the upper pressure zones. The Capital Improvement Program stated in this Plan illustrates this priority. 3. Although storage may not be constructed in specific areas for a number of yea rs, the City should pu rsue acquisition of these sites now so that they will be available when needed. TRANSMISSION 1. The transmission and dist ribution pipelines have reasonably good capacity in most a reas of the City. However, some deficiencies do � occur in pipeline capacity; and these were identified as a result of computer analyses of the entire System. It is impo rtant to note that these deficiences occur only during a fi re or .failure of a key part of the System. 2. Certain sections of the City's System are very old and the useful life of these pipelines has been or will soon be exhausted. In other a reas, the pi pel i ne materi al that was used du ri ng the ori gi nal installation is of poor quality which also necessitates replacement in the near future. 3. Better reliability and increased capacity are needed in some areas. Improvements listed in this Plan will resolve these concerns rega rding pipeline capacity, age, and material . BOOSTER PUMPS � 1. Most boost er pump stations in the City's System a re old and need updating or rebuilding. Some of these existing stations are unsafe and should be modified immediately. 2. The northeast section of the City's System (Highlands and Kennydale areas) is vulnerable to loss of supply f rom booster pump stations supplying this area. The Improvement Program recommended in this Plan recommends development of new booster pump stations for supplying the Highlands 435 and 565 pressure zones as well as the Kennydale 320 pressure zone. 3. The West Hill supply f rom the City of Seattle is also vulnerable since it is a single supply to this entire area. The City is currently constructing a new booster pump station which will supply the entire West Hill area from the City's lowest pressure zone (which is supplied by wells). Upon completion of this pump station, the Seattle supply will then provide the necessary reliability since it will be placed on standby status. xii .. l DEMANDS 1. The City's System cu rrently experiences a maximum day demand of 15.6 million gallons. Peak demand rates on a maximum day approach 26 million gallons per day (1.1 mg per hour). 2. The projected demand at saturation for areas currently within the City limits and also for those areas outside the City that are not currently planned to be served by an adjacent system is 28.6 million gallons per day. This represents approximately an 83� inc rease in the maximum day demand and System capacity will need to be increased accordingly. It is anticipated that saturation demands, as defined in this Plan, will occur in approximately 35 years. Therefore, '� improvements recommended will need to be constructed in a period somewhat less than 35 yea rs in order to have the capacity available to accommodate growth. The Capital Improvement Program shown in this Plan reflects this schedule. 3. Unaccounted for water (p rima rily leakage) should be monitored to determine when it is economical to reduce this component of System demand. Cu rrently it is recognized that certain a reas of the System have unacceptably high leakage rates. 4. Fireflow requirements for all types of buildings, especially commercial and indust rial facilities, have a very significant impact on the size of System facilities, and therefore, costs of these faci 1 ites. It is noted that these fi refl ow requi rements must be met while the System is expe�iencing a maximum day demand. � CONTROL 1. The existing System is complicated since it has 12 diff erent pressure zones, five different sou rces of supply, six diff erent reservoirs, nine booster pump stations, 165 miles of pipeline, and 16 p ressu re-reducing stations. The existing cont rol system has the capability to monitor but a few of these facilities. . 2. The cont rol system cu rrently being used is old and t echnologically outdated. Parts are no longer available other than by salvaging other systems. The existing control system should be replaced as soon as possible. The City should develop a new cont rol system in phases so that increasing the levels of control and monitoring capability can be provided until maximum operational efficiency is attained. FINANCIAL . 1. The City cu rrently has the lowest rates when compa red with the 12 adjacent water systems. . 2. Increases in rates are necessary in order to finance the recommended Capital Improvement Program, refund replacements, and provide the additional staff recommended in this Plan. xiii • � 3. The City should update the previous rate study in order to accommodate the Capital Improvement Program, replacements, and additional staff recommended here. OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE 1. The present staff level is insufficient to accomplish the functions that are necessary in order to properly operate and maintain the � utility. 2. An additional nine crew members are necessary in order to provide a staff 1 evel necessary to adequately operate and mai ntai n the System without additional growth. 3. As g rowth occurs and old facilities a re updated, as well as new facilities being added, the staff level necessary to p roperly operate and maintain the System should be reevaluated.. PRESSURE REDUCING STATIONS 1. Some pressu re reducing stations in the System a re unsafe to enter and should be modified. Improved drainage and pressure relief valves shoul d be p rovi ded i n order to al l ow proper operati on. 2. Additional pressure reducing stations are needed in order to improve reliability and maintain acceptable pressures as well as accommodate growth in the System. ENERGY MANAGEMENT 1. Power consumption occurs primarily in wells and booster pump stations. Older, inefficient pumps should be replaced with high efficiency pumps. � 2. Some wells and booster pump stations have inherently higher efficiencies and their use should be maximized. 3. Back-up power supplies should be provided for wells and key booster stations. 4. The recommended new control system can minimize energy consumption and this objective should be accomplished in the development of the recommended cont rol system. The above conclusions and recommendations summarize key points made in the remainder of this Plan. It is anticipated that the reader will desire additional information regarding specific points and •the reader is, therefore, di rected to the Tabl e of Contents i n order to 1 ocate the speci fi c i nformati on desired. A general representation of the recommended improvements is illustrated in Figures 5 and 6. xiv CHAPTER 1 SYSTEM DESCRIPTION The City of Renton's Water System provides service to an area of approximately 60 square miles which has in excess of 10,000 customers. The System is complicated and in order to simplify the System description, the following sequence will be used: 1. Review of the overall S stem and its ma 'or facilities. y � 2. Descri pti on of the System's pressu re zones i ncl udi ng topography, zone limits, and hydraulically inter-related zones. 3. Examination of the control capability and System instrumentation. 4. Description of the sources of supply, transmission and distribution pipelines, booster pump stations, and pressure reducing stations. . � 5. Documentation of the System's computer model and its uses. This Chapter is limited to a description of System facilities while a , later chapter will address their operation and maintenance. After revi ewi ng thi s Chapter, the reader shoul d be fami 1 i a r wi th the Ci ty's System in sufficient detail so that a good basis for the recommended improvements made later in this Report is provided. 1 OVERALL SYSTEM AND MAJOR FACILITIES Shown i n pl an vi ew i n Fi gu re 1, the Renton Water System i s 1 a rge i n comparison to most municipal systems in the State of Washington. The following facilities are characterized by function: Source ---- Four active Mells i n the System and one artesian spring which supply water to the enti re City with the exception of two small a reas that a re cu rrently bei ng suppl i ed by the City of Seattle through the Cedar River Transmission System. Most water supplied to the System enters the lowest pressure zone which serves the downtown, Valley floor and commerci al/i ndust ri al a reas to the south. Booster Pumps ---- Pumping is accomplished by nine booster pu�p � stations that are located throughout the City. Transmission and Dist�ibution Pipelines---- Approximately 165 miles of pipeline are used to transmit water from the supply sources to the reservoi rs and customers. Storage ---- Currently there are six reservoirs in the System, and the majority of the reservoi r capaci ty i s i n the 1 owest p ressu re zone. Pressure Zones ---- Because of the City's topography, the System has been separated into twelve hydraulically different pressure zones. P ressu re Reduci ng Stations ---- Sixteen different pressure reducing stations having various purposes and functions are located throughout the System. The System is complicated, requiring a good understanding of System hydraulics and of each facility's capability to ensure fully efficient operation. The key to understanding the City's Water System and its facilities lies in appreciating the need for the twelve hydraulically different pressure zones. They are, therefore, discussed in detail fi rst. It is important to note that the water quality from the City's wells is excellent. In fact, it is of a higher quality than the water from all of the water systems that are adjacent to the City. The source of this 3 water is f rom the Cascade Mountains snowmelt and lowland rainfall which is conveyed in underground rivers called "aquifers". The water supply is . pumped at the City's wells from the aquifer at the mouth of the Cedar River near City Hall . The City also owns an artesian spring, known as Springbrook Springs, which is located to the south of the City. It is bel i eved that �hi s sou rce of supply i s al so f rom the Cascade Mou ntai ns. PRESSURE ZONES � The System is divided into twelve different pressure zones for the pu rpose of p rovi di ng reasonabl e p ressu res i n the di st ri buti on system. The City currently serves customers within an elevation range of 30 feet to 500 feet. This range alone results in at least three p ressure zone divisions and, therefore, four separate pressure zones. Physical ba rriers such as hills and valleys often prevent the extension of a pressu re zone f rom one location to another. As an example, the pressure zones in the Highlands area have not been extended across Maple Valley into the Renton Scenic Nill or Talbot Hill areas, even though the el evati ons served on these two hi 11 s a re simi 1 a r. Thus, Mapl e Val l ey has provided a physical barrier which has precluded joining of hydraulically similiar pressure zones. As a result of these physical barriers and the elevation range served, there are twelve pressure zones in the City's System. Tabl e 1-1 detai 1 s each p ressu re zone, as i t i s comrnonly named, a nd the nominal hydraulic elevation that each pressure zone provides. The nominal hydraulic elevation is the overflow elevation of the highest reservoi r i n the pressure zone or the elevation that a reservoi r should have if there were a reservoir in a zone which currently does not have one. Also included in Table 1-1 a re the lowest and highest ground elevations served in each pressure zone and the corresponding pressure at those locations. ' Figure 2, The System Hydraulic Profile, shows the vertical relationship of the System's pressure zones and demonstrates how water can move up or down through the System. In the City System, water moves up through booster pump stations and down through pressu re reducing stations. The hydraulic profile illustrates how water can move vertically through the System, whi 1 e Fi gu re 1 i 11 ust rates how water can move hori zontal ly through the System. With the exception of the West Hill and Scenic Hill , all of the pressure zones are hydraulically interrelated with the 196 zone. The West Hill and Scenic Hill a re supplied by the City of Seattle's Cedar River transmission pipelines and are hydraulically unrelated to the rest of the City's System. Their operation and behavior have no effect on the remainder of the System. The remaining pressu re zones a re hyd raulically related since the supply for these p ressu re zones comes f rom the City's fou r acti ve wel l s and Sp ri ngb rook Sp ri ngs. 4 I TABLE 1-1 PRESSURE ZONES . MAXIMUM MINIMUM MINIMUM MAXIMUM ELEVATION SERVICE ELEVATION SERVICE SERVED PRESSURE SERVED PRESSURE PRESSURE ZONE (FEET) (PSI) (FEET) (PSI) Kennydale 320 210 48 15 132 Highlands 435 320 50 100 145 Highlands Elevated Tank 565 415 65 300 115 Downtown 196 100 42 15 78 West Hill 450 � 350 43 150 130 W est Hill 270 190 35 50 95 Scenic Hill 370 200 75 100 117 Scenic Hill 490 380 48 200 126 Talbot Hill 590 455 58 300 126 Talbot Hill 490 400 39 200 126 Talbot Hill 350 250 43 125 97 Talbot Hill 300 175 54 50 108 NOTE: P ressures stated above are static values. . .. . . . . . .. .. All of this supply, if not consumed in the Downtown 196 zone, is pumped to a higher zone where the water is prima rily used to supply residential and commercial demands. As an example, water consumed in the Highlands E1 evated Tank 565 zone i s fi rst pumped f rom the aqui fer at the wel l s into the Downtown 196 zone, then pumped into the Highlands 435 zone, and then pumped again to the Highlands Elevated Tank 565 zone. Another example is the route that water follows to supply the Kennydale 320 zone. This supply comes f rom the Downtown 196 zone, is pumped up to the Highlands 435 zone, and pressure reduced to the Kennydale 320 zone. The remaining routes for supply to each zone can be traced by following the connections shown on Figure 2. 5 It is desirable to have two or more connections (or supply points) that will allow water to move upward to a higher pressure zone or downward to a lower pressure zone. This maximizes System reliability by providing multiple paths or routes that the water can take when moving between p ressu re zones. The System supply is reliable since each zone has two or more supply sou rces, with the exception of the Seattle supplied areas, which have only one sou rce of supply. However, some supply facilities are old, inefficient, and of questionable reliability. Some facilities are in poor locations hydraulically; therefore, in some zones a thi rd or fou rth Supply i s necessa ry. The West Hi 11 and Sceni c Hi 11 a re cu rrently vul nerabl e to System fai 1 u res si nce they have a si ngl e source of supply and no storage. Later chapters of thi s Report wi l l discuss methods to resolve these concerns. SOURCE OF SUPPLY Sp ri nqb rook Sp ri nqs Springbrook Springs is located 4 miles south of the City's center and • has been used continously since 1909 to supply water to the City's 196 pressure zone. The City has acqui red ownership of a significant amount of property to form a watershed di rectly surroundi ng the Spri ngs. A fence has been erected around the property to restrict access to and activities within the watershed. The springs are a natural flow of water out of a coarse gravel stratu+n in the side of a steep ravine. The water whi ch exi ts the st ratum i s ponded behi nd two 1 a rge conc rete bul kheads that a re backfilled with gravel , each at a different elevation. Perforated pipes within the gravel section collect and channel the Spring discharge into several large, concrete basins that are interconnected to a 20" pipeline which reduces to a 16" diameter pipeline on the site. The 16" pipeline conveys the water directly to the di st ri buti on system. A meteri ng and chl ori nati on stati on i s 1 ocated on the 16" pi pel i ne wi thi n the watershed a rea. The chl ori ne i nj ecti on i n thi s stati on i s metered and set manually. A third impounding structure at a lower elevation collects water which bypasses the intake and conveys this water to a stream. The vertical and horizontal extent of the course gravel stratum which produces the Springbrook water is unknown. However, the general appearance of the exposed strata together with other surface signs indicates that the alluvial beds of sand and gravel are heterogeneous and may be discontinuous. The Springs currently produce approximately 2 million gallons per day. However, the output reduces to a range of 1.75 to 1.50 million gallons per day in late August or September. The City currently has a water right at Springbrook of 2.99 million gallons per day. A copy of Spri ngbrook Spri ngs Watershed Map and Ordi nance No. 1557 � is contained in Appendix C. � 6 I � I I � Active Wells The City currently utilizes faur wells as the primary means of supp]y to the Water System: Wel l Nas. l, 2, and 3 (1 ocated i n Li berty Fa rk} and Well No. 8 (lacated in Cedar River Park}. The characteristics af these ' wel l s a re summa ri zed i n the fal l owi ng wel l data sheets, Well Nas. 1, 2, and 3 pump to the 196 pressure xone. The water from Well No. 3 is chlorinated while the water from WeTI Nos. 1 and 2 is not. We11 No. 8 pumps di rectly to the Mt. O1 i vet Reservai r due to the sand p roduci ng cha racteri stics of the wet l . At thaugh the pump i s sta rted agai nst an apen di scha rge 1 i ne to the Ceda r Ri ver a nd al l owed ta pump far several mi nutes befare ptrmpi ng to the ('C'S@['VO1 t'� sand i s sti i t present i n the water from the Wel l . By pumpi ng di rectly ta the , reservair, sufficient detention time is provided to settle the sand from ' the water. ' When the pumps and motors i n Wel T Nos. 1 and 2 were repiaced i n 1962, it was discovered that the casing for Well No. 1 would nat pass the 12" pump that was i ntended to be i nstal 1 ed. I nstead, a 10" pump was installed with a discharge of 2000 gpm although it was understood that the We11 can produce 3040 gpm. It shauld also be noted that hoth We11 � Nos. 1 and 2 are equipped with 200 horsepawer motors. ' The building that contains Well Nas. 1 and 2 is in poor condition with inadequate lighting, ventilation and drainage. Much of the equipment in the building is corroded due to many years of expasure to the humid air i n the bui 1 di ng. The f1 aw meter on the wel l di sctta rge �}1�}1 ltt� i s i inaccurate and the site perimeter is not fenced. The entrance stai rway to the building makes access difficult and, at times, hazardous. The vault that contains Well No. 3 needs modification. Access is difficult, and the vault can fill with water faster than the sump pump ' can discharge it. The lighting and ventilation are inadequate for an-site inspections and repairs, and the fiaw meter an the discharge pi pi ng i s i naccu rat e. i The building that contains Well No. 8 is in good condition althaugh the site perimeter i s not fenced. The accu racy of the fl ow meter appea rs ta � be reasonable although it should be checked. The City is currentiy in the pracess of drilling Well No. 9 located approximately 400 feet from Weli No. 8 in Cedar R�ver Park. Well Na. 9 � is expected ta produce 35QQ gpm. An abservation well will also be dri i 1 ed to a depth af 400 feet to i nvestigate the possi bi 1 ity of devel opi ng addi ti anal supply sou rces from a deeper aqui f er i f such an � aquifer exists, , � I 7 � �_ WELL DATA BHEET ,: < i:'.e< :.� :. , _... �,9��,"a ;��s`.����� , WELL NAME OR NUMBER _ �IBERTv PaRK No. i LOCAT I ON L IBERTY PARK CONSTRUCTED 1942 PUMP MANUFACTURER Cornell MODEL NUMBER 12 Es • FLOWRATE z000 qpm T•D•H• 210 feet TYPE Verti cal Turbi nP - 7 �gP I NSTALLED 1962 MOTOR MANUFACTURER General E1 ectri c MODEL NUMBER wv� 922ooa � HORSEPOWER 200 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TYPE Above Grade WALLS Concrete Masonrv Block ROOF wood HEATING Radiant Electric ' VENT I LAT I NG Manual l v oaened wi ndov�s CASING SIZE(DIA) 16" DEPTH �3 fpPt SCREEN 40 ft to 82 ft below Qrade WATER 9UAL I TY Good STATIC WATER LEVEL 22 feet below grade (elev. 17.0) PRODUCTION (TEST PUMP) 320o qpm WATER R I GHT 9UANT I TY Z000 gpm WATER R I GHT STATUS Acti ve OPERAT I ONAL STATUS Acti ve s WELL OATA BMEET � WELL NAME OR NUMBER LIBERTY PARK N0. z , LOCATION LIBERTY PARK 1942 CONSTRUCTED � PUMP MANUFACTURER Cornell MODEL NUMBER 14 EC , FLOWRATE 300o qom T D N 210 fP�t TY PE • Vertical Turbine - 3 Staae I NSTALLED �95� � MOTOR � MANUFACTURER General E1 ectri c , MODEL NUMBER WVJ 929001 � HORSEPOWER 200 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TYPE Above Grade , WALLS Concrete Masonry B1 ock , ROOF wood , HEAT I NG Radi ant E1 ectri c VENT I LAT I NG Manual l v ooerated wi ndows , CASING SIZE(DIA) 16�� , DEPTH 73 feet , SCREEN 40 feet to 82 feet below arade , WATER AUALITY Good STAT I C WATER LEVEL 22 feet bel ow 9rade (e�ev. 17,o) , PRODUCTION (TEST PUMP) 555 gpm (�imited by test pump) WATER R I GHT 9UANT I TY 3000 gpm WATER R I GHT STATUS Acti ve OPERAT I ONAL STATUS Acti ve 9 WELL DATA SMEET WELL NAME OR NUMBER �IBERTY PARK N0. 3 - LOCAT I ON L IBERTY PARK CONSTRUCTED 1959 PUMP MANUFACTURER �orne�� ' - MODEL NUMBER i2 oc , FLOWRATE 160U qpm T•D•H• ZLU feet TYPE Verti cal Turbi ne - 5 Sta4e I NSTALLED ��? MOTOR � MANUFACTURER General E1 ectri c MODEL NUMBER 2VJ 1229122 HORSEPOWER • �Q4 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TYPE Underground Vaul t , WALLS Precast Concrete R��F Pra�act ('nn�rPta HEAT I NG Radi ant E1 ectri c VENT I LAT I NG Forced Ai r , CASING SIZE(DI�) 12" DEPTH l06 feet , SCREEN 50 feet to 56 feet (not confi rmed) WATER AUAL I TY �ood STAT I C WATER LEVEL 19 feet bel ow grade (e�ev. 22.o) PRODUCTION (TEST PUMP) 640 gpm (limited by pump equip. ) WATER R I GHT AUANT I TY 160o gpm WATER R I 6HT STATUS Acti ve , � OPERAT I ONAL STATUS Acti ve �o WELL DATA SI�EET No. 8 WELL NAME- OR NUMBER � LOCAT I ON Cedar Ri ver Park , 1967 CONSTRUCTED � '� I PUMP MANUFACTURER BYron Jackson � MODEL NUMBER �h GH � ' FLOWRATE 3500 apm , 'L�U I UH TYPEH� verti ca 1 Turbi ne- 2 Staqe � I NSTALLED �9�� � MOTOR I�� MANUFACTURER General Electric , � MODEL NUMBER h286P24 � HORSEPOWER 250 , � BUILDING CONSTRUCTION � TYPE Above grade , WALLS Architectural Brick , ROOF Cast i n ol ace concrete HEAT I NG Radi an _�stri r VENT I LAT I NG Forc:Pd Ai r CASING SItE(DIA) 24" , DEPTH l�z feet , SC REE N 66 ft. to 92 ft. (below �rade) WATER AUAL I TY Good , STAT I C WATER LEVEL 22 feet bel ow grade (e�ev. 1�,o) , PRODUCTION (TEST PUMP) 3,325 gpm 3,500 gpm � WATER RIGHT AUANTITY � WATER R I GHT STATUS Acti ve Active OPERATIONAL STATUS � � i l��LE. �Q1YA BMEET WELL NAME OR NUMBER No. 4 (formerly Highlands we>> No. 1) _ LOCATION Sunset Boulevard & Northeast 12th CONSTRUCTED 1942 PUMP f MANUFACTURER worthi ngton o MODEL NUMBER 1�-b��-5 FLOWRATE 1(l� gnm � T•D•H• TYPE Uerti cal Turbi ne I NSTALLED 1942 MOTOR � MANUFACTURER u.s. MODEL NUMBER 326117 , HORSEPOWER 30 , BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TYPE Above Grade � WALLS Concrete Masonrv B1 ock ROOF wood HEATING - VENTILATING - CASING SIZE(DIA) lo" DEPTN 175 feet SCREEN 92 feet to 175 feet , WATER AUALITY unknown STAT I C WATER LEVEL 72 feet bel ow grade (e�ev. 291) PRODUCTION (TEST PUMP) 170 9Pm WATER R I GHT AUANT I TY 170 gpm WATER R I GHT STATUS Acti ve OPERATIONAL STATUS Inactive �2 � WELL DATA SNEEt WELL NAME OR NUMBER No. 5 . LOCAT I ON Southeast 100th Street & 108th Ave. SE CONSTRUCTED 1953 PUMP MANUFACTURER �ayne-Bowl er , MODEL NUMBER 12 KHMM , FLOWRATE � 3�� an�m TYPEH• Verti cal Turbi ne - 10 Stac�e � I NSTALLED 1953 , MOTOR MANUFACTURER General Electric MODEL NUMBER RKJ 304006 , HORSEPOWER Zoo , BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TYPE Above Grade WALLS Concrete Masonrv Block ROOF ��^�+ � HEATING - � VENTILATING - � CASING SItE(DIA) 20�� to 287 feet, iz�� to 376 feet DEPTH �RR faat SCREEN 3�,� fPat tn 37'�1 fPP1' WATER AUAL I TY Poor - hi gh i ron content STATIC WATER LEVEL 135 feet below grade (e�ev. �oo) PRODUCTION (TEST PUMP) 1300 gpm WATER RI GHT AUANT I TY 1500 gpm Active WATER RIGHT STATUS � OPERAT I ONAL STATUS Inacti ve 13 Inactive Wells The City owns two wells (Nos. 4 and 5) that a re not presently being used. The characteristics of these wells are summarized in the following well data sheets. Wel1 No. 4, formerly Highlands Well No. 1, was originally constructed for the Northwest Water Company before the Highlands area was annexed to the City. The well has a capacity of 100 gpm and was used until the early 1960's to introduce chlorine into the then uncovered Highlands' reservoi rs. When the reservoi rs were covered the need for chl ori nati on was eliminated and the well was abandoned. The building was raised and the well capped. The City has an active water right of 170 gpm at Well No. 4. • Well No.� S was drilled in 1953 and operated satisfactorily until 1959 at which time the well developed a sand production p roblem. Even though the well was packed with gravel and redeveloped, the sand production problem was not eliminated. The well was not used again until 1965 at which time it was operated du ring high demand periods only. Many water quality complaints (due to taste and odor) were received, with the result that the well 's use was discontinued, and it has not been used since 1965. The City cu rrently has an active water right of 1500 gpm at ° Well No. 5. There are no chlorination facilities at the well and the building is in ext remely poor condition. If this well is reactivated, it will pump to the Highlands 435 zone. Water Riqhts The Su rface Water Code of 1917 decl a�es that subj ect to exi sti ng ri ghts, al l surface and ground waters i n the State are the property of the public (excluding water rights obtained prior to the Code's development). A right to appropriate water for a beneficial use must be � acquired in accordance with Title 90 of the RCW. Appropriations which are first in time shall be first in right subject to the rigfits of the , riparian owners. The date of recei pt by the Depa rtment of Ecol ogy of an appl i cati on for appropriation establishes the priority of the water right. Prior to development of the source of supply, a permit is issued by the Department of Ecology to construct, develop, and test the supply source. A wate� right may then be issued following a thorough review p rocess and a determination of the amount of supply which is put to beneficial use. This water right establishes priority use of the water and becomes an appurtenance to the property. Renton's existing water rights are shown in Table 1-2. The City is cu rre�tly operati ng withi n the const rai nts of al l of the water ri ghts. Well Nos. 4 and 5, which have active water rights, are not operational . If these wells a re not reactivated, it may be possible to t ransf er these rights to a different location. This may be beneficial if future water ri ght app rop ri ati ons a re rest ri cted. � 14 � TABLE 1-2 WATER RIGHTS AMOUNT OF CURRENT CAPACITY ANNUAL WITHDRAWAL WATER RIGHT OF SOURCE LIMITS CERTIFICATE N0. SOURCF OF WATER STATUS (GPM) (GPM) (GPM) (MG) 463 SPRINGBROOK SPRINGS ACTIVE 1,032 2,082 1,100 531 G102605 SPRINGBROOK.SPRINGS ACTIVE 1,050 2,082 1,100 531 886-D WELL N0. 1 ACTIVE 1,040 2,000 2,000 1,050 5838-A WELL N0. 1 ACTIVE 960 2,000 2,000 1,050 887-D . WELL N0. 2 ACTIVE 1,040 3,000 3,000 1,290 �„ 5836-A WELL N0. 2 ACTIVE 1,960 3,000 3,000 1,290 6461-A WELL N0. 3 CANCELLED 5835-A WELI N0. 3 ACTIVE 1,600 1,600 834 884-D WELL N0. 4 ACTIVE �70 100 89 3591-A WELL N0. 5 ACTIVE � 1,300 � 1,500 1,300 756 5834-A WELL N0. 5 ACTIVE 200 1,500 1,300 � 756 6775-A WELL N0. 8 ACTIVE 3,000 3,500 3,500 1,837 6776-A WELL N0. 8 ACTIVE 500 3,500 3,500 1,837 WELL N0. 9 PENDING 3,500 UNDER CONSTRUCTION ------ i In an attempt to identify unused and inactive water rights, the Depa rtment of Ecol ogy requi red reconfi rmati on of al l exi sti ng ri ghts i n 1976. The City compl i ed with the request; however, it is important to note that the City of Seattle did not use this opportunity to establish an official right for the water it withdraws from the Landsburg di versi on. Thi s topi c wi 11 be di scussed i n detai 1 i n the "Inst ream Resources Protection" section of this Chapter. The recent Instream Resources Protection Program Report adopted by the Department of Ecology addresses the fact that the water resources in the Cedar River basin are limited. Renton will experience difficulty in obtaining future water rights, particularly from supply sources which tap the al l uvi al fan of the Ceda r Ri ver. Thi s a rea i ncl udes the aqui fer which supplies all of the City,'s active wells and the new Well No. 9. The City is currently conducting a study to detennine the extent of the hydraulic continuity between the aquifier and the stream flows in the Cedar River. If there is hydraulic continuity and the operation of Well No. 9 at 1,500 gpm (which is currently under construction) causes a 5 percent reduction in the minimum flow in the River, the water right for Wel l No. 9 wi 11 be reduced f rom 1,500 gpm. If the operati on of Wel l No. 9 demonstrates hydraulic continuity between the aquifer and the River but does not affect the flow by more than 5 percent, the water right may be approved. As mentioned previously, the acquisition of water rights will be more difficult and complicated. Efforts should be made to develop new supply sources and acqui re water rights for these suppli es as soon as possible. Supply Water Quality Testing has recently been performed on water f rom all wells with the � results that all current Envi ronmental Protection Agency, Department of ' Social and Health Services, and American Water Works Association standards are met. The Seattl e supply, Spri ngbrook Spri ngs and Wel l No. 3 are the only supply sou rces that currently use chlorination. Well Nos. 1, 2, and 8 a re not chlorinated. Table 1-3 is a comparison of water quality in the Renton System. Samples from Well No. 5, and abandoned Well Nos. 6 and 7, are of interest and are also included in the Table. The quality of water in the City System has an exceptional record of ineeting Health Department requirements. 16 TABLE 1-3 WATER QUALITY COMPARISON � CITY SOUTH 9TH AND SPRINGBROOK WELL WELL WELL QUALITY PARAMETER STANDARD HALL HIGH AVENUE SOUTH SPRINGS 1 & 2 3 8 INORGANIC CHEMICALS (mg/1 ) A rsenic 0.5000 0.0100 Ba ri um 1.0000 0.2500 Cadmium 0.0100 0.0020 Ch romi um 0.0500 0.0100 Iron 0.3000 0.0500 0.17 0.16 Lead 0.0500 0.0100 Manganese 0.0500 0.0100 0.0 0.0 Me rcu ry 0.0020 0.0005 Selenium 0.0100 0.0050 Silver 0.0500 0.0100 Sodium 10.0000 28.0 5.4 F1 uori de 2.4000 0.2000 0.4 0.092 Nitrate 10.0000 0.2000 1.1 0.54 Sulfate 250.00 21.2 8.9 Chloride 250.00 10.0 6.0 � ORGANIC CHEMICALS (Pa rts per million� ENDRIN 0.0002 0.0001 LINDANE 0.0040 0.0010 METHOXYCHLOR 0.1000 0.0100 TOXAPHENE 0.0050 0.0010 . 2, 4-D 0.1000 0.0100 2, 4, 5-TP (�.0100 0.0100 PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS TURBIDITY 1.0000 0.1000 0.2 0.8 HARDNESS (AS CaCO ) 80.0000 80.0 56.0 COLOR (UNITS) 315.0000 5.0000 5.0 5.0 TRIHALOMETHANE (ug/1 ) CHLOROFORM 100.0000 0.1000 40.0 0.7 0.6 0.6 BMRL DICHLOROBROMOMETHANE 100.0000 0.0000 1.3 0.6 BMRL BMRL BMRL BROMOFORM 100.0000 0.3000 0.0 4.2 4.2 BMRL BMRL CHLORODIBROMOMETHANE 100.0000 0.1000 0.0 7.6 0.6 BMRL BMRL ALL QUALITY PARAMETERS ARE EXPRESSED IN (mg) MILLIGRAMS PER LITER, (ug) MICROGRAMS PER LITER, OR AS NOTED OTHERWISE BMRL = BELOW MINIMUM REPORTING LEVEL The Scenic Hill and West Hill areas are currently served with City of Seattl e water that has 1 esser qual ity than the water f rom the Renton wells and springs. The Seattle water is also fluoridated, whereas the Renton water is not. The City of Renton is currently in the process of transferring supply for these areas to the City's wells and springs. Cedar/Sammamish Basin Instream Resources Protection Prog�am State law provides that perennial streams and rivers in the Cedar and Sammamish Basins as well as others shall be retained with the base flow rates necessary to provide for preservation of wildlife and fish, as well as scenic, aesthetic, environmental and navigational values (RCW 90.54.020-3A-1911). Base flow rates are compared with rates that can be expected i n the st ream a rel ati vely hi gh percentage of the ti me under natural conditions. Prior to 1979, the primary statutory authority for the protecti on of the i nst�eam fl ow rates was provi ded by the State Fisheries Code. In 1979, a committee consisting of representatives from the Depa rtment of Ecol ogy, Depa rtment of Fi sheri es, Depa rtment of Game, Department of Natural Resources, Department of Highways, and Interagencies Committee for Outdoor Recreation was formed to detennine and establ i sh the i nst ream fl ow rates and su rface water 1 i mitati ons to p revent futu re over-al 1 ocati on of water resou rces i n the Ceda r/Sammami sh Basins. The result of this Comnittee's action is the Western Washington Instream Resources Protection Program, available from the Department of Ecology. �'he Report documents the minimum instream flows necessary to ensure sufficient water for food and game/fish propagation, hydropower generation, navigation and lock operation, maintenance of lake levels for protecti on of shorel i ne faci 1 iti es, recreati on, and enhancement of aesthetic values. The Instream Resources Protection Program di rectly affects the future water rights of the City of Renton by restricting water right appropriations to those that do not significantly affect the flow in the Cedar River. The law stipulates that all future water rights and al l ocati ons may not reduce the su rface water fl ows i n the Ceda r Ri ver by more than 5 percent of the minimum flow value. The minimum flow value for the Cedar River is 110 cubic feet per second. The existing Renton well field in the Liberty and Cedar River Park area is adjacent the Cedar River and has been identified as the location for some of Renton' s future wells. It has not been demonstrated that Renton's wel l s a re hydraul i cal ly connected to the Ceda r Ri ver. The Ci ty i s cu rrently i n the p rocess of i nstal l i ng water tabl e measu rement and recordi ng i nst ruments i n al l of the wel l s i n thi s a rea and i n two observation wells. The data from these sensors will be used in conjunction with a computer model to calculate the effect that Well No. 9 has on the Ceda� River stream flows. If this study demonstrates that the flow in the river is reduced by more than 5-1/2 cubic feet per second (5 percent of the 110 cubic feet per second minimum flow value) du ri ng operati on of Wel l No. 9, the water ri ght appl i cati on for Wel l No. 18 9 will not be approved. If there is a large degree of hydraulic continuity (greater than 5 percent) between the wetl field aquifer and ' the stream flows in the Cedar River, the impacts are serious. To date, Renton Water System planning has relied on the ability to develop additional wells nea r the Cedar River as System demand dictates. A con�rehensive revie+ of the Instream Resources Protecting Program and its effects on the City should be accamplished as soon as possible and action taken rhere the City deens necessary, since future Mater resource planni ng depe�s upon the abi 1 ity to use the Cedar Ri ver aqui fer for ' Mell supply. Areas Supplied by the City of Seattle There a re cu rrently two a reas in the Renton System that a re supplied by water f rom the City of Seattle on a normal basis. These a reas a re the Scenic Hill and the West Hill . There are also two_ additional supply connections that are available to supply the Talbot Hill area on an emergency basis; the first is located at the Fred Nelson School and is a booster pump from the Cedar Rive� Transmission Pipeline No. 4 into the 590 pressure zone; the second is located at Tiffany Park and also pumps f rom the Ceda r Ri ver Transmi ssi on Pi pel i ne No. 4 i nto the 590 zone. These stations are used for emergency supply only, since the primary supply to the 590 zone is th rough the Talbot Hill Pump Station. Table 1-4 lists the Seattle supply meters and other pertinent i nformati on about these meters. I n 1979 the Ci t of Seattl e i ni ti ated a ro ram to establ i sh cont racts � Y P 9 between the City of Seattle and all purveyors of the Seattle Water System. Numerous water districts and cities signed the purveyor contract. Renton, however, did not, since it is the City's intention to t ransf er al l supply i n the West Hi l l a nd Sceni c Hi l l a reas to the Ci ty's supply, and further, since the conditions of the purveyor agreement were, in some instances, inappropriate. Another issue with the City of Seattle relative to supply to the City of Renton is Seattle's need to negotiate a new franchise agreement to �allow continued usage of the existing Cedar River Pipeline alignments through the City of Renton. Cu rrently, the status of this pipeline f ranchise renewal effort is that the City of Renton is drafting a proposed f ranchise renewal agreement for review by the City of Seattle. The features of the draft agreement are summarized in the following: 1. Renton should be compensated for the franchise. 2. Eliminate all direct services by the City of Seattle within the City of Renton. 3. Eliminate a special wholesale rate to the City of Renton. 19 ! i r } TABLE 1-4 SEATTLE SUPPLY METERS MAXIMUM SEATTLE METER METER TYPE RATED CAPACITY LOCATION NUMBER METER SIZE AND MANUFACTURE (CONTINUOUS) GPM RENTON SCENIC HILL � S36 153901 6" x 3" Hersey MFM Detector Check 1600 #3424492 S37 61026 3" Hersey CT #5017781 320 WEST HILL S38 102776 6" x 3" Hersey MFM Detector Check 1600 #2088359 TALBOT HILL S33 137353 6" x 3" Hersey MFM Detector Check 1600 #2370798 S39 Tiffany Park 164077 10" x 12" Hersey FM #3921692 5800 S34 Fred Nelson 163644 8" x 4" Hersey FM #3867555 2800 4. Negotiate an acceptable period and conditions for the new ! agreement. ' STORA6E FACILITIES '' Water storage within the distribution system provides for (1) equalizing storage and (2) standby storage for firefighting reserves and emergency reserves. Storage is provided by reservoi rs and el evated tanks located within the dist ribution system. This section will discuss the performance criteria for storage and the existing storage facilities. The recommended sizing and location of future storage facilicites a re presented in Chapter 5. Equalizinq Storaqe Equalizing storage provides the difference between the capacity of the sources of supply and the maximum demand rate (generally considered the highest use hour of the hottest day of the year). In water systems which service a large number of residences, the demand for water varies hourly and supply facilities are sized to meet the average rate of the maximum day demand. The maximum hou r demand rate is typically about twice the average maximum day rate. If equalizing storage is not available to provide water during peak hou rs, the supply facilities and major pipelines would have to be sized for the maximum hou r demands. However, du�ing non-peak hou rs, much of the supply capacity would not be used. Instead, equalizing storage facilities are used to make up the difference between maximum hour and maximum day demand. The stored water is released when demand exceeds the supply and replenished when the supply exceeds demand. In this way supply facilities and pipelines can be smaller than if equalizing storage is not available and, therefore, the lower costs for supply and pipeline facilities are obtained. Standb.y Storage Standby storage provides supply during fires, equipment failures, or power failures. Standby storage is seldom used, but obviously is essential . The volume required for standby storage is detennined based on the amount of wate� needed for fire-fighting reserves and other emergency conditions in the service area. The volume requi red for fi re fighting reserves is based on City Ordinance which uses the Insurance Service Office (ISO) fi �e flow requirements and is equal to the amount of water required to extinguish the la rgest probable fire in the service area. Standby storage for emergency conditions provides supply duri ng equi pment or pi pel i ne fai 1 u re and i s based on the Depa rtment of Soci al and Health Services (DSHS) criteria of 800 gallons per customer, or on failure probability criteria. Since it is probable that a fire and equipment failure could occur simultaneously, the quantity of standby storage shoul d be the sum of the fi re fi ghti ng reserves and emergency 21 storage requi rements. Furthermore, the fi re fighti ng reserves must be contained above the elevation that will produce a minimum of 20 psi pressure at the highest service in the zone, to allow the fire department to use the fire flow storage efficiently without cavitation in the distribution system pipelines or contamination in a customer's service. Existinq Storaye Facilities The Ci ty cu rrently has si x reservoi rs, the cha racteri sti cs of whi ch a re discussed below, and the locations of which are shown on Figu re 1. 196 Zone The 196 zone has two reservoirs: (1) the Talbot Hill reservoir, and (2) the Mount Olivet reservoir. Constructed in 1976, the Talbot Hill resecwoir is a cast-in-place concrete, ground level reservoir with a capacity of 5 million gallons and an overflow elevation of 196 feet. The Mount Olivet reservoir, constructed in 1967, is an above-grade steel reservoir with a capacity of 3 million gallons and an overflow elevation of 186 feet. The Mount Olivet reservoir is equipped with an altitude vatve to allow the Talbot Hill reservoir to be filled without overflowing the Mount Olivet tank. The overflow elevation at the Mount O1 i vet reservoi r i s 10 feet 1 ower than at the Tal bot Hi 11 reservoi r. Both of the 196 zone reservoi rs a re suppl i ed by water f rom Wel 1 s 1, 2, 3, 8, and Springbrook Springs. These reservoirs are in good condition, although better groundskeepi ng is needed at Mount Ol i vet reservoi r. Highlands 435 Zone Storage The Highlands 435 zone has two cast-in-place concrete, ground level reservoirs which are located adjacent to each other and act as a single reservoir with a capacity of 3. 5 million gallons (2.0 and 1. 5 mg, respectively) and an overflow el evation of 435 feet. These reservoi rs provide storage for the Highlands 435 and the Kennydale 320 zones. They are supplied with water f rom the Mount Olivet and the Windsor Hills booster stations. These reservoi rs have been in service for a number of years, and a detailed inspection of their condition should be accomplished. Highlands 565 Zone Storage The Highlands 565 zone has one reservoir which is an elevated steel tank � and is located on the same site as the Highlands 435 reservoirs. The tank, which has an overflow elevation of 565 feet and a capacity of 0.75 million gallons, provides storage for the Highlands 565 zone and is supplied water f rom the Highlands and the Monroe Avenue booster stations. This reservoir was repainted in 1978 with a graphic design complimentary to the City. 22 �� � — jaibot HiU 1 'Rui►ing Hi11s Hi11 Elevated Tank gcen�� ��g 59a � tiffianY park P.S• � Fred � N�ghiand� Rollin9 Hi�1s 590 p.a�� 11 p �►elson p �y �', � - � 1 � �� P.S. Srea�►e,,,�u:: �I C - _- �S�, N►11 Nighian�nk Elevate� �y�g 565 Ni11s 12 �I hiands $e-liSupp.Y.,.... Au11in9 9 �; �� Hi9 p 75�►� 49fl � 565 ' , , Scenic Ni11 ,� g ,Nlonroe pve. p 49� P.S. 6 R H�ghlands p ,� 5 p.S. Hq9hiands �� geservoirs , geattle SuPp�� M�g 436.9 ►•• i � �,. 350 to � —� 2 p �,t Taihot 450 �t H�11 1.5 �G Scenic N'til � 435 {NG ti6 3']Q NiN 300 5outh Talbot H�ghian'ds East Nospitall pS• Tu�cwila Renton• t Renton- , 14 Salbot Hi►1 .•+Intert�e C 13 � Mount 30� p 0livet p Int pRv P � p p Ta1bot P.S.1 pS. No��' � �Iindsor Hi11 P.S. gprin9brook 2 3 Hi11s gpr�n9S dale p,�,. �Wg 196. Ke�'ny � 15 �Wg 206 320 196 ,�.o �� West Hi►1 ��g 186A 2�0 t HiN R��°ir "�albo 3.0 N C• {�►G 1 196 - ,�R�p et P p p � ��� We11 ' y�ell w2� � 3 a P �" , � , F�gure � , . rQf i1e u��c P � Nydra � Reducing S�tion &Numbe� _ _- ,, —__ — �I � Ex�stin9 pressure _� � � � � M (�Ieter _ — a EX�stin9 _ &Nlotur - � (1 EX;sti�9 p�mp _ _r.._.-.-- \�.J ', _-- � � � � � -� , -- � � � ', - —� _--_ ,�--�"_ Rolling Hills 590 Zone Storage The Rolling Hills 590 zone has one reservoir, an elevat ed steel tank with an overflow elevation of 590 feet and a capacity of 0.3 million gal l ons. The reservoi r provi des storage for the Rol l i ng Hi 11 s 590, the Rolling Hills 490, the Talbot Hill 350, and the Talbot H111 300 zones. The reservoir is supplied by the Talbot Hill pump station, and the Tiffany Park pump station. The tank has inadequate capacity to serve this much area and, in effect, only operates as a hydraulic control surface for the pumps that supply the 590 zone. The amount of storage provided in the System is currently insufficient. Additional equalizing and standby storage is required for the West Hill and Scenic Hill a reas, the Kennydale 320 pressure zone, the Highlands 565 zone, the Rolling Hills 490 zone, the Talbot Hill 350 zone, and the , Rol l i ng Hi 11 s 590 zone. The quanti ty and type of storage requi red wi 11 be addressed in Chapter 5. TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION Transmission The City's Water System pipelines are displayed in plan view in Figure 2. Pipelines shown in black represent the major t ransmission mains in the System while those shown in gray represent the distribution network. Transmission capability for the System is primarily provided by 12, 16 and 24-i nch di ameter pi pel i nes f rom the wel l fi el d 1 ocated i n Li berty and the adjacent Cedar River Parks to various points within the service area. Since approximately 90% of the System's supply is provided from this well field, major transmission facilities are required in the 196 Pressu re Zone Area to ensu re adequate water di st ri buti on th roughout the service area. As can be observed in Figure 2, the transmission pipelines are located primarily along the major t�ansportation corridors. Some t ransmission capability is also provided by the looped 8-inch diameter pipelines in the well developed residential a reas of the System, such as the Tal bot Hi 11 and Hi ghl ands a reas. A summa ry of the major transmission facilities as displayed in Figure 2 is presented below by sector service area. 196 Pressure Zone Transmission pipelines in the 196 Pressu re Zone predominantly run north to south supplyi ng the downtown busi ness zone, the Green Ri ver Val l ey industrial complexes, and the four booster pump stations which serve the eastern areas of the System. Additional transmission capacity is also provided by east-west pipelines that connect to the north-south transmission mains. The pipeline loops or grids formed by these connections help to increase System reliability and capacity throughout these two Sectors. The principal transmission corridors in these two Sectors include: � 24 0 24-i nch diameter mai n f rom Houser Way to the Mt. O1 i vet Reservoir and Booster Pump Station which connects the i ndi vidual wel l s to the transmi ssion pi pel i nes on Sunset Boulevard, Northeast 3rd St. and the Maple Valley Highway. 0 12-inch diameter main on Sunset Boulevard which connects the well field to the Windsor Hills Booster Pump Station. 0 12-i nch di ameter pi pel i ne 1 oop on Houser Way and Ga rden Avenu e No rth f rom the wel l fi el ds to NE 12th St. and back to North 3rd St. This pipeline loop is the primary source of supply for the Paccar and Boeing industrial complexes. 0 12/16/24-inch diameter main on South Talbot Hill Road and Main Avenue South which connects the well field to the Tal bot Hi 11 Reservoi r. 0 12-i nch di ameter mai n on Rai ni er Avenue South f rom South 3rd Place to Northeast 7th Place which serves the lower West Hi 11 a rea. 0 12-i nch di ameter mai n on Logan Avenue f rom South Tobi n Street to North 4th St. which serves the Renton Ai rport. 0 16-inch diamete� main on Shattuck Avenue South from South 3 rd St reet to South 7th St reet. 0 24-i nch diameter mai n on Bu rnett Avenue South f rom Grady Way to South 4th St reet. 0 12-i nch di ameter 1 oop f rom Ha rdi e Avenue Southwest to Southwest 17th St. whi ch serves the Ea rl i ngton I ndust ri al Park. 0 12-i nch di ameter mai ns f rom Southwest 17th St reet to Grady Way on: - Ha rdi e Avenue Southwest - Lind Avenue Southwest - Thomas Avenue Southwest - Powell Avenue Southwest - Seneca Avenue Southwest 0 12-i nch diameter mai n on Mapl e Avenue Southwest f rom Grady Way to Southwest 16th Street. 0 16-inch and 10-inch diameter main on Lind Avenue Southwest f rom Southwest 16th St reet to Southwest 43 rd St reet. 25 0 12-inch diameter main on the East Valley Road f rom Southwest 21st Street to Southwest 43rd Street. 0 12-inch diameter main on Monster Road Southwest (72nd Avenue South) f rom Southwest 7th Street to Southwest 16th St reet. 0 12-i nch diameter main on Valley Parkway Southeast from Southwest 34th St reet to Southwest 43rd St reet. 0 12-i nch diameter mai n on the West Val l ey Road f rom Southwest 93 rd to Southwest 36th St reet. 0 12-inch diameter main � on the East Valley Road f rom Southwest 19th Street to Southwest 43rd Street. 0 16-i nch di ameter mai n on the South Tal bot Hi 11 Road f rom Southwest 43 rd to Sp ri ngb rook Sp ri ngs. 0 12-i nch di ameter mai n on North 8th St reet f rom 1 i nki ng t ransmi ssi on pi pel i nes on Houser Way to Ga rden Avenue South. 0 12-inch diameter main on South Tobin St reet linking t ransmission pipelines on Logan Avenue No rth to Rainier Avenue North. 0 12-i nch diameter mai n on South 3rd St reet 1 i nki ng t ransmission pipelines f rom the well field and Houser Way to Rai ni er Avenue North. 0 16-Ynch diameter t ransmission main on South 3rd Place � linking transmission pipelines on Rainier Avenue North and Shattuck Avenue North. � 0 12/18-inch diameter main on South 7th Street (Southwest 17th Street) linking transmission pipelines on Main Avenue and 72nd Avenue South (Monster Road Southwest). 0 12-i nch di ameter mai n on Southwest lOth St reet f rom Li nd Avenue Southwest to Powell Avenue Southwest which p rovides a looped grid for the Earlington Industrial Park. 0 12-inch main on Southwest 16th Street linking transmission pipelines on Maple Avenue Southwest, Lind Avenue Southwest, and Monster Road Southwest. 0 16-inch diameter main on Southwest 19th Street linking the Talbot Hill Reservoir to the transmission pipeline on Lind Avenue Southwest and the East Valley Highway. 26 � ..w.k. 0 12-i nch diameter mai ns on Southwest 27th St reet, Southwest 34th St reet, and Southwest 41st St reet whi ch p rovi de a looped grid between the East Valley Road, Lind Avenue Southwest, and Valley Parkway Southwest. 0 12-i nch and 24-i nch di ameter mai n on Southwest 43 rd St reet 1 i nki ng the East Val l ey Road, the Val l ey Pa rkway, Li nd Avenue Southwest, and the East Valley Road transmission pipelines to the Hospital Booster Pump Station and the Sp ri ngb rook Sp ri ngs. For areas on the eastern side of the Valley, the topography of the terrain dictates that the transmission corridors run in a north/south ' orientation within each pressure zone and in a west/east orientation between the different pressure zones. Major transmission pipelines for these areas include: Hi ghl ands 435 P ressu re Zone . 0 12/16-inch diameter main located on Edmonds Avenue Northeast, from Northeast 3rd Street to Northeast 24th Street, which connects the Mount Olivet Booster Pump Stati on di scha rge mai n on Northeast 3 rd St reet to the Highlands Reservoir transmission main on Northeast 12th St reet. 0 12-i nch diameter mai n on Meadow Avenue Northeast f rom Northeast 26th St. to the PRV for Sector 1 on North 32nd St reet. 0 12-i nch diameter mai n on Jones Avenue Northeast f rom Northeast 24th St. to Northeast 28th Street. 0 8/12-inch diameter main on Harrington Avenue Northeast, which connects Northeast 3rd Street to Northeast 12th . St reet. 0 8/12-inch diameter main on Sunset Boulevard Northeast, which connects the Windsor Hills Pump Station to the Edmonds Avenue transmission main. 0 16-inch diameter main on Northeast 3rd Street, which connects Mount Olivet Booster Pump Station with the Monroe Booster Pump Station. � 0 12-inch diameter main on Northeast 12th Street, which connects the Highlands Reservoirs to the 16-inch diameter . main on Edmonds Avenue Northeast. 0 8/12-inch diameter main on Northeast 24th St. which connects the major north-south transmission mai n on Edmonds Avenue Northeast to Jones Avenue Northeast. 27 0 12-inch diameter mains on North 26th St. and Kennewick Avenue South which connect the Jones Avenue Northeast and Meadow Avenue Northeast transmission mains. 0 12-i nch diameter mai n between Northeast 5th Street and Northeast 6th Street which connects the Windsor Hills Booster Pump Station to Edmonds Avenue Northeast. Kennydal e Area 0 12-inch diameter main on Meadow Avenue North, which runs from the PRV from Sector 2 on North 32nd St. to its connection with a 12-inch diameter main 1-oop on Lake Washington Boulevard Southeast. 0 12-i nch di ameter mai n on Lake Washi ngton Boul evard f rom Northeast 40th Street to Northeast 50th Street. 0 12-i nch diameter mai n on Li ncol n Avenue Northeast f rom Lake Washi ngton Boul eva rd to Northeast 44th St reet. 0 12-i nch di ameter mai n on Li ncol n Avenue Northeast f rom Northeast 40th Street to Northeast 30th Street. 0 12-i nch di ameter mai n on Northeast 40th St reet f rom Lake Washington Boulevard to Lincoln Avenue Northeast. Highlands 565 Pressure Zone 0 12/16-inch diameter main on Union Avenue Northeast from Southeast 4th Street to Northeast 19th Street. This pi pel i ne connects the Monroe Street Pump Station to the Highlands Elevated tank via 12-inch transmission mains on Northeast 4th Street and Sunset Boulevard Northeast. 0 10-inch diameter main on Kirkland Avenue Northeast from , the Monroe Avenue Booster Pum Station to the Highlands P elevated tank on No rtheast 12th St reet. 0 16-inch diameter main on Kirkland Avenue Northeast from No rtheast 4th Street to the City's new maintenance facility. 0 12-inch diameter main on Sunset Boulevard Northeast from • the intersection of Sunset Boulevard Northeast and Northeast 12th Street to 138th Avenue Northeast. � 0 12-inch diameter main from the Monroe Street Booster Pump Station to Union Avenue Northeast. 28 � Talbot Hill Area 0 12/16-inch diameter 350 pressure zone transmission main on Ta 1 bot Road South f rom South 43 rd St reet to South 23 rd St reet where it connects to the 8-inch main on South 23rd St reet and the PRV on Williams Avenue South. 0 12-inch diameter t ransmission loop on South 26th Street and Cedar Avenue South in the 490 pressure zone. o T ra nsmi ssi on to the Rol l i ng Hi 11 s 590 and Rol l i ng Hi 11 s 490 Pressu re Zones is via 16 and 12-inch diameter mains on Puget D rive Southeast, which connects the Talbot Hill Booster Pump Station with the 300,000 gallon Rolling Hills Reservoi r. o Transmission in the Valley General Hospital area is p rovided by a looped 12-inch diameter main east of Talbot Road South. 0 12-inch diameter main on Carr Road from the Hospital Booster Pump Station to 98th Avenue South. o Transmission within the 590 Rolling Hills Pressu re Zone is p rovided by a 12-inch main loop which is located on Youngs Way Southeast, Lak e Street and Royal Hills Drive. Transmission for the western sector of the City in the West Hill area is provided predominantly by looped 8 and 6-inch diameter mains, since transmission facilities are not well developed in this area. These transmission pipelines consist of: 0 8/10/12-inch diameter pipeline on Hardie Avenue Southwest and .Taylor Avenue Northwest from Langston Road to South 124th St reet servi ng the 1 ower West Hi 11 P ressu re Zone. 0 8-inch diameter main on Langston Road from the Seattle supply meter to Ha rdi e Avenue Southwest. 0 8-inch diameter main along 84th Avenue South from the Seattle supply meter to South 124th St reet. Distribution System The di st ri buti Qn system for the Ci ty as shown i n Fi gu re 2 consi sts of all the smaller pipelines under 12 inches in diameter that convey water from the transmission grid to the individual service connections. A dist ribution system functions by meeting individual demands in the 29 i�nediate vicinity via branching and looping pipelines throughout the service area. Table 1-5 summarizes all the pipe lengths by diameter for each section. As displayed in this table, there are approximately 165 mi 1 es of pi pel i nes i n the City Water System, of whi ch app roximately 110 miles a re within dist ribution systems, and approximately 55 miles of transmission grid. Vulnerability Analysis Transmission mains generally convey water between the supply sou rces ( reservoirs or wells) to the local distribution grid where it is conveyed to the source of the demand. Ideally, under normal demand conditions, minimal head losses should occu r in transmission pipelines during normal demand periods, allowing these mains to also convey fire demands to the dist ribution system and to meet. other emergencies without � experiencing adverse head losses. Under normal conditions. the velocity of water in either transmission and dist ribution mains should be less than fi ve feet per second (fps) du ri ng peak demand ,peri ods, and 1 ess than ten feet per second during fire demand periods, so that frictional losses in the pipe are minimal . Computer simulations of the City's System were performed to determi ne areas with insufficient transmission or inadequate distribution grid. The following criteria were used for these analyses. An area was considered to be deficient if: o velocities exceeded 5 fps du ring normal dema nds and 10 fps during a fire; o fireflow capacity was i.nsufficient to meet the fire fighting requirements at a particular location. As a result of the computer analyses of the System., it was determi ned that the transmission capacity and dist ribution grid under normal demand conditions were adequate. However, du ring fire demands, there appea red to be inadequate transmission and dist ribution capacity in certain areas. These areas as described for each sector are presented below. Kennydale o The dist ribution grid in the older Kennydale a rea between No rth 28th St reet and No rth 38th St reet contains old 4 and � 6-inch asbestos-cement pipe which needs to be replaced if adequate fi reflows are desi red. o Low pressures are observed in the higher areas of the sector during fireflow simulations along Lake Washington Boul evard. This can be corrected through resolution of the transmission system or supply inadequacies as previously described. 30 TABLE 1-5 WATER SYSTEM PIPE INVENTORY (FEET) KENNYDALE HIGHLANDS 435 HIGHLANDS 569 196 ZONE WEST HILL TALBOT HILL SCENIC HILL TOTAL DIAMETER (inches) 2.0 200 1,050 1,500 2��5� r 4.0 13,400 13,900 15,980 19,550 11,600 14, 150 5,400 93,980 r, 6.0 14,400 40,125 73,560 51,175 11,650 33,580 9,725 234, 215 8.0 9,235 32,325 60,210 40,450 14,825 48,020 1,700 206,765 10.0 775 6,050 14,685 9,300 2,650 4,215 900 38,575 12.0 18,530 21, 100 22,760 108,540 1,200 43,801 400 216,337 16.0 16,950 2,625 28,250 10,085 51,910 18.0 3,900 3,900 20.0 300 150 450 24.0 14,485 14,485 TOTAL 56,540 131,800 189,820 275,800 43,425 153,857 . 18,125 869,367 Highlands o Additional north/south t ransmission capacity is required i n the northern area of the Hi ghlands i n order to meet the Kennydale area fi reflow requi rements. Currently, Aberdeen Avenue Northeast and Northeast 24th Street have sections of old 6 and 8-inch pipe. Upgrading of these two corridors would help to resolve the transmission inadequacies in this area. o Transmission is inadequate in the north section of this zone. Excessive head loss is observed in the 8-inch diameter pipeline on Union Avenue Northeast north of Northeast 19th Street. There is also inadequate east/west transmission in this area as can be observed by the minimal fireflow capacities. o High velocities and excessive head losses are observed east of Union Avenue Northeast on Northeast 24th Street, Northeast 19th Street, and Anacortes Way Northeast. Completion of additional North-South transmission corridors north of Sunset Boulevard and the development of a distribution grid west of Union Avenue Northeast will al 1 evi ate these i nadequaci es. o High velocities are also observed in the 10-inch diameter pipeline on Monroe Avenue Northeast between the Highlands Reservoir and the Monroe Street Booster Pump Station. Additional t ransmission capacity is required in this area either along Ki rkland Avenue Northeast or Monroe Avenue Northeast. � , Downtown 196 o Additional north/south transmission capacity is needed in the Northwest downtown area in order to meet the fireflow requi rements from redevelopment that are anticipated to occu r in this area. Specifically, the development of additional t ransmission capacity along any of the north/south streets between Garden Avenue North and Logan Avenue North will greatly improve the fi reflow capacity to this a rea. o The transmission capacity of the following pipelines is inadequate to meet cu rrent fireflow demand: - along Bronson Way North from the well field to Grady Way, which presently has an 8-inch diameter pipeline - al ong Riverside Drive from Bronson Way to Ai rport Way, which presently has a 6-inch diameter pipeline 32 - along Burnett Avenue from South 4th Street to South Tobi n St reet, whi ch presently consi sts of a 4/6-i nch di ameter pi pel i ne - on Mapl e Val l ey Hi ghway f rom Southeast 5th St reet to the City limits, presently served by a 6-diameter pipeline o Much of the downtown di st ri buti on g ri d i s comp ri sed of 4 and 6-inch diameter steel pipe. Replacement of this grid with la rger diameter pipe would provide adequate capacity to meet normal and fire demands, assuming that the previously mentioned t ransmission inadequacies a re eliminated. West Hill o Additional transmission capacity is required in this a rea to meet cu rrent fi refl ow demands: Pi pel i nes that appea r to have inadequate transmission capacity include: - along Raymond Avenue Northwest f�om Langston Road to South 123rd Street, which presently has an 8-inch diameter pipeline - South 122nd Street from Raymond Avenue Northwest to Taylor Place Northwest, which presently has an 8-inch di ameter pi pel i ne - Tayl or Avenue Northwest f rom Southwest 2nd St reet to South 124th St reet, which presently has a 10-inch diameter pipeline - Langston Road f rom Rayinond Avenue Northwest to Hardi e Avenue Southwest, which presently has an 8-inch di amet er pi pel i ne o The distribution grid in the south section of the West Nill between Langston Road and Sunset Bouleva rd is comprised primarily of 4-inch and 6-inch old steel pipe. Replacement of this pipe with larger diameter pipelines will be necessa ry to imp rove the fireflow capacity in this a�ea. Talbot Hill o Additional transmission capacity is needed for for the 350 pressure zone along South 23rd St reet f rom Williams Avenue South to Talbot Road South. An additional �connection to the upper 490 pressure zone construction of additional 33 storage or additional transmission capacity along the South Talbot Hill Road f rom the Valley General Hospital � area would alleviate this concern. o The distribution system in the 300 pressure zone west of Talbot Road South is composed of prima rily 4 and 6-inch diameter mains. If additional transmission capacity in this area is requi red, replacement of the distribution system with larger diameter pipelinEs would be necessary to eliminate the existing inadequate fireflow capabilities. As an example, there is inadequate fireflow ' transmission capability in the pipeline on Shattuck Avenue South f rom South 15th St reet to South 23 rd St reet. o The distribution system in this area is predominantly composed of 4 and 6-inch old steel mains. Replacement of ' these mains will improve the fireflow capabilities in this a rea, provided that the sou rce of supply inadequacies, as I p reviously mentioned, is resolved. P ATIONS BOOSTER PUM ST Function and Capacit,y The City cu rrently owns and operat es nine booster pump stations which boost water from the 196 pressure zone to the City's upper pressure zones. All supply to the upper pressure zones is provided by booster pump stations, with the exception of Scenic Hill and W est Hill which are supplied from the Seattle/Cedar River Transmission Pipeline. Fire flow requirements are met using a combination of supply f rom booster stations and storage in upper zones rather than providing oversized capacity in the booster pump stations to meet this unusual condition. The Kennydal e 320 and Tal bot Hi 11 300 zones are the only zones i n the System that have supply which has been pumped to an upper zone and then p ressu re reduced f rom that upper zone, an i neffi ci ent p rocedu re. Desc ri pti ons I The characteristics of the booster pump stations in the City are I' detailed in the following data sheets. The functions of the booster stations a re: 1. Mount Olivet Pump Station The Mount Olivet Pump Station is the lead (first operated) supply for the Highlands 435, Highlands 565, and Kennydale � 320 pressure zones. The pump has a smal l er capacity than Well No. 8 which pumps directly to the Mt. Olivet reservoir. Therefore, the lesse� capacity of this pump 34 station limits the production of Well No. 8. The pump stati on i s control l ed by the 1 evel s i n the Hi ghl ands reservoi rs. The Mt. Olivet Pump Station is in reasonably good condition although imp rovements should be made in lighting, ventilation and humidity control to reduce the amount of corrosion on equipment i n the i nterior. At present the site is not fenced; a barrier should be erected to minimiz� defacement of the exterior of the building and exposure to vandalism. 2. Windsor Hills Pump Station Th e Windsor Hills Pump Station is the lag (second operated) supply for the Highlands 435, Highlands 565, and Kennydale 320 pressu�e zones. All water which is consumed in the Highlands or Kennydale area must pass through the Windsor Hills or the Mt. Olivet Booster Pump Stations. The Windsor Hills Pump Station is also cont rolled by the levels in the Highlands reservoirs. ' This station is in poor condition; water seepage th rough the walls has resulted in corrosion of equipment inside the building. Inadequate lighting, poor ventilation, and , drainage p roblems also exist in the building. The location I of the stati on on i ts unfenced si te renders i t vul nerabl e � to an automobile leaving the roadway and colliding with the pump station. Since this is one of the two pump stations whi ch supply a l a rge porti on of the exi sti ng Ci ty System, these conce�ns should be resolved as soon as possible . It is noted that pump No. 2 is scheduled to be �ebuilt this yea r. 3. Monroe Avenue Pump Station The Monroe Avenue Pump Stati on i s the l ead supply to the Highlands elevated tank and the Highlands 565 zone. The station pumps f rom the Highlands 435 zone at the Highlands Reservoi r site and i s control l ed by the 1 evel i n the Highlands elevated tank. This station is in good condition. However, it is important to improve the control capability at both this stati on and al so at the cent ral cont rol panel so. that the station responds automatically to inadequate supply in the Highlands 565 zone. Although the sit e is not fenced, no vandalism has been noted at this station. This ci rcumstance may in part be ascribed to the exterior appea rance of the building matching the adjacent Renton Vocational/Technical Center. 35 �OOSTEA STATION DATA SNEET PUMP STAT I ON NAME Mount ol i vet Mount Olivet Reservoir LOCATION CONSTRUCTED � � NUMBER OF PUMPS 2 wi th provi s i on for 2 addi ti onal PUMPS AND MOTORS PUMP NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER Worthi ngton Worthi ng�on MODEL NUMBER �s� _s2_3� 15M-15A-3� FLOWRATE , 1�5� 9.Rm �,550 a�m T•D•H. 300 320 TYPE ,y.T. 3 Staq� v.T. 3 st�ap MOTOR NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER .�-E. G.E. MODEL NUMBER B404TP VHS �444TP VHS HORSEPOWER �nn �n BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WALLS Cast-i n-pl ace Concrete , RO OF Cast-in-place Concrete , HEAT I NG Forced ai r el ectri c , VENT I LAT I NG Forced a i r , 36 • BOOSTEA STATION DATA BHE�T PUMP STAT I ON NAME Wi ndsor Hi 11 s LOCAT I ON Sunset B1 vd. and NE 5th CONSTRUCTED 1961 NUMBER OF PUMPS 2 PUMPS AND MOTORS PUMP NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER Cornell Cornell . MODEL NUMBER 12-cc i2-cc FLOWRATE l000 �on j•D•N• 335 335 TYPE Vert. Turbi ne �lPrt Ti�rbi nP MOTOR NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER �.E. G.E. MODEL NUMBER vHs vHs HORSEPOWER ioo ioo BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WALLS Cast-i n-pl ace Concrete - Parti al l v bel ow qrade ROOF �,�st-i n-ol ace ConcrPtp HEAT I NG Pnrtahl P F1 Prtri r VENT I LAT I NG Gravi tv Damnar 37 BOOSTER STATION DATA SMEET PUMP STATION NAME MONROE STREET LOCAT I ON Renton Vocati onal-Techni cal Insti tute CONSTRUCTED NUMBER OF PUMPS 2 PUMPS AND MOTORS PUMP NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER Bvron ,lackson Byron �ackson MODEL NUMBER 12 GM �M ' FLOWRATE _L�,p,II.�.Rm 1�nn ;� T.D.H. i5n rnN 150 TDH TYPE V.T. 3 Stave V.T. 2 Staae MOTOR NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER Westi nqhouse Westi nqhouse MODEL NUMBER 365 UP 404 UP HORSEPOWER �n as BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WALLS Archi tectural bri ck , ROOF Cast-i n-ol�cP r..oncrP�e HEAT I NG Forced ai r el ectri c VENT I LAT I NG Gravi t,x D�mnarc 38 BOOSTEA STATION DATA BHEET PUMP STATION NAME HIGH�ANos I LOCATION Highlands Reservoir Site CONSTRUCTED NUMBER OF PUMPS 3 ! PUMPS AND MOTORS PUMP NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER Flowav Flowav Floway ; MODEL NUMBER i a nKi ].0 DKL 10 DKL ', FLOWRATE 1500 � �Qy�m 600 q�m T•D•H• 12a� 124� 124� T Y PE �rt Turhine V�rt. Turbinp Vert. Turbine �, MOTOR NUMBER 1 2 3 � MANUFACTURER u.s. u.s. u.s. MODEL NUMBER 404 UP 324 UP HORSEPOWER b� 25 25 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WA LLS CMU block partially below qrade ROOF Cast-in-alace concrete HEAT I N6 Radi ant E1 ectri c VENTILATING Gravitv Damoer 39 Page 1 of 2 0008TEA STATION DATA SHEET PUMP STAT I ON NAME NORTH TALBOT H ILL , ���AT I ON So. 18th Street and Tal bot Hi 11 Road CONSTRUCTED 1978 NUMBER OF PUMPS � 4 - Wi th provi si ons for 2 addi ti onal PUMPS AND MOTORS PUMP NUMBER 1 2 3 La ne La ne Layne MANUFACTURER y y � MODEL NUMBER FLOWRATE 175o qpm 1500 qpm 990 qpm 4 ti 418 � � � 1 418 T D H TYPE Ve rt. Turbine Vert. Turbine Vert. Turbine MOTOR NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTU RER u.s. u.s. u.s. MODEL NUMBER 445 VPA 445 VP 405 VP HORSEPOWER 250 20o i25 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION I WALLS Archi tectural Bri ck , RO OF Cast-in-nlacP Concrete , HEAT I NG Forced a i r el ectri c VENT I LAT I HG Gravi ty uampers , �� 40 Page 2 of 2 B008TEA STATION DATA SI-IEET i PUMP STAT I ON NAME NORTH TALBOT H ILL (cont.) . LOCATION CONSTRUCTED ' NUMBER OF PUMPS �� PUMPS AND MOTORS PUMP NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER �ayne _ MODEL NUMBER FLOWRATE 50o qpm max. T•D•H: l�o TYPE Vert. Tur. MOTOR NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER u.s. MODEL NUMBER 286 VPAZ NORSEPOWER _�0-variab�e BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WALLS ROOF HEATING VENTILATING 41 :,� BOOSTEA STATION DATA SMEET PUMP STATION NAME SOUTH TALBOT HILL (Hospital ) LOCAT I ON Val l ey General Hospi tal CONSTRUCTED 1982 NUMBER OF PUMPS 4 - 2 domestic, 2� fire w/provisions for 3rd domestic pump PUMPS AND MOTORS PUMP NUMBER 1 2 3 (fire pumps - 2 ea) MANUFACTURER BYron Jackson Byron ,lackson Byron Jackson MODEL NUMBER 8 GL 12 GL 18 KXH FLOWRATE 20o qpm 600 qpm 3500 qpm T•D•H• 200 TDH 200 1'DH 211 TDH TYPE VT - 10 Staqe V.T. 5 Stave V.T. 2 Staqe MOTOR NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER u.s. u.s. u.s. MODEL NUMBER wPt-vHs wPl-vHs 445-VPA NORSEPOWER �5 40 250 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WALLS Architectural Brick , ROOF Cast-i n-nl ace Concrete _ HEAT I NG Forced ai r el ectri c VENT I LAT I NG Gravi tv Damaers , 42 ' BOOSTEA STATION DATA SHEET PUMP STATION NAME TIFFANY PARK LOCATION Northeast corner of Tiffany Park CONSTRUCTED 1963 NUMBER OF PUMPS 2 - Wi th provi si ons for a thi rd PUMPS AND MOTORS PUMP NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER Cornell Cornell . MODEL NUMBER 12 AC 14 AC FLOWRATE 350 �m �],�,�, T.D•H• �n fPPt � 165 fPpt TYPE JCPrt Ti i na �(ar+ T�,�,� MOTOR NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER �.E. G.E. MODEL NUMBER vs� vst HORSEPOWER 25 4n BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WALLS Concrete masonry bl ock ROOF wood HEAT I NG Portabl e radi ant el ectri c VENTILATING ►vone , 43 BOOSTEFi 8TATION OATA SNEET PUMP STATION NAME FRED NELSON LOCAT I ON Benson Hi ghway and Approx. 164th Ave. SE CONSTRUCTED 1964 NUMBER OF PUMPS 2 PUMPS AND MOTORS PUMP NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER Cornell Cornell . MODEL NUMBER io ac i2 Bc FLOWRATE T.D.H. z5��t z4�t TYPE VPrt_ Turbi nP Vprt Ti�rhi nP MOTOR NUMBER 1 2 3 MANUFACTURER General Elec. General Elec. MODEL NUMBER vss vss HORSEPOWER ,�o �5 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WA L LS Cast-in-place Concrete - 1/2 buried RO OF Cast-in-place Concrete HEAT I NG . E1 ectri c VENT I LAT I NG None , 44 II 4. Highlands Pump Station The Highlands Pump Station is the lag supply to the Highlands 565 Zone and pumps f rom the Highlands 435 zone. The pump station is cont rolled by the level in the Highlands elevated tank. All water which is consumed in the Highlands 565 pressure zone must pass through the Highlands or Monroe Avenue Pump Stations. The station is in fair condition, similar to the state of other pump stations described previously. As an example, the lighting is inadequate, and ventilation improvements need to be made. There are wood entrance doors to this stati on whi ch need to be repl aced. D rai nage imp rovements should be accomplished at the same time that the other modifications are constructed so that corrosion of interior equipment can be reduced. 5. North Talbot Hill Pump Station ' The No rth Talbot Hill Pump Station has three constant-speed pumps which pump f rom the 196 p ressure zone to the Rolling Hi 11 s 590 p ressu re zone and a re cont rol l ed by the 1 evel s i n the Rolling Hills elevated tank. The pump station has one va riable speed pump which pumps f rom the 196 pressu re zone to the Tal bot Hi 1 1 350 pressu re zone. Thi s pump i s cont rol l ed by p ressu re i n the 350 zone whi ch has no storage. This relatively new pump station is located adjacent the Talbot Hill Reservoir, and is in very good condition. This station is the lead pump station to the 350 zone since it has a valuabl e speed pump whil e the Hospital pump station can provide additional supply when needed. 6. Hospital Pump Station (South Talbot Hill Pump Station) Th e Hospital Pump Station also known as the South Talbot Hill Booster Pump Station has two domestic and two fire flow pumps. This station pumps to the Talbot Hill 350 zone f rom the downtown and i ndust ri al pa rts of the 196 p ressu re zone. Since the 350 zone has no storage, the pumps are cont rol l ed by the p ressu re i n the zone as i s the North Talbot Hill pump station. 7. Ti ffany Pa rk Pump Stati on The Tiffany Park Pump Station pumps from the Seattle Cedar River supply line to the Rolling Hills 590 zone and is operated as a backup to the Tal bot Hi 11 Pump Stati on. The Pump Station is manually controlled. 45 � The Tiffany Park Pump Station is in .poor condition. The suction and discharge piping are exposed outside the bui 1 di ng and, therefore, subject to f reezi ng si nce thi s pump station is operated in a standby mode. This piping shoul d be buri ed and/or i nsul ated. The i nteri or of the , building shows the need for numerous improvements including ventilation and lighting, access, roofing, drainage, and other items. The exterior improvements which should be made include the addition of a new exterior door and painting since the walls have been defaced. The City � should consider waterp roofing the walls and backfilling agai nst the wal l s to create an ea rth berm. Thi s would reduce the defacing and also the visibility of this booster pump stai on 1 ocated wi thi n a nei ghborhood pa rk. 8. Fred Nelson Pump Station The F red Nel son Pump Stati on pumps f rom� the Seattl e Ceda r River supply lines to the Rolling Hills 590 zone and is operated only in emergencies. The pump station is manually cont rolled. All supply to the Rolling Hills 590 zone must pass through the Talbot Hill , Tiffany Park, or Fred Nelson Pump Stations. The Fred Nelson Pump Station is in poor condition and in need of repai r. The 1 ack of pa rki ng faci 1 i ti es poses a potential safety hazard. Comments made for the Tiffany Park Pump Station regarding lighting, ventilation, and drainage a re applicable here as well . 9. Kent Intertie Pump Station The Kent Intertie Pump Station pumps from the Renton System to the Kent Water System. It can also pressu�e reduce f rom the Kent system to the Renton system, thereby allowing flow i n either di rection. The station is enti rely underground and is located near the intersection of Southwest 43rd and Lind Avenue. The station is owned and operated by the Kent Water Department. PRESSURE REDUCIN6 STATIONS Function and Capacity Pressu re reducing stations a re installed between pressu re zones and allow water from a higher level pressu�e zone to flow into a lower level pressure zone at reduced pressures. The pressure reducing valves (PRV) i n the p ressu re reduci ng stati on hyd raul i cal ly va ry the fl ow rate 46 � through the valve to maintain a constant and preset discharge pressure up to the limit of the flow capacity of the valve. The effect of a PRV on the lower pressure zone is the same as that of a reservoi r whose � overfl ow el evati on i s the same as the p ressu re setti ng on the val ve (hydraulic grade line). Lead PRV's should be l ocated hydraul i cal ly remote f rom both upper and 1 ower zone. reservoi rs to promote good ci rcul ati on i n both zones and maintain water quality. Lag PRV's may be located hydraulically closer to storage to mi ni mi ze System head 1 osses du ri ng hi gh fl ow rate conditions when the lag valves need to operate. The primary purposes of the PRV's in the Renton System are as follows: 1. To niai rrtai n pressures i n the 1 ower zone du ri ng hi gh demand p e ri ods; 2. To increase pressure and fla+ which would otherwise be requi red du ri ng an emergency such as a fi re or pipel i ne failure; 3. To achieve �timu� circulation in each zone thereby maintaining water quality. When a PRV malfunctions in an open position and allows downstream p ressu res to ri se above the PRV setpoi nt, fai 1 u res ca n occu r due to overpressu ri ng the zone. The p robabi 1 ity of overpressu ri ng the 1 ower zone can be greatly reduced by placing a pressure relief valve on the discharge (pressure reduced) side of the PRU, a procedure recently implemented by the City for pressure reducing stations. If a pressure senso� i s al so i nstal 1 ed on the PRV di scha rge and the p ressu re readi ng telemetered and alanned at the central control center, the City will know rapidly when the failure is occurring and be able to minimize its liability caused as the result of a PRV failure. Table 1-6 details the characteristics of the pressure reducing stations i n the Renton Water System. INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL The capability to automatically control and remotely monitor a water system is often the most important factor in obtaining optimum operation of a water utility. Inadequate or improper control can result in . failures that can be expensive and dangerous. The ability to effectively control a water system wi11 result in: 1. lower operating costs because of increased efficiency, 2. a higher degree of reliability, and 3. decreased utility liability. 47 ' TABIE 1-6 PRESSURE REOUCIN6 SSATIONS* PRESSURE ZONES SETPOINT fROUND HYDRAULIC YALYE UPPERJLOIiER �QCATION {p�t) ELEVATION {FT} ELEYATION {�T� 1. West HiIT 45dj 124th and Taylor 87 150 351 �est Hilt 270 2. West Hill d50j 4th and Lind 63 175 320 kest Hill 210 ' 3. West Hill 450/ Langston and Bagley 77 200 378 West Hfll 274 4. Scenic Hill 490/ 6th and Cedar 62 20U 343 Scenic Hiil 37d 5. Scenic Hill 490/ 5th and Cedar �5 200 373 Stenic Hitl 370 6. Seattle 5upply SOQ/ Renton Avenue and 45 225 329 Scenic Hill 370 Beacan Avenue � «� 7. Talbot 590/ 15Lh and Pu9et D M ve 64 123 29$ Talbot 300 8. Talbot 590/ 15th and Eagle Ridge 26 217 28q Talbot 300 Drive 9. Talbot 590/ Talbot Pump Station 85 123 346 Talbot 350 10. Tal�ot 350/ 16th and Talbot Toad $7 .9$ Talbot 300 il. Talbot 590/ 23 M and 100th 131 P20 ' Talbot 490 Avenue South 12. Talbot 590! 23rd and lObth 7J 22p Talbot 350 Avenue South 13. High]ands 435/ 28th and Meada+ Avenue 60 220 357 Kennydale 320 14. Highlands 435! 32nc! and Meadow Avenue 47 204 312 Kennydale 320 . 15. Kennydale 324/ 28th a�d leke 43 60 159 • Downtown 196 Washington Boulevard 16. HighTanQs 435! Sunset 8ouleva M and 55 54 171 Downtown 196 I-405 � * Atl nresst�re setti�qs shoren are for lead prv's. Lag prv's are set larrer. ,� Table 1-7 �wa Tmio CONT_ROL SY9_TEM FUNCTIONS NATER TELEMI:TRY CONTRnL INDICATI07 AT CITY �HOI'S ALJIRM AT CIiY Sf10PS _ SYTEM LINK TO LEVGL IN SYSTF,M OTHER RP,S. FL(�► PUMP TO'fAl, RONNING PIIMP RES. POWRK LINE FACILITY SHOPS RES. PRESSURE CONTROL LEVEI. RATF. ON FLOW TIME �AIL LEVEL FAIL FAIL RESF,RVOiRS T�1,B�)T lIILL YRS NA NA NA YF.S NA NA NA NA NA YES YF.S YF,S MT. �I,TVRT YF.S NA NA NA Yh;S NA NA NA NA NA YES Yh:S YI:S IIIGII�.ANDS YES NA NA NA YF.S NA NA NA NA NA YF.S YEti YES IIIGNLANDS ELF,V. YRS NA NA NA YF,S NA NA NA NA NA YF.S YF.S Y�:S RI�I,LINC IILLI,S YES NA NA NA YES NA NA NA NA NA YF.S YIiS Yh;S � � SUPPLY SNRINGI3R(lOK SPRS. YES NA NO NO NA YF.S NO NO NA NA NO YRS YES IJI;LI, N�. 1 YES YES NO NO NA NO YES NO YES YES NA Yh:S YES WELL N0. 2 YFS 1F,S NO NO NA NO YES NO YES YF,S NA YF.S Yl:S WF.I,I. N0. 3 YF.S YES N� NO NA NO YF.S NO YES YF.S NA YF,S YGS WI;I.L N0. 8 YES YF.S NO NO NA NO YES NO YES YES NA YLS YI',S PIMP STATIONS WINDSOR IIILLS YF.S YES NO NO NA NO YES NO YES YF,S NA YRS YF.S NIGNLANDS YIiS YGS NO NO NA NO YRS NO YF.S YES NA YF.S 1tRS fIFFANY PARK YES YES NO NO NA HO YES NO YES YES NA Y65 YF.S P1(1NRl1F. AVE YF.S YF.S NO NO NA NO YES NO YES YES NA YIiS YES P1T. OLIVFT YES YF,S NO NO NA Nn YES NO YF.S YES NA YFS YF.S TALR��T IIILI, YF,S IF.S NO NO NA NO YES NO YES YES 'NA YN:S YH;S III�FpI'fAt. NU NO YES NO NA NO NO NO NO NO NA NO NO p,k.V`� NO NO YF.S NO NA NO NA NO NO NA NA NA NA The City currently owns and operates an automatic control system manufactured by Service Controls Company of Portland, Oregon, that was i nstal l ed i n the 1950's. Servi ce Cont rol s Compa ny i s no 1 onger i n business. The System consists of a central alann and control center at the City's shops, which compiles and displays data for most of the pump stations, wells, and reservoirs in the Water System. The data is transmitted (tel emetered) over 1 eased tel ephone 1 i nes. The System cont�ols the operation of the wells and booster pumps based on the 1 evel s i n the reservoi rs to mai ntai n adequate pressu res and storage reserves. During an emergency, the pumps can be manually operated from the City's shops i rrespective of reservoi r levels. Refer to the Table 1-7 for a summary of the System capabilities. The exi sti ng automati c cont rol .equi pment i s defi ci ent i n the fol l owi ng areas: 1. Reliability: the equipment is old and fai•ls frequently. 2. Inadequacy: the System does not have the capability to control and monitor to the degree necessary for efficient operation of the Water System. 3. Repai rs: spa re pa rts a re not avai 1 abl e. 4. Accuracy: the System is inaccurate. 5. Operation: the System is difficult to operate. HISTORY The history of the City's System is well documented in the previous . Comprehensive Plan prepared for the City by CH2M Hill and dated October, 1965. The specific section of that Report which documents history is contai ned i n Appendi x A, whi ch consi sts of ext racts f rom the Washi ngton Survey and Rating Bureau's Reports from previous years. That particular information is not repeated in this document. For those interested, the 1965 Comprehensive Plan is available from the City. The detailed reports provided in Appendix A cover the years 1931, 1935, 1940, 1948, 1962, and 1965. . The previous Comprehensive Plan documented the System as it existed i n 1965. Numerous changes to the System have occurred since that Plan's preparation, including: 1. Sou rce of Supply a. Development of Well No. 8. 50 b. Placement of Well No. 5 in a standby status. c. Abandonment of Well Nos. 4 and 6. d. Conversi on of most of the supply on Tal bot Hi 11 f rom the City of Seattle to the City of Renton via the Talbot Hill Pump Station. e. The addition of an intertie between the City's System and the City of Tukwila's Water System. f. The addition of an intertie between the City of Kent's System and the City's System. g. A redevel opment of Sp ri ngb rook Sp ri ngs to i mp rove both its capacity and structural integrity. 2. Storage . ' a. Const ruction of the 5 million-gallon Talbot Hill reservoi r. b. Repai nti ng of al l reservoi rs i n the City's System whi ch were steel st ructu res. � c. Construction of the 3 million gallon Mount Olivet reservoi r. 3. Booster Pump Stations a. The addition of a booster pump station to supply the Talbot Hill area f rom the 5 million gallon Talbot Hi 11 reservoi r. b. The addition of a pump station near Valley General Hospital to supply the south Talbot Hill area and areas surrounding the Hospital . c. R eplacement of some pumps in selected pump stations i n the System. d. Placement of the Fred Nelson School and Tiffany Park Pump Stations on standby status. 4. System Pipeline Additions� a. A portion of the 24-inch diameter downtown t ransmission pipeline has been constructed. � b. A major transmission pipeline improvement to improve supply to the Kennydale area has been constructed. 51 c. A replacement of the Spri ngbrook Spri ngs transmission line to the Valley General Hospital has been const ructed. d. An abandonment of the transmission line from the Valley General Hospital to the Talbot Hill Reservoir has occu rred. e. A devel opment of a st rong pi pel i ne g ri d i n the indust rially-zoned areas of the Valley that lie south of downtown has occu rred. f. A rebuilding of certain portions of the downtown ' System pipelines that has occu rred as a result of higher intensity land use necessitating higher fire flow requirements and increased pipeline capacity. 9 . A series of developer extensions throughout the System which have improved the grid capacity i n al l areas of the System. 5. Pressure Reduci ng Stations a. A new primary pressure reducing station for supply to the Kennydale area. b. A p ressure reducing station f rom the Highlands pressure Zone to supply improved fi re protection to the industrial areas in the northern part of the dow nt ow n a rea. c. The addition of pressure reduc�ng stations in the Talbot Hill area to establish interim pressu re zones to accommodate developments at that time. Essentially ail of the remaining System components are as they were in 1965. A major difference exists in the size of the City's staff between 1965 and the present. This is documented in the Operations Program Chapter of this Report. SYSTEM COMPUTER MODEL The computer model of the City's Water System is used for the pu rpose of determi ni ng fi refl ow capabi 1 ity and for use i n the desi gn of new facilities. Originally developed in 1975 and updated in 1982, the model contains all the physical data of the Water System such as pipe length, diameter., intersection elevation, and internal pipe roughness as well as all operational data such as reservoir wate� levels, pump operation, and customer demand. With this model it is then possible to add or change 52 � � any of the System's physical or operational such as pipe diameter, reservoi r 1 evel , etc. and determi ne the effects these changes wi 11 have on the Water System. Prio� to 1975 fi eld fi refl ow testi ng was used to detenni ne the fi refl ow capacity fo� a particular area or development. Fi reflow requi rements for a development would be established by insurance carriers and would then be checked by the Washi ngton Su rvey and Rati ng Bu reau. To veri fy that the Water System was capabl e of supplyi ng the requi red fi refl ow, a fire hydrant or hydrants in the area of the proposed development would be physically tested to detennine the total quantity of flow available. This field-measured method of checking the Water System has many , disadvantages. These are field testing errors, problems associated with testi ng, recordi ng, and measuri ng hydrant fl ows can al 1 1 ead to sou rces ' of errors duri ng fi eld testi ng. An exampl e of this type of error can be observed when fi el d testi ng i s performed i n the vi ci ni ty of Val 1 ey General Hospital or in the area of the new Benaro�a Development on Southwest 43 rd St reet. When the hyd ra nts i n thi s a rea a re i ni ti al ly opened, a 5,000-6,000 gpm fi reflow is recorded for the fi rst 15 minutes. After that the fl ows wi 11 d rop to 1,300 gpm. Thi s occu rs because of the large, 16-inch diameter transmission line from Springbrook Springs supply which acts as a reservoi r. Field test errors can also occur if the hydrant test is run duri ng non-peak peri ods such as du ri ng the wi nter o r du ri ng the mi ddl e of the day. The time of year and the time of day are very critical in establishing fireflow capabilities. Not only is it expensive to run actual fi reflow tests in both manpower and the cost of pumping water, it is also difficult to dispose of the test water. Most storm sewer systems are not designed to accommodate large quantities of water that are released during testing periods. Also, if tests are run on hillsides, the excess water that cannot be handl ed by the storm sewer system can fl ood homes and p roperty doi ng damage that can cost the City additional expense. Fi el d tests do not expose operati onal p robl ems. La rge d raws of water from the System can cause major problems to the Water System if not planned for eittier during testing or actual demand situations. High water velocity in the pipelines can cause pipelines, valves, and hydrants, in the area of the fireflow demand to vibrate and break. Also during fireflow periods certain sections of the City may experience low or negative pressures causing the Water System to dry up in that area. Both of these problems are not exposed during field tests, but yet should be identified since they can cause major operational problems in the System. When large quantities of water are moved at a fairly high velocity in the Water System, di rt and debris, such as rust and scale can be agitated from the bottom of the pipes and can cause complaints from users. Removal of this dirty-looking water from the System could 53 require additional manhou rs due to flushing and cleaning. Grit that is carried in the water can also clog customers' tap filters causing , complaints. The computer model is based on ISO criteria and fireflow analyses are simulated in accordance with Insurance Service Office's criteria which assumes the Water System is experiencing a maximum day demand with the single largest source of supply to the area of the fire out of service. A summary of the criteria used in modeling the Renton Water System is listed below: Mi nimum service pressure of 40 psi i n the service area and 20 psi du ring fire demands. Wel l Nos. 1, 2, and 3 are operati ng, whi 1 e Wel l No. 8, the � System's largest source is out of service. Spri ngbrook Sp ri ngs i s supplyi ng the System at 1,300 gpm. The Talbot Hill Pump Station is operating at 1,500 gpm. The Windsor Hills Pump Station is operating at 1,700 gpm. The Highlands Elevated Tank Pump Station is operating at 1,200 gpm. The Monroe Street Pump Station is operating at 2,000 gpm. The Mt. Olivet Booster Pump Station and the Valley General Hospital Booster Pump Station are both out of service. Th e Ta 1 bot Hi 11 Reservoi r i s i n operati on wi th a 3 foot d raw down. The Rolling Hills Elevated Tank is in operation with a 5 foot d raw down. Mt. Olivet Reservoir is in operation with no draw down. I The Highlands Ground Reservoir is in operation with a five foot draw down. � The Highlands Elevated Tank is in operation with a 2.5 foot d raw down. All fireflows a re computed on a residual p ressu re of 20 psi. 54 CHAPTER 2 SERVICE AREA AND ADJACENT SYSTEMS This Chapter defines the differences between the study area, the service area, and the city limits. The location and topography of the study area are then discussed in order that those unfamiliar with the City understand the need for faci 1 iti es descri bed i n Chapter 1. The second section of this Chapter describes the existing and proposed land use while the final section of this Chapter discusses the twelve watec� systems that a re adjacent the City's Water System. SERVICE AREA The following terms are used th roughout this Report: o Study A rea Study area as used in this Report refers to those areas studied in the four planning areas which were used in the developmer�t of the City's Comprehensive Land Use Plan. It is noted that these areas extend well into the service area of the twelve adjacent systems. o Service Area The City 's service area is that area where customers are , cu rrently being served and generally coincides with all area in the City limits, except in a few instances. Those exceptions occur primarily at the City limits and are caused either by the City serving outside of the City limits or a Dist�ict serving an area within the City limits. The secwice area is � di st i nct f rom the study a rea i n that the servi ce a rea i s much smaller since those areas which are not currently served by the City are excluded. The service area is particularly important since there are numerous policies that affect service provided outside the City limits, both by the City Council and the King County Council . As an example, the City must obtain a franchise for an area which lies outside the City limits in order to provide service to that area. 55 � i o Future Service Area The future service area fo� the purposes of this Report is defined as the existing service area with the addition of those a reas beyond the existing service a rea which extend to the limits of planning by adjacent water systems. It is less extensive than the study area. This definition of a future service area utilizes the concept that the adjacent water systems, primarily water districts, have planned to serve areas or are currently serving areas which lie within the extent of � the study area and, therefore, should be the responsibility of those adjacent systems. In the event that the City does annex areas beyond the future service area as defined here, then the City can either extend thei r syste+n or if the adjacent system has facilities in place, acquisition of these facilities can occur from that adjacent system. o The study area, existing service area, and future service areas as well as the location of adjacent systems are shown in Figu re 3. The "Adjacent Systems" section will be presented later in thi s Chapter. It i s al so noted that a number of a reas a re cu rrently bei ng pu rsued by the Ci ty for 1 ogi cal i ncl usi on i n their service a rea. A detailed discussion of these a reas is not included in this Plan since all of these areas are within � the future service area of the City; some of these transfers of service a re discussed in the "Adjacent Systems" section of this Chapter. ' Location The City is located at the southern te rniinus of Lake Washington which is ��I southeast of the City of Seattle. This location has many unique cha racteri sti cs such as: o Four hills located approximately at the periphery of the I service area. o Three valleys within the service area, each of which has a river flowing through it. - o Virtually all of the different types of geological deposits and st ratas, as a resul t of gl aci er recessi on, ra ngi ng f rom ha rd rock outcroppings on the West Hill to very deep sand deposits in the Cedar River nea r City Hall . o A natural location for major transportation corridors such as hi ghways, rai lways, ai rports, etc., and regi onal uti 1 iti es such as power t�ansmissions, sewer interceptors, Seattle water t ransmission pipelines, natural gas pipelines, and others. 56 �/�.. v y,, . //,�//' % � .:�. �, �, �, '�" ��", � d �' r� ,, ,- � - , >, , ,�. �.. : o � ,, i,c �/i��.� , ; �.;�;. ,,;.< ;� . �:.. , ;,;r „� 4.; , :� �'> ' �� �, f.. ✓ M. �,� ,.0 �' 'S- � i � �, i�/� >�„� it / ! N � �Y / i �' �f /,; £ .i..;? '-�i, i�, �/ /' Y 4 i. 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",i- . ;.�; � �, � ' �V1f D 128 W p �� � � ,�,��`� ������'�` � �� , , �� '�� `�� ii, ��i � .. . � - �� < r���� � V.�J �$� Y� � � `�r ,�h 6z, CI�Y O� KENT � � , �; , � w•-..�� ,. � � ����'���� �,;`;,r, � ��� � � ' !' � H�� � � �- 7 � � i� �� � � 3 �j �� � �� > y ,,�j i� �nr r .r/i///N� �i, ,.,5� . . � � ,� �., � . .. ���� � �� ,,,, /, GREEN R�����'� � � r� ;` 1+`� y ;;x���� � �� � ,��;, �n� t� � � � ��e x�,'. �iii- � � , � n � � �,.. ` ^r �� �� a � y q�# (�l�'* hp /� p t��y�'�y � # �'� � �, � ��'s�r,}�' ��r���II. �t�.M1Y��l1f4a H["1�H L?�Vi'itJ���i�,; � �' s �'�"''m�r ,r+u�""�" ,��"%'� P � ��� ,��• %X �� ,� �r �� ,� ,��� y � �^ wr, �. >- ':'� �- �, i y,l,�, /- / �x;.,/ � � %�n, � �i ��� /> r u;✓ * L 9 .� � C � �, � �:: , �`. � ,� ��" :�. 'F, .�w�����. ^�;: � z�'„ ���, > �- r,, .�-. f,ly, F. . "����t ' .,i��'r .��' �. r: %5> ?� � �'w � �(�` ./ /;,,;�. ..s�� .��,.�� � .� t �., ,F � ��' ,� �..� Y ,/�i'" ��: / l v,/. i"� ./� �. i� � �' i�� -:���// K� ���� � �Y, ��������'Wc.- �.. ��:� / �i .� .. .��: ��� ? <ik` ^,� .���:�.; !� ..'�:" �� / :�7"a ,.n.�, �i. �7%,,... i i. a .� v { . .. . f � i � � �;;3�� �r. , �, .. `.. x' '�/,1..,.;� „ , r�% ,,...:'.�k`i'"�/ �.��� . '�� �y� i��'s'Jr./:: ��. � ��.� �� ,/�:,'�� � .'� -,i: y:, . .�., . � �; . �' �' '� � � j%;°%ss� �,r.:: �% �!�� . � ,�� . :�`� '�' ���,4 0%,,,- ,� ,/-i .. . � :�' ��, /�'ti, Xx r.�; . . . ,�, ��„ � �� �' � '�:i/ 5; , . � i'r<., ,�� r � ,F/f/, z, �' � � .� ':^k 3 . ... / S d" rt.. , �; i i� �3 .r.,*.�;�. `.� ,��..� !� ./�'�" ;�# F�' , . / s`"..: . '+y�'/�y /'/: . �� � � � f'� �- �- ✓ s X� A :�!%*! ;), '� .l, rz�u", �;:*, p.F ��.. �, �� i / ' � � i� � � . . ��� . .. 3"�%<.���; 5'sa ,i� . . . . �r, ;� * �'�' � i � x. '� `���'` �, <y / S �. Y f i , � � � i _�i".. �z,'> � . , y M � �rx, �, � i�s• �' � ,y �': �, w� 3, / / X , / + ?, � f. '�D� f ?, �, r �tz �%, i A y�' %� r' 9 ��, � s �' 7 � The City of Renton represents a commercial nucleus as well as a corridor through which regional utilities pass. These factors have a significant impact on the existing Water System as well as planning for futu re conditions. Topog raphy The topography of the study area presents wild variations which include the extremes of a fl at val l ey fl oor i n the Green Ri ver Val l ey a reas south of downtown to the gradual slopes going up to the Highlands and Talbot Hill a reas as well as the ext reme of the steep cliffs along the Maple Valley. Elevations range f rom 20' to 540' above sea level (USGS datum). The effect of this topography upon the Water System has been discussed in Chapter 1 under the heading, Pressure Zones. Existing Land Use Development in the service area is governed by the City's Comprehensive Land Use Plan and policies which represents a long range plan fo� relating to the issues of growth and physical development of the City. The cu rrent cha racter of the Ci ty i s an outg rowth of the ori gi nal Comprehensive Land Use Plan which was adopted in 1965 and revised in 1968. Under this Plan industrial and commercial development was directed toward the Central and Green River Valley Areas to allow for fu rther expansion of the City's business center. Residential growth under the Plan was primarily di rected toward the eastern areas such as the Highlands and Talbot Hill Areas of the City since the West Hill was al ready developed primarily with residences. A summary of the land use that resulted f rom this Plan is presented in Table 2-1. Review and updating of the original Comprehensive Land Use Plan was initiated in 1975 to effect changes made in the economic, legislative, and land use philosophy of the City since the adoption of the original ' plan. To accomplish this updating, the original Plan was divided into four planning areas as shown in Figure 3: The Northeast Planning Area, the Southeast Planning Area, the Central Planning Area, and the Green River Valley Planning Area. Existing and proposed land use for each I Area was examined, revisions were proposed and hearings were held with final revisions incorporated into the Revised Comprehensive Land Use Plan. Since 1975, all four Planning A�eas have been examined and revi sed Land Use P1 ans adopted for each P1 anni ng Area. 58 �_ _ _. TABLE 2-1 EXISTING SERVICE AREA LAND USE (1980) INSIDE CITY LIMITS (AREAS IN ACRES) GREEN RIVER NORTHEAST CENTRAL SOUTHEAST VALLEY PLANNING PLANNING PLANNING PLANNING AREA AREA AREA AREA TOTALS SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAI 1270 235 500 20 2025 � MULTI-FAMILY Low Density 165 20 50 5 240 Med. Density 85 15 40 -0- 140 High Density -0- 15 20 -0- 35 COMMERCIAL 90 195 5 95 385 PUBLIC/ QUASI-PUBLIC 280 175 55 60 570 PARKS & RECREATION 100 60 65 275 500 AGRICULTURE 20 -0- 20 50 90 INDUSTRIAL ' Extractive 170 -0- 25 -0- 195 Light 5 40 -0- 40 85 Heavy 65 570 30 260 925 , RIGHT OF WAY 160 235 130 185 710 UNDEVELOPED 1370 310 1160 875 3735 ' TOTALS 3780 1870 2100 1885 9635 ..... . .... . .... Planned Land Use Planned land use in a service area is based on current City policy. Secti on 3A of the adopted pol i ci es el ement of the La nd Use P1 an recommends maximizing the use of available utility and service resou rces in existing areas p rior to allowing development of outlying areas. This policy section provides the framework for current land use development and is stated below. 59 ` "3.A. LAND DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE: Growth and develo ment should P occu r in a timely and logical progression of the existing u rban area to maximize the use of existing services. ' POLICIES: 1. To minimize the necessity for redevelopment, prematu re development should only be allowed where it can be shown to be compatible with futu re uses in the vicinity. 2. Development beyond the urban fringe should only be a 11 owed where i t i s a consi stent extensi on of u rban services. 3. Vacant land surrounded by developed land should be given priority for development. . 4. Land where adequate public utilities are available should be given priority for development. 5. A balance of residential , commercial , and industrial areas should be achieved. 6. The upg radi ng and/or redevel opment of ma rgi nal a reas I should be encouraged. 7. The City should identify its sphere of influence. 8. Annexations should have logical boundaries. 9. To reduce processing time and effort and provide for efficient use of existing public facilities, la rge annexations should be encouraged. 10. Annexations that are economically advantageous should be encou raged. 11. Development requirements should be definite and reasonable. Based on these planning policy statements, the objectives of the Comp rehensive Land Use Plan updates a re as follows: 1. To manage growth and physical development in the City and . surrounding unincorporated areas. 2. 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SSSS■no ■■ 1 on R :� • - SSSS►■ SSSS ■ ..�`" ice■ ■a ■1 � 1■■ ■ ■Q ■ • ■► SSSS■■ME■■ vM WHO 1 � � n■n u pz•NowM.M. �■■■E■■n .:: '�i S■MSI S • 1SE■SLINSEV- / r�E11SMSSEMSII■■■■SSM■I . .•. .• :. . .MEM■EMM■■■r110■■S■SE■E■SM■■■■•�■■��j■■■JIMEMN �■..� a ■MESE.\�MSSM.\I•i■■■■11ME 120000 MENRIS xp�. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■• Edo l■HIM ■■■1 71v •\■■■■■■■■■/iEEMMMII■■ mom SEEMS 011moon ■ r • • . s' sommosomanow r Ma M� � • 7 /� P' • �? B ^ Ii r 3. To direct expansion of residential , commercial , and i ndust ri al devel opments i nto a reas where 1 and, uti 1 i ti es, access, and community facilities are available with the capacity to accommodate the projected growth. 4. Allow higher dwelling densities in areas capable of supporting a higher level of development and lowering densities in areas where facilities are limited. All four plans include areas outside the boundaries of the City's corporate limits as depicted in Figu re 4. No distinctions have been made between areas inside or outside the City limits in regard to land-use decisions, population p rojections, or dwelling unit p rojections. The Plans a re based on the existing City of Renton's Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, King County Community Plans, and the various utility plans for each planning area. Population and dwelling densities are from 1980 census data with future projections based on Puget Sound Council of Government forecasts for each area. A summary of the four plans is provided below. ' A. Southeast Renton Comp rehensive Plan The Southeast Planning A rea encompasses app roximately 11,610 acres of land of which 25 percent is in the City's corporate limits and 75 percent withi n uni ncorporated Ki ng County. 1. Land Use Proposed land use for the area consists primarily of single family residential units, with low to medium density multi-family units located near the major arterials. Multi -family areas are concentrated in the more developed northern and western sections of the Planning Area, with single family units in the southern and eastern sections. . Additional commercial land use is designated for areas adjacent to existing business locations. Two major areas of comrnercial expansion include the intersections at � Pet rovitsky Road and 140th Avenue South; and Ca rr Road and Benson Road. 2. Population Puget Sound Council of Government forecasts for the area indicate an increase in population from 31,426 persons in 1978 to 38,400 to 45,400 persons by 1990 (22 percent to 44 percent increase). At saturation, the projected population is anticipated to be approximately 100,000 persons. 62 � —: 3. Housing Total dwelling units in the planning area are projected to increase f rom 10,400 as of 1978 to 13,600 - 16,000 by 1990. Single family dwelling units will increase f rom 23 percent to 38 percent and multi-family units f rom 36 percent to 81 percent over this period. At saturation, the land use plan will have the capacity of at least 4.5 times the single family g rowth and 2 times the anticipated multi-family . growth. A summary of the revised land-use changes for the Southeast Planning Area is presented in Table 2-2. TABLE 2-2 SOUTHEAST PLANNING AREA LAND USE � EXISTING PROPOSED CHANGE LAND USE LAND USE IN LAND USE SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL 2,775 7,350 4,815 MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL Low Density 105 160 55 Medium Density 120 200 80 High Density 20 0 -20 COMMERCIAL 60 90 30 PUBLIC/QUASI-PUBLIC 1,460 1,655 195 PARKS AND RECREATION 455 670 • 215 I AGRICULTURE 750 0 -750 INDUSTRIAL Ext racti ve 80 0 -80 Light 5 0 -5 ' Heavy 30 0 -30 RIGHT OF WAY 195 385 90 (MAJOR ARTERIALS, FREEWAYS) 'I GREENBELT 1,100 1,100 �' UNOEVELOPED 5,555 -5,555 TOTALS 11,610 11,610 .. .... ... ...... 63 B. Central Renton Comprehensive Land-use Plan The Central Planning Area covers approximately 3,485 acres in the northwest section of the City. Approximately 45 percent of the Planning Area is within the City's boundaries, while approximately 55 percent is ' i n uni ncorporated Ki ng County. 1. Land Use The revised Plan designates most of the unincorporated area in the Planning Area as single-family residential land use. In contrast to the 1965 Plan, single-family residential land use is also designated within the north and south Renton neighborhoods. Multi-family residential land use areas are located along Empire Way, Sunset Boulevard, in the Skyway area, and as a transition between the commercial/industrial areas ajacaent to the north and south Renton neighborhoods. Areas designated for commercial land use are located in the 1 b i ness di st ri ct Renton Vi 11 a e a nd center a reas cent ra us , g , and along the Rainier Avenue and Grady Way corridors. Heavy industrial use areas are located in North Renton adjacent to the ai rport and around the Boei ng and Pacific Car and Foundry industrial complexes. Also included is an area near Monster Road. 2. Population Revisions to the existing land use will increase the existing population by approximately 250 persons to 15,650 persons by 1990. At saturation, it is forecasted that approximately 18,000 people will live in the planning area. 3. Housing Housing units are anticipated to increase by approximately 775 to 7,600 units by 1990. Most of this growth will occur withi n the City 's 1 imits and wi 11 be i n the form of multi-family units. By 1990 multi-family housing will constitute 60 percent of al 1 housi ng i n the i ncorporated areas and 32 percent to 38 percent in the entire planning a rea. Puget Sound Council of Government housing projections indicate that by saturation there will be � app roximately 9,500 dwelling units available for occupancy in the planning area. A summary of the revised Land Use Plan for the Central Planning Area is displayed in Tahle 2-3. 64 TABLE 2-3 CENTRAL PLANNING SECTOR LAND USE EXISTING PROPOSED NET CHANGE LAND USE LANO USE IN LAND USE SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL 1,260 1,345 85 MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL � Low Density 35 40 5 Medium Density 45 220 175 High Density 15 0 -15 COMMERCIAL 230 505 275 PUBLIC/QUASI-PUBLIC 250 300 50 PARKS AND RECREATION 85 110 25 AGRICULTURE 40 0 0 INDUSTRIAL Extractive 35 0 -35 Light 40 0 -40 Heavy 570 465 -105 RIGHT OF WAY (MAJOR 290 290 0 ARTERIALS, FREEWAYS) GREENBELT 210 21Q UNOEVELOPED 590 0 -590 TOTALS: 3,485 3,485 � .. . .. . . . . . . . ... C. Northeast Renton Comprehensive Land Use Plan The Northeast Planning Sector covers approximately 11,845 acres in the Renton Highlands and adjacent areas. Approximately 35 percent of the Planning Area is in the City's corporate limits with the remaining 65 percent i n uni ncorporated Ki ng County. 65 l. Land Use Land use distribution closely follows the primary � t ransportation routes and is predomi nantly si ngl e fami ly, j residential . Higher intensity land uses such as multi family, commercial , and business parks are concentrated ' along NE Third, NE Fourth, and Sunset Blvd. Additional multi -family areas are located along the 405 corridor at the Maple Valley Highway, north of Park Drive along Lake � Washi ngton B1 vd. , and nea r NE 44th. Commercial areas are planned for major arterial i ntersections, at SE 72nd and Coal Creek Parkway, and SE 128th and 164th Avenue SE. In addition, 120 acres of the P1 anni ng Area has been gi ven an offi ce pa rk desi gnati on. This classification is to allow a campus-like development in areas unsuited for commercial activities due to the su rroundi ng resi denti al cha racter of the nei ghborhood. Al 1 other i ndustrial zoni ng proposed for the Area i n the 1965 Plan has been deleted or changed to multi-family uses. 2. Population Puget Sound Council of Government population estimates in 1978 for the Planning Area were 30,300. Population ' forecasts for the Area i ndicate an i ncrease of approximately 43 percent within the next 10 years or approximately 45,210 persons by 1992. Saturation population estimates for the Planning Area are forecasted to be approximately 110,000 persons. 3. Housing The number of additional dwelling units by 1990 is anticipated to be approximately 4,590 units of which 41 percent (1,860) will be multi-family units and 59 percent I (2,730) will be single-family units. Most of the g rowth is a nti ci pated to occu r adjacent to exi sti ng . devel opments within the City's limits. Multi-family growth will occur p redomi nately i n the Kennydal e Area adjacent to the exi t f rom I-405, al ong NE Fou rth St reet and al ong Sunset B1 vd. By 1992, multi-family housing will constitute 26 percent of all housing in the Planning Area. 6ased on these i ncreases, the total number of dwel l i ng units by 1992 and saturation will be approximately 16, 180 and 50,000 respectively. A summary of the revised land use changes for the Northeast Planning A rea is displayed in Table 2-4. 66 TABLE 2-4 NORTNEAST PLANNING AREA LAND USE EXISTING PROPOSED NET CHANGES ' LAND USE LANO USE IN LAND USE SINGLE-FAMILY RESIOENTIAL 2,965 6,530 3,565 MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL Low Density 190 900 710 Medium Density 85 385 300 High Density 0 0 COMMERCIAL 120 190 70 PUBLIC/QUASI-PUBLIC 415 450 35 PARKS AND RECREATION 190 260 70 AGRICULTURE 595 0 -595 INDUSTRIAL Extractive 195 0 -195 , Light 5 -5 Heavy 85 0 -85 Office Park 0 90 90 RIGHT OF WAY (MAJOR 210 240 30 ARTERIALS, FREEWAYS) � GREENBELT 0 2,800 2,800 � UNDEVELOPED 6,790 0 -6,790 TOTALS: 11,845 11,845 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ij 67 � TABLE 2-5 GREEN RIVER PLANNING AREA EXISTING PROPOSED NET CHANGE LAND USE LAND USE IN LANO USE SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL 20 0 -20 MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL Low Density 5 -5 Medium Density 0 0 0 High Density 0 0 COMMERCIAL 105 100 -5 PUBLIC/QUASI-PUBLIC 60 60 0 PARKS AND RECREATION 330 390 60 AGRICULTURE 105 0 -105 ' INDUSTRIAL ' Extractive 0 0 0 Ma nu factu re Pa rk 50 1,400 1,350 , Heavy 305 0 -305 RIGHT OF WAY MAJOR 185 190 5 � ARTERIALS, FREEWAYS) GREENBELT 180 180 I UNDEVELOPED GREENBELT 1,095 0 -1,095 . ' TOTAL: 2,260 2,260 . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . D. Green River Valley Comprehensive Plan The Green River Planning Area is located in the Green River Valley covering the area north of the City's limits to the southern boundary of the central Renton Planning Area. The Planning Sector covers approximately 2,260 acres of which approximately 88 percent is located within the Renton City limits. 68 � l. Land Use Current land use in the Planning Area consists primarily of i ndust ri al/busi ness pa rk devel opments (28 percent) and agricultural/undeveloped uses (72 percent). This area is facing increased pressure for further industrial development as a southern extension of the central Renton business/industrial area. Under the proposed Plan approximately 770 acres currently designated heavy i ndust ri al wi 11 be i ncorporated i nto a manufactu ri ng / business park designation which will account for approximately 1,400 acres within the Planning Area. Other 1 a nd uses i n the P1 anni ng Area i ncl ude a commerci al 1 and use area located in the northeast corner of the planning boundary, rec�eational land use encompassing the Long Acres Racetrack and a greenbelt area adjacent to the Green River. No plans for housing areas are included within this Planning Area. 2. Population and Housing Residential land use has not been included in the planning a rea. A summary of the revised Land Use Plan for the Green River Valley area is displayed in Table 2-5. ADJACENT SYSTEMS PLANS The City's System is surrounded by ten municipal systems and two private water systems, as shown i n Fi gu re 3. Documented bel ow a re the pl ans of these adjacent systems together with additional information, obtained through discussions with representatives of some of these systems. Some smal l areas i n uni ncorporated Ki ng County not served by any of these 12 systems will also be reviewed in the following paragraphs. Discussions regardi ng who should provide service to those small areas currently unserved have been initiated between the City and the utility adjacent to the unserved area. The intent of these discussions is to determine the most reasonable means of providing service to those areas. Another topic herein addressed is the compatibility of adjacent systems pressure zones, facilities, or plans for development of facilities. Awareness of adjacent system facilities and of plans to construct facilities may hold significance for the City. As an example, the City is currently in the process of developing joint use supply, storage, booster pumping and transmission pipeline facilities on the West Hill with Water District No. 63. These facilities will provide service to both Di st ri ct No. 63's servi ce a rea and the Ci ty's �+Jest Hi 11 servi ce area. During the development of plans for the West Hill facilities, it 69 was originally proposed that six municipalities pa rticipate in these joi nt use faci 1 iti es. Due to va ri ous reasons, the number has now been reduced to two ; however, both of the muni ci pal i ti es i nvol ved wi 11 � experience significant cost savings for their customers because of constructi on of joi nt use faci 1 iti es (and a correspondi ng g rant f rom the DSHS), minimizing redundancy while maximizing reliability. Set forth below is a summary of the published plans of these adjacent systems regarding their capabilties. The plans for modification or improvement of these systems, as well as thei r hydraulic compatibility, a re al so revi ewed. � Water Di st ri ct No. 107 . This District 's Plan was prepared i n 1980 by Yoshida, Inc. , and recommends a series of improvements to the District's System. District No. 107 borders the City's System in the northeast part of the City adjacent to the Kennydale, Highlands, and Highlands' elevated tank pressure zones. Current plans call for construction of a 5 million gal l on reservoi r nea r Hazelwood E1 ementa ry School whi ch i s east of 116th Avenue SE and an eastward extension of SE 72nd Street. Further, numerous pipeline improvements would be made in the southern portion of the District primarily through the May Valley area which is adjacent to the northern City limits. The overflow elevation of the proposed 5 mi 11 i on gal l on reservoi r i s 440 f eet above sea 1 evel (USGS datum). Thi s overflow elevation is very close to the Highlands 435 pressure zone. It is reasonable that the City request an intertie with Water District No. 107 when thi s storage i s const ructed to obtai n emergency supply capabi 1 iti es. The i nterti e would supply the Kennydal e 320 pressu re zone du ri ng an emergency. The Di st ri ct al so serves the south si de of May Val 1 ey whi ch i s on the City's northern City limits and this area is currently served by a connection from the City of Seattle's East Side Supply Line (ESSL). It is noted that a 1 million gallon reservoir is proposed for service to this area with an overflow elevation of 440. It appears as though this 440 overflow reservoir would not be connected to the proposed 5 million gal l on reservoi r that i s 1 ocated nea r Hazelwood E1 ementa ry School . It is reasonable to request that District No. 107 consider constructing the 1 million gallon reservoir with an overflow elevation of approximately 435 whi ch woul d match the Hi ghl ands reservoi r whi ch i s 1 ocated to the south. Di scussi ons rega rdi ng const ructi on of Di st ri ct 107's p ropos ed reservoi rs at an overflow elevation of 435 should be accomplished as soon as possi bl e si nce the Ci ty i s awa re that the Di st ri ct i ntends to p roceed with the 5 million gallon reservoir promptly. At that time, a di scussi on rega rdi ng servi ce to a reas i n May Val l ey shoul d al so be accompl i shed. Thi s statement i s based on the topog raphy and 1 i mi ts of exi sti ng servi ce and servi ce a reas i n the May Val 1 ey a rea. It i s entirely possible that a more efficient development of service area 70 1 imi ts can be devel oped such that physi cal ha rri ers wi 11 be respected and thereby el imi nate the need for costly pi pel i ne extensi ons accross the physical barriers. The February 16, 1983, letter to �ir. Larry Bradbury, Manager of District No. 107 addresses the service area issues. A copy of thi s 1 etter i s contai ned i n Appendi x C. Di st ri ct No. 90 The most recent Comprehensive Water System Plan for District No. 90 was developed in 1978 by Doneshvar Company, and is currently being updated by Wi 1 1 i ams and Roth. Di st ri ct No. 90 serves a reas east of the Hi ghl a nds el evated ta nk north of Mapl e Val 1 ey and south of Di st ri ct No. 107. District No. 90's primary pressure zone east of the City ' s Highlands elevated tank pressure zone is served by a 645 pressure zone and al so a 1 ower p ressu re zone nea r Mapl e Val 1 ey. Nei ther of these zones is directly compatible with the City's Highlands elevated tank p�essure zone. Currently there is an intertie between District No. 90 and the City which is used for emergency service only. This intertie is located on Southeast 128th Street at Union Avenue (132nd Avenue SE). It is noted that development is taking place in areas adjacent to the existing City limits and some of these developments require sewer service which is available from the City but requi res annexation prior to service. This has the impact of establishing the City's Water System as the utility to provide water service. In an effort to identify these properties which will likely follow this course of action, the District Engineer, Mr. John Roth, and representatives of the City have met to discuss this situation. Further negotiations are necessary in order to obtain a mutually agreeable service boundary between the District and the City. Water Di st ri ct No. 108 District No. 108 updated its Comprehensive Water System Plan in August, 1982. The Pl a n was devel oped by Mr. Ri cha rd C. T. li , the Di st ri ct's . Engineer who had met with representatives of the City to discuss system capatability. The area under consideration for compatability between the two systems lies within the District's west area which includes the Mapl ewood Gol f Cou rse and areas east i n the Mapl e Val 1 ey. Cu rrently District No. 108 does not provide service in this area at lower elevations in the Valley. However, its Comprehensive Plan does show servi ce to thi s a rea by pressu re reduci ng f rom the upper pressu re zones. An alternate supply would include development of a joint use source of supply (well ) which would provide supply to the District's proposed 325 . pressu re zone or the City's 196 pressure zone. An alternative supply is that of a connection to the existing Seattle East Side Supply Line along Maple Valley Highway. The City has previ ously expressed i nterest i n development of joi nt use supply facilities with District No. 108 and an evaluation of the areas which are probable locations for a well supply should be identified as soon as possible. 71 Water Di st ri ct No. 58 The Comprehensive Plan for District No. 58 was developed in 1980 by Williams, Roth, and Associates. District No. 58 is located south and east of the City's Rolling Hills/Tiffany Park and Talbot Hill service areas. The District currently has an adjacent 598 pressure zone which borders the City's 590 pressure zone in the Rolling Hills area. The District has planned pressure zones at the 440 and 290 level to serve the areas east of the City limits in the Talbot Hill area although no facilities in these pressure zones have yet been constructed. The City and District have been communicating regarding the transfer of service f�om District No. 58 to the City for the area known as Pondorosa Estates. There are also other areas between. these two systems where negotiation of reasonable service limits for each entity should be developed. As an example, it is in the City's interests to serve the areas east of Talbot Road (96th Avenue South) up to the 250 foot el evati on app roximately where the property 1 i ne nea rest thi s el evati on occurs. This would establish a service area boundary based on hyd�aulic and topographic considerations. It is suggested that District No. 58 consider development of future p ressu re zones i n the a rea ad j acent to the Ci ty at the same hyd raul i c elevation as the City's pressure zones, namely 490 instead of 440, and 350 instead of 290. This would provide the opportunity for development of joint use of facilities which would allow each system to take advantage of economi es of scal e and mi nimize redundancy at the servi ce area limits. Ci ty of Kent The most recent Ci ty of Kent Comprehensi ve Water System P1 an i s dated A b uent Water October 10, 1979, and was prepared by URS Company. su seq System Plan Amendment, prepared by the City of Kent Department of Public Works, was completed in June, 1982. The 1979 Plan identified a shortage of supply in comparison with existing and projected demands within the Kent service area. Numerous recommendations were made in the 1979 Plan including the recommendation to construct an intertie with the City of Renton. Thi s i nterti e woul d requi re pumpi ng f rom the Renton 196 pressure zone into the Kent 240 pressure zone and pressure reduction when fl ow was di rected f rom Kent to Renton. Thi s i nterti e has been const ructed and, to date, Kent has used thi s pump stati on du ri ng peak use days of the summer for each of the past three years i n order to meet its maximum day demands. Currently, a contract exists between the ci ti es of Renton a nd Kent for Kent to be abl e to pu rchase supply f rom the Ci ty of Renton so 1 ong as a su rpl us exi sts i n the Ci ty of Renton. This contract has a clause wi�ich allows the supply to be interrupted by the City of Renton at any time. A copy of the City of Kent Water Supply Contract is contained in Appendix D. 72 The 1982 Plan Amendment presented a significantly reduced maximum day demand of 22 mgd rather than the 30 mgd presented in the 1979 Plan. A re-evaluation of the sources of supply resulted in the conclusion that groundwater sources or contractual service (from Renton, as an example) were not readily available. The conlusion presented in the 1982 amendment was that the City would have to develop surface water storage in an impoundment. This impoundment would have the capacity of approximately 2,265 acre feet and, in addition to other planned source of supply developments, would have a supply equivalent approaching 29 million gallons per day by the year 2000. It is emphasized that none of this supply capacity is predicated upon use of the Renton/Kent intertie pump station as a supply. In discussions with City of Kent's staff, they indicated that they are not intending to continue to use su rplus Renton supply capability based on development of the sources of supply and storage identified in the Plan Amendment. The service area limits in the Green River Valley between Renton and Kent a re southwest of 43 rd St reet (South 180th) west of the East Val l ey Freeway. Neither the 1979 Comprehensive Plan nor the 1982 Plan Amendment shows any expansions of the Kent service area east of the East Val l ey F reeway south to Southeast 200th St�eet, whi ch i s the extensi on of the City of Renton's Spri ngbrook Spri ngs source of supply. Wasmeta Park Water System Currently no comprehensive water system plan is available for the Wasmeta Park Water System. This System is operated as a private water user's association and serves an area immediately east of the City 1 i mi ts i n the Mapl e Val l ey a rea south of the exi sti ng Gol f Cou rse and north of the Ceda r Ri ver. Thi s system i s suppl i ed by two wel 1 s 1 ocated , wi thi n the devel opment whi ch pump f rom the Ceda r Ri ver aqui fer underlyi ng the Wasmeta Pa rk Devel opment. It i s hi ghly p robabl e that thi s a rea coul d request servi ce f rom the Ci ty shoul d thei r exi sti ng wells fai.l due to water quality problems, mechanical failures, or any other reason. The City has stubbed a 12" transmission line at the City limits which is adjacent to Wasmeta Park, and this pipeline has the capability to meet fireflow requirements. Chapter 5 of this Report ' identifies improvements to provide fireflow capabilities to this area as well as areas inside the City in the Maple Valley area. City of Tukwila The City of Tukwila'.s Comprehensive Water System Plan has recently been developed by Norton Dennis and Associates, and this Plan, although not yet adopted, shows numerous improvements to the Tukwila System, including provision of storage since .the City currently has no storage , i n thei r System. Thi s storage i s proposed i n the western porti ons of � the City of Tukwila and, therefore, is physically and hydraulically remote from the western portion of the City of Renton's Water Systerr. 73 � Thi s storage has been recommended at an overfl ow el evati on of 360 feet which is not compatible with any of the City's pressure zones where the systems are adjacent. It is noted that the Comprehensive Plan for the City of Tukwila shows a future crossing of the Duwamish River to supply an isolated area on the east side of the Duwamish River, south of Longac�es and north of SE 27th, whi ch i s su rrounded by exi sti ng Ci ty of Renton uti 1 i ti es. The City of Renton opposes the City of Tukwila's serving this area although this area has already been annexed by the City of Tukwila. The opposition by the City of Renton is based on consideration of providing a rel i abl e supply to that a rea west of the Duwami sh Ri ver on a cost-effective basis. The City of Renton has argued that they can service this area most cost-effectively. An example of a similar situation has occurred on the east side of the . Duwamish River near South 184th west of the West Valley Highway. A si ngl e 12" underwater crossi ng of the Duwami sh Ri ver has fai 1 ed, and, therefore, service to this area was being provided through an intertie with the City of Kent. However, as mentioned previously, the City of Kent has a shortage of source of supply and cannot continue to serve thi s a rea on a l ong term basi s. The Ci ty of Kent cu rrently buys water from the City of Renton to supply its existing demands. Therefore, it is reasonable that the City of Renton negotiate with the City of Tukwila to provide service to areas that are east of the Duwamish River. Independent Water Company The Independent Water Company is a small , private water company which is currently in the process of selling its system to the City of Tukwila. This sale has virtually no impact on the City of Renton Water System and is not discussed in further detail . Water District No. 128 Water District No. 128 represents a combination of former Water District Nos. 69, 77, and 88. These districts were combined as a result of a favorabl e vote duri ng the November, 1982 el ection. Steps are now bei ng I taken to formally combine the three systems over the next few years. These systems serve areas with similar topography, and their pressure zones are generally compatible and will allow integration. ' The decision by the former districts which has particular significance in coordination with the City of Renton was the decision not to 'I participate in the development of the West Hill improvements, (storage t ion and other reservoir transmission i eline, su 1 booster ump s at , � p P PP Y P facilities) . The decision was based on two considerations : first, the position that Seattle adopted regarding cancellati•on of the terms of the purveyor agreement, and second, the timi ng of the project wherei n the Ci ty of Renton needed a response at a ti me when the th ree di st ri cts were being combined. A nullification of the purveyor agreement on the part of the three districts would have resulted in costly compensation to the 74 City of Seattle, rendering uneconomical their participation in the West ; Hill project. Although it has been considered with various alternatives ' since 1976, the timing of the West Hill project was such that the ' combination of the three districts was of higher priority than I pa rticipation in the West Hill project. It should be noted that despite I this decision, the City intends to make facilities available to District No. 128 where app rop ri ate and avai 1 abl e. , Water Di st ri ct No. 14 � Water District No. 14 is also located on the West Hill and serves an ��I area immediately north and west of the City's West Hill service area. � Di st ri ct No. 14 pa rti ci pated i n the devel opment of an engi neeri ng repo rt on the West Hi 11 joi nt water system faci 1 iti es, dated Ma rch, 1981, i n which the West Hill facilities needed for their system were identified. Oi st ri ct No. 14 was i nterested i n pa rti ci pati ng i n the West Hi 11 facilities develoment; however, the project became uneconomical since they al so were subj ect to the condi ti ons of the .Seattl e pu rveyor agreement. Since it was uneconomical , they have concluded to not � participate in the project at this point. District No. 14 has two pressure zones which are hydraulically similar to the City ' s West Nill . It is the City' s intent, as a result of const ructi ng the West Hi 11 faci 1 i ti es, to p rovi de emergency i nterti es between District No. 14 and the City's System. Water Di st ri ct No. 63 ' Water District No. 63 did not sign the City of Seattle' s purveyor agreement, and can, therefore, take advantage of the economi es associated with the West Hill project. District No. 63 has pressure zones which a re also compatible with the City's and Dist rict No. 14's. The net effect on District No. 63 by participating in the West Hill project is that of: 1. Elimination of the City of Seattle's demand charge � 2. Imp roved supply reliability and water quality 3. Imp roved fireflow capability 4. A substantially improved position regarding long term costs, since the capital cost component for District No. 63's share of the West Hill facilities will be eliminated following retirement of the debt service att ributable to Dist rict No. 63. City of Seattle The City of Seattl e serves a number of customers di rectly f rom the Ceda r River t ransmission pipelines. Examples of these include direct service customers in the W est Hill , Ea rlington, and Black River a reas as well as individual companies such as Boeing and PACCAR, among others. The City 75 � of Renton's staff is currently negotiating with the City of Seattle's �' staff for transfer of these services. Other issues related to the City of Seattle are discussed elsewhere in this Report. They include the following: supply from the City of Seattle transmission pipeline, renewal of the pi pel i ne f ranchi se for the Ceda r Ri ver pi pel i nes whi ch cross through the City of Renton, and lastly, the purveyor agreement. In this Chapter, the study area and service areas have been discussed, the land use within these areas has been presented and discussed in detail , and all of the �water systems that are adjacent to the City's System has been di scussed b ri efly. There a re numerous reports avai 1 abl e which contain more information than presented here, ar�d for those interested, those reports are contained in Appendix B, the Plan Bi bl i og raphy. 76 CHAPTER 3 SYSTEM DEMANDS System demands and demand rates are the two most significant criteria used i n determi ni ng the si ze of sou rces of supply, t ransmi ssi on and dist�ibution mai n, and storage reservoi rs requi red. Therefore, the demands and demand rates discussed here will directly cont rol the costs ' to provide adequate water service to customers. This ultimately has the most significant impact on customer monthly rates, system, development f�ees, and other charges. Besides providing an adequate level of service for normal demands, the Water System must al so be capabl e of supplyi ng water at a sufficient rate and duration to meet the requi rements of fi re fi ghti ng and other emergenci es. In this Chapter, demand records are documented by: 1) revi ewi ng the past fi ve yea rs' demand hi story, 2) subdividing the overall demand by area of the City or hydraulic s ect o r, 3) discussing fi re flow requi rements, 4) presenting future demand estimates at saturation conditions, 5) estimating the 10 and 20 year future demands level for the City's service area, and 6) discussing the fire demands for saturation conditions. PAST FIVE YEARS A summa ry of the water suppl i ed to the System for the past fi ve yea rs i s presented in Table 3-1. It is important to note that the data presented i n Tabl e 3-1 and referenced i n the fol 1 owi ng di scussi on i s based on supply (and not demand records). For the purposes of this Report, it is assumed that supply equals demand although the actual demand will be 1 ess than supply due to hydrant flushi ng, reservoi r cl eani ng, 1 eakage, and other unmetered uses. Well production records, Springbrook Springs ' supply records, and the City of Seattle's master meter records were used to compile the historical data for the System. These records consisted of either flowmeter data or run time data for well pumps if the . fl owmeter was out of servi ce. It i s noted that the wel l total i zati on flow meters are in poor condition and that the values reported are 77 � TABLE 3-1 DEMAND RECORDS FOR THE PAST FIVE YEARS 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 ANNUAL DEMAND (mg) City Wells 1679.5 1997.0 1972.3 1845.0 1910.7 Sp ri ngb rook Sp r. 530.3 576.6 533.8 564.2 572.8 City of Seattle 122.1 219.8 112.8 105.3 108.5 2�S 2�T�'3� 2�f$� 233�� 2�� Average Annual Daily Demand (mgd) 6.4 7.7 7.2 6.9 7. 1 No. of Service Connections 9460 9826 10,215 10,425 10,577 Average Annual Daily Demand per Service 680.0 780.0 700.0 660.0 670.0 Connection (gpd/sc) MAXIMUM MONTH OEMAND (mg) 272.6 324.7 251.9 273.1 322.0 Month July August August August August Maximum Month Average Daily Demand 8.8 10.5 8.4 8.8 10.4 (mgd) Maximum Month Average Daily Demand per Service Connection 930.0 1070.0 820.0 840.0 980.0 (gpd/sc) • MAXIMUM DAY DEMAND (mgd) 13.1 15.6 12.5 13.1 15.5 See Note 1 Maximum Day Demand per Service Connection 1380.0 1590.0 1220.0 1260.0 1470.0 (gpd/sc) 1- Maximum Day Demand determi ned from System supply records and changes i n System reservoi r 1 evel s. 78 suspected of being inaccurate. During periods of well meter failure, which occurred numerous times during the reporting period, run time data was used to determine the quantity of water supplied. This method provides only an estimate of the pumps ' actual output, since the pumping rate varies during its time of operation with variations in the system pressure. Consequently, the historical records presented in this chapter, while based on the most accurate records available, are only a reasonable estimate of actual supply. The accuracy of this data is sufficient to p roject future water demands and resulting System improvement requi rements. However, it is recommended that accurate meteri ng and recordi ng of both sources of supply and customer demands be initiated as part of the first phase of System improvements. Data accumulated in the succeeding years will then be used to re-evaluate later phases of the recommended System improvements. The following terms, used in this section, are defined helow. o Total Annual Demand Total Water System demand for one calendar year expressed in million gallons (mg)�. o Average Day Demand The total Water System demand for one year divided by the number of days i n the year, expressed i n mi 11 i on gal 1 ons per day (mgd). o Maximum Month Demand The highest demand month of the year (generally July or Auguest) expressed in million gallons (mg). o Average Day Demand for Maximum Month The maximum month demand divided by the number of days in that month, expressed in million gallons per day (mgd). o Maximum day demand The highest demand for any day in that year (as an example, July 17, 1979), expressed in million gallons per day (mgd). All of the above demand factors can also be expressed as a rate of demand in gallons per minute (gpm) by dividing the demand factor by the time period over which it occurs in minutes, i .e. , maximum day demand in mgd divided by 1440 minutes per day equals maximum day demand in gpm. Examination of the System records is useful for developing trends which will be used in estimating future System demands. The data presented in Table 3-1 is summarized based on three time periods: annual , maximum month, and maximum day periods. In Table 3-1, the total quantity of 79 water produced for each period is displayed followed by the daily average and the daily average per service connection values. Variations i n these averages for the three time periods i n the year are i nfluenced by changes in seasonal water consumption patterns (based on temperature, rainfall and lawn watering practices), water rates, and economic conditions. For the last five years, the average annual daily demand has ranged from a minimum of 6.6 million gallons per day (mgd) in 1978 to a maximum of 7.7 mgd in 1979. The major cause for this increase is an unusually hot, dry summer and the correspondi ng i ncrease i n 1 awn wateri ng and other hot weather-related activities. Growth in the number of customers during this period has averaged approximately two percent per year. This growth has been inconsistent as seen in the large increases experienced in 1978-80 compa red with 1980-82. In examining the historical records, the maximum day demand is particularly significant since it represents the vol.ume of water that the System must provide over the maximum 24-hour period for the entire year. It is the highest consumptive day of the year and usually occurs on the hottest day. Wel l production records along with rese�voi r records were used to determine the maximum day demand. As displayed in Table 3-1, the maximum day demand was 15.6 million gallons or approxiaately 1,590 gallons per day (gpd) per service connection. This figure is particularly important since this is the basis for future demand projections. Fu rther examination of the maximum day demands for the highest consumptive day on record, July 17, 1979, was performed to determine demand 1 evel s for each major customer cl ass. The demand 1 evel s � presented in Table 3-2 were developed based on 1979 customer class consumption ratios as displayed in Table III - I of the 1980 Peat, Marwick, Mitchel & Co. Water and Sewer Rate Study. Based on the maximum day demand levels for each customer class, an estimate of the number of equivalent single family residential connections and area demand for each classification was then determined. It is important to note that the number of service connections presented here represents the actual number of connections to the Water System that are in use for each classification; whereas, the number of equivalent single family residential connections (ERU) represents the number of single family residential connections required to equal the demand level for any one classification. The maximum day demand level for the average single family residential customer is detennined by dividing the single family residential maximum day demand by the number of single-family connections. For July 17, 1979, this equaled approximately 694 gallons per day. This value compares favorably to typical maximum day, single-family residential demands and to the Stat e Depa rtment of Social and Health Services criteria. 80 I TABLE 3-2 ESTIMATION OF MAXIMUM DAY DEMAND BY CUSTOMER CLASS 1919 MAX. DAY % OF N0. OF MAX DAY EQUIVALENT DEVELOgED DEMAND/ TOTAL SERVICE DEMAND CONNECTIONS AREA AREA CUSTOMER CLASS DEMAND 1 CONNECTIONS (MGD) (ERU) (AC) (GPD/AC) SINGLE FAMILY & • SINGLE SERVICE MULTI-FAMILY CUSTOMERS 34. 7 7,801 5.41 7,801 2,025 2,673 MULTI-FAMILY 7 ' SENIOR GITIZEN � DISCOUNTS 11.3 1,032 1.76 2,536 415 4, 241 COMMERCIAL 7 BUSINESS PARKS 17.4 744 2.71 3,905 470 5,766 INDUSTRIAL 28. 7 39 4.48 6,455 925 4,843 PUBLIC FACILITIES 4.4 58 .69 �994 570 1,210 OTHER 3.5 151 .54 782 TOTAL 100.0 9,825 15.60 22,478 4,405 1 COMPILED FROM "WATER AND SEWER RATE STUDY FOR THE CITY OF RENTON", PEAT, MARWICH, MITCHELL, & CO. , DEC. , 1980 2 EXISTING LAND-USE, RENTON PLANNING DEPARTMENT . Analysis of the 1979 maximum day demands indicates that the maximum hourly demand for that day was 18,525 gpm or 26.7 mgd. The hourly demand for this date was examined so that : - 1. The magnitude of maximum hourly demand can be determined as an extreme condition. 2. The amount of equal izi ng storage used can be determi ned and the effect of the hourly demands on reservoir level variations and operations can be studied. The Ci ty does record reservoi r 1 evel s al though i nformati on for July 17, 1979, i s i ncompl ete. A pl ot of hou rly demands usi ng reservoi r 1 evel s and supply meter readi ngs du ri ng a 24-hou r peri od i s cal l ed a di u rnal demand curve. The Washington State Department of Social and Health Services has compi 1 ed a typi cal di u rnal dema nd cu rve f rom studi es of resi denti al systems i n the State, and thi s cu rve was used for compa ri son wi th hou rly variations in the City's demand. The curves show the classical pattern of i ncreasi ng demands du ri ng the morni ng and eveni ng due to 1 awn watering, showers , laundry, and other activities. The pattern is similar regardless of season or total flow and is similar on peak demand days except with a higher ratio of peak hour to average day demand for that day. Based on the DSHS diurnal curve, the maximum hour demand is approximately 1.74 times greater than the maximum day average. This value was used to estimate the 1979 peak hour demand rate and future maximum hour demands. PRESSURE ZONE DEMANDS Maximum day demand levels for the major System areas and pressure zones are summarized in Table 3-3. These values are based on 1979 July-August bi l l i ng records, booster pump stati on records, and System supply data. It is important to note that where booster pump station data was incomplete or missing, estimates were made of the quantity of water pumped. � As displayed in Table 3-3, Talbot Hill showed the largest increase in demands over the four years of record with an approximate 23� increase between 1979 and 1981. As expected, the downtown pressure zones consumes approximately 48X of the total System supply. The next largest area is the Highlands 565 pressure zone which consumes approximately 20� of the total supply. These two areas are then followed by: the Highlands 437 pressure zone with 15%, Talbot Hill pressure zone with 9�, Kennydale 320. pressure zone with 4%, West Hill with 3%, and Renton Scenic Hill with 1%. �2 TABLE 3-3 MAXIMUM DAY DEMANDS BY PRESSURE ZONE AREA - -MGD- 1979 1980 1981 1982 KENNYDALE 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.7 HIGHLANDS 2.1 1.9 2.0 2.2 HIGHLANDS ELEVATED TANK 2.9 2.3 3.1 3.0 DOWNTOWN VALLEY FLOOR 8.2 6.1 5.1 7.6 WEST HILL 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 � TALBOT HILL 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.3 SCENIC HILL 0.3 0.2 0,2 0.2 TOTAL 15.6 12.5 13.1 15.5 . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . DEMAND COMPONENTS Total System demand can be divided into three major components which consi st of: o Residential Demands (Single and Multiple Family Services) o Commercial-Industrial Public Facilities and Other Use Demands o System Losses (unaccounted for water) These three components are comprised of both peaking or non-peaking demand elements. Peaking demands are those demands that vary with time (seasonally, weekly, daily, or hourly), such as irrigation demands. Peaking demands are the major contributors to the difference between average annual and maximum day demand and they are al so the most 83 difficult and costly to meet. Non-peaking demands are those demands which do not vary seasonally such as normal household (inside the house) or commercial demands. � Residential demand is a major component of the City's total System demand. This can be concluded from the large areas of predominantly residential neighborhoods served by the System and from actual demand records. In 1979, the ratio between maximum to average day demands was 2.0. A conclusion reached here is that a major portion of this difference between maximum day demand and average daily demand represents the water used for i rrigation and other hot weather related • . uses ; this difference was 7.9 million gallons in 1979. Commercial and industrial demand also represents a major component of the total System demand. Major industrial users such as the Boeing Company and Pacific Ca r and Foundry use significant volumes of water although their variations in daily demands are minimal . Commercial and other industrial users such as retail stores, businesses, and manufactu ring pa rks typically have low-volume, non-peaking demands, which are also fairly constant in aggregate. The remaining demand component, System loss or unaccountable water, is predominantly leakage. Comparison of the 197'9 supply data with demand data f rom actual customer bi 11 i ng records i ndi cates that a si gni fi cant percent of the water suppl i ed to the System was unaccountabl e. O1 der areas of the System generally exhibit greater per service demands due to increased losses from broken pipes, bad joints, and other exfiltration losses. Losses between 10-15% of total System supply a re generally considered acceptable for a System the size of the City of Renton. The percentage of unaccountabl e water du ri ng 1979 va ri ed f rom a hi gh of 47% for the peri od Ja nua ry th rough Ju ne, 1979, to a 1 ow of 11.3% du ri ng the peak two month period of July and August, 1979. Explanations for the wide variation in these values can be attributed to either actual System losses (leaks, under registration of ineters, etc. ) or master meter errors. It is recommended that i noperabl e or suspect master meters be replaced or repaired as soon as possible in order to determine accurate water supply values. In simulating the City System, 1,590 gallons per service connection per day were used for maximum day demand and fireflow conditions. With better meteri ng of the System faci 1 iti es and a 1 eak detection program for the distribution system and service connections, changes may result in water consumption which could influence future demand projections. Therefore, future System demand should be closely monitored to identify changes which could alter the design criteria of this Report. FIRE CONDITIONS The capability and reliability of a water system is c ritical du ring fi refl ow peri ods. Du ri ng these peri ods, an adequate combi nati on of supply, storage, and system pipeline capacity must be available to meet the fi re fi ghti ng requi rements. To determi ne the behavi oral 84 characteristics of the City's Water System during a fire, a I comprehensive evaluation of the fireflow capability of every fourth ' hydrant in the City's Water System was performed and a map showing the results of the evaluation js available at City Hall . The Insurance Services Office guideline, "Guide for Determination of Required Fireflow", is used to estimate the fireflow demands of buildings located within the City ' s service area. Avera.ges were developed for multi-family residences, commercial buildings, and industrial complexes within the City for specific fireflow requirements based on experience in the past five years. For the purposes of this Report, the fol lowi ng fi reflow requi rements, as displayed i n Tabl e 3-5, were used for establishing the City's Water System performance criteria. For specific buildings or complexes, the City's Fire Marshall should be ' consulted to determi ne actual fi reflow requi rements. Under ISO , criteria, the primary goal of a water system is to provide water to a fi re at a sufficient rate and duration to extinguish the fi re. Adequate storage and supply i s usel ess i f the t ra nsmi ssi on or di st ri buti on system cannot del i ver water at the requi red rate necessary to exti ngui sh the fire. To achieve this goal , ISO recommends that the following criteria be met in conjunction with the recommended fireflow demand : 1. It is assumed fi reflow demand will be requi red during a period of maximum day demand. 2. A major component of the water system will be out of service either due to repai rs or mai ntenance. This can either be a major transmission pipeline, storage reservoi r, or source of supply for the water system. Computer simulations for the comprehensive fireflow capability evaluation were based on ISO criteria, with either the largest source of supply (Well 8), a reservoir (such as Mt. Olivet), or a booster pump station (Monroe Street, Valley General Hospital , or the Windsor Hills Pump Stations) out of service, depending on the location of the simulated fi re. Information on a specific fireflow capability for a specific area or a � summa ry of thi s eval uati on can be obtai ned f rom the Ci ty Fi re Ma rshal 's Office or Engineering Department. 85 TABLE 3-4 AVERAGE FIREFLOW REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS BUILDING OR FACILITY (GPM) Suburban, Urban Single Family Residential 1,000 Multi-Family Residential 3,000-4,000 Busi ness � Commercial 2,000 P 3 .000 Busi ness arks , I ndust ri al 3,000-4,500 .. . ... . . .. .. . . . • Noted exceptions to the above Table include some of the Boeing Company's facilities which, in two instances, exceed the indust rial requirements. Specifically, as an example, the paint hangar has a fireflow requirement of 8,988 gpm. This has also been used as a criterion similar to the average fi refl ow requi rements 1 i sted i n Tabl e 3-4. FUTURE DEMANOS Saturation Levels Considerations For the purposes of this Report the proposed saturation service area for the City's Water System encompasses the area within the current City limits and adjacent a reas within unincorporated King County not currently served by other water systems. It was assumed that if those areas currently served by the adjacent public water systems are annexed by the City than the adjacent system would conti nue to provide service, � or the area's pipelines would be incorporated into the City's System. In either case, utility planning for those areas has been accomplished in each District's Comprehensive Water System Plan. Devel opment of futu re demand 1 evel s for the Renton Water System i s based on the City's four comprehensive land use plans as summarized in Chapter 2 and the System records as presented in Tables 3-1 and 3-2. Saturation demands were determi ned based on a rea estimates of each 1 and use category within the four planning sectors encompassed by the proposed service area. It was assumed that areas zoned for a particular land use would be developed or redeveloped to that land use and that maximum 86 _ _ � devel opment of al l bui 1 dabl e a reas wou 1 d occu r by satu rati on. I n Tabl e 3-5 those areas within the City of Renton, and adjacent areas not currently served or planned to be served by other water systems withi n their corporate of franchise boundaries are displayed by major land-use I category. Saturation maximum day demand levels shown in Table 3-5 were then determined for each category, based on maximum day demand factors, as developed in Table 3-2. INTERIM DEMAND LEVELS 10-year and 20-year demand projections shown in Table 3-6 are based on Puget Sound Council of Governments growth projection for the Renton service a rea. G rowth within the City and su rrounding areas will depend to a large extent on the national economic climate. 8oth Boeing and Pacific Car and Foundry, two major employers located within the City are influenced by the national economic climate which directly affects growth i n the City. Demands for housi ng and i ncreases for City ' uti 1 i ti es a re rel ated to the empl oyment p rospects of thes e two as wel l as all other em lo ers. Locall the economic climate of the wood P Y Y� products industry will , to some extent, influence growth within the City and corresponding demands for housing. Upzoning or the redevelopment of currently lower land use areas will also influence City growth and the need for additional water utility improvements. Upzoni ng wi 11 most commonly be seen i n the downtown 196 pressure zone where older, commercial or residential commercial st ructu res wi 11 be repl aced with mul ti-story commerci al st ructu res. Major system improvements could be required to meet the needs of these new st ructu res. It is difficult to predict when this upzoning will occur. However, it is assumed that the majority of the upzoni ng withi n the downtown sector will occur within the next 20 years. Therefore, it is important to note that while 10 and 20-year growth projections are presented in this Plan, they are primarily for the development of a planning horizon. Specifically proposed improvements as presented in the System Improvement Chapter are based on the number of equivalent residential units (ERU's) served and not a particular time I f rame. � 87 � � TABLE 3-5 SATURATION DEMANDS BY PLANNING AREA SATURATION SERVICE DESIGNATED AREA (1) MAX. DAY LAND-USE PERCENT AREA DEMAND(2) (ACRES) SERVED (ACRES) (MGD) SOUTHEAST PLANNING AREA Single Family 7350 19 1397 3.85 Multi-Family (Low) 160 45 75 0.32 Multi-Family (Med) 200 45 92 0.78 Commercial 90 60 54 0.32 Public Facilities 1655 18 298 0.36 Subtotal �6� CENTRAL PLANNING AREA Single Family 1345 33 440 1. 18 Multi-Family (Low) 40 90 36 0. 15 Multi-Family (Med) 220 85 190 1.58 Commercial 505 80 404 2.33 Public Facilities 300 55 165 0.20 � Heavy Industrial 465 100 465 2.25 Subtotal .�ig GREEN RIVER PLANNING AREA Commercial 100 90 90 0.52 Public Facilities 60 100 60 0.07 Business Parks 1400 85 1190 5.77 Subtotal �� NORTHEAST PLANNING AREA � Single Family 6530 28 1828 4.89 Multi-Family (Low) 900 80 720 0.31 Multi-Family (Med) 385 80 309 2.62 Commercial 190 65 124 0.71 Public Facilities 450 65 293 0.35 . Subtotal �$$ TOTAL MAXIMUM 28.56 � DAY DEMAND (mgd) � (1) Includes only those areas currently within the City of Renton's corporate limits and adjacent areas within King County not currently bei ng served by adjacent water systems. (2) It was assumed that reductions in existing unaccountable uses would offset anticipated Parks and Recreation uses. � 88 TABLE 3-6 I'i INTERIM DEMAND PROJECTIONS ' ESTIMATED MAX HOUR MAX DAY TOTAL EQUIVALENT DEMAND DEMAND ANNUAL CONNECTIONS (MGD) (MGD) DEMAND YEAR (ERU) (MGO) 1983 23,100 27.4 16.0 2,953 I, 1993 28,500 33.9 19.8 3,655 2003 31,500 37.4 21.9 4,043 SATURATION 41,200 48.9 28.6 5,279 . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . Based on the projected demand levels for 1993, 2003 and saturation, recommendations fo r System imp rovements to the City's supply, transmission, storage, and distribution components can be developed. To determine the need for improvements in each pressure zone, the maximum day demands a re categorized by pressu re zones in Table 3-7. It is thereby possible to identify those areas of the System which may exhibit future deficiencies based on the future demand requirements and to recommend improvements to meet these requi rements. The demand 1 evel s presented i n Tabl e 3-6 and 3-7 were used i n the devel opment of the system improvement alternatives presented in Chapter 5 of this Report. Saturation Fi re Demands Fi re demands (fi re flow requi rements), as stated previously, have been used in simulating fires at 1993, 2003, and saturation conditions. It is possible that these demand estimates will be inaccurate and that some facilities will require different fire flows that those listed in Table 3-4. Therefore, each plan development should be evaluated independently by the City Fi re Marshal to detennine the fi re flow requi rement. The City's staff can then respond by. stating whether the existing fire flow capability at that location is available or if imp rovements are requi red. As presently i s the case, this procedu re wi l l i nsu re that improvements are made where necessary to provide adequate fi re p rotecti on. In this Chapter the existing System demands have been presented along with the existing fire flow requirements and capabilities. Comp rehensive land use planning, as developed by the City's planning depa rtment was used for establ i shi ng the va ri ous types of 1 and use withi n those areas currently served by the City of Renton and areas adjacent which are not currently served by other water municipalities. Saturation demand estimates were then developed for these areas and each pressure zone based on actual demand records from the City of Renton's Water System. 89 II TABLE 3-7 PROJECTED DEMANOS BY AREA 1993 MAX. DAY 2003 MAX. DAY SATURATION MAX. DAY EQUIVALENT DEMAND EQUIVALENT DEMAND EQUIVALENT DEMAND AREA CONNECTIONS (MGD) CONNECTIONS (MGD) CONNECTIONS (MGD) HIGHLAN�S 437 R 4, 31() 3.0 4,460 3. 1 5,900 4.1 KENNYDALE 320 NIGHLANDS 565 4,900 3.4 5,320 3.7 6,910 4.8 DOWNTOWN 196 12,380 8.6 13,820 9.6 18,440 12.8 • o rn WEST HILL 1, 150 0.8 1,730 1.2 1,870 1. 3 ROLLING HILLS 590, 2,300 1.6 2,420 1.7 . 3, 180 2.2 TALROT NILL AND SCENIC HILI. 3,460 2.4 3,750 2.6 4,900 3.4 T(1TAL 28, 500 19.8 31,500 21.9 41,200 28.6 � CHAPTER 4 ENERGY CONSUMPTION Thi s Chapter detai 1 s the pol i ci es that the Ci ty has adopted rega rdi ng energy consumption and provides a plan for future System facilities const ructi on. The Ci ty uses two types of energy: 1) el ect ri cal energy for operati ng booster pump motors, wel l pump motors, and heati ng and lighting buildings and 2) fossil fuel for operating the City's t ruck and utility vehicles. ELECTRICAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION The si ngl e 1 a rgest 1 oad (power requi rement) that the water uti 1 i ty has is the operation of electric motors to drive well pumps and booster pumps. The use of electric motors for pump operation is a common and efficient method although some municipalities use diesel engines to dri ve fi re pumps. Thi s method reduces the demand meteri ng costs imposed by the electric power companies and also allows fire flows to be satisfied during electric power failures. The power required to operate a pump and motor at speeds slower than desi gn speed, such as a va ri abl e speed motor or gea r reducer, i s i neffici ent and results i n power costs that are greater than i f the pump and motor are operated at design speed. The City currently has one ' variable speed motor that is located at the North Talbot Hill Pump Station and is used to su 1 the Talbot Hill 350 ressure zone. It is Pp Y P al so desi rabl e to sta rt and operate pumps only du ri ng non-peak power consumption periods to minimize the possibility of incurring the demand metering rates imposed by Puget Sound Power and Light when large motors a re sta rted du ri ng peak demand peri ods. Du ri ng emergenci es, i t i s possible that the Cjty could reduce power costs by providing an engine/generator set for the critical booster pumps in the System since this would reduce the peak load on the utility. The critical booster pumps are those that are the primary supply to a pressure zone and also have the capability to provide adequate fire flows. Critical booster pumps in the City System are the Mt. Olivet booster pump, Monroe Avenue booster pump, Highlands booster pump, the proposed Talbot Htll 490 booster pump and the proposed West Hill booster pump. Table 4-1 summarizes the historical power requirements and costs for the wells and booster pumps from 1979 to 1982. The Power Cost per 1000 ', gallons of water pumped in July 1919 is shown to demonstrate the effect ' that demand meteri ng has on operational costs. Well Nos. 1 and 2 which are operated the most frequently, distribute the one-time monthly demand 91 � . _.__ � TABLE 4-1 FACIL[TIES POWER CONSUMPTION AND COST • MONROE TIFFANY NORTFI FRED MOUNT HIGH- WINDSOR POWER CONSUMPTION WELL N WEIL N WELL � AVENIIF FARK TALBOT NELSON OLIVET LANDS NILLS (KWIi) 1 & 2 3 ' 8 B.P. B.P. B.P. B.P. B.P. B.P. B.P. 1979 2,347,950 116,820 473,100 47,160 9,624 10,670 26,208 742,720 300,60Q 526,925 19II0 2,053,500 118,260 684,600 154,800 7,393 7,560 4,608 1,356,480 179,460 29,880 1981 2,739,650 183,100 382,II00 133,080 0 9,220 4,080 1,871,880 206,142 395,434 1982 1,696,800 126,180 909,200 107,760 2,784 16,910 3,288 1,001,920 242,800 216,320 Peak Month 290,100 44,640 122,850 23,760 4,656 2,360 5,664 174,080 33,480 8II,560 (month. Year) (6/79) (12/82) (6/82) (8/82) (1/79) (2/82) (3/79) (6/82) (7/79) (1/79) I�OWER COST ($1000's) N rn 1979 26.3 3.1 7.9 1.5 0.4 0.3 0.8 14,2 6.9 9.3 1980 29.6 4.6 23.4 4.7 0.3 0.3 0.3 25.6 6.1 3.4 1981 36.6 6.9 7.8 4.9 0 0.4 0.3 21.7 6.8 9.4 1982 32.9 5.6 18.1 4.8 0.3 0.1 0.3 31.6 7.5 S.0 Peak Month 3.9 Z.1 1.9 0.9 0.1 0.1 0.2 3.9 0.7 1.4 (month� year) (1/81) (3/81) (6/82) {8/82) (1/79) (2/82) (5/79) {6/82) (6/82) (6/79) Averagr Yearly lncrease, <Decrease> 2.20 0.63 3.40 1.10 <0.03> 0.13 <0.11> 5.80 0.7_0 <0.32> POWER COST PER 1000 f,AL. OF WATER PUMPED IN JULY, 1979 E0.014 E0.021 E0.03II E0.036 * * * $0.080 E0.015 $0.016 KWH used per 1000 gal. of water pumpeA in July, 1979 1.27 0.98 2.1 *Total flow data not available metering charge over a large volume of water, therefore the power cost per unit of water i s the 1 owest (.1.4 cents per 100 gal l ons) . Wel l No. 8 which is operated the least frequently and therefore distributes the monthly cha rge over a smal l er vol ume of water, has the hi ghest power cost per unit of water. It can be seen that power costs per facility can be minimized by allowing the facility to operate frequently or not operate at all . ' Power costs for the booster pumps cannot be directly compared due to the fact that all of the facilities are operating at different Total Dynamic Heads. These figures are presented for interest only. The Ki 1 o-watt Hou rs Used per 1000 gal l ons of water pumped i n July 1979 are a good indication of the overall efficiencies of the three supply sources. It is noted that these figures are derived from total flow readings made at each site f rom water meters that a re not certified fo r bi 11 i ng pu rposes. The rel ati ve di ff erences refl ect bui 1 di ng heati ng and lighting, well screen size and discharge piping efficiencies, and number of pump cycles. Since the pump and motor efficiencies are nearly the same for all three facilities the majority of the differences can be attributed to these factors. The importance of an operation and mai ntenance program that mi nimizes cycl e times, an improvements program that places high p riority on energy conservation for buildings, and a design approach that yields simple and efficient designs is clearly evident. The City 's second largest load (pow er requirement) is heating and 1 i ghti ng for the wel l s and booster stati ons. Many of the wel l s and booster stations a re uninsulated and have open vents to the building's exterior. It is necessary to heat these structures to prevent equipment deterioration and failure, expecially during cold weather. Significant power reductions could be made by insulating all buildings and by providing positive ventilation which is used only when necessary. The i ncandescent 1 i ght fi xtu res i n most of the bui 1 di ngs a re i neffi ci ent compared to fluorescent type lights and do not provide adequate interior light levels when operating. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Washington State Energy Office have recently announced a plan entitled "Institutional Buildings Program", that offers federal grant money to municipalities' to conduct a detailed energy audit and construct improvements to reduce power consumption. The grant money for these programs is bei ng offered on a "fi rst come - fi rst serve" basis, and therefore the City should aggresively pursue application for the "IBP". � FOSSIL FUEL CONSUMPTION Fossil fuel consumption consists primarily of gasoline and diesel which is consumed hy the City's vehicles and equipment for operation, meter readi ng, and mai ntenance. 93 y Operation of the System is partially accomplished by the automatic cont rol system and partially accomplished by physically traveling to each facility. A comprehensive telemetry and supervisory control system would minimize the amount of manual operation required and significantly reduce the number of t ri ps necessa ry to remote faci 1 i ti es to obtai n operational data. A comprehensive telemetry and control system would, therefore, reduce the fuel costs requi red to operate the System by el i mi nati ng the need for operators to f requently t ravel to wel l s, booster pumps and reservoi rs. The City presently reads all meters once every two months. Meter readers drive to all locations to record meter readings although the truck is generally parked in a central location and the reader walks through a neighborhood. This is an efficient way to obtain meter readings and the fuel consumed for these tasks cannot be significantly a reduced. A1 though there a re several devi ces on the ma rket whi ch transmit residential meter readings to a central location where they can be automatically totaled and billed, this is not currently a cost-effective program. If fuel prices significantly increase, or the cost of these devi ces si gni fi cantly dec rease, i t may be cost-effecti ve to automate the meter reading process. The City should keep abreast of these developments. The location of the City's shop and maintenance facility minimizes the use of fossi l fuel s si nce i t i s cent ral ly l ocated wi th respect to the service area, and this results in the least consumption of gasoline and di esel fuel s. 94 CHAPTER 5 SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS This chapter presents the improvements that are necessary in the City System in order to resolve existing concerns and accommodate growth. ' The costs of the improvements and a prio�itization of the improvements are also p�ovided. The Chapter is presented in two major sections: "Performance Criteria" and "Facilities". The fi rst section, Performance Criteria, presents the planning criteria and City policy regarding the Water System which guides the sizing, locating and phasing of the proposed facilities. The second section, Facilities, presents the specific improvements proposed for the System. A. PERFORMANCE CRITERIA This section details the planning criteria to be used to establish an optimum behavior level and a standard of quality for the Water S stem. Y 1. Pressure (source: City policy) o A minimum of 40 pounds per squa re inch (psi ) at customer meters shall be provided during normal demand conditions not i ncludi ng a fi re or emergency. o A maximum of 130 psi at system meters shall be provided du ri ng normal demand condi ti ons not i ncl udi ng �ressu re , su rges. o Maximum allowable pressure suppression during normal demands is 40 psi . o Ouring fire conditions, the minimum pressure at any ma j or ri sk and i n the remai nder of the System i s 20 psi in the water main (also ISO criteria). o Du ri ng a fai 1 u re of any pa rt of the System, the maxi mum pressure shall not exceed the nominal pressure rating of the pipe, generally 150 psi . 95 2. Velocities (sou rce: City policy) o Under normal conditions the velocity of water in a t ransmi ssi on mai n shoul d be 1 ess than 5 feet per second (fps) during demand periods. o Under emergency conditions, such as a fire, the velocity of water in a transmission main shall be less than 8 fps. 3. Source of Supply o It is the City 's policy to aggressively pursue the el i mi nati on of al l supply f rom the Seattl e Ceda r Ri ver Transmission Pipelines and to supply all customers within the Water System's service area from the City's supply sources. The Seattl e supply meters wi l l remai n operational , however, to provide emergency supply if it is necessa ry. This policy is justified from an economic and safety standpoint. Renton's supply sources are less expensive to operate and of a higher quality than the Seattl e/Cedar Ri ver water. o The capability to p rovide adequate, reliable water supply is based on careful and comprehensive planning. Recent development as a result of the Instream Resources Protection Program has also demonstrated the need for flexible planning and supply alternatives in regard to water supply sources. The City should actively pursue saturation planning for supply sources so that future water resou rce allocation limitations can be handled effectively and the impacts of limitation programs can be minimized. o Saturation planni ng contai ned herei n addresses both the capacity and reliability of new sources of supply. The Standards for Municipal Supply as set forth by the Department of Social and Health Services specify that the minimum production capability of all sources of supply shall meet the maximum day demand of the Water System with the capability to replenish standby storage in 72 hou rs while meeting maximum day demand. These standa rds should be used as a minimum only. To provide a more reliable supply system, each pressure zone has been � individually examined, the potential and reasonable fai 1 u re mechani sms for that zone have been i denti fi ed, and supply requirements have been based on this criteria. The City does, therefore, have different planning cri teri a for supply to each zone i n the System. As an example, all of the booster stations which supply the Hi ghl a nds 565 zone a re f ed f rom the same power g ri d, which means that all water supply to the zone is off 96 during a power failure. The supply stations to this zone must, therefore, be backed up by portabl e generati on equi pment or suppl i ed f rom another secti on of the power grid. The Talbot Hill 350 zone, however, can be supplied . with water from upper zones if the booster pump supply to the 350 zone fai 1 s. Therefore, pl anni ng for the 350 zone can be based on the DSHS standards ; however, planning for the Highlands 565 zone must include criteria which is in excess of the DSHS standards. o Th e capaci ty of the sou rce of supply, i ncl udi ng wel 1 s, springs, booster stations, and transmission mains, shall be sufficient to meet maximum day demand (including industrial demand) and to replenish storage used during a fire within 72 hours after a fire. It is our assessment that the supply system is capable of ineeting this c ri teri a wi th the l a rgest supply sou rce out of servi ce, o r a ny other combi nati on of fai 1 u re that i s consi dered reasonably possible which has an effect on supply sizing, locating, or planning. 4. Storage (source: DSHS, City policy, Engineering practice) , o Storage wi thi n the Di st ri buti on System must be of sufficient capacity to supplement transmission supply when peaking demands a re g reater than the maximum day I demand rate (equal i zi ng storage) and sti 11 mai ntai n ' sufficient storage for a fi re or other emergency condition. , ' o Equalizing storage must be stored above the elevation which yields a 40 psi service pressure to the highest service in the zone. o Fire flow storage must be stored above the elevation which yields a 25 psi service pressure to the highest servi ce i n the zone. o The following emergency storage criteria available from the ISO were consi dered i n the study. The quanti ty of . emergency storage provided will approach these requirements as closely as possible considering economic factors and other design criteria. 1. Provide sufficient emergency storage so that should a fi re occur, the supply capacity from the reservoi rs woul d be suffici ent to fight the fi re whil e meeti ng the average rate of the maximum day demand with any System component out of service for the duration of the fi re. 97 2. Sufficient storage for a fire condition is the product of the fi re protecti on water demand and the requi red durati on. o Location of storage facilities should be in areas where they will satisfy the following requirements: 1. mi ni mi ze fl uctuati ons i n System p ressu re du ri ng normal demands. 2. maximi ze use of the storage faci 1 i ti es du ri ng fi res and peak demands. 3. improve the reliability of the supply for the Water System. 5. Transmission and Distribution (source: Amercian Waterworks Association, City policy) o Where practical , transmission and distribution mains shall be looped to increase reliability and decrease head losses. o All mains shall comply with the generally recognized design criteria from the American Water Works Association as follows : 1. In residential areas, the grid of distribution mains should consist of mains at least 6 inches in diameter arranged so that the lengths on the long sides of blocks between intersecting mains do not exceed 600 feet. Where longer lengths of pipe are necessary, 8-inch or larger mains are required. Where the layout of the streets and the topography are not well adapted to the above arrangements, or where dead ends and poor loopi ng are unavoidabl e, 8 i nches should be the minimum main size. 2. In high-value districts, the minimum size should be 8 '! inches with intersecting mains in each st reet; 12 inch or larger mai ns should be used on the pri ncipal st reets and for al l 1 i nes that a re not connected to other mains at intervals close enough for proper mutual support. o All new construction shall be in accordance with the Renton Standards for additions to the Water System. o Distribution System design assumes that an adequately sized service line will be used. All residential service 1 i nes wi 11 be 3/4-i nch or 1 a rger copper, accordi ng to City ordinance. 98 o Valve installations shall satisfy the following criteria : 1. Zone valves shall be located at all pressure zone i nt erfaces to al 1 ow futu re pressu re zone re-al i gnment without the need for additional pipe construction. 2. Isolation valves shall be located wherever necessary to allow individual pipelines to be shut down for repai r or i nstal 1 i ng servi ces. 3. Air/vacuum release valves shall be placed at all high poi nts or "c rowns" i n al l pi pel i nes. 4. I ndi vi dual servi ce pressu re reduci ng or check val ves a re �recommended for al l new customer service 1 i nes i n � the City. The p ressu re reducing valves p rotect customers from high pressures in case of failure of a p ressu re reduci ng stati on. Check val ves p revent hot water tanks from emptying into the transmission main when the mai n i s empty and prevent contami nati on of the System mains due to possible cross-connections in the customer's service. 6. Booster Pump Stations o All existing booster stations and all future booster stations should be const ructed to comply with the following minimum standards: � 1. Al1 structures should be non-combustible, where practical . . 2. Al1 buildings should have adequate heating, cooling, ventilation, insulation, lighting, and work spaces necessary for on-site operation and repai r. 3. Underground vaults should be avoided where possible due to the increased potential of flooding, el ect rocuti on, and other haza rds. 4. Sites should be fenced to reduce vandalism and City liability where appropriate. 5. Each station shall be equipped with a flow meter, and a 11 necessa ry i nst rumentati on to assi st personnel i n operating and troubleshooting the facility. 6. Em e rgency power capability shall be p rovided to at least one booster pump station supplying each booster zone. 99 _ . i o Booster stations should be placed wherever necessary to fulfill the following criteria: 1. Provide supply redundancy to a pressure zone. 2. Improve the hydraulic characteristics of a pressure zone. 3. Reduce the cost of water supply. 4. Improve water quality (i .e. eliminate Seattle Supply). 7. Pressu re Reduci ng Stati ons o The Ci ty has a standa rd desi gn for t ransmi ssi on 1 i ne p ressu re reduci ng stati ons al though cu rrently most stations are not similar. The standard design reduces design costs and minimizes confusion. o All pressure reducing valves should be placed in vaults that are large enough to provide ample work space for . field inspection and repair of the valves. Vaults should be tall enough to allow operating personnel to stand e rect. o Vaults should drain to daylight or be equipped with sump pumps to prevent vault flooding. o P ressu re rel i ef val ves shoul d be p rovi ded on the 1 ow pressure side of the PRV to prevent System overpressuring in case of a valve failure. o High pressure alanns should be transmitted to the central control cabi net to al ert operati ng personnel of the PRV failure. 8. Cont rol a nd I nst rumentat i on The existing telemetry and supervisory control system is inadequate for the size and complexity of the City's System. As stated i n Chapter 1, "Control Capabi 1 ity and System Instrumentation", and repeated here for clarity, a new tel emet ry and supervi sory control system must i ncorporate the following characteristics as a minimum. 1. Cont rol Cont rol must be capabl e of optimi zi ng the operati on of the Water System's components i n response to reservoi r levels, System pressures, abnormal System conditions, electrical power rate structure, and water costs. 100 2. Indication Indication should be accomplished with conventional digital displays. The use of a CRT and keyboard for primary operation and control of the Water System should be avoi ded. CRT di spl ays a re not capabl e of di spl ayi ng the status of the enti re Water System at a glance, and ' k eyboa rd ent ri es a re a sl ow method of remotely operati ng the Water System. The use of a CRT and keyboard may be useful at City Hal l , however, for advanced engi neeri ng infonnation and a secondary level of operation and cont rol . Automatically generated hard copy records are a cost effecti ve method of provi di ng the i nformati on necessa ry for the City's accounti ng and planni ng purposes. Records shoul d i ncl ude conti nuous recordi ngs of reservoi r 1 evel s, ' well flow, booster pump flow, pump run time, aquifer 1 evel , and System al a rms. 3. A1 a rms All abnormal or hazardous conditions must be reliably alarmed at the city shops so that the appropriate action be taken. This includes all situations that may jeopardize the supply of water to the public, create a potential health hazard to operating personnel or other personnel , or cause equipment failure or accelerated wea r. In addition to control , indication, and alanns, there are other cha racteri sti cs of a tel emet ry and supervi sory cont rol system that must ' be considered in the design and selection of control hardware: modularity, flexibility, expandibility, cost, reputation, and prior experi ence. The City should authorize a study of the comprehensive control needs of the City as soon as possible. The study should identify and map a multi-year improvement program for the automatic control system. It is ' anti ci pated that the automatic cont rol equi pment wi 11 be i nstal l ed i n schedules commensurate with the City's budget over a 5-year period. Scheduled construction allows the immediate needs of a water system to be satisfied without sacrificing the ultimate sophistication required to operate the Water System effici ently, rel iably, and safely. The study should also address the automatic control requi rement of the Sewer System and the Traffic System. Both of these departments have • expressed an interest in participating in the control system for the Water Department, and these interests should be examined closely. Participation by the Sewer and Traffic Departments may create economy of scal e cost benefits; however, the i ncreased compl exity and vul nerabi 1 ity 101 of jointly operated co►�trol systems may significantly reduce the effectiveness of the water control system. The study should also consider a multi -level control system that will consist of easy-to-understand and operate control components at the City shops and a termi nal at the Engi neeri ng Depa rtment to generate management reports and on-call system infocmation and summaries. B. FACILITIES Sou rce of Supply This Section will discuss proposed supplies and improvements to existing sou�ces. Please refer to Figure 5, Proposed Improvements, and Figure 6, Proposed Hydraulic Profile, for location and hydraulic configuration of the proposed improvements. , 1 . Wel l No. 9 and other Ceda r Ri ver Wel 1 s Well No. 9, which is currently under construction in Cedar River Park, is anticipated to be completed in 1983 and produce approximately 1,500 gallons per minute. As discussed in detail in other sections of this Plan, if there is hydraulic continuity between the aquifer below Cedar River Park and the streamflow in the Cedar River, a water right for Well No. 9 and other future wells in this area will not be granted or the supply rate will be reduced accordingly. I The City should pursue maximum development of wells in the I' Cedar River area. In order to accomplish this, an aquifer evaluation study should be performed. 2. Alternatives �I , I n the event that futu re water ri ght app rop ri ati ons for wel l s in the Cedar River aquifer are rest ricted, the City will need alternative supply sources. The following alternatives are available. a. Impoundment/Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River The City of Bellevue has initiated a study to examine the feasibility of constructing an impounding structure �on the middle fork of the Snoqualmie River and a regional transmission line to serve the City of Bellevue and other municipalities that may be interested in pa rticipating in a . project of this nature. The proposed alignment of the transmission line would be through the East Lake Sammamish P1 ateau, Issaquah, Eastgate, and i nto Bel l evue. The City of R enton coul d const ruct a seconda ry t ransmi ssi on mai n � 102 f rom the Highlands area through May Vall ey and connect to the regional supply line between Eastgate and Issaquah. Although this alternative is less economical than Renton's own well supply, the City should keep its option open for participation in a project of this type. b. Other Basins The City should examine the possibility of supply from i mpou ndi ng st ructu res i n other basi ns, such as the Green River Basin, as alternatives for supply sources. These projects are uneconomical due to the lengths of transmission main required to connect to an impounding st ructu re and the general compl exi ty of such a p roj ect. However, the City should be aware of, and open to, participation in these projects. c. Treatment of Lake Washi ngton Water As a result of the Instream Resources Protection Program, � Lake Washington cannot be used as a source of supply for a water treatment plant. d. Seattl e As discussed in detail in other sections of this Plan, the Renton City Council has adopted a policy of ' non-participation in the Seattle/Cedar River transmission 1 i ne as a regul a r supply sou rce due to demand cha rges, poorer water quality, high water costs, and an onerous purveyor agreement. The ability to utilize the Cedar River transmission pipeline for supply on an emergency basis should be negotiated as a part of the franchise renewal for the Ceda r Ri ver pi pel i.ne. e. Other Wel l s The City should actively explore the areas around Spri ngbrook Spri ngs, East Mapl e Val l ey, and May Val l ey for � aquifers that are suitable fo� potable water wells. Existing wells in these areas indicate that high-quality water beari ng stratas are present. These and other wel l sites may become vitally important if the water rights in the Cedar River aquifer are restricted. The City needs i nformati on f rom test dri 11 i ng i n these a reas for advanced supply planning. • A futu re wel l i n the May Val1 ey area woul d be ideal ly suited, both geographically and hydraulically, to supply . the Kennydale 320 zone. The construction of this well fo� 320 zone supply would eliminate the current undesirable 103 J supply path in which water is boosted from the 196 zone to the 435 zone then pressure reduced to the 320 zone, ', A future well in the Maple Valley area that could be used � to supply the hydraulically remote eastern areas of the ' City should be developed. This well would also be ideally situated to provide supply to the booster station for the , 590 and 565 pressure zones and would greatly improve supply I system reliability. Individual wells east of the City �I limits in Maple Valley are known to have good quality water. It is also possible that Water District No. 108 may � want to participate in joint development of a well field in ; this area with the City. The reader is cautioned, ' however, that the aquifer in this region may be hydraul i cal ly i nte�rel ated to the Ceda r st ream fl ows, thereby subject to the water supply restrictions of the Instream Resources Protection Program. The City should investigate reactivating Well No. 5. The sand, iron, and manganese concerns could be removed with an in-line filter. If this well is reactivated, the well bui 1 di ng shoul d be reconst ructed. . I f thi s wel l i s operational , it will provide needed supply to the Highlands a rea. g. Existing Wells II� The following improvements should be made to existing ' wel 1 s. 1. Wells 1 and 2 a. Reconst ruct the wel l bui 1 di ng, i ncl udi ng new 1 i ghti ng, roof, doors, wi ndows, exteri or coati ng, etc. . b. Replace flow meters. c. Paint interior, pipe and equipment. d. Fence building perimeter. e. Recontour floor for better drainage. . 2. Wel l 3 a. Const ruct new above g rade st ructu re. b. Replace flow meter. 104 3. Wel l 5 a. Const ruct new st ructu re. b. Repl ace pi pi ng, val ves, meters, etc. 4. Sp ri ngb rook Sp ri ngs a. Install automatic controls to Chlorinator ' (including flow meter). Booster Pump Stations This section documents the proposed booster pump stations necessary for � the City System, and the proposed improvements to the existing booster pumps. 1. Pro osed Pum Stations p P o West Hill Booster Pump Station The City has received a grant to construct a booster pump station to pump from the downtown 196 zone to the new West Hi 11 Reservoi r at approximate overfl ow el evati on 495. Thi s booster pump wi 11 repl ace the Seattl e supply meteri ng as the primary supply to the West Hill area, thus providing all West Hill customers with Renton water. The City is cu rrently in the p rocess of designing this facility, which will be located between Rainier Avenue� South and Perimeter Road opposite the Renton Ai rport cont rol tower. The steeply sl opi ng cha racteri sti cs of this site suggest that a cast-in-place, .ea rth-sheltered bui 1 di ng wi 11 be a cost-effecti ve and practi cal desi gn. The pump station should be equipped with multiple pumps to p rovide effici ent, normal demand pumpi ng requi rements and also provide fireflow capability if the reservoir is out of servi ce. o Black River Booster Pump Station This booster pump station would also pump from the downtown 196 zone to the new West Hi 11 reservoi r at elevation 495. It is anticipated that this booster pump will be constructed concurrently with the Black River Reservoir and will provide redundant supply from the 196 zone to the West Hill area. The construction of this booster pump can• add sufficient capacity to accommodate other unincorporated a�eas not currently served, if . needed. 105 o Rolling Hills Boost er Pump Station The proposed Rolling Hills Booster Pump Station will pump from the Talbot Hill 490 zone to the Rolling Hills 590 zone and thereby replace the North Talbot Hill Pump Station which is to be converted from a 590 to a 490 zone supply. It is anticipated that this Station will be constructed concurrently with the Talbot Hill 490 zone reservoir and will contain multiple pumps to meet the ' domestic demand and the fi re flow requi rement of the Rolling Hills 590 zone. o Maple Valley Booster Pump Station A critical station to develop, since it can fulfill many requi rements, i s the Mapl e Val l ey Booster Stati on whi ch would also have pressure eduction and, therefore, reverse flow capability. This booster pump station will pump from the 196 zone to both the Rolling Hills 590 zone and the Highlands 565 zone. The pump station will provide redundant supply to the Rolling Hills 590 zone and the Highlands 565 zone and will further reduce the need for. the Tiffany Park and the Fred Nelson Pump Stations and Seattle supply meters. It is anticipated that this pump station will be co�structed concurrently with the Maple Val l ey Wel 1 and wi 11 contai n the app rop ri ate equi pment to , perform the following: a. Pump f rom 196 to 590 b. Pump f rom 196 to 565 c. Pump from 5b5 to 590 d. P ressu re reduce f rom 590 to 565 This pump station will hydraulically connect the Talbot and Scenic Hills to the Highlands a rea and will significantly reduce the number of hydraulically . i ndependent zones i n the .Renton System to improve reliability and reduce cost. This station should have the capacity to supply domestic demands and meet fireflow requi rements on either hill . o Kennydale Booster Pump Station The Kennydale Booster Pump Station will pump from the Kennydale 320 zone to the Highlands 435 zone to provide redundan.t supply to this zone. This booster station should provide the domestic supply requirements of the 435 zone but should not be larger than the May Valley Well , which must supply this bonster pump and meet demands of the 320 zone. 106 3. Proposed Improvements to Existing Pump Stations The following improvements should be made to the existing booster pump stations. o Windsor Hills a. Rebuild Pump No. 2. b. Replace incandescent lighting with flourescent lighting. c. Paint walls, piping, and equipment. d. Test accuracy of flow meters and replace if necessary. e. I nstal 1 forced-ai r venti 1 ati on. f. Fence bui 1 di ng perimeter. g. Excavate a round enti re bui 1 di ng and i nstal 1 waterproofing to exterior walls (Bentonite sheeting or equivalent). o Mt. Olivet a. Pai nt i nteri or equi pment. b. Replace incandesc ent lighting with flou rescent lighting. c. Repl ace fl ow meters (meter each pump) . d. Fence building perimeter. . e. Install nonconductive floor mat in front of high voltage panels. o Ti ffany Park a. Place station on standby status. b. Reconstruct building or remodel building to eliminate exposed suction and discharge piping. c. Replace roof. d. Replace wood door with metal door. e. Pai nt i nteri or, exteri or, pi pi ng and equi pment. f. Test accuracy of flow meters and replace if necessa�y. 107 J g. Fence building perimeter or construct a berm with landscaping against building walls. h. Replace incandescent lighting with flourescent lighting. o Fred Nelson a. Place station on standby status. b. Replace incandescent lighting with flourescent lighting. � c. Test accu racy of fl ow meters and repl ace i f necessa ry. o South Talbot Hill (Hospital ) Station a. Fence bui ldi ng perimeter. o North Talbot Hill Pump Station a. Test accu racy of fl ow meter and repl ace i f necessa ry. b. Convert to discharge elevation 490. (Concurrent with construction of 490 reservoi r and Rolling Hills B.P. ) c. Eliminate variable speed drive as soon as 350 zone storage is constructed. o Highlands Pump Station a. Test accu racy of fl ow meters and repl ace i f necessa ry. b. Replace wood entrance doors with metal doors. c. Paint interior walls, piping, and equipment. d. Replace incandescent lighting with flourescent lighting. o Monroe Street a. Fence building perimeter. b. Test accu racy of fl ow meters and repl ace i f necessa ry. 108 Storage Facilities Chapter 1 contained a description of the City ' s existing storage facilities. A discussion of the additional storage quantity needed and performance cri teri a for si zi ng and 1 ocati ng storage i s p resented here. The storage necessary to meet saturation development levels is based on using the City's existing storage facilities as efficiently as possible whi 1 e meeti ng the performance criteri a stated here. Quantity � ' The components of storage equalizing and standby were discussed in Chapter l. Equalizing storage is used to augment supply during normal demand conditions while standby is used du ring fires and emergencies. For large systems like the City's, the quantity of emergency storage provided is more of a policy decision rather than a requirement. The decision should be based on: Failure o Anticipated duration of a major transmission pipeline, booster pump station, or reservoir failure. (Failures are based on ISO guidelines and a re detailed in Table 5-1). o The p robabi 1 i ty of that fai 1 u re occu rri ng. o The operational modifications that could be made to accommodate that failure. Financial o The financial impact on the City from construction of ' additional storage facilities. Water Quality o A balance must be obtained between the amount of standby I storage and detention time or turnover rate i n the City reservoirs so that the dissolved oxygen content is not seriously reduced. Table 5-2 is a summary of the storage needed at saturation development. The Table also identifies the "worst case" failure mechanism for determining the standby storage component, which is indicated by an asterick. From the Table, it can be concluded that a substantial amount of storage needs to be constructed prior to saturation development. 109 — — -- - TABLE 5-1 STANDRY STQRAGE RF�)�JIREMENTS AT SATURATION DEVELOPMENT BASED ON FAILURE PROBABILITY CRITERIA ( ISO r,UIDELINES) (ALl VALUES IN MILLION GALI.ONS) �ARGEST TW4 LARGEST SUPPLY SUPPLY TRANSMISSION SUPPLY SOURCE SOURCE RE5ERVQIR MAIN SOURCES MECHANICAL POWER OUT OF DSNS PRESSURE FAILURE FAILURE FAILURE FAI�LURE SERVICE CRITERIA �d�� (3 DAYS} (5 DAYS) (5 DAYS} (2 pAYS) (3 pAYS) ** 196 0 0 0 1I.4* 0 9.9 w est Nitl Q 0.4* 0 0 NA 0,9 Kennydale 320 Q 2. 1 0 0 NA 1.4 Highlands 435 0 Q.5 0 0 1.3* 2.1 Hi ghl a nds 565 0 2.7* 0 0 NA 7.3 �, Talbot Hill 350/300 0 3.0* 0 0 NA p,9 Rolling Hills 490 0 2.5* 0 Q NA 1.9 ^ Ralling Nilis 590 0 2,3* 0 0 NA 1.8 � Indicates "worst case" condition and is the value used for total storage requirement in Table 5-xS below. **Included for camparison purposes only - see text. � , - - -- — --- - —--- � The location of storage facilities is important in minimizing costs for sto�age and pumping facilities. The location will generally determine the type, size, and therefore, cost of the storage facilities by determi ni ng whi ch of fou r types of reservoi rs wi 11 be const ructed: I 1. Ground level storage within the pressure zone 2. Ground lev 1 tora e outside of the ressure zone e s g p 3. El evated storage withi n the pressure zone 4. Elevated storage outside of the pressure zone Ground level storage within the pressure zone must be accompanied� by booster pump stati ons to pump the water f rom the reservoi r to the necessa ry hyd raul i c el evati on si nce water i n thi s confi gu rati on wi 11 not naturally flow out of the reservoir. Ground level storage outside of the pressure zone may be located at a hi gh enough el evati on to al l ow the water to natu ral ly fl ow out of the reservoir and provide the necessary pressure in the distribution system wi thout the need for booster pumps . Thi s confi g�a rati on, however, requi res transmission mains that extend outside of the service area and . which may be lengthy and costly depending upon the reservoir location with respect to the service zone. In general , this type of reservoi r must be located on ground which is at least 90 feet higher than the ' maximum ground elevation in the service area to provide approximately 40 , psi mi nimum pressures. Elevated storage within the pressure zone is the most common confi gu rati on used and does not requi re booster pumps or 1 ong transmission mai ns for operation. The water is contai ned i n storage i n either elevated tank form or standpipe form approximately 100 feet above the highest ground elevati�on in the service zone and naturally flows out of the reservoi r to p rovi de the necessa ry p ressu re i n the di st ri buti on system. The exact height of the tank is dependent upon the quantity of equalizing storage that must be contained above a specific g�ound elevation, and the diameter of the tank . The diameter is usually dependent upon site constraints and height-to-diameter cost estimates of the tank, and must be i ndi vidual ly determi ned for each tank and si te. El evated storage outsi de of the p ressu re zone i s general ly used to reduce the height of a standpipe or elevated tank where a hill is adjacent to the service zone, and the increased ground elevation can be used to reduce tank costs without adding significant costs to the distribution piping. 111 TABLE 5-2 TOTAL STORAGE REQUIREMENTS AT SATURATION DEVELOPMENT (ALL VALUES IN MILLION GALLONS) MAX DAY REQUIRED STORAGE PRESENT PRESSURE ZONE ERU1 DEMAND EQUALIZING STANDBY FIRE FLOW TOTAL TOTAL DEFICIT < 196 17,580 12.2 2.8 11.4 0.72 14.9 8.0 6.9 West Hill 1,870 1. 3 0.3 0.4 0.7 1.4 0 1.4 Kennydale 32� 2,360 1.6 0.4 2. 1 0.53 3.0 0 3.0 Highlands 435 3, 540 2.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 2.6 3. 5 0 � Highlands 565 6,910 4.8 1. 1 2.7 0.5 4.3 0.7 3.6 r Talbot Hill 350/300 1,617 1. 1 0.3 3.0 0.5 3.8 0 3.8 Rolling Hills 490 3,283 • 2.3 0.5 2.5 0.5 3.5 0 3.5 Rol 1 i ng Hi 11 s 590 3, 180 2. 2 0.5 2. 3 0.5 3. 3 0.3 3.0 lERU = equivalent residential units 23,000 gpm for 4 hours 32,500 gpm for 3 hours Each of the storage configurations are considered when planning for storage faci 1 i ti es. Fi nal sel ecti on of the reservoi r confi gu rati on should be based on the following: � 1. Location 2. Transmission System Adaptability and Reliability 3. Topog raphy ' 4. Tank Costs and Construction Schedules ' 5. Operation and Maintenance Costs 6. Bidding Climate � 196 Zorie Proposed Storage The worst case failure mode for the 196 zone is a failure of W ell 3 and Wel 1 9 for a peri od of 5 days. An addi ti onal 9.0 mi 11 i on gal l ons of storage needs to be constructed in the 196 zone prior to saturation development. It is proposed that this capacity be divided between three reservoi rs, one i n the B1 ack Ri ver area, another i n the Mapl e Val l ey i area, and the last as an addition to the existing Talbot Hill Reservoir, to stabi l i ze pressu res i n these hydraul i cal ly remote secti ons of the ; City. The reservoi rs should be constructed concurrent with or prior to construction of the Black River Booster Pump and Maple Valley Booster Pump to provide suction storage for the pumps. The sizes should be as follows: Black River - 4.0 million gallons, Maple Valley - 2.0 and Talbot Hill 3.0 million gallons. I West Hill Proposed Storage II ' Fai 1 ure of both of the booster stati ons that wi 11 supply the West Hi 11 a rea i s the worst reasonabl e ext reme anti ci pated. Thi s resul ts i n the need for a 1.4 mi 11 i on gal l on reservoi r to be const ructed p�i or to saturation development. Those interested are referred to the Engineering Report on the "West Hill Joint Water System Facilities" for a detailed analysis of the sizing criteria for this reservoir. This project is currently being developed. Kennydale 320 Zone Proposed Storage At saturation, the 320 zone will be supplied directly from the May Creek Wel l , and i ndi rectly th rough pressu re reduci ng stati ons f rom the Wi ndsor ' Hills booster pump, the Mount Olivet booster pump and W ell No. 5. Fai 1 u re of the two 1 a rgest sou rces of supply, the Mount O1 i vet and Windsor Hills booster pumps, for five days results in the need for a 3.0 mi 11 i on gal 1 on reservoi r that woul d be const ructed pri or to satu rati on development. Highland 435 Zone Proposed Storage No additional storage will be necessary at saturation for the Highlands 435 zone. 113 � Highlands 565 Zone Proposed Storage � The 565 zone is intended to be supplied from the Highlands booster, the ��lonroe St reet booster, and f rom the Mapl e Val 1 ey Pump Stati on. Fai 1 u re of the two largest sources of supply, the Maple Valley Pump Station and the Highlands booster for five days results in the need for an addi ti onal 3.6 mi 11 i on gal 1 on reservoi r that woul d be const ructed p ri or to satu ration development. Talbot Hill 350/300 Zone Proposed Storage Using the same failure mechanism for the Talbot Hill 350 and 300 zones requi res that a 3.8 mi 11 i on gal l on reservoi r be const ructed p ri or to saturation development. The proposed reservoir for the 350 zone will also service the 300 zone since it is uneconomical tct provide storage in the 300 zone. Rolling Hills 490 Zone P roposed Storage Again assuming the same failure mechanism for the 490 zone requires that a 3.5 mi 1 1 i on gal 1 on reservoi r be const ructed p ri or to satu rati on � development. The proposed reservoir for the 490 zone will also service the Renton Hill 450 zone (which will be raised to H.E. 490) and the Renton Hill 270 zone. Rolling Hills 590 Zone Proposed Storage At saturation the 590 zone will be supplied from the Maple Valley, Rol l i ng Hi 11 s, Ti ffany Pa rk, and Fred Nel son Pump Stati ons. A 5 day failure of the two largest booster pumps which supply the zone, the Maple Valley and Rolling Hills boosters requires that an additional 3.0 mi 11 i on gal 1 ons of storage be const ructed p ri o r to satu rati on development. Location In determining the location of storage facilities within a service area, the following criteria were considered: 1. P1 acement of storage faci 1 iti es should be i n areas where they wi11 help to minimize fluctuations in system pressure during nonnal demands. 2. Maximum use of the storage faci 1 iti es shoul d be obtai ned duri ng fi re and peaki ng demands. ' 3. The location should improve the degree of supply rel i abi 1 ity for the System. The locations of the proposed storage facilities are shown in Figure 5. The City should pursue the acquisition of property near these sites as soon as possible. 114 Transmission and Distribution Pipelines �� Thi s secti on summa ri zes the proposed pi pel i ne repl acement and extensi ons necessa ry to resolve those weaknesses identified in Chapter 1 and to provide adequate capacity to convey water from sources of supply or storage to System customers. Proposed transmission and distribution pipeline improvements needed to resolve existing concerns and to meet saturation conditions as described in Chapter 3 are display ed in Figure 5. Alignments shown in Figure 5 are suggested for preliminary consideration. They have not been examined in sufficient detail to proceed with design and, therefore, hydraulically equivalent alternatives on dif,ferent _alignments should be considered prior to desi gn. Pi pel i ne improvement p roj ects over 8" i n di ameter a re 1 ocated i n a reas where significant development is projected and increased transmission capacity is required. It is emphasized that these improvements are based on a development of a grid of distribution mains as previously i described in the System criteria section. This grid will probably be I constructed primarily as a result of developer extensions in previously !, undeveloped areas. Since it is difficult to predict where these new ' distribution grids will be developed, only replacement and improvement projects located in the existing distribution system have been • identified in Figure 5. These proposed distribution projects are to primarily increase distribution grid capacity by completing loops and to repl ace only thi n-wal l ed steel pi pe cu rrently i n use i n certai n a reas of the System. , Transmission main improvements, as shown in Figure 5, are described below by major pressure zones. It is emphasized that the alignment and si ze of these pi pel i ne improvements may be modi fi ed as necessa ry� to reflect revised fireflow requirements, topographical problems, and futu re growth patterns i n the servi ce a rea. Downtown 196 P ressu re Zone M 'or transmission im rovements ro osed for this area include: aJ P p P o Creation of a high pressure transmission loop in the north i ndust ri al a rea east of the Renton Ai rport. Thi s imp rovement would increase the fireflow capacity of the Water System to the Boei ng, Paci fi c Ca r, and other i ndust ri al compl exes 1 ocated i n this area. This loop would be an extension of the Kennydale 320 p ressu re zone and woul d requi re the const ructi on of a 12" di ameter pi pel i ne al ong Northeast 24th St reet and Lake Washi ngton Boul eva rd f rom Aberdeen Avenue Northeast to the i ntersecti on of the 12" di ameter pi pel i ne on Ga rden Avenue North. It will also be necessary to increase normal transmission to this area which will be provided by pipeline improvement on Park Avenue North, North 6th Street, and North 5th St reet. 115 o Increasing transmission capacity in the vicinity of the Airport by extendi ng t ransmi ssi on mai ns f rom Rai ni er Avenue North,� North 6th Street, and Ai rport Way i nto the Ai rport compl ex. o Completion of the 24" diameter downtown transmission corridor al ong Bu rnett Avenue South and Ri versi de Di rve to the wel 1 field. , o Replacement of the 12" diameter transmission main on Sunset Boul eva rd North f rom the wel 1 fi el d to Grady Way. o Extension of the 12" diameter pipeline on the Maple Valley Hi ghway f rom Southeast 5th St reet to the p roposed Mapl e Val 1 ey well field, reservoir, and booster pump station. This improvement coupled with the supply and storage facilities ' proposed for this area will significantly increase the fireflow capabilities in the Maple Valley corridor. Additionally, t ra nsmi ssi on mai ns f rom the proposed booster pump stati on to the upper Highlands pressure zone and the Rolling Hills pressure zone will provide alternate sources of supply for these two areas and will allow for the transfer of water from the Highl�ands area to the Talbot Hill area. These improvements will significantly increase the reliability of the Renton Water System to serve both the north and south val l ey a reas. o I nc reasi ng t ransmi ssi on pi pel i ne capaci ty i n the B1 ack Ri ver � area with the extension of the 12" diameter pipeline on Southwest 17th Street, Grady Way, and along I-405 to connect to the Monster Road transmission corridor. These improvements will increase the fireflow capacity in the Earlington i ndustrial area and to the Metro/Renton Wastewater Treatment Facility. o Increasi ng transmi ssion mai n capacity i n the Green Ri ver Val l ey i ndust ri al a rea. Compl eti on of the East and West Val l ey Highway ' s 12" diameter pipelines will add two north/south transmission corridors in this area. Other improvements such as extension of the 12" diameter pipeline on Orillia Road and the development of the Green River industrial distribution grid will significantly increase fireflow capacities in this area. For the zones located on the eastern side of the Valley, the proposed major improvements consist of p�oviding additional north/south transmission corridors to increase the reliability of supply to these zones. The proposed improvements include: Kennydale 320 Zone o Completion of the 12" diameter transmission pipeline loop on Li ncol n Avenue Northeast 116 o Extension of the 12" diameter main on Lake Washington Boulevard f rom No rth 40th St reet to No rth 33 rd St reet o R epl acement of the exi sti ng 6"� di ameter pi pel i ne on Northeast 28th Street with a 12" diameter transmission main. Highlands 435 Zone o Repl acement of the exi sti ng pi pel i ne on Aberdeen Avenue Northeast with a 16" diameter transmission main which will provide additional north/south transmission in this sector from Sunset Boulevard to the existing.l2" on North 24th St. o Extensi on of t ransmi ssi on pi pel i nes south of Northeast 3rd Street to serve the anticipated developments in the Mt. Olivet and Monterey Terrace areas. Highlands 465 Zone I� o Extensi on of east/west transmi ssi on pi pel i nes to the northwest I'�, corner of this section with improvements on Northeast 27th Street from Union Avenue Northeast to Southeast 95th Way. o Replac�ement of the existing pipelines on Union Avenue Northeast f rom Northeast 19th St reet to Northeast 24th St reet. Thi s improvement coupled with the extension of the 12" diameter pipeline on 138th Avenue Southeast and the extension of the 12" i diameter pipeline on Sunset Boulevard Northeast will improve the transmission capacity in this area. o Pipeline replacement on Northeast 12th Street, Sunset 8oulevard Northeast, Harrington Avenue Northeast, and Monroe Avenue I No rth east wi 11 imp rove east/west t ransmi ssi on capaci ty i n the western area of these two sectors. � Talbot Hill Zones o Pi pel i ne extensi ons i n the Arnol d Pa rk, North Rol 1 i ng Hi 11 s area primarily intended to increase the north/south ; transmission grid in the upper 590 Rolling Hills pressure zone. o The 12" diameter pi pel i ne extensi on i n the Pondorosa Estates area will provide an additional transmission pipeline from the p roposed 590 p ressu re zone. o Extension of a 12" diameter pipeline along Grant Avenue Southeast f rom Southeast 18th St reet wi 11 p rovi de a sou rce of supply to the Renton Hi11 area. o South Tal bot Hi 11 Reservoi r pi pel i ne whi ch wi 11 serve the Valley General Hospital and surrounding areas. 117 � Scenic Hill Zones o R epl acement of the exi sti ng pi pel i nes wi th 12" t ransmi ssi on mains on Mill Avenue South, Renton Avenue, Cedar Avenue, and Arnold Park will increase the transmission capacity and source � of supply to this sector. Proposed transmission for the West Hill area includes: o Transmission main replacement along Raymond Avenue South, Renton Avenue South, and Langston Road South with 12" diameter pipelines which will significantly increase t ransmission capabilities in the West Hill area. o An addi ti onal sou rce of supply wi 11 be p rovi ded by the B1 ack River Booster Pump Station discha rge tTansmission main which will connect into the south area of this Sector. o Transmission to the north area of this Sector will be provided by the 12" diameter transmission main from the West Hill Booster Pump Station located on Rainier Avenue. These improvements coupled with the proposed West Hill Reservoir will significantly improve transmission capabilities. P ressu re Reducing Stations This section discusses the p roposed pressure reducing stations as shown on Figu res 5 and 6. Assuming all of the p roposed p ressu re reducing stati ons a re const ructed and operati onal , al l p ressu re zones wi 11 be abl e to be suppl i ed f rom booster pump stati ons or wel 1 s and PRV's. Furthermore, storage at any location in the System can be transmitted to any pressure zone through use of the proper combination of pumps and PRV's, maki ng the Renton Water System compl etely rel i abl e. The p roposed p ressu re reducing stations a re as follows: Kennydale PRV (435 to 320) This PRV will be constructed when PRV �13 is abandoned, and will be used to stabilize pressure and provide fireflow to the southern section of the 320 distribution grid along the Lake. PRV #13 will be abandoned because it is unreliable and has inadequate capacity. The grid downstream of this PRV which will provide supply to the southern 320 zone has less capacity than the grid at the proposed PRV location. PRV #15 will remain in service to supply the residences at a 196 hydraulic elevation along the Lake. 118 CO) . ..... . ..... "_j CN V 7— co m Tit C'n .7-- t se� �N vt w ................. . .......... .. is co N-41 /V 1� CL LL. ee .. . .. ...... .... . . ...... . .......... . L Co ............. . z X ism i — — ' 5a ' , 0. et -7 - UP ma i6 ..... ....... . .. ......... . . IT .......... . ... s, . . . . ...... .. ........................ . CINI t tv . .............. ....... .. . IN 8 co is ....... . . ........... . . . ................... LO COD Je 0 co ee.. a CD ca. . . ....... ss. se, . ..... . if cy 1 CIA, - - - ----- 0 Los 7. LZ cm Vol - ".. -. !'�� ) ....... ......... .......... le 77 ==K�lf PS # N�v ..... ...... v -Z "OL Z. Cd A**7 "ZL r Q P%' -A wa Cl) A C13 C7) . .. ... cm 00 M is see i ....... . ...... cm Opr W E rL / Is I If E'L m HE 3u" LLJ L.Aj j I ,I: . . :L cn -s, S C14 10 "I __'� 1. .-.. E 0 CL CL - - - ------- 0 E E A sR Is .......... se LA .......... L te IIR'%' I Li ,Ims lama els cc LL3 C.2 CD �11�(§' z el.';�' FAM !If -4-9— Lj_— Am a, lw!� 4 CU 0 flip se. s`l i amr z CL. CL AN z siI"W" a CO) "ZL "ZI. se ICD ee Ian 'zt is se "Z w ;L4 0 ICU C7) "ZL LO > *SV MW _ALI, ee: Kn Is C%l �rT�' 1185 r "9[ "9L sesesse— ... . ... ------- I,j r_ �u a . ........... dD 4 I � W_ LLJ ;21 cn it 0 CA 0 .......... .......... is see: ....... If "Zt 0 G= sies--se. a), exe Is. is. CA 0� Is _IOj co . ......... ng ME 3: CO cm cli z se Im ICU 0" co se 2m 10 0 'We a see 0 MINES ca Ilk, -4 V (of cc ca ZT- 2 SIMON ........... POW ft ............. . . .. 4WD 1L. j Is is -�j ej 'f" gi mi "MEN" West Hill Highlands 5cenic Hill Talbot Hill Rolling Hills Elevated Tank Highlands MWS 590 Elevated Tank Highlands Rolling Hills 590 Highlands MWS 565 Reservoir P 3.0 MG 0.3 MG (standby) 565 Maple Valley Four` �Ro I ng P �� M Fred M Tiffany Park P.S. West Hill �75I M; 3.6 MG P.S.IPRV Rolling Hills R PRV'S Hills P.S. P Nelson P (standby) Seattle Supply Reservair Metered Connection (standby) MWS 495 to W.D. 63 PP y' y) Reservoir S��le Su� PS• PP� �� �� � Highlands � Monroe Ave. S�ttl�Su I sta db T PP Y � �� Seattle S�I � • M � ��� P.S. l�J P.S. �P� Scenic Hill ' Rollin Hills M �MG I Highlands 490 490 450 West Hill Reservoirs 3.5 MG MWS 436.9 4 5 6 7 8 �; 9 12 Rolling Hills Adjust to High ands �� `�] R (standby) ] R �� Reservoir 495 1.5 2.0 MWS 490 MG MG 3 c;2 C i1 13 C 14 Kennydale 16 Scenic Hill � 7 7 Intertie with � P PS Change 370 MWS 350 setpoint W.D. 107 to H.E. 320 350 Kennydale Reservoir Mount (standby) �� �T�� 3.8 MG 32� � � �P Olivet East I � Talbot Hill West Talbot South Talbot Hill �___� 15 3.0 MG Windsor PS. �j7 300■�� Reservoir West Hill Hills Hill 30� Ma le Valle Convert to P.S. U P Y South Talbot 27� Kennydale P S Discharge Renton- Reservoir Elevation 490 (Hospital) P.S. P Black River P West Hill North Talbot P P Intertie P � R�nton-Tukwila P.S. P.S. Hill P.S. P.S.IPRV Intertie —— — — MWS 196.0 196 MWS 186.0 196 MWS 196.0 Future Tie 4.0 MG with W.D. 108 3•0 -, 2.0 MG 5.0 MG 3.0 MG Springbrook Black River M� _,N.C. Springs Reservoir �' Maple MWS 206 Mount Olivet Valley Talbot Hill Reservoir Talbot Hill Reservoir Reservoir Reservoir Y ti� � ti� � Y Y Y P Well May Creek y y��� Well Well Well 10 W e l l W e ll Future Well 5 Well g g Z Maple � 3 Development � 1 � Valley � � with W.D. 108 __�,—_ e Existing Pressure Reducing Station & Number �—�-�-� Figure 6 Q Proposed Pressure Reducing Station �f— 0 Existing Meter Proposed ' QM Proposed Meter � � O Existing Pump & Motor Hydraulic Prof�le pO Proposed Pump & Motor Boeing, Pacific Car PRV (320 to 196) Thi s PRV wi 11 al 1 ow standby storage i n the 320, 435, and 565 p ressu re zones to be used in the 196 zone during an emergency, and to stabiliie p ressu re i n the downtown a rea du ri ng a f i re. Thi s PRV wi 11 al so al 1 ow Well No. 5 and the May Valley Well supply to be used in the 19b zone, if requi red. West Hill PRV (270 to 196) This PRV will be used to stabilize pressure and increase fireflows in the northern areas of the Ai rport. Supply from the West Hil l Reservoi r or the Black River Pump Station can be used as supply to the North Ai rport area. West Hi11. PRV (495 to 270) This PRV will allow the Seattle supply meter to be placed on standby and provide supply to the West Hill 270 zone. West Hill PRV (495 to 196) This PRV should be constructed prior to construction of the Black River Reservoi r, and wi l l be used to stabi l i ze pressu re i n the hydraul ical ly ' remote 81 ack Ri ver area. Thi s PRV wi 11 be used only du ri ng emergenci es after the B1 ack Ri ver Reservoi r i s const ructed. Maple Valley PRV (435 to 196) Thi s PRV wi 11 be const ructed pri or to const ructi on of the Mapl e Val 1 ey Pump Station and Reservoir, and will be used to stabilize pressures and provide fireflows to the hydraulically remote Maple Valley area. The PRV wi 11 remai n i n servi ce after reservoi r const ructi on to p rovi de backup supply when the reservoi r is out of service. Scenic Hill PRV (490 to 370) This PRV will be constructed to replace the existing PRV which is in poor condition. Scenic Hill PRV's (590 to 490) These PRV's will be constructed to provide supply and fi reflows to the Scenic Hill 490 zone. Grant Avenue, Either Road and Benson Road PRV's (590 to 490) These PRV's will be constructed to provide supply and fireflows to this section of the 490 zone. 121 I Seattle Standby Supply PRV's (Seattle to 350, Seattle to 300) These PRV's will be const ructed to p rovide supply redundancy to the 350 and 300 pressure zones and will be used during an emergency or Renton supply .failu re. � PRV at Maple Valley Booster (Rolling Hills 590 to Highlands 565) Thi s PRV wi 11 be constructed i n conjuncti on with and wi 11 probably be . located within the Maple Valley Pump Station, and will be used to provide supply redundancy to the Highlands a rea. PRV at Highlands Reservoir (565 to 435) This PRV will be constructed in the Highlands Pump Station and will be used to provide supply redundancy to the lower zones in the Highlands area, from the 565 and Rolling Hills pressure zone. TELEMETRY AND SUPERVISORY CONTROL Recent System Imp rovements The City i s currently i nstal l i ng sensors i n al l of the Ci ty.'s wel l s, which will enable the water table level to be continuously monitored and recorded. The sensors will transmit data over City-owned, underground telemetry conduit to a reco�der at Well No. 8 that will accurately record the wel l 1 evel s on a si ngl e st ri p cha rt. Thi s data wi 11 be used to certi fy and obtai n a water right for Wel l No. 9. The wel l 1 evel measurement system has been designed so that it can be eff ectively used in an updated telemetry and supervisory control system to determine the long term effects of well pumping on the water table and to provide a planning tool for developing futu re sou rces of supply. Proposed Improvements The existing cont rol equipment should be abandoned and a new system installed. Replacement of the existing equipment will result in the fol lowi ng: 1. Decreased operation and maintenance costs 2. Inc reased reliability 3. Increased operati ng effi ci ency 4. Reduced liability 5. Effective reaction to emergencies 122 The changes necessary in the telemetr�y and supervisory control system shoul d be studi ed and eval uated fu rther to determi ne the 1 evel of improvement that can be justified from an economic and safety standpoint. As a minimum, the study should address the following poi nts: 1. Cont rol Control must automatically react to and optimize reservoi r levels, distribution system pressures, fi re flow capability', the cost of the water being supplied, and the el ect ri cal demand rate st ructu re. Automati c cont rol s must react to abnormal system conditions and prevent costly equipment failures. 2. Indication Operati ng personel must be abl e to determi ne the behavi or of the Water System at a glance and be able to remotely control all System functions from a single location. Comprehensive, hard copy records must be continuously and automatically produced to provide support for the engineering and accounting needs of the City. 3. Al a rms All abnormal operating conditions must be reliably alarmed. Further, the System should anticipate impending abnormal iti es and al ert operati ng personnel before a failure. 4. Flexibility and Expandability The System must be modular in construction to allow for expansion with minimum expense. It must be compatible with a computer and al l types of tel emet ry i ncl udi ng radi os. 5. Serviceability The System must be serviceable by City personnel without the use of special equipment. SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT PLAN The System Improvement Plan stated here is the result of evaluating exi sti ng System capabi 1 iti es and i nadequaci es, i ncorporati ng the effects of anticipated demand increases, and, finally, identifying System improvement necessary to meet projected demands. It is emphasized that this Plan is in conformance with the City's Adopted Land Use Plans. The � resul ti ng pl an of i mprovements i s a seri es of projects that wi 11 resol ve the concerns identified. 123 � Estimated costs are provided for each project in the plan. The estimated costs are based on current prices and should be adjusted for ', inflation and bidding climate (economy) depending on the construction ' ' period. These cost estimates should be used for budget pu-rposes only si nce addi ti onal i nvesti gati on i s requi red before a more accu rate estimate can be made for financial planning purposes. The p roj ects 1 i st i n Tabl e 5-3 consi st of the recommended i mp rovements , that will resolve the greatest number of existing and 1993 System concerns, and, at the same time, be compatible with saturation conditions. The projects are rated using the following priorities: PRIORITY PURPOSE A (1983-1988) 1. Develop additional sources of supply. (Planned for 1983-1987) 2. Reconstruct Well Nos. 3 and 5. 3. Const ruct the West Hi 11 Facilities. 4. Replace the tel emetry and supervisory control system. 5. Improve transmi ssi on and storage capaci ty i n app rop ri ate 1 ocati ons in the System. 6. Acqui re property for al l future � facilities. 7. Pl ace p ressu re reduci ng stati ons � at recommended locations between , pressu re zones. 8. Negotiate transfer of services _ � from adjacent systems to City System. 9. Convert Sceni c Hi 11 f rom Seattl e � supply to Rolling Hills Supply. 10. � Accomplish booster pump and chl ori nati on imp rovements as ' , rec omme nd ed. ' 11. Conti nue ongoi ng program of pipeline replacements. 124 I� � B l. Devel op May Creek sou rce of (Planned for 1988-1992) supply. 2. Pu rsue development of well supply with Water District No. 108. 3. Devel op remai nder of iNapl e Val l ey facilities. 4. Conti nue to improve storage, transmission, and booster pump capacity. C through F (Planned for 1993-Saturation) All remaining facilities - Priority may. change based on ci rcumstances or conditions not currently identified. 125 TABLE 5-3 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS PROJECT PRIORITY N0. PROJECT NAME PROJECT COST C 1. lincoln Avenue Northeast Pipeline Extension �75, 197 1,400 L.F. , 12" D. I. A 2. Service Transfer from Water District 107 1,492 , (nea r Lincoln Ave N.E. ) D 3. Lake Washington Boulevard Pipeline Extension 161, 136 3,000 L.F, , 12" D. I. (Kennydale Area) C 4. 4 MG Kennydale 320 Zone Reservoir 2,088,800 A 5. May Creek Well Development 455,060 2,000 Gallons per Minute A 6. Remove PRV on North 28th Street 1, 194 at Meadow Avenue B 7. Northeast 28th Pipeline Extension 102,053 1,900 L.F. , 12" D. I. A 8. Kennydale Booster Pump Station and PRV 395,380 2,000 Gallons per Minute ( at N 28th St) A 9. Rehabilitate Well 5 179,040 C 10. Northeast 24th Pi pel i ne Extensi on and PRV 91, 310 1,700 L.F., 12' D.I.(near Lake Washington) C 11. Lake Washington Boulevard Pipeline Extension 225,590 4, 200 L.F. , 12' D.I. (Adjacent to Coulon Park) 0 12. Aberdeen Avenue NE Pipeline Replacement 539, 209 (Sunset to NE 28th) 6,500 L.F., 16" D.I. ' 2,400 L.F., 8" D.I. A 13. Servi ce Transfer to Water Di st ri ct 107 1,492 (upper May Creek Area) 126 A 14. Service Transfer from Water District 107 4,476 (Devil 's Elbow to Union Ave NE) E 15. No rtheast 27th Street Pipeline Extension 390,307 (from Edmonds Ave NE to Union Ave NE) 6,400 L.F., 12" D.I. 1, 200 L.F. , 8" D. I. A 16. Uni on Avenue Noc-theast Pi pel i ne Repl acement 178,443 2,900 L.F. , 12" O. I. (from NE 17th to SE 99th) F 17. 138th Avenue Southeast Pipeline Extension 53, 712 1,000 L.F. , 12" D. I.(f rom NE 17th to NE 20th) F 18. Sunset Boul eva rd Northeast Pi pel i ne Extensi on 75, 197 1,400 L.F. , 12" D. I. (NE corner of City Limits) E 19. Sierra Heights Pipeline Extension 19,396 500 L.F. , 8" D. I. (NE 17th to 126th Ave SE) E 20. Monroe Avenue Northeast Pipeline Replacement 31,034 800 L.F. , 8" O.I. (Sunset Blvd NE to NE 12th) B 21. Northeast 12th St reet Pi pel i ne Repl acement 124, 134 II 3, 200 L.F. , 12" D. I.(From Sunset Blvd to Union Ave NE) B 22. Sunset Boulevard Northeast-Harrington 455,959 Pi pel i ne Repl acement(f rom NE 5th P1 to NE 12th St reet) 7,800 L.F. , 12" D.I. 3, 100 L.F. , 10" D. I. � C 23. Northeast lOth Street and Northeast lOth Place Pipeline Replacement (f rom Sunset Blvd 31, 332 to Edmonds Ave NE) 1,000 L.F., 6" D.I. C 24. No rtheast 9th Place and Glenwood Avenue NE Pipeline Replacement . 37,598 �, 1,200 L.F. , 6" D.I. D 25. Northeast lOth St reet Pipeline Replacement 27, 154 II 700 L.F., 8" D.I. (From Monroe Ave NE to � Olympia Ave NE) D 26. Possible Service Transfer from Water District 90 4,476 (Along 138th Ave NE and Union Ave NE) 127 D 27. Duvall Avenue Pipeline Extension 780,316 II (from S 135th St. to NE 12th St) II 12,000 L.F. 12" D.I. 3,500 L.F. , 8"�D. I. D 28. NE 6th P1 . Pipeline Extension 96,682 (from Duvall Ave NE to Union Ave NE) � 1,800 L.F., 12" D.I. D 29. 140th Ave NE Pipeline Extension 112, 795 (f rom NE 4th to NE 6th) 2, 100 L.F. , 12" D.1. B 30. 3.6 MG Highlands Reservoir 2,954, 160 (Near Unio� Ave NE and NE 2nd) E 31. Monroe Avenue Northeast Pi pel i ne Repl acement 64, 753 1,400 L.F. 10" �. I. (f rom NE 5th P1 to NE 7th) A 32. PRV Setpoi nt Change for I ndust ri al & 746 Kennydale 320 zone A 33. City Shops Pipeline Extension COMPLETE C 34. 4th Avenue No rth Pipeline Extension 58, 188 (f rom Ha rri ngton Ave NE to B ronson Wy NE) 1,500 L.F. , 8" D. I. A 35. Well 9 Development (Cedar River Park) 245,220 E 36. Blaine Ave NE Pipeline Extension 171,878 3,200 L.F. , 12" D.I. (f rom NE 3rd to South) E 37. Edmonds Ave NE Pipeline Extension 123, 538 2,300 L.F. , 12" D.I. (from NE 3rd to Mt. Olivet Reservoi r) E 38. South Highlands/Maple Valley Intertie Pipeline Extension (west) . 96,682 1,800 L.F. . 12" D. I. E 39. South Highlands/Maple Valley Intertie Pipeline Extension (East) and PRV to Maple Valley 4,000 L.F, 12" D.I. 214,848 PRV 22, 380 F 40. South Highlands Pipeline Extension 221, 114 (Union Ave SE at SE 3rd St) 5,700 L.F. , 8" D. I. C 41. Maple Valley Booster Pump Station Pipeline 155, 168 Extension to the Upper Highlands Pressure Zone 4,000 L.F. , 8" D. I. 128 F 42. 2.9 MG Maple Valley Reservoir 1, 514,380 A 43. Maple Valley Well 10 Development 268,560 (Nea r Mapl e Wood Gol f Cou rse) 3,500 gpm A 44. Future Intertie with Water District 108 4,476 (i n Mapi e Val l ey) B 45. Futu re Wel l Devel opment wi th ldater Di st ri ct 108 (in Maple Valley) 223,800 A 46. P4aple Valley Pipeline Extension 365,242 (from SE 5th St to W.D. 108) 6,800 L.F. , 12" D.I. D 47. North Rolling Hills Pipeline Extension 209,477 ' 3,900 L.F. , 12" D. I. B 48. Maple Valley Booster Pump Station and PRV 5,000 gpm 432,680 PRV 22, 380 B 49. Maple Valley Booster Pump Station Pipeline 46,550 Extension to Rolling Hills 1,200 L.F. , 12" D.I. C 50. Mill Avenue South Pipeline Extension 46,550 (f rom S 4th St to S 6th St) 1, 200 L.F. , 12" D. I. A 51. Grant Avenue & S 7th St. Pipeline Extension and 1,000 L.F. , 12" O.I. 53,712 B 52. Ceda r Avenue Pipeline Extension 32,227 (f rom S 7th to S 9th) 600 L.F., 12" D.I. D 53. Arnold Pa rk Pi pel i ne Extensi on and PRV 1,600 L.F. , 12" D. I. 108,319 PRV 15,000 � D 54. North Rolling Hills Pipeline Extension T12,795 A1 ong Seattl e Pi pel i ne Transmi ssi on Corri dor (from Puget Drive to North) 2, 100 L.F. , 12" D. I. E 55. Rolling Hills 590 - 490 Zone PRV 22,380 (at Grant Ave & S lOth St) 129 E 56. Rolling Hills 590 - 490 Zone PRV 22,380 (at Grant Ave & Highlands Village �26) E 57. Grant Avenue Southeast Pipeline Extension 214,848 to Renton Hill 4,000 L.F. , 12" D.I. E 58. Rolling Hills 590 - 490 Zone PRU 22, 380 (at Grant Ave & Highlands Village #27) B 59. 3.0 MG Rolling Hills 590 Zone Reservoir 1,566,600 D 60. 3.5 MG Rolling Nills 490 Zone Reservoir and Booster Pump 2,000 Gallons per Minut e 2, 126, 100 A 61. Ponderosa Estates Pipeline Extension/Transfer 57, 700 600 L.F., 8" D.I. A 62. Rolling Hills 490 - 350 Zone PRV 22, 380 (South 26th & Bronson Rd) A 63. Valley General Hospital N. Pipeline Extension COMPLETE 1,000 L.F., 12" D.I. A 64. South Talbot Hill Reservoir Pipeline 251,818 4,800 L.F. , 12" D. I. A 65. 3.8 MG South Talbot Hill Reservoir 1,984, 360 A 66. Water District 63 Supply Pipeline and Meter 266,970 5,000 L.F. , 12" D. I. B 67. East Airport Pipeline Extension 118, 166 (North end of field) 2,200 L.F. , 12" D.I. B 68. Park Avenue/Lake Wash Blvd Pipeline Ext�nsion (at N 8th St) 600 L.F., 16" D.I. 41, 179 2,800 L.F. , 12" D. I. 150, 394 B 69. Houser Way N Pipeline Replacement 182,621 of existing 12" steel 3,400 L.F. , 12" D.I. A 70. West Hill Booster Pump Station (on airpo rt) 313,540 2,200 Gailons per Minute 130 � A 71. West Hill Transmission line from Pump Station to Reservoi r & N on 87th Ave S from S 124th to S 118th & S 122nd and PRV. 6,000 L.F., 12" D. I. 344,652 800 LF, 8" D. I. PRV B 72. No rth 6th St reet Pi pel i ne Repl acement (F rom Cedar River to Pelly Ave N) 128,909 2,400 L.F., 12" D.I. A 73. East Ai rport Pi pel i ne Extensi on (S end of Fi el d) 1,600 L.F. , 12" D.I. 116,973 800 l.F., 8" D. I. A 74. North Ri versi de Dr. Pi pel i ne Extensi on (f rom Wel l 1 to Wel l s Ave 6 ri dge) 1,200 L.F. , 24" D.I. 107,424 B 75. Downtown Pipeline Extension and PRV (from S 4th to S Tobi n on Burnett � f rom Cedar Ri ver to S 5th on Wel 1 s Ave & N 5th to Garden & PRV) 3,600 L.F. , 24" D. I. 322,272 4,400 L.F. , 12" D.I, and PRV 258,713 A 76. 1.4 MG West Hill Reservoir 552,040 E 77. 84th Ave S Pipeline Replacement (from Renton Ave Extension to Seattle Transmission Pipeline) 118,166 2, 200 L.F., 12" D.I. E 78. South 130rd Street Pipeline Extension 31,034 (f rom 84th S to Renton Ave S Extensi on) 800 L.F., 8" D.I. F 79. Renton Avenue Extension Pipeline �xtension 204, 106 (from Hardie Ave to 84th Ave S) 3,800 L.F. , 12" D. I. F 80. West Hill Pipeline Replacement 93, 101 (Seneca Ave NW North of S 132nd St) , 2,400 L.F., 8" D.I. ' F 81. � Langston Road Pipeline Extension 193,363 (f rom 80th Ave S to Powell Ave SW) 3,600 L.F. , 12" D. I. � A 82. West Hill PRV Relocation of PRV #3 to PRV #20 I (on Renton Ave Extension) 14,920 i � 131 F 83. Black River Reservoir Pipeline Extension and PRV from Langston & Powell to Reservoi r. 13,600 L.F. , 12" D. I. 752,863 PRV . A, F 84. Black River Pump Station & Edwards Ave loop completion & Sunset Blvd from Hardie to Earlington Pipeline Extension 150, 394 a,000 L.F., 12" D. I. 1,000 LF, 8" D. I. F � 85. 4.0 MG Black River Reservoi r 2,088,800 F 86. Black River Reservoir Pipeline Extension 268,560 � (f rom Reservoi r to 140th St on Monster Rd) � 5,000 L.F. , 12" D.I. F 87. Black River Booster Pump Station 365,540 2,200 GPM F 88. Naches Ave SW Pipeline Extension 75,197 1,400 L.F. , 12" D. I. (Black River Area) D 89. Cedar River Crossing (at S 7th Longacres Pkwy 10,742 to Monster Road) 200 L.F. , 12" D.I. D 90. Met ro Wastewater Treatment Faci 1 i ty 182,621 Pipeline Extension 3,400 L.F. , 12" D. I. C 91. Southwest Grady Way Pipeline Extension 257,818 (f rom Pacific Ave SW to Longacres Pkwy) 4,800 L.F. , 12" D.I. C 92. I-405 F reeway Pi pel i ne C rossi ng 9b,682 (at Raymond Ave & Grady Way extension from Raymond to Lind) 1,800 L.F. , 12" D. I. A 93. East Valley Highway Pipeline Extension COMPLETE 2,000 l.F. , 12" D. I. E 94. Grady Way Pipeline Crossing 11,638 (at Shattuck Ave) 300 L.F., 8" O. I. E 95. South Talbot Road Pipeline Extension 98,472 (f rom Grady Way to Renton Vi 11 age Pl ace) 1, 100 L.F. , 24" D.I. 132 � A 96. Convert North Talbot Hill Booster Pump 7,460 Station Discharge Elevation A 97. Convert Seattl e Supply Meters and PRV's COMPLETE to Standby A 98. East Valley Highway Pipeline Extension COMPLETE 1,400 L.F. , 12" D. I. D 99. Grady Way Bridge Pipeline Extension 42,970 800 L.F. , 12" D. I. F 100. Orillia & Longacres Pkwy Industrial Area Di st ri buti on Gri d 2,954, 160 55,000 L.F. , 12" D.I. 0 101. SW 34th Pipeline Extension 139,651 (f rom Longac res Pkwy to West Valley Hwy) 2,600 L.F. , 12" D. I. A 102. Test Dri 11 for Deep Wel 1 i n _ Sp ri ngb rook Sp ri ngs A rea COMPLETE A 103. Spri ngbrook Spri ngs Groundwater Investigation (increase capacity) COMPLETE A 104. Springbrook Springs Chlorinator Improvements 11,936 A 105. Telemetry and Supervisory Control System 1, 156,000 A 106. Improve Wel l Nos. 1 and 2 186, 500 A 107. Improve Wel l 3 134, 280 A 108. Wi ndsor Hi 11 s Booster Pump Improvements 373,000 ! D 109. Mount Olivet Booster Pump Improvements 38,792 B 110. Tiffany Park Booster Pump Improvements 25, 364 B 111. Fred Nelson Booster Pump Improvements 16,412 ' A 112. Hospital Booster Pump Improvements 3, 282 A 113. North Talbot Hill Boo�ster Pump Improvements 5,371 A 114. Highlands Booster Pump Improvements 46, 252 A 115. Monroe Street Booster Pump Improvements 3, 133 A 116. Well Exploration in May Valley Area 82,060 133 II I A 117. Emergency Interties with Water Districts 90, 107, 58, 14, and City of Tukwila 223,800 F 118. Talbot Hill 3.0 MG Reservoir 1,566,600 I�I F 119. Talbot Road f rom SE 44th to 192nd SE extension I 5,100 LF of 12" O.I. 273,900 (not shown in Figure 5) A, F 120. Springbrook Springs Reservoir 145,000 Site Acquisition (Additional Land) A 121. Mobi 1 e Waer Users Meteri ng Stati ons - 45,000 Highland, Downtown and South Indust rial Area A 122. • 3" Diameter Conduit and Conductor from 112,000 . Cedar River Park to City Shops TOTAL (1983 DOLLARS) 36,169, 165 134 . CHAPTER 6 OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE The operations program discussion presented here consists of four el ements: 1. Normal Operations 2. Emergency Operati ons 3. Preventive Mai ntenance 4. Staffing Within the discussion of each element, several other functions are addressed. For example, training programs are discussed in the section on staffi ng and a summa ry of the shop tool i nventory i s i ncl uded i n the section on equipment available for normal operations. NORMAL OPERATIONS � Staff and Responsibility A prerequisite for the delivery of efficient reliable service to all customers i s a competent staff organi zati on i n both the engi neeri ng and the operati onal di vi si ons of the Publ i c Works Depa rtment, as wel l as effective communication between the two divisions. A complete description of Department staffing appears in the section on staffing at the end of thi s chapter. - Equipment Available � The Water Utility Operations Division of the Public Works Depa�tment is equipped primarily with rented equipment. The equipment available for dai ly use i ncl udes rol l i ng stock , an i nventory of shop tool s and 135 equi pment as wel l as other portabl e equi pment fo� fi el d use. The vehi cl es and other rol 1 i ng stock a re 1 i sted bel ow wi th a desc ri�ti on of their primary use in the Department. Subsequently, the other field equi pment a nd the shop equi pment a re 1 i sted i n summa ry fo rm i ncl udi ng only the major pi eces. Rolling Stock Cars - Admi nistration: two 2-door sedans one station wagon Vans - Maintenance: one inspection van Trucks - Reco rds and Collection: one 1/2-ton pick-up Maintenance: five 3/4-ton pick-ups one 1/2-ton pick-up one club cab pick-up two 1-ton flatbeds one F-700 flatbed one 8-ton dump one 4-ton dump Heavy Equipment - Maintenance: one International Hopto backhoe one Ford 755 backhoe one Ford 555 backhoe one International Jet sewer • machine Field Equipment and Shop Tools Field - Maintenance: One 3" t rash pump Two 3" diaphragm pumps Two 2" diaphragm pumps One 1-1/2" pump One generator One compressor One wick tamper One sewer rodding machine One DM 50 saw Shop - Mai ntenance: The exi sti ng i nventory appea rs adequate at current staffi ng 1 evel s but should increase in proportion to customer increases. The City should examine the backup capabilities of the i nventory based on critical equipment 136 failure, and make provisions for additional equipment procurement on a short notice basis where necessary. Automatic/Manual Operation A detailed description of the existing control capabilities, and the proposed control improvements is contained in Chapters 1 and 5 of this Plan. The City should adopt an aggressive policy of providing and relying on automatic controls for the routine operation and recordkeepi ng needs of the Water System. Thi s wi 11 al 1 ow the exi sti ng operations staff to concentrate on preventive maintenance, equipment repai r, and the other speci al i zed needs of the Depa rtment, whi 1 e eliminating the "human factor" from routine tasks and inc reasing System efficiency and reliability. Routine Water Quality Sampling DSHS has adopted regulati ons that speci fy sampl i ng f requenci es for physical , bacteriological , and chemical (organic and inorganic) consti tuents and radi onucl ei des. The sampl i ng requi rements depend on the number of customers, source, type, and treatment provided. The specific requirements are contained in WAC 248-54-140 and are summarized in Table 3 (pages 25 and 26) of the "Rules and Regulations of the State Boa rd of Heal th Rega rdi ng Publ i c Water Systems". The Depa rtment shoul d develop a water quality sampling and recordkeeping program that ensures compliance with the regulations. Sampl es shoul d be col l ected f rom the Di st ri buti on System and submi tted to a state-certified laboratory for bacteriological analysis in compliance with Table 2 in the above-ref erenced rules. With the current population served of approximately 30,000, 35 samples should be collected monthly. Communications - Personnel Efficient and economical functioning of a team requires adequate provision for regular, effective communication among its members. The normal channel s and equi pment avai 1 abl e to mai ntai n effecti ve inter-staff communication are: 1. Vehi cul a r two-way radi os � . 2. Regularly kept work logs 3. Regular inspection reports 4. Daily work assignment meetings i 6.. Inventory and other recordkeeping practices 7. Emergency phone numbers for "on-cal l " empl oyees 137 Facilities Operations and Maintenance Manuals Operations and maintenance manuals are available for staff inembers' reference. These manual s are kept on fi 1 e i n the Engi neeri ng Offices. The Ci ty i ntends to mai ntai n i ts pol i ci es of requi ri ng compl ete operation and maintenance manuals for all new equipment. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS Capabilities The complexity of the Renton Water System and the large number of probable combinations of failure make it inappropriate and o�t-of-scope to detail an emergency operation plan, in this Report. The City should pu rsue the development of an emergency plan as an addition to this Report, and should consider the following topics: 1. Long-term loss of storage in a pressure zone - such as st ructu ral sabotage. Short-term 1 oss can be accommodated by following the imp rovements detailed in this Repo rt. 2. Loss of well supply, such as aquifer contamination, or aquif er depletion. This issue alone would greatly increase the content of this Plan. 3. Long-term loss of booster station supply to a pressure zone, such as structural sabotage or major equipment failure. • 4. Loss of operating personnel due to a labor dispute. 5. Long-term regi onal� power fai 1 u re. 6. Widespread transmission main failure due to an earthquake or other anomaly. 7. Water contamination due to sabotage. 8. Water supply duri ng major fi re. The City has the capability to accommodate the following short-term failures and abnormalities: 1. Multiple Water Sources . The City could lose one of its sources without adversely impacting its ability to meet normal demands of its customers. 138 _ . � 2. Multiple Water Storage Tanks Six storage facilities are dispersed over the service area. These tanks and reservoi rs and thei r associated t ra nsmi ssi on 1 i nes consti tute a network wi th the capability of providing flow to any part of the city from any one of several storage locations. 3. Di st ri buti on System The City has attempted to loop mains wherever possible. Many existing deadends have now been looped. 4. Emergency Equipment The Department is equipped with radio dispatched vehicles which have the necessary tools to deal with common emergencies. If a more serious emergency should develop, a n emergency vehi cl e equi pped wi th most spa re pa rts i s available for immediate dispatch. Heavier equipment such as a backhoe and dumptruck are also available for emergenci es such as pi pel i ne fai 1 u res. . 5. Emergency Tel ephone A 24-hour telephone number is provided to customers. This emergency number can be used to alert the manager and operations crew in case of emergency. 6. �laterial Readiness Some critical repair parts, tools, and equipment a�e on hand and are kept in fully operational condition. As repair parts are used, they are re-ordered. Inventories are kept current and adequate for any emergency which could reasonably be anticipated. The Department mai ntai ns • an i nventory of repai r pa rts, i ncl udi ng pa rts requi red for repair of each type and size of pipe within the service a rea. Reserve Suppl i es and Emergency Di si nfecti on Since chlorine may be needed for disinfection during an emergency, a reserve supply of chemical and replacement parts for repai r of the chlori nators at Springbrook Spri ngs and at Wel l 3 are mai ntai ned at the two sites. These two supply sources are the only ones which are chlorinated at present. Liquid and solid hypochlorites (sodium and calcium based) are maintained in sufficient quantity to provide a one-pa rt-per-mi 11 i on f ree chl ori ne resi dual i n the sto rage faci 1 i ti es. The Depa rtment i s al so studyi ng the provi si on of emergency chl ori nati on capabilities at the City's other wells. 139 Should future water s�ources requi re di si nfection, a 30-day supply of disinfectant chemicals would be maintained together with a stockpile of the spare parts necessary to return the treatment units to operating condi ti on fol l owi ng di s rupti on due to any reasonably forseeabl e forms of � equipment failure. These policies are adequate and should be continued. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE Maintenance schedules that meet or exceed manufacturer's recommendations should be establ.ished for all critical components in the Water System. The following schedule should be used as a minimum for preventive maintenance: Supply Sou rces . Daily: Observe and record motor current draw (three phases) ; check packing; log and record volume ' delivered and pump motor hours; check motor oi 1 1 evel ; measure and record static or pumpi ng water 1 evel ; check motor noi se, temperatu re, vi brati on. Weekly: Check security. Semiannually: Change motor oil . As Needed: Pai nt structures and pipi ng; mai ntai n electrical and hydraulic controls. • Sto�age Facilities Weekly: Check security. � Annually: Check interior condition, vents, hatches, etc. on tanks. As Needed: Repaint interior and exterior as needed on tanks (estimated 10 to 15 year frequency). Dist ribution System Booster Pump Station - Same as Supply Sources P ressu re Reduci ng Stati ons Annually: Check all valves ; check screens, and pressure � settings ; rebuild, as necessary. 140 Pipelines Annually: Flush dead-end lines Val ves Annually: Operate full open/closed; uncover where buried; clean out valve boxes, etc. , repair as necessa ry. Hy d ra nt s Annually: Operate; check drain rate; lubricate as necessary; measure pressure; paint as necessary. Meters 5-10 Year Intervals: Time and measure volume of ineter delivered flow; dismantle, clean, and inspect all parts, replace worn or defective parts; retest meter for accuracy. Cont rol Equi pment Semiannually: Check calibration of transducers and primary sensing units ; adjust as necessary. As Needed : Replace light bulbs. Tools & Equipment Rolling Stock Daily: Check all fluid levels and brakes. As Needed: Replace fluids .and filters in accordance with manufacturer's recommendations (or more f requently dependi ng on type of use) 141 � Tools As Needed: Clean after each us�e; lubricate and maintain as necessa ry. STAFFIN6 - MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS The preventive mai ntenance procedures and normal as wel l as emergency ope�ati ons of the depa rtment a re desc ri bed i n the p revi ous secti o�s. The hours of labor and supervisory activity requi red to effectively carry out the work of these on-going maintenance and operations schedul es form the basi s for detenni ni ng adequate staffi ng 1 evel s. Current Staff . ' The current staff organization is illustrated in Figure 7. There are at present 18 employees, includi_ng supervisory personnel , technicians, mai ntenance workers and office staff, engaged i n operati ng and mai ntai ni ng the Water System. The tasks whi ch are performed by water department staff include inspection, testing, installation and repair of system faci 1 iti es and routi ne preventi ve mai ntenance. Recordkeepi ng, administrative tasks, general clerical work, and corrective or breakdown mai ntenance requi red i n response to routi ne emergenci es compl ete the work load of the Department staff. The hou rs of work requi red to adequately mai ntai n the Water System (excluding supervisory time, time associated with the work needed to accommodate expansion or growth, i .e. pipe laying, new service connections, etc., and time requi red for clerical tasks) are shown in the Table 6-1. For the p�eventive maintenance alone, the annual hours total 19,240 or 370 crew hours per week. This requires a minimum of . ni ne pl us c rew members worki ng ful 1 time, i .e. , 40 hou rs per week, excluding vacation, sick leave, and all other tasks not related to preventive maintenance. As indicated in Figure 7, there is presently a total of nine water department maintenance crew members employed by the City. If, in addition, due consideration is given to the hours involved in vacation, holiday, illness, meetings, training, on-the-job travel and startup time, then the total number of hours actually available for performi ng the work of operati on and mai ntenance dimi ni shes to a 1 evel of approximately 1,662 hours per year per crew member. At this rate, a staff of twelve full-time maintenance crew members is just adequate to accomplish minimal preventive maintenance with no time available for normal operations activities, emergencies, or new connections. Figure 7 indicates the current size of the maintenance crew: There are nine crew members presently employed. 142 DIRECTQR OF PUBLIC WORKS � CdOKUINATOtt I � � � ENGIN�ERINC � � MAINTENANCE � i}IVISZON DIYI,SION i � 4THER UTILITIES WATER OTHER � SECTIUNS � � SECTION � � MAiNTENANCE � � MAINTENANCE � � UTILITY ENGINEER � �ENGIKEERING SPECIALIST II� � '�ATER MAINT. SUPR.� I f � INSPECTOR ` � FOREMAN � � i ( CREW � I Figure 7 Organizational Flowchart i . 143 I �J These figures i ndicate that the Oepartment is not adequately staffed to regularly perform the basic tasks requi ;ed to provide even minimum recommended maintenance to the System. Any expansion of the System necessitating new service connections and/or additional facilities, without enlargement of the staff, will result in increased neglect of necessary maintenance. In view of predicted population growth in the service area over the next several decades and the concomitant growi ng demand for water suppl i ed by an i ncreasi ngly compl ex system, the unavoidable conclusion is an immediate and continuing need for additional staffing. There are many arguments to support the wi sdom of adequate staffi ng i n any workplace. One of the most persuasive arguments relevant to a compl ex Water System concerns the negl ect of preventi ve mai ntenance schedules which tends to accompany short-staffing. Routine, regular preventive maintenance tasks are often the first to be dropped from the schedule when the time available is inadequate to do the job properly. The resulti ng mi sfortune is usual ly i ncreased breakdown mai ntenance and excessive reliance on an expensive abundance of standby equipment requi red to ci rcumvent servi ce outages du ri ng emergency repai rs. The preventive maintenance tasks listed in Table 6-1 account for approximately fifty percent of the total number of hours requi red of the mai ntenance crew. The other tasks requi red of the crew for normal operati ons, du ri ng emergenci es, and du ri ng peri ods of system expansi on a re itemi zed i n Tabl e 6-2. Addi ti ons Necessa ry Regular performance of all necessary work in the depa�tment, with the current number of service connections, will require additions to the present mai ntenance crew. The expected i ncrease i n the number of service connections should serve as further impetus to develop a staff of an adequate size to effectively operate and efficiently maintain the System. The si ze of the mai ntenance c rew shoul d be i nc reased to twi ce its present size. The increase from 9 crew members to 18 personnel shoul d not be a matter for fu rther study. It shoul d be made as a provi si onal step i n an effort to reach the staffi ng 1 evel s requi red to adequately operate and maintain the System. Further additions to the staff wi 11 be requi red before there a re adequate c rew hou rs avai 1 abl e to carry the full work load of the Department without neglecting preventive maintenance, emergency preparedness, o� safety precautions. Maintenance and technical staff additions should be accompanied by additions to the clerical , secretarial and other support staff needed to assure that recordkeeping, billing, public relations, communications and other general functions of support staff are performed with the accuracy, timing and regularity required for the smooth functioning of the Depa rtment. 144 , TABLE 6-1 STAFFING TIME FOR PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MINIMUM QUANTITY FACILITY OR FREQUENCY OF IN SYSTEM TIME PER TIME REQUIRED EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE (N0. OF UNITS) UNIT PER YEAR HYDRANTS ANNUALLY 1,600 6 HRS. 9,600 HRS. LARGE VALVES (16" or Larger) ANNUALLY � 215 4 HRS. 860 HRS. DISTRIBUTION VALVES ANNUALLY 3,400 1 HR. 2,400 HRS. METERS EVERY 5-10 1Q,400 2 HRS. 2,000 HRS. YEARS MAINS ANNUALLY 160 MILES 2/3 HRS. 106 HRS. BOOSTER PUMP STATION * 9 120 HRS. 1,080 HRS. PRESSURE REDUCING STATION * 16 40 HRS. 640 HRS. WELLS/SPRINGS (ACTIVE) * 5 263 HRS. 1,315 HRS. RESERVOIRS * 6 120 HRS. 720 HRS. CONTROL • SYSTEM SEMI-ANNUALLY 1 400 HRS. 240 HRS. TOTAL 19,240 HRS. *DAILY, WEEKLY, OR AS NEEDED; VARIES WITH COMPONENT AND TASK. . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . � 145 TABLE 6-2 MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS TASKS* CREW HOURS ACTIVITY FREQUENCY PER ACTIVITY TOTAL TIME 1) Monitoring System 2 per Week per 1/3 Hour 728 Nrs/Yr Operation Station . 2) Checking on Facilities 100 per Year 1 Hour 100 Hrs/Yr (False Alarm Response) 3) Meter Reading 4 per Year per 1/6 Hour 6,933 Hrs/Yr 4) Groundskeepi ng 1 per Week per 1 Day 1,000 Hrs/Yr Facility (May to October) 5) Inventory (Shop) 4 per Year 48 Hours 192 Hrs/Yr 6) Repai r & Replacement 50 per Year 20 Hours 1,000 Hrs/Yr of Meters 7) Main Breaks 3 per Month 40 Hours 1,440 Hrs/Yr 8) System Failures 4 per Year 24 Hours 96 Nrs/Yr 9) New Service Connections 30 per Month 16 Hours 5,760 Hrs/Yr 10) New Main Connections 2 per Month 4 Hours 96 Hrs/Yr 11) Reservoi r Sanitary 40 per Month 1/3 Hrs 960 Hrs/Yr Checks (Water Qual ity) (per Reservoi r) TOTAL 18,305 Hrs/Yr * Excluding Preventive Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 • Trai ni ng Programs In-service training consisting of special courses and seminars specifically designed for particular requi rements of an employee group are widely avai 1 abl e. They a re offered through such organi zati ons as the AWWA, 1 ocal section; various other trade organizations; local colleges' and uni versi ti es ' heal th depa rtments ; Seattl e-Ki ng County; by some of the 1 a rger water utilities ; and by industrial training specialists. As the technological complexity of the System increases and as the service area expands, the need for trained, efficient, effective staff to keep pace with publ ic demand and advances i n technology wi 11 become imperati ve. New empl oyees need ori entati on and basi c i nformati on whi 1 e more experi enced expl oyees can profi t f rom conti nui ng t rai ni ng for update and revi ew. The importance of training opportunities and their impact is such that trai ni ng should be ti ed i n with the overal l personnel program. Of equal importance to the personnel program and to the goal of mai ntai ni ng an effective staff is a promotional plan. A definite promotional policy ' h n lo ee trainin ro ram is of rimar im ortance in closely linked wit a emp y g p g p y p developing improved competence and proficiency. An important point rega rdi ng t rai ni ng i s that mandato ry certi fi cati on i s requi red by the State. . ' Qual i ficati ons and t rai ni ng requi rements for obtai ni ng and mai ntai ni ng certi fi cati on a re sti pul ated by the State Depa rtment of Soci al and Heal th Secwices. RECORDS Provision of time for keeping and maintaining accurate records should be an i ntegral consi derati on i n determi ni ng the time to be al 1 otted to any departmental task . Adequate records are an essential tool in utility management and operation, providing the supporting data for operations assessment and long-term planning, while saving time and difficulty when trouble arises. The Water Department has need for several types of records: operational records (flow and level recordings), chlorination station records, main disinfection records, personnel records, customer contact records, meter I records, i nventory records, and mandatory water qual ity sampl i ng records. These and other appropriate documents should be legible, clear in fonnat, permanent, accurate and accessible. Their importance to the efficient functioning of the Department is a continuing issue which could be effecti vely addressed i n the context of the i n-servi ce staff t rai ni ng sessions. 147 CHAPTER 7 FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS This chapter considers the financial impact on the Water System of constructing the recommended improvements stated in Chapter 5 and phasing the additions of operating staff recommended in Chapter 6. In order to assess the financial impact, past operating revenues and expenses are documented and used as the basis for the future revenues and expenses projected here. The revenue needed for fi nanci ng the recommended improvements is then compared with future net revenues. Finally, a discussion is p rovided rega rding adjustments to existing rates and a comparison of these rates with those for adjacent systems. i, It is emphasized that this chapter is not intended to fulfill the requi rements of a rate study, but only to p resent an i 11 ust rati on of the impact of constructing the recommended improvements based on projected expenses (costs) . F rom the combination of revenue sou rces that p rovide sufficient funds to construct the recommended improvements, the respective adjustments to water rates, system develoment charges and other revenue sources will need to be established (as part of a rate study) . Actual improvement costs will depend upon the actual timing of � construction of the recommended improvements, the bidding conditions, rate of inflation, and numerous other factors. Therefore, the annual I budget devel opment process shoul d consi der the improvements needed i n the forthcomi ng year and establ i sh rate 1 evel s for each revenue sou rce so that the City Council and Mayor can then determine the financial acceptability of those rate levels. PAST FINANCIAL OPERATION � The financial records of the City's Waterworks (Water and Sewer) Utility for the yea rs 1977-1982 have been exami ned to eval uate the Water Utility's financial capability to continue operations and to support new construction as well as improved operation. Table 7-1 contains a 148 ' summary financial operating statement for the years referenced. As can be seen from Table 7-1, operating revenues and exp.enses have been increasing ,considerably during the past five years. This �is a result of i ncreased numbers of customers, record i nfl ati on rates, record i nterest rates, and other factors. A definition of the customer classes and expense items is included in the 1980 rate study and, therefore, is not repeated here. Further, a detailed evaluation of each revenue and expense category has not been provided here since that is normally accomplished in a rate study, which is not pa rt of the Scope of Work for this Comp rehensive Plan. Table 7-1 indicates that the net operating income available for debt servi ce reti rement had been decl i ni ng du ri ng the .yea rs 1978-81, and i n 1982 i ncreased due to a rate i ncrease early i n that year�. The net result is that although the Utility is earning more revenue, the net revenue available is not increasing at the same rate. An item of particular importance is that of maintaining sufficient funds for depreciation so that as System components wear out, enough has been placed in reserve to pay for the replacement. Tabl e 7-2 i 11 ust rates a rates compa ri son b�tween the Ci ty's water rates and adjacent systems ' rates. Thi s compa ri son has been made for residential 3/4-inch meters which are the primary source of revenue for the City' s System as well as adjacent utilities. The comparison i 11 ust rates that the Ci ty has the 1 owest rate of al 1 nei ghbori ng utilities, a fact indicative of the following points: 1. efficient operation, 2, a revenue basi s whereby exi sti ng customers a re not payi ng . f or improvements to accomodate growth, since the City has special fees and procedures for providing facilities for that pu rpose. 3. an inadequate staff level to carry out recommended and required maintenance of System facilities, 4, exhausti ve efforts to reduce the Water Uti 1 i ty budget, and 5, maximize efforts to obtai n grants and other fi nancial assi stance i n order to devel op new faci 1 i ti e�s and have sufficient capacity to meet System demand. Table 7-3 illustrates rates for other meter sizes, commodity rates, and outside City customer rates. ' 149 TABLE 7-1 I WATERWORKS UTILITY STATEMENT Of REVENUE AND EXPENSE 19JR 1979 1980 1981 1982 �PERATING REVENUE I�NMETERE� SALES $ 510.00 b 510.00 S 330.00 $ 195.94 E 240.00 METERED SALES 1,949,950.55 2,066,719.05 2,146,867.22 2,685,991.61 3,213,393.47 PUBLIC fIRE PROTECTION SERVICE 23,022.00 26,078.00 29,755.50 39,536.40 45�411.60 OTHER SALES TO PtIBLIC AUTHORITIES 69,790.83 74,146.10 75,249.81 89,714.56 116,661.12 SALES FOR RESALE 1,572.75 MISCELLANEOUS SERVICE REVENUE (311.02) (479.66) (750.81) (560.19) (237.12) RENTS FROM WATER PROPERTY 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,150.00 2,014.56 INSPECTION/APPROVAL FEES 25,53�.81 15,940.66 6,423.93 OTHER WATER REVENUES 919.86 350.32 304.66 741.12 824.34 TOTAL OPERATING REVENUE S'1,U44,882.2'1 E2,169,896.b6 E2,278,'18/.ly E 2,833,310.10 E3,384.737.90 OPERATING REVENUE DEDUCTIONS BEFORE DEPRECIATION OPERATING EXPENSES E 998,406.28 E1,088,825.48 E 1,284,719.22 f 1,484,483.01 E1,658,724.30 MAINTENANCE EXPENSES 413,019.85 436,075.84 544,194.21 607,989.11 693,547.81 TAXES 284,226.89 323,454.24 327,211.56 396,133.41 477,834,13 TOTAL OPERATING REVENUE DEDUCTIONS BEfORE DEPRECIATION E 1,695,653.oz El,aa8,355.56 5 z,156,1[4.yy E 2.488.605.53 E2,830,106.30 NET OPERATING REVENUE INCOME BEFORE DEPRECIATION S 349,229.20 S 321,541.00 E 122,162.20 E 344,704.57 554,�31.60 , LESS DEPRECIA7ION 284,705.52 300,760.56 353,898.00 3 418,207.08 b 4�8,387.76 NET OPERATING INCOME E 64.523.68 E 20,780.44 E (231,735.80) E (73,502.51) E 126,243.84 � ADD: NON �PERATING INCOME MERCHANUTSING, JO��1NG, AND CONTRACT WORK E 600.00 E 3,300.00 b 4,380.00 5 3,805.00 E 2,600.00 � INTEREST EARNINGS 775�129.52 918,771.05 E 920,985.27 939,465.02 239,354.40 AMORTIZATION OF DISCOUNTS ON INVESTMENTS PURCHASED 230.52 230.52 230.52 TOTAL NON OPERATING INCOME E 175,729.52 S 9ZZ,301.5/ E 925,595.79 E 943,5U0.54 E 241,954.40 TOTAL INCOME E 840,253.20 E 943,082.01 E 693,859.98 5 869,998.03 E 368,198,24 LESS: NON OPERATING EXPENSE INTEREST EXPENSE - REVENUE AND REFUNDING BONDS E 861,789.48 E 856,850.75 E 850,267.84 3 841,523.25 b 207�780.00 INTEREST EXPENSE - OTHER LONG TERM DEBT 4,240.46 3,430.28 2,620.10 1,809.92 1,000,00 , AMORTIZATION Of DERT DISCOUNT AND EXPENSE 17,842.69 17,841.12 11,841.12 17,841.12 17,841.12 AMORTIZATION OF DISCOUNTS ON INVESTMENTS PURCHASED (231.32) OTHER INTEREST EXPENSE • E 46.32 LOSSES FROM DISPOSITION OF UTILITY PROPERTY 2,381.93 AMORTIZATION OF PREMIUMS ON INVESTMENTS PURCHASED 3,076.76 3,075.60 3,075.60 3.075.60 TOTAL NON OPERATING EXPENSE S 886,718.07 E 881,197.75 E 873,850.98 E 866,631.82 b 226,621.12 NET INCOME BEFORE EXTRAORDINARY INCOME E 141,577.12 EXTRAORDINARY INCOME E 144,784.97 NET INCOME TO RETAINED EARNINGS E (46,464.87) E 61,884.26 E (179,990.99) 3 3,366.21 E 286,362.09 TABLE 7-2 WATER RAT� COMPARISON STUDY � F�gures Based an Single Family Residence (3J4" Water Meter} , Using 1,000 Cubic Feet Monthly NAM£ OF CITY BASE MIN. COST PER TOTAti OR DISTRICT RATE CIF 100 CJF PER 2,000 C1F Kent 1 ,95 --- 1.33 15.63 {2.5� tax) Water #14 7.75 --- .60 13.75 I Water #lp7 5.75 --- .65 12.25 Water #90 $.00 500 .55 10.75 Water #108 4.70 --- .53 1Q.Q0 Water #128 4.70 --- .45** 10.00 Water #63 8.00 600 .40* 9.60* � Tukwila 6.80 500 .50 9.30 � Bel l evue 6.26 500 .557 9.05 Water #58 6.00 600 ,75 9.00 Renton 2.55 --- .62 8.75 * cai 1 i ng i n A.M. to confi rn� these fi gures ** .45 after 1,200 c!�' used I � � I . 151 TABLE 7-3 MONTHLY WATER RATES � BASIC SERVICE CHARGE Meter Si ze Servi ce Cha rge 3�4�� $ 2. 55 1�� 3. 30 1-1/2" 5. 20 2�� 8. 55 3�� 17. 25 4" 29.85 6�� 64.50 g" 113.85 10" 176.85 12a 253.50 COMMODITY RATES 0-2,500 Cu. Ft. E .62 2,500-35,000 Cu. Ft. � :57 Over 35,000 Cu. Ft. .50 � ,•; THE RATES FOR METERED WATER SERVICE SUPPLIED TO PREMISES OUTSIDE THE CITY LIMITS SHALL BE AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO ONE AND FIVE-TENTHS (1.5) TIMES THE RATE FIXED FOR WATER SERVICE SUPPLIED TO USERS WITHIN THE CITY. . 152 TABL� 7-4 �ITY OF RENTON SCtIEDULE OF CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJLCTS r�OJECT 19BJ TO 198a 1985 1966 1987 i�88 1989 I990 1991 1992 1993 199I-199B 1999-2003 2001-2008 2009-SATIitATION �OJECT /: C�TY DEVELOPER f�tAe+T � 75,197 I 15,197 2 1,492 2 1,19Z } 161,136 3 80,568 80,568 � Z��g8�g00 � 2,098,800 5 <55,060 S 333,060 122,000 6 1,19a 6, 1,194 7 102,053 7 10T,053 8 jy5 }e� 8 395,390 q 179,oac� ' 9 179,M0 10 91,310 10 91,310 tl 225,590 I1 225,590 12 519,209 12 539,209 13 1,192 13 1,�92 14 1,476 t4 �,476 IS ' 390,307 15 97,576 292,731 16 176,143 16 176,�13 � 17 53,712 17 53,712 18 75,197 18 )5,197 19 19,396 19 19,3% 20 31,031 20 31,03� 21 124,111 21 12�,131 Zp 155,959 22 �53,959 2} 11,332 23 31,332 2� S7,S99 21 37�598 25 27,151 2S 27,131 26 �,176 , 26 1,476 27 7BO,S16 27 780,i16 z8 %,692 . 2B %,682 29 112,795 29 112,795 }0 2,951,160 30 2,951,160 3i 6I,733 31 61,753 }2 1d6 32 7/6 iS CO►�PLETED 33 }4 SB,188 3� SB,198 SS 2d5,220 33 173,220 72,000 36 171,878 36 171,878 37 123,336 37 123,538 1B %,682 38 %,682 �y 237,228 39 237,228 d0 221,114 ,0 22�,I11 �I 155,168 I1 155,168 d2 1,514,380 •2 1,108,380 ♦06,000 a} 268,560 �3 t96,S60 7p,000 4a a,a76 I1 /,476 45 223,800 ♦S 111,900 e6 165,242 16 182,621 47 209,177 17 209,�71 OB 455,060 18 155,060 49 46,550 •9 16,550 50 �6,550 SO �6,550 51 53,712 SI 53,712 5� 32,227 52 32,2T7 ....::.. ......... .......:. _..:'��_: :==::z.== _��:.:... .:....... .:....... ...:..... ......... a........ ........a ......... .s........ ..:.as... ..o....: ......... SUBlOTAI 083,3�3 6,714 455,060 179,uc0 t,030,i76 IB0,850 580,09i 0 0 678,660 5,763,693 1,931,2�5 1,134,816 1,861,403 SISTOTAL 10,071,366 3,2�7,786 672,000 - Sl$TOTAL: 14,288,677 SLBTOTAL 11,28B,67i 153 TABLE 7-4 • CITY �F REMTON SCNEDULE OF CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS ' PROJECT 1983 TO 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1991-1998 1999-200i 2004-2008 2009-SATUHATION PROJECT�/ CiTY DEVELOPER GRANT AIRPORT OTHER SIbTOTAL 4Bi,34i 6,714 455,060 179,040 1,Oi0,i76 190,830 580,093 0 0 678,860 5,763,893 1,931,245 1,131,816 1,864,40i S16TOTAL 10,074,i66 3,247,786 672,000 0 294,521 53 108,i19 53 IOB,319 � 112,795 51 112,795 , 55 21,580 55 22,i80 56 22,380 56 22,i80 57 214,848 57 214,848 58 22,380 58 22,i80 59 � 783,300 783,300 59 1,566,600 60 2,126,100 60 1,556,100 570,000 61 57,700 61 57,700 62 22,580 62 22,380 - 63 COMPlETEO 63 bq 257,818 . 64 257,818 65 992,180 992,180 65 1,984,360 66 266,570 66 I94,570 72,000 67 118,166 67 118,166 68 191,57i � 68 191,573 69 182,621 69 182,621 ' 70 317,540 70 215,540 98,000 71 3�4,652 71 252,252 9T,400 72 150,000 128,909 72 128,909 150000 73 134,780 73 134,780 )4 I07,424 74 107,420 79 580,985 75 580,985 76 517,280 76 369,280 148,000 77 ' 118,166 77 118,166 78 31,034 78 31,03A 79 204,106 79 2W,106 80 93,101 BO 9i,101 81 193,363 81 96,682 96,681 82 14,920 82 14,920 B3 752,863 83 752,86i � 72 �� 79,39/ 84 110,071 40,320 85 2,088,800 85 1,528,800 560,000 86 , 268,560 86 196,56D 72,000 B7 365,5A0 87 267,540 98,000 88 , 75,197 B8 75,197 89 10,712 89 10,7/2 90 182,621 90 182,621 91 257,818 91 257,818 92 40,000 56,682 92 96,682 93 COMPLETED 9i 94 11,638 94 11,638 95 98,172 95 98,472 � 7,460 96 7,460 97 COMPLE7E0 97 98 COMPLETED 98 99 42,970 99 42,970 I� 2,951,160 100 2,954,I60 10� t39,651 101 139,651 102 COMPLETED 102 ....:.... :.......� :.:...__. ..:.....: ......... :.::..... ..:...... ......... ::....... ::.::...: ._....... .::...... .::..:::. .......:.. .:........ _......... �:........ .::...::.. ::........ SIBTOTAL 1,984,929 523,994 1,727,438 1,171,220 I,Oi0,376 1,008,890 771,666 783,300 783,300 861,181 6,085,853 1,654,113 1,676,1�1 8,9i8,�87 SIbTOTAL 20,071,610 8,927,830 2,422,720 281,780 294,521 SIbTOTAL 32,001,491 SIbTOTAL 32,001,�91 . 1 SS � TABLE 7-4 CITY OF RENTON SCNEDULE OF CAF'ITAL I�IPROVEMENT PROJECTS PROJECT t 1983 10 �984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 199�-1998 1999-200i 2004-2008 2009-SAT PROJECT /: CITY DEVELOPER GRANT AIRPORT O7FIER SUBTOTAL 1,98�,929 523,994 t,727,438 1,171,220 1,030,376 1,008,890 771,666 763,300 783,300 861,481 6,085,953 1,654,413 1,676,114 B,93B,487 SIbTOTAL 20,071,640 8,927,830 2,<22,720 284,780 294,521 I03 COMPLETED 103 104 11,936 104 11,9i6 105 231,000 95,000 60,000 150,000 75,000 185,000 80,000 IS0,000 1i0,000 105 933,185 222,515 106 186,500 106 186,500 107 134,280 107 134,280 108 i73,000 tOB 373,000 I09 38,792 109 38,792 I10 25,364 110 25,364 I11 16,412 111 16,412 I12 i,282 112 3,282 113 5,371 11i 5,371 114 46,252 114 �6,252 115 i,li3 ' 115 3,13i 116 82,060 116 82,060 117 111,900 111,900 117 111,900 111,900 118 1,566,600 118 1,116,600 420,000 119 273,900 119 273,900 120 45,000 100,000 120 145,000 121 45,000 121 I5,000 I22 112,000 122 56,000 �,�0 .::..:... �...�:.s� :::...a.. ......... ........: ......... ......... ......... .._...... ......... ......... ..:...... ............_..... .......... .......... ....:.��:. ...:�:.... .:._...... 'fOTAL 2,567,427 I,t86,998 1,787,438 I,367,172 1,299,536 1,i3t,154 868,078 9i3,300 91i,300 861,481 6,085,85i �,651,1�3 1,714,906 10,878,987 T0T11L 23,436,007 9,201,730 3,065,235 284,780 462,421 TOML PROJECT COSTS: 36,150,173 TOTAL PROJECT CO5T5: 36,I50,17i CONTRIBUTION OF FUND$ fOTAI CITY 1,852,217 1,038,998 I,391,540 1,i27,257 t,024,610 917,208 655,055 893,085 878,�50 749,58� 3,271,518 2,207,507 116,108 4,779,843 2S,Ii6,007 DEVEIOPER 40,000 0 257,818 0 0 252,4�6 19I,573 0 0 0 811,335 1,876,936 1,268,798 4,502,824 9,201,750 GRANT i34,400 148,000 138,080 40,215 92,105 49,600 21,450 40,214 i4,850 0 0 570,000 0 1,596,320 5,065,235 AIRPORT 284,780 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T84,780 OIHER 56,000 0 0 0 162,621 111,900 0 0 0 111,900 0 0 0 0 162,421 a.....:..s ..�....�n .....a�a= :........ :.......� .._:._... .:....... .:....... ......... ......... .......... .......... ..s.:.:... .::.:...e .....:_... TpTAL: 2,567,427 1,186,998 1,787,438 1,367,072 1,299,336 1,331,154 868,079 9ii,S00 913,i00 861,/81 6,085,853 1,6S4,IIi t,714,906 10,878,987 36,IS0,17i li5 TABLE 7-5 PROJECTED FINANCIAL OPERATION (In Thousands of Dollars) . 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 Water Use (100 Cu Ft) 2580000 2634696 2690552 2747591 2805840 Sewer CE's 17352 11699 18053 18414 19782 REVENUES Water Revenues 1736 1986 2291 2709 3205 Sewer Revenues 538 615 708 837 989 Metro Revenues 1223 1474 2004 2729 3118 Rate Inc rease 273 338 474 562 531 Interest-Revenue Fund 75 69 15 16 19 Interest-Bond Reserve 25 39 47. 60 76 Misc Service Fees 96 101 108 116 126 West Hill Fees 0 20 20 20 20 *** Total Revenues 3966 � 4641 5667 7049 8144 OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE EXPENSES Water 1511 1604 1734 1893 2066 Sewer 563 598 646 705 769 Met ro 1223 1474 2004 2729 3178 *** Total 0/M 3297 3676 4385 5327 6013 AVAILABLE FOR DEBT 669 965 12$2 1722 2130 DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENT Existing 338 518 713 950 1275 New 62 195 237 325 315 Reserve 20 74 123 188 251 Debt Service Coverage Ratio 1.67 1.35 1.35 1.35 1.34 CURRENT YEAR BALANCE 249 179 209 259 289 AVAILABLE FOR CAPITAL Prior Year Balance 857 1431 227 255 312 Cu rrent Yea r Balance 249 179 209 259 289 Const. Fund Interest 50 69 84 114 111 System Devel op Fees 0 0 0 0 0 Latecomer Fees 25 50 55 61 67 Fund Transfers In 54 0 0 0 0 Bond Proceeds 1448 1523 1856 2544 2469 *** Total for Capital 2683 3251 2430 3233 3247 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 1252 3024 2175 2921 2942 PERCENT INCREASE 9� 13% 16% 16� 13� 156 PROJECTED FINANCIAL OPERATION � Recommended capital improvements have been shown in Chapter 5 of this Report. Table 7-4 documents an implem�entation schedule for each project recommended; in addition, the anticipated sources of funding are also shown. It is noted that these costs are all cu rrent cost estimates, and are for complete projects in place. Therefore, price inflation should be considered when computing the anticipated impact on rates. We . recommend using 8.5% per year compounded for price inflation. Table 7-4 identifies the respective responsibilities for funding each recor�nended improvement. It is anticipated that developers will bear a significant amount of cost responsibility. Water rates to existing customers as well as System development charge increases and other revenue source increases need to be evaluated in detail in order to determi ne the combi nati on of i ncreases whi ch wi 11 generate the funds needed. Identification of each p roject's capacity to accommodate g rowth followed with multiplication of the respective p ropo.rtion attributable to the existing and futu re customer times the estimated project cost can serve as the basi s for determi ni ng the respecti ve i nc reases i n water rates and System development cha rges. As an example, cost responsbility can then be divided by the anticipated amount of development area to obtain a cost per square foot for new development. Table 7-5 illust rates the amount of revenue increase on a percentage basis for the next five years based on the assumption that the capital improvement program i s impl emented usi ng the schedul e shown i n Tabl e 7-4. The following assumptions a re made in order to determine these percentage i ncreases: o Water use and sewer customer equivalents will increase at the rate of 2% per year for the next five years. o Increases in operation and maintenance costs will occur at the rate of approximately 8� per year. o I nvestment i nterest rate ea rned as wel l as the i nterest , rate on futu re bond issues will both be approximately 9X. o Met ro wi 11 i ncrease rates as pl anned, f rom a cu rrent 1 evel of $5.85 to $14.25 per 100 cubic feet in 1988. o Latecomer fees wil l hold relatively stabl e i n the range of $50,000-$70,000 per year. o Reserves and coverage are generated for future bond issues on a pa rity basis with existing issues. The increase in revenue shown in Table 7-5 illust rates the revenue that must be generated from existing rates and System's development charges, as the two primary sources of revenue. The percent increases in revenue shown may i ni ti al l y appea r rel ati vel y hi gh, but the Ci ty cu rrently has 157 the lowest rates of an of the 12 ad'acent water s stems. If the Cit I Y J Y Y already had relatively high rates, the percent increase would be less in order to generate the same amount of additional revenue. The cu rrent level of funding for replacements is approximately $300,000 per yea r; thi s appea t�s to be i nadequate. P resently, i t i s esti mated that the replacement value of the City's Water System, including all facilities, approaches $45-$50 million. Using this approach, the replacement funds generated each yea r should approximate $1 million. However, this is an average and does not reflect necessarily what is required fo� replacements each of the next five years. A detailed economic evaluation of the specific a reas of the System that have been shown on Figure 5 as needing replacement should be conducted to determi ne the annual cost for the next fi ve yea rs. In this chapter, the historical revenue and expenses for the Utility have been shown, together with the level of existing rates and the compa ri son of those rates with those of other adjacent uti 1 i ti es. The Utility is meeting all debt service obligations as• well as coverage requirements. The expenditu res for capital improvements have been identified, and the additional revenue required to construct these capital improvements has been documented. 158 , __ -- � I . �I I I . i I . I I I .� � � � � � � � P � � _____---- __ , - ____- , __ - � __- __ _ �_--_ ___---__ i i , ; 1 � j APPENDIX A 1 PRQJECT BIBLlQGRAPHY � CITY OF RENTON COMPREHENSIVE WATER SYSTEM PLAN BIBLIOGRAPHY ERADCO PLANNED UNITE DEyELOPMENT, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, January, 1981, City of Renton - R.W. Thorpe and Associates PORT QUENDALL PRELIMINARY PLAN, Final Environmental Impact Statement, City of Renton, February, 1982, CH2M Hill BLACK RIVER OFFICE PARK, Final Environmental Impact Statement, City of Renton, R.W. Thorpe and Associates, April , 1982 . , PORT QUENDALL PRELIMINARY PLAN, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, City I of Renton, CH2M Hill , September, 1981 ', • HIGHLAND VILLAGE, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, City of Renton, I March, 1982, Triad Associates, Inc. HIGHLANO VILLAGE, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, City of Renton, June, 1982, Triad Associates, Inc. ADVANCE PLANNING STUDY REPORT REZONE, Valley Parkway SW, SW 27th Street, City of Renton, URS, June, 1981 � ADVANCE PLANNING STUDY REPORT, Valley Parkway SW, SW 27th St, City of Renton, URS, January, 1982 LAKE TERRACE MULTI-FAMILY REZONE, Expanded Environmental Checklist, City of Renton, R.W. Thorpe & Associates, November, 1982 EARLINGTON PARif - Draft Environmental Impact Statement, City of Renton, R.W. Thor e & Associates, Jul , 1980 P Y MODEL PURVEYOR CONTRACT BETWEEN CITY OF SEATTLE AND WHOLESALE WATER CUSTOMERS FOR THE SUPPLY OF WATER, Kenneth Lowthian, July 1, 1980 A REPORT ON AN ENGINEERING INVESTIGATION OF THE MUNICIPAL WATER SYSTEM, City of Renton, Cornell , Howland, Hayes & Merryfield, October, 1965 AN ENGINEERING REPORT ON A WATER COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR KING COUNTY WATER OISTRICT N0. 90, Hill , Ingman, Chase, and Company, March, 1971 ENGINEERING REPORT COMPREHENSIVE PLAN IMPROVEMENTS AND BETTERMENTS,� REVISION N0. 2, WATER DISTRICT N0. 108, KING COUNTY, Hugh F. Goldsmith & � Associates, Inc., December, 1974 A-1 1982 WATER SYSTEM COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, KING COUNTY WATE� DISTRICT N0. 108, Richard C.T. Li , Inc., September, 1982 WATER SYSTEM PLAN FOR THE CITY OF KENT, URS Company, October, 1979 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN AMENDMENT, City of Kent, June, 1982 A-2 . APPENDIX B S.E.P.A. CHECKLIST . � - ENVIROI�IENTAL CHECKLIST I. BACK�tOUND 1. Name of Proponent City of Renton, Washi ngton 2. Add ress and Phone Nuinber of P roponent: City of Renton Publ i c Works Depa rtmer�t . 200 Mill Avenue South Renton, Washington 98055 (206) 235-2631 3. Date Checklist Sub�itted 4. Agency Requiring Checklist City of Renton, Washington 5. Name of Proposal, if applicable: Comprehensive Water System Plan for the City of Renton 6. Natu re and B ri ef Desc ri pti on of the P roposal (i ncl udi ng but not li�ited to its size, general design elenents and other factors that Mill give an accurate understanding of its scope and natu re): The proposal is a Comprehensive Water Plan for the municipal water system of the City of Renton, as required by the State of Washingt on in RCW 57.16, WAC 248-54-580 and by KCC 13.24. The Plan supersedes the previous plan completed in 1965 and describes improvements to and/or additions to nearly every ma j o r el ement of the System f rom sou rce to si nk, i ncl udi ng wells, booster pumps, pressu re reducing valves, t ransmission mai ns, di st ri buti on g ri d, and tel emet ry-supervi sory cont rol system. The major el ements of the Comprehensi ve P1 an are required for upgrading the existing System so that it can adequately serve the present service area population and continue to provide adequate service as the number of service connections increases. The major elements are listed below: o Distribution Grid - 55,000 L.F. (10 miles) B-1 o Transmission Mains - 179,600 L.F. (34 miles) o Pressu re reducing valves at 11 locations o Reservoi rs at 8 1 ocati ons (Kennydal e, HTghl ands, Mapl e Valley, Rolling Hills #1, Rolling Hills #2, South Talbot Hill , West Hill , Black River) o Booster Pumps at 6 locations (Kennydale, Maple Valley, Rolling Hills, Sunset Bouleva M, West Hill , Black River) o Wells at 3 locations (May Creek, Cedar River Park (#9), ' Maple Valley #10) o Tel emet ry and Supervi sory Control System - Compl ete system. Designed to link existing and planned facilities to cent ral control point with provision for incorporating future expansion. 7. Locati on of Proposal (descri be the physi cal setti ng of the proposal, as Mell as the exterrt of the land area affected by any environaental impacts, including any other information needed to give an accurate understanding of the emiron�errtal setting of the proposal): Major facilities proposed in the Plan will be located within the service area of the Water System which coincides approximately with the city limits of Renton at the southern te rniinus of Lake Washington and includes some of the lake shore as part of its northern boundary. The service area covers roughly 60 squa re miles, spans three river valleys, is commercial-industrial and urban-residential in character and is crisscrossed by major transportation and utility corridors. The Renton city center is at the hub of the service area. The downtown sector is bisected by the Cedar River which flows into Lake Washi ngton. The peri pheral sectors i ncl ude fou r hi 11 s (400-500 ft. elevations) and exhibit widely divergent land use. 8. Estimated Date for Canpletion of the Proposal : Projects described in the proposal are scheduled for completion at appropriate irrtervals throughout the 20-year period addressed by the Comprehensive Plan. 9. List of all Pen�its, Licenses, or 6overnnent Approval Requi red for the Proposal (federal, state, and local including rezones): Comp rehensive Water Plan approval by King County Depa rtments: Public Wo rks, Planning, Health, and by the King County Council s-2 Speci fi c p roj ects app roval by Ki ng Cou nty, Ci ty of Seattl e, City of Renton: construction and right-of-way permits. King � County Substantial Development Permit (Shoreline Management). State of Washington approval by : Departments of Ecology, Fisheries, Game, Social and Health Services, and Natural Resou rces. 10. Do you have plans for future additions, expansion, or further , activity related to or connected Mith this proposal? If yes, explain: Yes. The additions and expansion will be carried out over a ' period of 20 years and amendments or modifications to the proposal may be requested as needed to provide for the demand of the service area population 11. Do you know of any plans by others which may affect the property covered by your proposal? If yes, explain: Yes. The pl ans of the Ki ng County Water Di st ricts adjacent to � o r nea rby the Ci ty of Renton, i .e. Nos. 14, 58, 63, 90, 107, 108, 125, and 126 as well as those of the City of Tukwila and the City of Kent have all been considered in the development of this proposal as have the City of Renton's Comprehensive Land Use Plans, several related King County Community Plans, the Southeast Renton Comp rehensive Plan, the Cent ral Renton Comprehensive Land Use Plan, the Northeast Renton Comprehensive Land Use Plan, and the Green River Valley Comp rehensive Plan. 12. Attach an�r other appl ication for�n that has been compl eted rega Mi ng the proposal ; i f none has been compl eted, but i s expected to be fi 1 ed at sane futu re date, descri be the natu re of such application form: Shoreline Management Permit II. ENVIROMIENTAL IMPACTS (Explanations of all "yes' and "maybe" ansNers are required) Yes Maybe No � 1. Ea rth Nill the proposal result in: a. Unstable earth conditions or in changes in geologic substructu res? X B-3 b. Disruptions, displacenents, com- paction or overcovering of the soil? X . c. Change i n topogrephy or ground su rface rel i ef f eatu res? X - d. The destrvction, covering or niodi- fication of any unique geologic or physi cal featu res? X e. Any i ncrease i n Mi nd or water ero- si on of soi 1 s, either on or off the site? X � f. Changes in deposition or erosion of beach sands, or changes i n si 1 tati on, deposition or erosion r+hich inay nwdify the channel of a river or strear■ or the bed of the ocean or any bay, i nl et . or lake? X Explanation: lb. Di s rupti on or di spl acement of soi 1 wi 11 occu r du ri ng construction and installation of water mains and during the construction of reservoi rs, wells, pump stations. The extent of i mpact wi 11 be 1 i mi ted to the a rea of the t renches i n the case of water mains and transmission lines. Impact resulting f rom reservoi r, pump stati on, and wel l const ructi on wi 11 be confined to the imnediate construction site. Following i nstal l ati on of water mai ns/t ransmi ssi on 1 i nes, t renches wi 11 be backfi 11 ed and the su rface compacted, repaved, regraded, or revegetated (as appropriate) using approved construction practices. lc. Changes i n topography or ground su rface rel i ef features may occur in the few locations where cuts are required along t ra nsmi ssi on 1 i ne routes. Cuts wi 11 not be made, i f they can be. avoi ded, and al l cut su rfaces wi 11 be backfi 11 ed and re-graded. Natural flora will be restored through appropriate revegetation. le. Ouring the construction process, some increase in water erosion of soils on or near the sites is possible. All accepted p recauti ona ry const ructi on techni ques avai 1 abl e wi 11 be used to contai n any i ncidences of erosion. lf. Construction of the Cedar River crossings may result in a temporary, very short-term, increase in siltation as may result from other improvements located in the vicinity of water cou rses. Such const ructi on wi 11 be accompl i shed i n accordance B-4 with State De a rtment of Fi sheri es re ui rements to assu re that I p q stream and fishery resources are protected. Steps will be taken to minimize the extent and severity of any resulting adverse effects to flora, fauna, and natural channels. The lines will be securely bedded, well beneath channel bottom. No long-term adverse effects are anticipated. 2. Air YES MAYBE N 0 Mi 11 the p roposal resul t i n: II� a. Ai r e�issions or deterioretion of asbi er�t ai r qual ity? X b. The creation of objectionable odors? X c. A1 tereti on of ai r a�ovesent, i■oi stu re • or teinperature, or any change in climate either locally or regionally? X Explanation: 2a. During construction the air in areas near the construction sites may be subject to increased concentrations of particulates : airborne dust and exhaust from fossil fuel combustion. It is anticipated that this would be a very short tenn impact over very limited areas. 2b. Some objectionable odors may be present during the period of construction. These odors would consist primarily of exhaust f rom gasol i ne and di esel powered equi pment and woul d be expected to dissipate quickly. 3. Hater Yes Maybe No Will the proposal result in: a. Changes in cu�rerrts, or the source or di recti on of Nater naveaents, i n ei ther uia ri ne or f resh rraters? X b. Changes i n absorpti on rates, drai nage patterns or the rete and aa�ount of surface water rvnoff? X c. Alteretions to the course or flar of fl ood waters. X B-5 i� d. Change in the amourrt of surface water I i n any water body? X e. Discharge irrtQ surface waters, or in any alteration of surface rrater quality, in- cluding but not lin�ited to temperature, dissolved oxygen or turbidity? X f. Alteration of the di rection or rate of flovr of ground Naters? X g. Change i n the quaritity of ground waters, eithe� through di rect additions or Mith- draMals, or through inter�ception of an aquifer by cuts or excavations? X h. Deterioration in ground Mater quality, ei ther th rough di rect i nj ecti on or th rough . the seepage of leachate, phosphates, detergerrts, Materborne vi rus or bacteria, or other substances i nto the ground waters? X i. Reducti on i n the amount of rate� other- Mise available for public rrater supplies? X Explanation: 3a. At the c rossi ng of the Ceda r Ri ver, a temporary change i n the course or direction of the water movement may be a result of const ructi on acti vi ty. The pi pel i ne wi 11 be wel l secu red at the River bottom and any disruption of flow will be short-term. The River's banks will be restored to the preconstruction state and no long-term effects are anticipated. 3b. Some of the present supply to the System is drawn from the Cedar River. The Plan. recommends development of alternative sources and eventual cessation of any and all reliance on this sou rce. Thi s coul d have some effect on fl ow rates for the Cedar Ri ver. The alternati ve sou rces to be devel oped a re wells. These wells draw from local aquifers. It is not known what relationships exist between the Cedar River flow and the aquifer levels. Any impact the well development might have on � the river flows in the area would be strictly regulated by pre-existing water rights entitlement. 3e. During construction, temporary increases in turbidity are possi bl e i n shal l ow su rface waters and i n st reams and ri vers adjacent to construction sites. This is a potential result of B-6 ea rth movi ng and use of heavy equi pment requi red for trench p repa rati on and foundati on const ructi on. The potenti al for turbidity changes will be minimized through accepted const ructi on p racti ces over the short-term const ructi on peri od. No long-term impact is anticipated. � 3f. See 3d. 3g. The quantity of ground waters may be affected by di rect withdrawals via an artesian spring and through the wells in the System. Thi s withdrawal i s cu rrently occu rri ng, as thi s i s the source of supply for the System. However, as the System expands to accommodate a growning demand, the rate of withdrawal will increase. 3h. A temporary, minor deterioration in ground water quality may be a result of exploratory drilling for a well site. Any change ' in quality would be localized at the drilling site and would be short-term i n impact. . , 3i . The proposal is a Comprehensive Water System Plan for an area with an expanding population. It includes recommendations for development of additional sources of supply and improvements a nd ext ensi ons to the di st ri buti on system. The rate of withdrawal from local/regional aquifers which would otherwise be avai 1 abl e for publ i c water suppl i es wi 11 be affected as wat e r i s made avai 1 abl e to that segment of the publ i c whi ch i s served by the System. 4. F1 or•a Yes Maybe No Will the proposal result in: a. Change in the diversity of species, or nwabers of any speci es of fl ora (i ncl ud- ing trees, shrubs, grass, crops, micro- flora and aquatic plarrts)? X b. Reduction of the nuaibers of any unique, rere or endangered species of flore? X c. I rrt roducti on of new speci es of fl ora into an area, or in a barrier to the noneal repl eni shme�rt of exi sti ng speci es? X d. Reduction in acreage of any agriculture c rop? X Explanation: s-� 4a. Construction of pipelines and sitework for reservoi rs and pump stations may result in minor localized changes in the diversity of species of flora due to the clearing of trees and shrubs and to the performance of other construction and maintenance activities along the routes of transmission pipelines and at sites selected for new facilities. All changes in diversity a re expected to be temporary ; with the exception of possible disturbances to the natural environment caused by ongoing mai ntenance and repai r activities. Disturbances are expected to be minimal . Re-vegetation with natu ral flora will follow const ructi on. 5. Fauna Yes Maybe No Will the p roposal result in: a. Changes in the diversity of species, or nua�bers of any species of fauna (bi rds, land aniwals including reptiles, fish . and shellfish, be�rthic or�ganisais, insects or microfauna)? X b. Reducton of nun�bers of any unique, rare or endangered species or fauna? X c. I nt roducti on of ne�+ speci es of fl ora i nto an area, or i n a ba�ri er to the normal replenishment of existing speci es? X d. Deterioration to existing fish or rildlife habitat? X Explanation: 5a. Mi nor, 1 ocal i zed changes i n the di versity of speci es of fauna may result due to the clearing of shrubs and trees along corridors selected for proposed pipelines and at sites of . proposed facilities and due to other construction and maintenance activities. All changes in diversity a re expected to be tempora ry; with the exception of possible disturbances to the natural envi ronment caused by ongoi ng mai ntenance and repair activities which disturbances are expected to be mi nimal . Post-const ructi on re-vegetati on usi ng natu ral fl ora is anticipated to minimize any long-term change in diversity of speci es of fauna. 6. Noise Yes Maybe No Will the proposal increase existing noise levels: X B-s Explanation: 6. It is anticipated that noise levels will increase during - periods of construction activity. This increase will be tempora ry i n natu re. 7. Light and Gla re Yes Maybe No Nill the proposal produce nerr light or glare? X Explanation: 8. Land use Yes Maybe No Will the proposal result in the alteration . of the preserd or planned land use of a n a rea? X Explanation: 9. Natural Resoures Yes Maybe No Nill the proposal result in: a. Increase in the rate of use of any natu rel resou rces? X b. Depl e�tion of any non-renewabl e I natu ral resou rce? X Explanation: 9a. Construction of facilities proposed will result in the consumpti on of mi nor amounts of natu ral resou rces such as pet rol eum p roducts requi red to power equi pment used i n const ruction. Thus, the rate of use of the products wi 11 be temporari ly el evated. 9b. Increased rates of withdrawal from aquifers will be a result of this proposal . This increase in the rate of use of a natural resource will be mitigated through controls provided by the assignment of water rights which limit withdrawal rates. 10. Risk of Upset Yes Maybe No B-9 ' Does the proposal i nvol ve a ri sk of an expl osi on or the rel ease of haza Mous substances (including, but not limited to, oi 1, pesti ci des, cheni cal s or radi ati on) . in the event of an acciderrt or upset conditions? X Explanation: 11. Population Yes Maybe No Mill the proposal alter the location, distri- X bution, de�ity, or gror+th rate of the • hua�an population of an area? Explanation: . 12. Housing Yes Maybe No Will the proposal affect existirg housing or X create a dewand for additional housing? Explanation: 13. Transportatioo/Ci rculation Yes Maybe No Nill the proposal result in: � a. 6eneretion of additional vehicular aavemerrt? X b. Effects on existing parking faci- 1 iti es, or denand for neM parfci ng? X c. I�pact upon exi sti ng t ransportati on syste�ns? X d. Alterations to preseirt patterns or ci rculation or move�ent of people and/or goods? X e. Alterations to Naterborne, reil or ai r traffic? X • B-l0 f. Increase in traffic hazards to motor vehicles, bicyclists or pedest ri a ns?. X Explanation: 13a and b. The proposed additions to the maintenance and operations staff will be accompanied by additional vehicular movement and demand for parki ng requi red for performance of mai ntenance duties. New facilities (wells, reservoirs, pump stations) will include provision for parking. Construction will generate temporary increases in vehicular movement and parking demand. 13c. Temporary traffic alterations or disruptions may occur during construction of the proposed improvements. Any impact on transportation or circulation will be minimized through the use of detou rs, rest ri cted const ructi on acti.vi ty du ri ng peak commuter periods or location of facilities away from transportation corridors. �i 13e. Waterborne, rail or ai r traffic could be temporarily i nconveni enced by const ructi on acti vity. Schedul i ng of any construction activitiy with potential for disruption of traffic wi 11 be a rranged such that di s rupti on i s avoi ded o r, at 1 east, minimized. 13f. Temporary minimal increases in hazards for pedestrian traffic , may occur in the immediate vicinity of construction. � 8arricades and signs will be employed to reduce the potential for hann through accident. 14. Public Services Yes Maybe No Will the proposal have an affect upon, or in a need for new or altered goverrmental senri ces i n am► of the fol l orri ng a reas: , i a. Fi re protection? X b. Police protection? X � c. Schools? X d. Parks or other recreational facilities? X e. Maintenance of ublic facilities, P i ncl udi ng roads? X B-11 I f. Other governmental services? X Explanation: 14a. The proposal is a plan for water system improvements including improved fire flow and hydrant maintenance. As such, it will have the effect of improving fi re protection. 14d. The p roposal is expected to imp rove the supply and dist ribution of water within the City of Renton. Increased availability of water could result in imp�oved recreational opportunities through improved swimmi ng pool mai ntenance, parks and landscaping, etc. 14e. The � proposed improvements to the water distribution and . t ransmi ssi on systems wi 11 requi re excavati on and resu rfaci ng of some roadways. This activity will be coordinated with the City's regular, ongoing maintenance schedul.e for streets and roads. 15. Ener�g,y Yes Maybe No Ni 11 the p roposal resul t i n: a. Use of substairtial aa�ourrts of fuel or ene�y? X b. Desand upon existing sources of � energy, or c�equi re the devel opment of ne++ sou rres of energ�r? X Explanation: 16. Utilities Yes Maybe No Nill the proposal result in a need for new syste�s, or alterations to the folloning utilities: a. Power or natural gas? X b. Co�munications syste■s? X c. Water? X d. Sewer or septic tanks? X e. Stos� water d�ai nage? X ' B-12 I � f. Solid Maste and disposal? X Explanation: 16c. The water utility of the City of Renton will be altered as a result of this proposal which includes additions and improvements to nearly every component of the System. 17. Human Health Yes Maybe No Will the proposal result in the creation of any health hazard or poterrtial health hazard (excluding merrtal health)? X Explanation: � 18. Aesthetics Yes Maybe No Will the proposal result in the obstrvction of amr sceni c vi sta or vi er+ open to the publ i c or ri 11 the p roposal resul t i n the creation of an aesthetically offensive site open to publ i c vi er+? X Explanation: 18. All p roposed facilities will be designed to be aesthetically pl easi ng and wi 11 be pai nted to bl end i nto the su rroundi ng environment. Supplemental screening will be provided to minimize the visual impact which any new facility might have on the surrounding area. Any clearing of vegetation will be followed by re-planting of natu ral vegetation. 19. Rec reation . Yes Maybe No Mill the p roposal result in an impact upon the qual i ty or quar�ti ty of exi sti ng recreational opportunities? X B-13 Explanation: 19. The proposal is expected to improve the supply and distribution of water within the City of Renton. Increased availability of water could result in improved recreational oppo rtunities through improved swimming pool maintenance, parks and landscaping, etc. 20. Archeological/Historical Yes Maybe No Hi 11 the proposal resul t i n an al tereti on of a significant archeological or historical site, strvcture, object or beilding? X Explanation: III. SI6NATURE I, the undersi gned, state that to the best of my knowl edge the above information is true and complete. It is understood that the 1 ead agency may wi thd raw any decl a�ati on of non-si gni fi cance that it might issue in reliance upon this checklist should there be any willful misrepresentation or willful lack of full disclosu re on my pa rt. Proponent: CITY UF RENTON B-14 PROPOSED DECLARATION OF NON-SIGNIFICANCE Description of proposal : Comprehensive Water Plan per RCW 57.16, WAc 248-54-580 and KCC 13.24 Proponent: City of Renton ' Location of P roposal : City of Renton Lead Agency: City of Renton This proposal has been determined to not have a significant adverse ' impact upon the environment. An EIS is not required under RCW 43.21C.030 (2) (c). This decision was made after review bythe lead agency of a compl eted envi ronmental checkl i st and other i nformati on on file with the lead agency. Responsible Official : Position/Title: Date: i S natu re: 9 B-15 �-� , , -� .. 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I !:��?,,, t „_ �~1 �°� �,� C � a � -.. —---�` --.. ._ .. ,. � � ..,f� - . , w�.�t.�� ra'tZ1� —'— 4'7194'76 — • . �p o�nwtcs �to. �°�� � • � . . __�. . . . • - , , _. -�_ .... : .. . .._.� �.:, � /►11 9RDIHAI`C� OF TH� czs�r oF �:sxrog� tr4as�xaTo�r, . D88IaYA�i'ZNG A RFs9TltICTED AAEA ADJAC811T TO I?3 � WAT�t RESERYOIIt w3 �INO YITSIx JIIRISDICTIOU AF �FIE CITZ ,�R PROTSCTInl� OF IT3 yATER dIIPPLY � FR�k POLLUTIOHj DBCLARI�Id CERTAIY �CTS TO 8S . ♦ 1�saxc�i rP�cRia�ta �cTs co:vs�irarZxc OFP�+i3�'.9 AGkItIST TII;: PURITY OF SIICH YATjA S7P- ?LYj A14D ?hOYIDIYO !''�LTISS FOit TiiB VIOL►TZO! ' ' '�'H$BBOP r . .. . . ,._ . . . .•... _ . ... .. . �'... , . B� IT �r�DAI1tFsD,SX,THE l�GYOR�,�ID OITY OOiROIL 01� 2'8S CITY O�T A�N?O�t � � . _ . .. _ �.. ,, ._. �: , ._ --�• • . . , �� ' SECTIO:I ?t !oa ths Durpo�� ot pre`eoting th• y�t�' lltttsi�� to t� id�abi0aut� st th� cit�r ot R�nton aa� ath�r� tro� pollutioa. aod !or tls� pr���i�at�on aad yzwt�stioa ot � puri� ot th� C1t��a r►t�! �uPP�T� aotiag yarsnaat to Cha,pt�r !t2'r, or Law et i9oT aan,�.a.r+. . 35.aa.oio t. 35.e8.090 �v.s••, r,�. as�, .�r,a.atea n.r.�,,�,°�ar� Juriadiotion pr�r tbr r�al prop�rt� h�r�i�ab�lo� hsariD�d. aad.d�olar�a aaid prop�rtt .�u���et Le th� r�atriations LapoNd ?+7 atoiy��i4 3�r� :�� thia Ordiwae�+ aaid:pro�r�J b�1r�B;Q9s�ifd � 0�'J,►d.1�f �nd.;d�r�al?� tio � iarks, rss�rvoirs�..����sa�, braachea. D�p�s. sDrin�. arNlv, I Lrib�utari�s sad a�r�aiy:�bov1 snd b�lotr:Ss'R�md. �t'!� w�iah.o�,�, s�uns ot vh�Oh t� Ci�� ot A�nt,oa Obt4iai r �G4uRK3.at�s, �torts,�ai�d f�a�a�arts wt�r S`urni�h�d to th� ls�iab3tiaats �t t.b� Cit1 � ad�so�at,�M,a�►�-. pliod xith v���r Lhrough thv �wni4iPal r��r a,y�t�a •t,th� Gst�� s�iQ I . . . . „_: . . _ .,. . � _ , , .. . . . , . _ . , , Droy�rLi b�iag d��orib�d as lollow. to-xitt H�ginning at ths inters�ation of t� •�►�t lins ot 96t�h , �tean� South naa th• aorth lin� ot �hiy ?2 aot�tn. , 8ang� 5 aast K. M.j thenae •nst alang, th� aorth lia� of �tiQ ?o++r�ahip 2p Diortb to th• vs�t 2i:� o! 10lath ��vnw siov�hsut proQuced nort�hi th�acs south aloa�, h . th� r��t lin� ot 104th A��au� South�ut prodwo�d aorth , to ch� aorth lins of South�aat 2UOth Strsets. th�a� I x��t along th� north 11.a� ot South�uaL.200th� 9tr��t j � to ths eut lina ot 9oth I►venus Southj t2�nw aorthorly , along t�e �o�t lius o1' 9bth A�enu� Soutih to tb� north lia� o! Tewn�hip 22 llorth b�iag t,h� point ot b�giz�iagf . •11 aituat�d in Toxnahlp sL2 11orGh, H�,pg• 5 �C 1i..N.� la Kiag Couaty, Maahingtoa. � .. .. ._. � �ECTIOY II� Tb� ��tablis�ot�e�► �itit�n�►o� o! �y sLnghtu! ��as. •Look r��4� �ard�, h�q D�na, or tLs d�po�iti or maiat�aas►o� o! � J�1: � . 'i i11�.�• �..J� . . � . , 1 • •'__ . C-2 ' _ . � { . * I � �f n��l es �Milek►�ar sli�rt�ras�, or ths ae�a►d.nat o! �q bnsStro�a ', ex` 000ttpttiq�r � tls�l DroprM� }�r�iaab�t►� dl�esiDrd� +os th� ot�satt� or allawl,a� st aa� sandltion uqoa sa1+R ptop�rt� or sutl'iat�atlx n�ar ssid prop�rCY to swuat t�� st'er�u►wid itit�y trat�r �p3� '0�►, t� �all�t+s� oi� • th� p�trii�y ot said tr�at�r er � pu� th�rro!' te IMs d�stro��b or �#�4tttg+�iyt, is har+tb7 prahi�it�at +�utd dwel:r�rd fa 3� �mlartul, a�d ii_�!� t�r daslarsQ ta�Da .aad ea+as t3Lvtl�.a a�is+�ssa�t. � ' � �s,cTln�i 2Z2: a� p.r.o�c►, nrs or sorpor.xs.on xno s�sall �1a, •st.sb�ll�Ib.� #I�tm��t. m' aYt'+�,ta �f,T a�•C� thir�i a�► oor►Q,it►l,ow hrxtitb�' prohibit�L, o�a sh�3l b ae� ot tha thiags hs�r�by dialar�d nala�rtul. abi►11 b� d.�rard guiltY ot +�ty►atiag a�rtd sai�Lai�.t,ag a nui��asi� aad �aLt Y�tCh�ar � ' , D� guiltT af a aiaelaraner� awd a�-�uh���►�i;�R�o� 4orpor.ai.tawa , �6 s�22 t� suDjsat to pa►oaiautian tor �r�ating�Nuah nuiaanow► atu'�/or Zor sammit� �►uoh a�isd�waoor, aad ugoa aamriattaa t,�rN! ahall b� �uni�h- .a b7 . rsa. ta .� auw� ,� to c�►s au�r�.rl r�ot�.� tilvo�.c�i), eu� b�► sYs. I �►rs.ox�.at !s, th• cs1�T J.s1 ror .� p.rioa � �e wsat� i3o) dys. .a 1�pr ; Lath aup�h t3sys aud ia�risa�tnt. . . , � �8C'TIODi N� "!hl.a Os�dl,aanN, 1a t►�s d�stl7aistg i►! J�t�riadistio� � aa�d ro�til�i�rtad Iuwa t►arrSa• s�sal.l 7�ot bu dwa�d o! �aa�trt�ld te b11 ia ', � d�roga#►ioa:ar 1l�asitation ef � iuriad3stian, t��f�iatlaar, prohibitions, sight►a, powsyr or ar�►aa sub��otc 4hhsra'�o,� e#hsa�iaw a�d.stiag m�x a� - .;�, . . . . , .. qroiriaien of ls�r. . ' �...,�--- �,C,'PIBIf V� 'thi� O,�di�at�N �Aa�3.l�r! ia!'xll t�ss�. a�t_ttt+�1� i`ro�s e�r�d �tt+�r it.� y�assag�, +�PL�'o�� '� �u���°'i►r�v�..* ••�•-- - - -- ,.,�ssew az zna �i•rs �:cauaviL �� ` i����'•!!L'��j�'-`='�i''"'""'''"��''f- . ..:.�:, �� y� ��aa�a�.s. O�o� al�s'!C �+;. �,,�� �t.�► . 1456« �1'PR4XSD BY TSB liJlYBR tdsis � � ������'`"'_� C � ' � O• � �r� �� � `�'4►"b -'"'� �� �� � � , 4fs1'a='d N. �Mltihr Liltj aULii1�� - i �ciSf,� T.,a.. nfi ^ii����':'}�(,�': t#:l'11"f e1 � . , r.._ * ` I C_� _ . .._ �-------- — � . /�,'� • \ �?�L.• � �� � � � Z3� ' - ���- r' -r�ECE�VEO f � " �, '�0 1)j ^,J r . � ;4 ! -� MAY I Yg 1969 ;s � Cb A,;j�£CE��E� R�NandPermitDept ,.� n tt�o mati:cr oS tho r,pp.licatl.on of i � I:��y,9 �, King County ,�' CI1Y OF RENTON � O ' �B'�eer �� t`% to 1cS noian, construc�, mnintain und • r K»e��n��e �� 6i �li� opereto a system oi' wood and iron � �' .�c,, HAter mains, lnternls and sorvico plpos. S '�� y-� . ' 1%'(1'1l.11l�.�1 iS�. ��� l�l� T'riE B011RD OF COUIvTY COI�lMISSIONERS OF KING COUNTY, TdASHIl�TON, gi•antin6 CITY OF RENTON fr�nchise rights to , ' • Sor watormain installation, maintenance end operation. . � cta�c ur� e�r.�rrur Tha appiication of for a Si•anchiso to lay dok�n, construet, maintsin e:�d operata a sin�'le line oi' iron pipes snd . iron lateral pipe along, 'under and across such county roads, streots, avenuos boulav�rds, alleys and public. plac'�h�r�yi��f��i��sg���od, having come on re�ularly to be heard on this and it havin� been msde to appear to ss�d Board that all oi said stireets, avenues, boul.evards, alleys, public places and public ro3ds and highways lie outsine the limits of any incorporated toz•rn or city and that due and legal notice of said application and ot the hearing had been given by posting and pu�licatior. and in manner ond as required by law, and said Board having considered ssid application and being advised in the prenises, it is now • ORDERED by the Board of County Commissioners ot King County, Washinaton, that there be and there is hereby granted to said CITY OF RENTON heroinafter called the grantee, and to itself, its successors and ��5s��g=� subJect to ell the forms and conditions, hereof; for the term ot Prom the date hereof, tho right, privilege, authority and franchise for itself, its successors and essi�ns, to lay down, construct, maintain and operate a single line of wood and iron water rains, laterels and service pipe along, under and across such countp roads ( where pipes cross such paved roads, pipes shall be placed in steel jackets) to�ether with all necessary equipment of overy sort�necessary for the delive:y of water to consumers � apon the tollowing county roads, streets, avenuos, boulovards, alleys and public places: . � , The location and nature of the franchise being more p�rticularly described es Sollows: , � SEE DESCRIPTION ON�ATTACHED SHEETS � . ' . � , � . f , � � . � . � . � � ` . . � ( . � • � ; • . • C-4 - - - -- � • I i \ � . -; � •; Page 1 b��l . � Alt those portions of To�vnships 23 and 24 North, Ranges 4 � 5 East, W.M, lying bet�.een the City limits qf the City of Renton and the foltowing described line: , Beginning at the S. W, corner of the North Half of the N.E.� of Sec. 32, T►ap. 24 tJ�., R. 5 E.W.M., said corner also being a point on the City limits of the Ci•ty of �enton; thence Southerly and Easterty along said city limits to the Sc+utherly margin of 112th Place Southeast; thence Southerly along said margin to the South line of the Northeast one-quarter of said Section 32; thence Easterly alony said line to �iie � Westerly line of Section 33, Township 24 North, Range 5 East, 1J.Pt.; thence Southerly along said Westerly line to the present city limits thence Southerly and casterly along said city limits to the North line of Section 4, Township z3 North, Range•5 East, W.M.; thence Easterly along said North tine to the Northwest corner of the �dorth- east one-guarter of the Northeast one-quar�er of said Section 4; thence Southerly along the West line of said Sub-division to the Southwest cornar thereof; thence Easterly along the �outh line of said Sub-division and the South lins of the North one-half of the Northw�st one-quarter of Section 3, Township 23 North, Range 5 cast, W.M., �o the East line of said Norttnaest one-quarter; thence Northerly along said East tine to the North line of sa�d Section 3; thence Easterly along said North line to the Northeast corner of the �lest one-half of the East one-half of said Section; thence Southerly ' along the East line of said Sub-division to the Southerly margin of the Sunset High�aay (5R 900); thence Westerly along said Sou.ther)y margin to the West line of the East one-half of the, West one-half of the :���th:•rest �.^.�-q�arter of t`+e Sc��th���t one-quzrter cf ��id Section; thence Southerly atong the 'rlest line of said Sub-division to the North line of Section 10, Township 23 North, Range 5 �ast; W.M.; thence 1Jesterly alony said North line to the Northeast corner C-5 i i G � �°' , . � ' � Page 2 of the West one-quarter of said Section 10; thence Southe�ly along the East line of said Sub-division to�tJorth line of Section 15, To�anship 23 North, Range 5 East W.M.; thence Easterty along said North tine to a point 150 feet east of the North�•rest corner of the North one-half of the Northeast one-quarter of the Northeast one- quarter of the Northwest. one-quarte� of said Section 15; thence Southerly along said line to a point 90 feet �dorth of the South line of said Sub-division; thence 1�lesterly along a line 90 feet North of and parallel with the South line of said Sub-division to a point • 110 feet East of the West line of said Sub=division; thence Southerly � along a line 110 feet, east of the parallel with the West line of said Sub-division a distance of 90 feet to the 3outh line of said Sub- division; thence Easterly along the South line of said Sub-divisi n to the East tine of proposed county road connection to Orton Road; thence Southerly atong said Easterly line to the South line of said North�vest � one-quarter of said Section 15; thence Westerly along the South line of said Sub-division to a point 700 ft. West of Southeast cornar of Northwest quarter; thence Southerly atong a line dra�an 700 feet Ylesterly of and parallel with East line of the Northeast one-quarter of the South- west one-quarter of said Section to the Easterly tine of the Plat of Heather po��ns Division No. 2, according to the Plat recorded in Votume 64 of Plats, Pages 3 � 4, records of King County, Washington; thence Southerly along said Easterty line to a� intersection with a line drawn 700 feet Westerly of and parallel with the East line of the Northeast one-quarter of the Southwest one-quarter of said Section 15; thence Southerly along said line to the North tine of the South one-half of the South�aest one-quarter of said Section 15; thence ��testerly along saic' North tine to the 41est line of said Section; thence Southerly atong said West line to the ��orthwest corner of the :�uthwest one-quarter of the Southwest one-qua�ter of the Southwest one:quarter of said Section; i ( � C-5 _._ __ _ � _- . . � �-. b��✓ ,. . . Pa�� � thence Easterly alang the Narth line of said Sub-divisian to the Northeast corner thereof; thence Sautherly along the East line of said Sub-division to. the North line of Section ?2 i'ownsh9p 23 North Range 5 East W.M.; thence Easterly along said North line to . the West line of the East one-half of Government Lot 6 in said Sect4on; thence Southerly along said line to the Nartherly ban�c of � the Cedar River; thence Westeriy along said FJortheriy bank to the I West line of said Section ?2; thence Southerly alang said west line � . to the Southeast corner af Section 21, thence IJesterty atong th� Sauth line o€ Sectian 2l� T4WCSS�ii�} 23 North, Range 5 East; W,M, ta I the Easterly line of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said , Section 21; thence Northerty along said Easterly tine ta the Southerly ' line af Cedar River pipe tine right of tivay, the City Limits of the City af �entan; thenee Westerly and Savtherly atang the City �imits of the City of Renton through Sections 21 and 29, T�Wnship 23 North, IRange $ East, W.M. to the Northeast carner of the West one-hatf of the North one-quarter of the No�th�aest one-quarter of the So�thwest one'-quarter of said Section 2g, thence �outheriy aiong the East tine � af said Sub-divisian to the Southeast corner thereof; thence Westerly - atong the South Tine of said Sub-division to the West line of said Section 29; Chence 5outherly alang said tilestl9ne to the N�rth line I of the South one-quarter oP the South��est one-quarter of the "aouth- ( ' west one-quarter of said ;ection; thence Easteriy along said fdorth • line a distance of 570 feet; thence Southerly along a iine parailel —wi-th- the'1d�st tine af said Sub-division a- distante�of 150 feet; - ` thence Easterly along a line parallel with the South line of said Secti on to the West'�'r t jr�; �ry �-of-I . U. 'Carr Caunty Road ��vi si on Wo. 3; (103rd Place Southeast); thence Southerly along the tilesterly margin ta the North tine of Section 32, 3awnship ?3 t��rth, Range 5 East, W.M.; 4hence Easterly atong said North line to the Northeast ' 1 -�- � � _ _ ,� - l � C-7 � :� i . � . � � b�� Page 4 corner of the West one-half of the North�vest one-quarter of said Section; thence Southerly along the East tine of said West one- half of the South line of said Northti,rest one-quarter; thence Westerly along said South line and the South line of the Pdorth one-half of Section 31 , Township 23 North, Range 5 East; W.M, to the Easterly margin of the East Valley Freeway (SR 167); thence Northerly along said Easterly margin to the Southerly margin of South 180th Stree.t; thence Westerly along said Southerly margin ' to the Easterly ma�gin of Old East Valley Highway (92nd Avenue South), the City Limits of the City of Renton; thence Westerly and Northerly atong the City Limits of Renton to the Southerly margin of the City of Seattle Cedar River Pipeline Right of Way; in Section 13, Township 23 North, Ranye 4 cast, W,Fi., thence Northeriy along the center line of Langston Road; thence �dorth- i westerty atong said centerline to the centerline of 80th Avenue I' South; thence Rortherly along said centerline to the tJ�rth line . of said Section 13; thence Easterly along said tdorth line to the Northeast corner thereof; thence Northerly along the East line of Section 12, Tot�nship 23 horth, Range 4 East, W.M, to the North- 'i east corner of the Southeast one-quarter of the Southeast one- quarter of said Section 17.; thence 4lesterly along the North line ' of said Sub-division to the West line of the East one-quarter of said Section; thence Northerly along said line to the 41�sterly product i on of the center 1 i ne of B 1 ock 50, Bryn t4a�•1r, accordi ng to the Plat recorded in Volurie 5 of Plats, Page 58, Records of , � Kin Count 1�lashin t�n thence ,.asterl alon� said centerline and 9 Y� 9 , Y .. its production Ylesterly and Easterly to the centeriin� of 82nd Avenue South; thence . - -- - - - -- - - � C-� � , . . � �,- b,-,� - - . -_ : , . ' Page 5 �outherly along said centerline to the centerline of South 122nd Street; thence Easterly along said centertine to the centerline of 87th Avenue South; thence Southerly along said centerline of 87th Avenue South to an intersection with the centerline of South 122nd Street; thence Easterly along said centerline to the existing City limits of the City of Renton; thence �ortherly along said existing City limits to the Westerly production of the North line of Section 32, Twp. 24 N., R. 5 E.YJ.M.; thence East along said line produced West and the North line of said Section 3? to point 180 feet West of the North-South centerline of Section 32; thence South along a line 180 feet West of and parallel to the North-South centerline of Section 32 to the South line of the tJorth one-quarter of said Section 32; thence East to the South��est corner of the North Half of the Northeast one-quarter of said Section 32 and the point of begin�ing; LESS any portion therein lying within Water District #78. EXCEPTION: The N. W. � of the N. E. } of Section 3, T�vp. 23 N., R. 5 E,W,M. �As submitted by the County Engineer at hearing 4-28-69) C-9 -- -- � i ' � \ , , � Y . � Water Franahisa b � Pg. 2 This Pranahise is granted upon the SOZ�OY1�Dg express terms end coriditians, to-o�it: � . FIRST: ?menever sny oP the streets, avenues, al2eys, cauntp romds or pu:�iic places r�s designated in 1:his Srcnchise by reason af �ho subsec,uent incor7ora�ion or exteneion of sanie of any city o: tos•rn within tt�Q torritorf h�reinBeParQ d�scri'��d, 'sbal2 fa21 wlthin bl;e c2ty or towa lltr,its, then ull the rigbts, prlvileges and franchise herein granted shall terninate in respect to seid str.eet�s, avenues, alleys, county roeds and public plsce� sa annexed, but this Pranchise sha2l cantinue in force and er.ieet in respect to all such strests, avenues, slleys, county raads, nnd public places not - so 4nneaed. � And in the event the territor�, cavered by this grt�nt,:sha31 et any time during tbe term af this franchise be included within the territorp ot any- incorporated City or Town, the authorities of' said aity or town shall have the ri�ht et their discretion to acqaire b� purchase or caademnmtian any or all af sz�ch mains, 3ater�sls, service pip�, snd equipment, etc., co:nprising the grantee' '� water system at a price' to ba based upon the reasa�able value of same at that time, without any additianal va2ue 1'or i:he Sranchise or sny unexpired period thereof. _ SECOx3D: The said CITY OF RENTON {hereinafter desi.gnated as the "grantee" • } shall have the right an� autharity to enter upon the above tr.entioneri streets, avenues, alleys, cou�ty roads and public places for the purpase oP construction work, meking e:ctensions of mains and lsterals, cannectin� same with cansumers sei�vice pij s . repair equipment, maintain snd operats said lines, cbarge and collect toll Par delivery of water, and make such rules and regulations governing same as may be in conPormity with suoh state ststutes and regulations as are naca in Sorce or as may hereaPter be enacted ar adaptefl, gaverning sucb ' utilities. T'riIRD: The grantee may lsy, construct, maintain and ogerate a singl� i�ne or double line o3 pipe or partly single and partly double line oS piper and the Board of Caunty Com:nisstoners may, upon a showing by the grantt�_ of its neeessity, change a single to a dauble pipe 3ine, al3 construction and installation work to be under the supervision and pass the inspaction oP the County Rood En}�ineer's Office. ' FOURTH: The Grantee itse2t, its successors or ass3�ns, shall co.,�mence • construction work under this fr�nahise� within six (6) mo:�ths 1'rom �and at'ta- � tt5e date of passaga therooP. If st the end aF five {�} years �'rom and s�te the granting of this 1'ranchise, the grantee �� successars or assigns, shall not have laid, constructe'd and have in oparatian upon any of the alleys, streets, avenues, aounty raads ar public p2aces as herain desi�nsved, a lin� oP watermains, 2atersls or service pipes, then in that event, the rights � hereby conferred upon the grantee shell cease and terminate so 1'ar as unoccupiad streets, T'08CY3� etc., are concerned. . _ FZFTH: The locatian of all mains laterals, service pipe and appurtenance tk�eir depth belo��i surtace of �round or grade oi any county road, street, svenue, slley ar pubiie plsce, shall be deterr..ined and fixed by the Cour,L•p Road En�ineer and bePore any work is done by the �rantee under this Srenchise, shall first 1'ile with the Baard o3`Z`aunty CoMmissior. • ' an application for parmit to do such wark, accompanied by blue prints {per� , 3'arm and blue grints in trfplica�e) showing the pasition and locatipn ot all maina, latarals, service pipes, extensions, meter boxes,p3u�s, sand- pipes, etc. , sou�ht ta be constructed, laid, installed o: erec�ea at the 43-� � sha�iin� �beir relative pasitions to existi:.� couaty roed, street, EYlep, � right oi way or property lines, upon prints drawn to sc31e, desi�n3ting � said raads or streets by their na::ies and nutnber, showin,� width oP sts�ie, �ivir: i I outline aS loasl imgravements, suah sa sidewalks, curbs, gutte:s, shoulcera 03' roadways, ditches, paved roedways, roadways to prop�rty line turnouts, I par'�cing strips, te3.ephone ar electric distribution polos, conduits, seiaer c I � water pipe lines, etc., as mt�y sxist on grouad sau�ht ta be oacupie8. � • � � • • I � _ .. _ _ _ ._,_. ..__. _. __,.. _ .___ I C-lU . - i L — t � ' � 1� � Water Franchis� . , •. P�. 3 The grantee shall specify the class nnd type oS :naterial used shown in deiail plans, equipment to be used and mode of ssi'eguarding and i'acilitat- ° in� the public trafiic during construction. Al1 such material and equipment shall be of first class, of �he type and kind and manner o� excavation, co:�struction installation, b�ckiill, and tempo:3ry structures, .as t:affic turnouts, road obstructions, etc. , shall meet with the approval of, p�ss All req;;irenents of, and be constructed uader �che supervision oS the Count� En�ineer's Ofiice. The said �r�ntee :,hall pay to the County all Costs oi �nd expenses incurrcd in the examinc�ion, inspection and supervision ot tiuch No_1; oa nccount of i.no �:antin; oS said �or:r.�.t, SIXTH: The grantee • shall leave all strzets, avenues, alleys, roads or public places, after�.eying and installing meins �nd doing construction work moking repairs to eouipment etc. , in as good and safe condition in all ; :espects as they were before the com;nence:nent of such work by the grantee_ itself, its agents or contractors, or when such iaork has met with tha app:ovzi oi the County Engineer. � In case of any damage to said streets, avenues, alleys, county roads, or p�olic places, or to paved or planked roadways,. turnouts, �utters, ditches, wood or concrete walks, drain pipes, hand or emban�cment rails, bridges, trestles, wharves or landings, by the grantee � , the said grantee agrees to immediately repair said demage at �y1e�,. own sole cost and expense. . , The County Commissioners may at any ti:ne do, order and have done any and all work considered necessary to restore to a safe condition an such street, Aver.ue, �Iley, road, or public place left by* the grantee itael� � or agents in a cor.dition nzngerous to life or property and the grantee upon demsnd shsll pay to the County all costs ot such construction or repair and of doing .such worl�. S�«iv��3: The grantee do hereby a6ree for itaelf , its successors or assi�ns, to protect aad save har:nless th�-ounty o�`-King fro:n all clains, actions or da:nages of every kind and description khich may accrue to or be suffered by any person or persons, corporation or property by reason of ar,y faulty construction, defective :naterial, or equipment, or �ainten3nce� or by the improper occupation of szid ri�ht of iaay by the said grantee or by raason of the ne�ligent, improper, or S2ulty manner of safe�uarding any excavation, temporary turnouts, or inefficient operation by the grantee_ of theix Pipe lines over said streets, avenues, alleys, roads and public places as hereinbe�ore designated 3nd in case that suit or action is brou�ht against the said County of King i'or damages arising out of or by reason of any of the above nentioned causes the grantee i�self , ite successors, or .assigns �ill, upon notice to them • or the:n of the corrrence:nent of said action, defend the same at _� r� or ,�� sole cost and e:cpense and in case �udgment shsll be rendere� a�ainsL-�Fie County oi' Kin� in suit or �action, will fully satisfy said judg.:�ent within ninety (90) days zfter the said suit or action shall have finally tieen oeter:nined if determined adversely to ifing County. " The grantee do hereby $�r•ee, for ,�,,,,�� , its successors and assions, io ^epair sny da:nage to the county":6dc'fs over which it holds a franchise, and all other county iTprovemen�s caused by the Sailure of the grantees work du•ring the li�e of 'this franchise. Failure on the part of tY�e �ranLee to proTptly repair the da:r.aged Vrork upon notice iro� the County Engineer to do so shall be warrant for the county to r�2ke the necessary repairs and charge same to the grantee. Accaotance o� the work by the County at the time of conpletion shall be no ne�ense for avoidance of„this covenant. • PROVID�D, that the gr2ntee herein, itself , i,�_ successors or ass��r.s shall have tre rignt to e:r:pZo�i�_or �he� ot�n counsel in an} csuse or action and be �iven the msr.aga��n� ois tha defense thereof. EIC�i^'r!: Tne laying, construction, �r:a=ntensnce and operation of the sa�c g:s��2e's system of water:�sins, laterals�, service pipe, etc. granted under this francY:ise shall not precl�de the County of Xing, its occre@ited asents, or its contrac�ors, fro� blastin�, gradin„ or doing other r.oceccary :oad i•�o^k con�i�uous to the said gran�ee�s pipe lines, proviced that the �rsntee shall have tt-�enty-four (21�) hours notice of said blas�ing or excavating in o:�er to�t said gran�ee nay protect �heir �,_ lines of pipe and property. • � I . . , . ' - - - C-1 1 -- � . _.. _� . . � . � �' ' . C Y:ater Franchise�\' , ' • . P�• � T;ID?^'r.: If, at any t;me, the County oa ICing, deemina it advisable to � ir:prove an�� of its stree�s, avenues, alleys, county roads or public places, as r,ereinbefore designated, by grading or re�radin�, planl:in� or paving sa:ne, o: altering, changing, rep�irin�, or rei:nprovin�, sar��, the �rantee , upon i•rrit�ea notice by the County of King sl:a�', at it's or thoir o.rn — P:C�v'P.3C� 1^::�Sc'Q19�613/ SO :::i�E� loi•�er, O� feU':C Iine of pi;�es i3O CO1:iQY"1 �O sGch �;::c•: �:ades Es msy oe c;�:,:Slishec, or �lace said pipes in �uc;� locs�ion, O: p03i�lO�1S �S shall CaUSB til3 104St lY1tCT'i erence 571�`.l� aTI;J Sl1Cri 1.7��i OVC- m^:,ta o:• �,oric t;:u=•co7 as contcmplct-od by i::n� Co��t-y and ti�e :;�id Co;:-,:;;� si�ail in no irise be hcld lisb2e So: any eatca�es to said grant•ee that �ay occu. by reason oi� the County's inp:ovenent•s, repairs or maintenance o: by the e�.ercise o� any rights, so reserved in this section or grant. I� the Coun�y oi i{in� shall improve' such streetis, avenues, alleys, couaty rosds or � p�blic places, the grantee shsll on written notice by the CounL-y oi Xing at iheir own expense re�lace such pipe or pipes ss :nay;be in or throu�h " the imp-roved subgrade of such improvement, with pipe or pipes oP such material as shEll con�orm to the specifications for �:�e improvement of such streets, avenues, alleys, county roads or public places. , T��ii'F?: This grant or privi�e�e 'shall not be deemed'or held to be a:. . e:�cinsive franc s � ^ '�i e.: It• shEll in no m�nnar prohibit the Cou��y of i{ing 1roR� .granting other franchises of a like nature or Pranchises for other puolic .' or private utilities, over,along, ac•ross, under, and upon any of the streets, • avenues, �lleys, roads or public placos as he:ein enumerated, and shall in :.o i:ise p:event or prohibit the Cou:�ty of i{in� using aay of said straets, , • roa3s, etc., or aifect its �urisdiction over them or any part o� the:n, • with full power to moke all necessary chsnaes, relocations, repairs rr,ainten- snce, etc., of same as �they deeM, fit. . FLE�I3ti'i'f�i: All the provisions; conditions, re�ulations and reouiremeats ' '.^.orein contAined shall be bindin� upo:� tne successo:s and assigns o� �he grantee and all privileges o: the grantae shall inure to successors and assig;�s equally as if they were s�eci;ical�entioned whereve: tne grEntee is mentioned. T'�!�'LFlri: If the gr�ntee itself, i�s successors or assi�ns, shall c:ill- fully violate, or fsil to c,omply witi� anJ o� the provisions o� this g:sn�, or throu�h willful or unreasonable neglect fail to heed or conpl'y iaitn any ' notice iven the ra y � . , g g ntee undor �he nrovisidns of this :an� toen ,,he . � , . said rantee itself s 'r* � , it successors o: assi ns shall all ri � for�eit �h�s con�erred hereunder and this Sranchise may be revo'�ced or annulled by the Board oP County Cor.,;�ssioners. e , _ T�IRTEEVT:i: . Kin6 County reserves ior itsel� the right at any ticne u�o� Z�Oit-y-eiont (�8) hours writ�en T�O�1C3,,t0 tO6 grantee t0 SO chan�e, 8^and, modify or arplify any of the provisions or conditions ne:ain enur►e-rsiac to . coniorm to any stute statute, or cocnty regulation, rela�ino to the oublic � • welfa=e, health, safety or �iohwaf reoulation �s may herein3Ster be enacted, amanded, adopted, chan�ed, etc. , aan this irar.chise may be terminaLed at any time if same is aot operated or r.aintEined in accornznce with its provisions, or at all. r^OJR:���?i:?: In consineration oi the grantin; o: this franchise b� �he gran;-,or to tne grantee , tne grantee itself, its successo:s or assib..s, oeraby cont:act snd agree to save Kin� County harnless ::o�n any liability oP i•�ha�soeve: �ature arisino out oi uny dar:age and/or destruction cor,e o: sufSe:ed to• be done to gran;-:ee's watar n'�ins, valves, pipes or othar Pitt_ags oi waa�soever nature placed upon, alor.g, or �nnec the county rosd :igh� o� uEp o: to s7y o�her �erson or p:o�e:�y in,;uren o� aa::agad as the .esult o- t^e �.se or occa�s�ion �i sny part o� the co4aty ro�d righ� o� t:ay by o:�::�ee �;;,ae: the terns of this f:aachise. This para�r�ph snall b� const:V�V to rasn tt.:i the �rsntee accept this fr��nc�ise and ar,y rigrts coa�e-:ed �:ere_ l:7Cic'_" :O: ��7� US8 E�fi occupa�ion Oi FJ17Y .'�O:�10:1 Oi tl'7B righ� Oi ti•73yT� a^L t;^,P.�: c:•:n :;sk, a7d sgroa to assu:r.e responsibility �or a�y dsna�e occass�o:�an �o grsntee , or �o any other person by `g•rsntor, in tho raintc;�snce anc/o:• constr�;c�;on wor:� per:or�en by oran�or upoa t';�e roa�:•:ays dascribod a�ova s::d M::1CC T:OC�Q i]O� i,3Vv' OCCl12'i ed but 1'O:` the presance 02] S81Q �O�Cti43yS Oi �::8 �ri:i�l1iGV�s pipes or otber property r..an�ioncd Ptove. • , . I . - - � C-12-- • / i � . G c - _ ,�,� � - �•Jater Franchise � ' � '� P�. 5 . FIrTE����iIi: If at any tinv the County of Kin� shall insL�.11 a line of pipes � for sea�2oa and d:aina�e, upon any of tl�e streets, �venues, alleys, county :oads or public pl�ces herein described, tne �rantee upon written notice by the Couaty of King, sh311 temporarily remove i;heir line o� w�ter p`_pes st thair oi;n expense nurin� said installatian �nd replace ss:na at tncir o:::� scie cost .:nd expense ur.c.�e: ��o supervision of the County of Fi�n�, SI�•�%��`~ BC�OT':�. E17�y*. •rlOi�: i$ '�J@_T'i0'�i��CCl under t�123 fr�T]C S � i� • ' hi e �;�e �rantee .�.n:: ' Z•E:_�,i^C.^.�'.0 .^..11 �:.0:'iL`:�it1i'1�:.^. :�:�(i f:,'.il':!��^3 Oi CV6Z`j/ il'1't.11l`f3 1'CZCi`.i.:l^ .a70 s�,�divi�ions, plats, highw�y a:�d a'_1 ot�er surveys. The rcfe•renc� points sha�l be so located t�at t�ey will not be disi:urbed durin� the 6rsn�ees oper�tions u:�der this franchise. ll�e rnethod of referer.cin� these monu:r:ents or other poi:�s to be referenced shall be approved by the Coun�y En�ineer before plecemen�. The replsce:�ent oi E11 such monuments or marke:s disturbec durino construction shall be made as e:�peditiously as conditions permit and ss diracted by zhe County Road Engineer. The cost of Monumer.t� or otY:er ma:'�ers lost, oestroyed, or disturbed znd the er.pense of replacement by approved nonunents shall be borne by tha gr�n�ee. � S�F�'?�T��:�TH: If within thirty (30) days a��cer tha granting of this franchise the g:,>n�ee herein si�all hzve failcn to sign this i•rritten acceg�i:snce of sa;�e, t;�en t�e herein granted righ�s-and privileges shall be deemed forieited �nd be declared nu11 and void. �J� in regular session in the office oS the Board o� Coun•cy Com:�issioners oP i��:,g Ca�;ntp, trlashington, this 7 X�'' day of 1� - � BOARD OF COUNTY CO�i!�1ISSIOA'F.RS KING COU ' Y, UASfi1I�GlON ?TT�S:: • � � ROBE T A. i!ORRIS / � C1 k of th o d �� / B `��,�'� tiP n I� aC. Daputy . . . .. U - T:�� unnersigned t±eraby accepi S sll th ights and privile�zs of the �bove �rant�d frznchise subject �o ell th terms, conditions,- • stip�:lat�or.s ead obligstions contained tnere n. - G��.� : . �J %�.(i,..,u�i�� Signsc / �`��� �Cti C��.��.iC., �� �f�i����r2��`'���v e ` , � Date6 tp�s /v � day of `/t��J 19 � • , � ��• . �'` , . .0 S�I��>5 N�,�, 1/8/b7 � C-13 APPENDIX D CITY OF KENT WATER SUPPLY CONTACT ___... . _,. � i ___..__ ___._� CAG 37-80 AGREEMENT FOR TFiE SALE QF WATER BY THE CITY OF RENTON TO THE CITY OF KENT This Agreement mad+e and entered inGo this qth day of ,,�,o , 19� by tbe CZTY OF RENTGN, a municipal corpora- i tion of the S�aGe of Washingtoa, hereinaf�er called "RENTON" , ana the CITY OF KENT, a municipal corporation of the State o� Washington, hereinafter ca].ied "KENT". . WITNESSETH: I WHEREAS, Che parties desire to enter into a contract providing � � Eor the sale af water by RENTON to KENT, NOW, THEREFORE, IT IS I AGREED AS FQLLOWS; { 1 ) Term of Contract. The effecGive date of this A�REEMENT � shall be �,,;�1 . 19�• The contrac� shall be for a two (2) year period with RENT having the op�ion to renew for an aclditional. one { 1 } year period under �he same terms and condi�ions as set I tforth herein, EXCEPT that the rate which KENT pays far water suppliecl by RENTON shall be subje�t to renegatia�ion at the time of renewal. {Zy Ra�es. KENT sha21 pay to RENTON for all water delivered �� Cents per lOQ cubic feet, Should RENTON raise the rate to � its other municiga]. ar industrial customers af the same class, . . the rate to KENT shali be increased by the same proportion. D-1 (3 ) Meterinq Equi mp ent. RENTON shall own and maintain an appropriate metering device to measure the water flowing from RENTON' s system to the system of KENT at the point of service connection. RENTON agrees that at KENT's request it shall install and maintain equipment selected by KENT and approved by REN�'ON to transmit signals to KENT's and RENTON's recording equipment located elsewhere of the total amount of water delivered as shown by RENTON's meters, all at KENT' s expease. (4) Meter Charqe. A monthly meter charge of fifty-one dollars and eighty-five cents ($51 .85) for the 12-inch me ter shall be paid by KENT. (5) Provision for Emerc�encY Surcharqe. In the event, that for � any reason, RENTON is unable to supply its customers from its own source, it may be necessary for RENTON to impose a surcharge in order to pay for unexpected expenditures that would be required to maintain a sufficient water supply. The charge to KENT for such water purchased or supplied by RENTON shall be negotiated in the event that RENTON must pay more than 90 percent of the current cost which KENT is paying to RENTON pursuant to this agreement. � (6) PrioritX and Continuity of Service. In the event of a general emergency �requiring restrictions on the delivery of water, RENTON shall have the right to restrict or terminate service to KENT. �n-2 � RENTON may temporarily interrupt or reduce deliveries of water to KENT iF RENTON determines that such interruption or reduction is necessary or reasonabl� in case of system emergencies or in order to install equipment and make repairs, replacements, investigations and inspections of, or perform other maintenance work on RENTON's water system or those parts of the system supplying KENT. Except in cases of emergency and in order that KENT's operations will not be unreasonably interfered with, RENTON shall give KENT reasonable notice of any such interruption or reduction, the reason therefore, and the probable duration thereof. (7) Payment. RENTON shall read the meter once each month at approximately thirty (30) day intervals. Payment shall be made by KENT as soon as possible after receipt of statement from RENTON�, and in any event, not later than the tenth ( 10th) of the second month following the presentation of the bill. In the event the meter shall fail to register, or obviously register �ncorrectly, the amount of water delivered through said meter shall be estimated on the basis of the meter readings for the same month, or months during the preceding year, when said meter was properly functioning. In the event the meter shall fail to register, or obviously register incorrectly any time during the first twelve ( 12) months of use,_ the amount of water considered delivered through said n-3 meter shall be that amount delivered the previous month or the latest month during .which the meter was properly �unctianing. {8} Penal�ies for Late Payment. RENTflN may assess a late charge on KENT for failure to comply with the provisions in Section �7) . This charge shall be twelve percent { 12� ) per year. In the event that KENT should fail to make any payment to RENTaN for a period of sixty (60} days after the same becomes due, RENTON shall have the right to terminate further water services until such delinquency is cured. {g} Procedure for Amendinq the Contract. Ei�her party can • request the other ta consider an amendment of the contract. Any proposed amendments shall be made in writing. Amendments may be made i£ they are mutually acceptable to RENTON and KENT and signe3 by both parties. ' ( 1Qa Access to Facilities and Records. Each party shall be en�itled to inspec�t the facilities of the other at any reasonable �, time. Both parties agree to make mutualiy available such infor- mation or records as are at their disgosal and as may be reasonably I necessary to grogerly implement any sec�ion of this contract. ( 11 ) Non-AssiqnabilitY. Neither this contract nor any interest � �herein shali be transferred or assigned by KENT without prior � written consent of RENTON. I I � � I � � � � . � I � I � �-� � L � , I __. _ . _ . . �.. _ _._ . _ ( 12} Water Quality. The quality of water delivered under this AGAEEMENT shall be subje�t to applicable provisions of State and Federal law and rules and regulations oE khe appropriate State agency governing water quality, and subject also to applicable � provisions 4f RENTON ordinances relating thereto and not incon- i - sist�ant herewith. RENTQN agrees to deliver water which shall be � of no less quality than is delivered to its custamers throughaut � the RENTON service area. ' ( 13} Quantity of Water. RENTON shali supply •a quantity af water to KENT in the amount of zero to Gwo and one-half million � i (2,500,000) qallons per day. The rate of delivery of water from RENTON's s stem to KENT's s stem sh o y y aII n t exceed two thousand t2,004} gallons per minute. ; { 14) Miscellaneous Control Devices. RENTON reserves �he ri ht to , 9 require xENT to install, as a condition of water service, a � pressure reducing valve, baekflow preventive device, pressure relie� valve, flow limiting device or similar devices at any lacation where RENTON determines a need to pro�ect its facilikies. �ENTON also reserves the righG to require KENT to oversize the � , system in the Qrilla Industria2 Area should the required flows to said area be affected by the service to KENT. ( 15) Termina�ion. This agreement may be terminated in whole or I in part by either party anytime upon thirty (30 ) days written notice sent by registered mail �ko the other party. � r � � I �-5 I — � IN WITNESS WHEREOF the parties have hereunto set their hands the day and year first above written. CITY C?F KENT ATTEST: , _. ,- M ��t.�'/L.�..�i �Jt.cs..`2y� Bv � •'r��"./, � i� <r . .. Citt',�JClerk j Ma ar � � Y CITY OF RENTON ATTEST: � `,fJ�.;,�,�.e.,. G . �,�G-.�-,�.e-t..- By 1�'��4h.�!�,�.�, • l.k�„n,�}o C-�. �,.�,f�ity Cler•k '�Mayor ' �� D-b L APPENDIX E CITY OF SEATTLE TRANSMISSION PIPELINE FRANCHISE ;. . - r} ` � � ORDI�TA1dCE �TO. 903 , . ( i 6DT ORDI�TA�TCE granting a rranchiae to the City of SeaLtle ^ � I = ror three pipe linea or maine for water eupply purpases in � certai� streete of the City of �tentan. �' � � HE IT �ORD�AINED BY � COUNCIL OF TFiE CITY OF RENTON� as i� ` followe: � Sectiun l. ihst there ie hereby granted to the City of ' Seattle, a municipal corporation, on the conditione aet rorth ia � i Section 2 hereoY, a franchiae to conatruct� re-ccnetruct, maintain ', aad o erate three i e linea� or mains for water eu 1 � P P P � pp y purpoaee , in the City �f Renton, as Pollovra:, � Mi (a} A pipe line or main n ta exoeed eixty-eiz incp►ee in � . . � I diameter. acr�as an d under �ill reet and Walla Walla Avenue, , � ana along and under Thira Street �e laid ofi' and eh�Wn on the pla�L rr or the Town �f Renton; •'•� " ; ''` ; I . (b} A pi�e line or main no��to exceed rifty-four inchea in �� diameter along the Yollowing rout�: entering the south line of the ' iown of e�enton under that right o= way 1cnoWn as the Cedar River �+ i Pipe Line ri�t �f �ray� i'ollowing� the eame ia a northweeterly direction, croeaing in ite couree, Hfgh Street, Renton Avenue, � Cedar Street and M.ill Street, thence croeaing Walla Wa�la AQenue " ii • and c�ntinuing in a nortSweeterly direction io ita interaection � with inird Stree't, thence weet along Third Street to the eset margia ' oi Burnett Street, thence northreaterly along �sid right of. way � to the west margin oP. the iown af Renton; . , � (c) A pipe line or main not to exceed eixty-six inchea in '! diameter along the Yflllowing route: Beginning at a point in l�ill . j � • , Street eight (8) feet eaet of the center line thereof, and on the � , � . . • � � north margin of Seattle•e Cedar River pipe line right-oi'-way,.: � which point is approxi�tely eighty-two (82) feet south of the I eouth msrgin of Third Avenue; thence running in a nor,therly direotion • '. i on aaid �ill 8treet anci eight (8) �'eet east of the center line . � r., � � .. . ' • ^1 , ., . -' I �"y'. "' _ _ +ai�`'� �' ' .. . � � E-1 i i - . . . . - ��+r-...�+-....."`��,,' - � -. !' - � ' . _ . � , . , . . , .. . ' thereof to Secoad Avenue; thence on Sec�nd Avenue� eight (8) Peet eouth of the center line of eaid Second Avenue in a weeterly . directioa to the Weaterly limita of the City oP Renton. . „ _ _ Said pipe line� from the. interaection ot aaid right-oY-way . to the end of the curve near the east line of Ysin Street, theaae west on Tnird StreeL to the Tast line of Burnett Street, ahall be � located ten (10) feet eouth of Lhe center line of said Third Street. Section 2. Conditionat ` (a} The eaid franchise ahall termiaate fifty-(50} yeare from tne date of ita acaeptance in writing by the City of 3eattle. (b} The City of Seattle ahall pay into the Treasury ,oY the City of Renton Tnirty Thoue and Dollara (�30,OOO.GG) in caeh, aa the acceptance in writing of this Yranchiee, and ahall pay in addition, if and when, paving is completed by the City, of Renton, auch sum over and above the coat of atan�iard concrete paving bet�een curba � as they now eaist on Third Street, in the City of Rentaa, irom the west margin of Burnett Street to the eoutheaetern msrgin of � Walla 1.'alla Avenue, a� is occaeioned by the existence of atreet railway trscka thereon. . (c) ihe City of Seattle arill, during the life of eaid franchise, furnieh to the City of �enton not leae than one � thuusand cubic feet nor more than txenty thous and cubic feet of ' � aater per d�y ae required by Lhe City of Renton� at the rate of ' Your cents per hundred cubic Seet. (d) ihe City cf Seattle vrill permit the City of Renton during •- the term of es.id franchise to uae ita private right�of-�ay on � Secann Street extended west, between Shattuck Street and a line 100 �' feet vreet of the wee� margin of Logan Street, for etreet purpoaea or f or the purpoee of beautifying the same, eubject at all timea to . � � the paramount right of the City of Seattle to the uee thereoP ; . for ite water eyatem. - , : , • �- � ... , . . . , - ;,�, , � �l t E-2 � { i � • i (e} The City ot Seattle will, upan application thereforr, I grant to the City of Renton peraieaion to lay a twelve-inch atorm seurer at a suitable location in ita right-of esy from Buraett SLreet to Blick River, eubject at all timee to the paramouat right - of the Ci•ty of Seattle to the uae aY eaid right-oP�way for ita Water ayetem. If eaid etorm eewer ie laid within the water maia trench of the City of Seattle, the City of Seattle will backtill over the etorm se*er, provided, however� that the eame is rea�jr for backfilling st the eame time the water main trench is bsck- filled. (f) In carrying out the construction work now under coatract, � it ie underetood that Lhe City of Seattle Will tear up eo much oP . Lhe old paving ae m�y be neceesary, dig the trench, lay the water . main, backfill the trench. and pey to the City of Reaton Thirty , Thousand Dollare 0 000.00 ae above eet Yorth� together with • �,� . 1 an eu� over and above the cost of a atandard concrete paving , Y between curbs ae they now eaiet on Thi.rd Aveaue (Street) from the ' west margin of Burnett Street to the eoutheaeterly margin of Walla Walla Avenue� occaefoned by the exiatence oP etreet rail�y ' tracks thereon. Zt iE under6tood that the City of Renton is to do the paving and re-paving made neceesary hy eaid conetruction : � Work now under contract. � (g} It is understood that the City of Aenton Rill promptly , grant the neceeeary permite to the City of Seattle and to the railroad companiee for auch xork in the etreets ae may be necessary to construct tY.e eizty-eix inch main aoW under contrac,t. � (h) Where said propoaed pipe liaee creas �ny street or `3 sidewalk, the excavation made by the grantee Por laying pipe shall be so bridged that said etreete ehall a t all timea be open to travel by pedeetriana and vehiclee end eaid eidewalka open to travel by . pedeetriane. Where esid pipe linee are along any atreet, the � , -�` : entire v�idth of euch etreet ahall be kept free from obetructione and . , � ___ - -- -- � -- -,� I .. �. . " r � . _ � � • �. , _ .__i !_ , � E-3 � • � .._._ i i . ' J I apen to travel, excepting that porLion ta bs occupied by the gipe � lin� trench. Suit�ble guards ehal3. he glacsd and mafntaiaed ta protect vehicles and pedeetrian$ Prom in3ury by reaeon oP excava- } tions, All pipe linee sa d tater maine and all other a erviae liaea � ar mains naw in place in any ct' the strests cz� Which axcavsticne i . , are made eha21 be allowad to raaain in their preeent location, or � , 9 �' if injured or d.estroyed ahall be replaced by the grantee or sa squsl �ubetitute provided therefor. � {i) A2I dirt re�ac�re� fram eaccavatians not required Par the � reiilling therecf shall be dep:.eited on the etreets oP the .City of � � Renton by the grantee ae direeted by ap inspectcr tc be appointed r` ' ; by said City of Renton; Providedw tksat no haui cver six bloalce ' ; ehall �e required to lae m4de. The asrvi¢ea o! aaid inepeobor E: r appainted ae above gravided Por ahall be psid by the grantee at tbe r . • . , ; ra te cf $5.00 ger day. + � ' (j) IIpon the completian of the work herein coatemplated t.�ie " ' eurx'ace of all streete in which excavations are made ehall het re- � � � � II sta:ed hy the ,grantes ta their present grade ready Par repa4ing by the grantor. � } �, {k} If the City cY Seattle eleote a L any time Lo abandan ' � ij , I tne xr�ncYiis e heretty granted, it shall remcve all pipes and � . i �rater maiue hereur�der included, and in eo dcing it shall restore � - � all streeta to goed condition and repair. , . {1} All wc rk a on tes�plaLed by thi s f'ran chis e to b e dane by the , grantee, shall be proeecuted Rithaut delay snd with all �e�eoaable � II diEp�tch. • � I (m} All regaira �ta be msde hereafter on esid pipe lines - within the limite of the City of Renton shall be made under the , i �. � direction af an inepector to be appointed by eaid City, and the '��� grantee ehall restore the surface oF any stxest ugon �bfch ex- ' I �`'t caYatians are made, ta the �ame eandi.tian it Wa� in pxior ta the 't' • J ��y � ' . f '��Arr making of e uch repaire. - ' • . '�. w • ._ . . � ` -'-A � •• .� r.��� �!'� ' ry • ���y ' , , ` E-4 � i` � I � I �' _ L� � II— — — — —-----— — — I , • i I � ' (n} ihe grantee agresa to save and keep harmless the City ' of Rentan fram any loss or dsmages austained by abutting praperty � owners cr by an�/ other pereoa, oacasioned by the exercise of the � - . + righte hereby grac��ed. � �w �4} ihis franahiae sh+�ll be sub,ject ta farfeiture f'or = �silure of the ,grantee to aamply veitti any oP ite ter�e. ,_ Section 3, This ardinance ehall be in Pul2 force �and erreot five {5j daye from azsd aPter its passa,ge, s:ppraval az�d " � � i4 . legal pub2ication as by law provided. ' ;� . I' �� approved this 1fJth dsy ct Yarc3s, 1931, �� i 07"//���..�i�e;..��,z�..�=— }� Mayor �_ Passed thie 1Gth day of ]Sarch, 1931. �-� I � } ° 7 � r0 ,r�,r.> ., - � .. , er } ' ' Approved aa ta farmsth3s � } i 2nd day of 1�Ga h, 1931. . �„�:_L- �'�'/, C�.:,s'�.,...�-,r.�.r' ; � ` City Attorney. . • " , Date cf Yirat publicatianz 3�arclx 13th, 1931. • : # . . . j � i y • . 7 . � 4 . ; . _ .. - . � . . � .� .� • -1 : ,I ' �`: � . � .' i �- ,. j . . - . . � , ' -i � . _ t 4 j� . -• - • , }! .��. t ' . � ' ., l,lS�•. . . . . ?� . • — '*E=5 ..._ -- � . . • •`! _ r . • ' .I�', � '. • , �"..`� .. . •±�.•.*• •� . �•��'w ,. ,�;{^ ; ..` ' : .'• « f ��R`�!y.�• �.+ • � � `� . �i'=' � _ y •• • .�' �,. � , . . . :;. i� t�• . •�1� , . �� ' .:' ' , � ' ` � • • , . ••n. � :! � �' � . .;�• . . .� }•� �. + :�` . , w.r= •�` ,� r .i � • � � � • •• . �f �s - � - � •1 ��,��'• . . :�i.�!`.. 1 �� • I��� 7q�f$,...i.4e� �I ` � �• , • a� . , ',' �iL,ri,�.sw��„a�4��L+„�..��;ws,w�ra:rw.-� . .. :. . r i��.'^M �c�. , ^.J-.� �+..a.', :..,�e+:+: �:.. � . .+� � . • F �'`' �!�!� �j iFf«E",.:i..� 'R,�^'�� �, ''+t:»T��'� y � � w»�l�' a. e. �'.�.�i�� .w�"'.lv'!f,Z'..`��� .,J ia .,�". .f w ir �7, � , ' i ; • � , • � > I` . ✓ '� � 't r.+V, r�'��h ♦.• � , � . . . ♦M• . � , � S�� �•� '� � • � ' •M w�y=w , � �.7M'e • •• •� h f.+L��. +.1 � ;�'- ��M�1W�'VYir , ��• r .y ''� ��� x'! `- . n, � , =. t+Y ��.. .•..:: " ; � ~' tI.w ' w :� rJ' """'`... n ,�IL'�i. �♦ ;M� r+ � �+ i�t'`�K+ � ;. 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'`_J' ' .•r�nc . ierS . �3 . �� APPENDIX F CITY OF RENTON/DISTRI�CT 63 JOINT FACILITIES AGREEMENT , CAG 011-83 CONTRACT FOR JOtNT WATER SUPP�Y, STORAGE, AND TRANSMLSSION This contcact betwee� the CLTY OF RENTON. a municipal corporacion oE the State of Washington� hereLnaEtec called the "City" and KtNG COUNTY WATER � D[STRICT N0. 63. foc and in co�sideration oE the covenants and agreemen[s �ontained her�in. i[ is I�ereby agreed by [he parties hereto as follows: 1. Purpose of Contract It is the purpose of this co�tract to provide an agreement fo� improvi�R the existing vater �upply. storage� and transmission facilities �erving the City of Ren[on West Hilt area and King County Water District No. 63, and also for serving expansion of these areas in the fucure and to provide an agreement foc operating and mai�tainin� j�int supply. storage and transmission facilities, and to ensure that the District will receive the water supply and facilities' capacity stated in this contract and that the City will be compensated Eoc providing that � service. 2. Defi�itions The folloving vords and phrases used i� this co�tract shall have the Eollowing meani�gs: a. "City" shall mean tRe City of Renton� Washington. b. "District" shall mean Water District No. 63 or King County, Washington. c. "Joint Facilities" shall mean the reservoir, the transmission pipelines, the supply pump station, [he portion of Well No. 9 used to supply the District, the City West Hill areas. the me[ering facilities. and the necessary land� riRhts-of-way, I and other property rfghts required thereEor, all as more I • specifically described Ln Exhihit A� attached hereto and by this refecence asade a part hereoE. d. "Joint FAcilities Costs" shall include all •:osts and expenses attcibutable to the constructiun and installar.ion of Joint Facllicies .znd financi�� theceof , includtnR b��t na[ limite.� C.� [he actual cost oE design and c�nstrur[ion� .��:c�tti�tti�n oE 11nd, compliance with any appticable envir�nmencil ��oli._y act uc prucedures, e�gineerinR Eees� leRal fees� financial consultant fees, intecest ducing co�isCructi�,n, .Ioint Facilt[iPs Bond discount� taxes� ruhlic�tion c��scs, cc,ntract adminisCraCion cosc�� co,;Cs in prrp.irt;ig, executi�ig� and ��EEectinR Chis contract , a�d �>ther c�>sts and expense� relatinK tn the planninK� desiKn, r.on�ccuction, instaliaei<��i� F-1 March 4, 19L3 and financing of the water supply. storage. aad transmissioa facilities. " e. "Joint Pacilities Bonds+ shall mean vater and sewer revenue bonds issued by Renton to pay Joint Facilities Costs of the Original Joiat Facilities or Futuce Joint Facilities and any � future bonds hereafter issued a�d sold to refund such bonds if such refundinq of bonds effects a savings to Renton. If only a portion of the proceeds of any issue or series of bonds is devoted to Joint Faciltties �Costs or [o the � cefunding of Joint Facilities Bonds, the pe�centage that such portioo represents of the entire proceeds shall be applied to each matucity of such bonds and the amount oE each redemption of such bonds. and such awounts equal to that percentage � shall be Joint Facilities Bonds. f. "Joint Facilities Maintenance and Operation Expenses" shall include all costs and expenses celating to labor, fringe benefits, power. light, water. heat, chemicals. equipment including repair aad replacement thereof, tools, materials, supplies. insurance premiums, con[ract services.• legal services. inspectioas, taxes, and "in-lieu-of taxes" other thaa those imposed by the� City. directly and properly chargeable to the opecation and maintenance of the Joint ` Facilities. g. "Joint Facilities Debt Service Expense" shall include the interest, principle, coverage and reserve deposits on the Joint Facilities Bonds as defi�ed above. 3. Construction of the Ori�inal Joint Facilities The City shall I construct the Joint Facilities and advance all Joint Facilities Costs therefoc through the sale of Joint Facilities eonds. The Joint Facilities constructed shall be owned by the Ci[y. 4. Maintenance and Operation of Joint Facilities The City shall supply the District through the Joint Facilities. and the District shall be , entitled and have the enforceable right to ceceive therefrom, water service in (but not exceeding) the quantities specified ie� Exhibit B (attached hereto and by this reference made a part hereof) subject to (a) the design capacity of the Joint Facilities to furnish that water at any one time, (b) i act of God, force majeuce� oc other cause beyond the reasonable control of the City, and (3) change in quantities specified in Exhibit B made pursuant to Paragraph 6 of this contract. Lt is recognized by the District that the City may need to implement conserv�tion measures Eor the en[ire City and District service area in o�der to mee[ an emergency condition. , The Dist�ict also vould be subject to and support such conservation , measures. . The City shall maintain and operate Che Joint Faciltties in accordance � with prevalent enginee�ing sta�dards and in conEocmity with the then curcent standards and requirements established by applicable State and I F-2 Federal lav and agencies having jurisdiction over such maintenance aad operatio�. Included �rith auch maintenance aad operation ahall be the � carrying of public liability insurance with limits in accordance �rith ' standard practice unless the City elects to become self-insured. Should the City elect to becooe self-insured. the Joint Facilities shall also be self-insured by the City. The District ahall have the right to observe the operation and review iaaintenance at any ti�e provided that a reasonable time period of notification has been provided to the City. 5. Access to Joint Facili[ies The District may have access to the Joint Facilities at aay time after a reasonable notification period has been provided to the City. b on Cructed 6. Future Joint Facilities Future Joint Facilities to e c s shall be agreed upon by the District and the City, but in no event shall be of less capacity and quality than is required by �pplicable Federal� State. � oc local standards, regula[ions, or Che minimum capacity and quality which good engineering praccice would dictate under the circumstances. The , District and Che City shall confer and agree upon a method for f�inancing such facilities. The payment of the cost of such Future Joint Facilities ' shall be made in accordance with Paragraph 7 of this Contract. � ' If regulatory agencies with jurisdiction over the Joint Facilities validly dicect the upgrading of the Joint Facilities by the making of qualitative improvements to such facilities, the City shall immediately commence the planning. design. an'd construction of the improvements subject to the approval of the City Council and availability of sufficient funds to finance such improvements. 7. Financinq Construction and Maintenance of Joint Facilities In consideration for the City's acquiring, constructing, installing, �oaintaining, and operating the Joint Facilities and as a condition for use thereof and service therefro�a, the Distcict shall pay to the City the amounts pcovided foc in Paragraph B. All such payments shall be made at the times and in the manner specified in Paragraph S: To finance the Joint Facilities Costs remaining after execution oE the grant contract with the State of Washington� the City may issue water and sewer revenue bonds (Joint Facilities Bonds) which may have a lien position on ttie gross revenue of the City's waterworks utility, including the system oE sewerage as a part thereof, on a parity vith its outstanding water and sewer revenue bonds and any bonds hereaEter issued o� a p�rity of lien with those revenue bonds. Such Joint Facilities Bonds may be Lssued and sold at any tirae after the effective date of this Con[ract. Lf thece are any excess proceeds from Joint Facilities Bonds and eacnings from the investrnent ChereoE after payment of all costs relatinR to the pucposes of such Bo�ds� the City shall deposit s�ch excess proceeds and F-3 . earnings into the Bond Redeaptioa Pund for auch Bonda for the purpose of paying principal and iatecest as they come due or redeev such Boads prior � to their aaturity. at such time such Bonda are subject to prior redemptioa. . The charges foc the Diatcict's share of the Joint Facilities Costa and Joint Pacilities Maintenance and Upecation Expenses shall be deemed water service charges made by the City to the District. ' 8. Billings a�d Payments The District's annual billiags for Joint Pacilities should be determined as follovs: a. • The District ' s total share of the Joint Facilities Debt � Service ExpenBc shall be computed by dividing the District's . share of the estimated project cost as shor+n in Exhibit C by the total estivated project cost and then multiplying by the Jolat Facilities Debt Service Expense. b. The District's an�ual share of the Joint Facilities Debt Service Expense shall be determined by multiplying the actual � annual debt service repayment schedule for the Joint Facilities Bonda by the same percentage as ia (a) above. � . c. The District s annual Debt Service Expense shall be billed at a rate oE S.17 per l00 cubic Eeet of water used for the first year and such per 100 cubic feet rate increased by S.026 each year thereafter until the District's total share of the Debt Secvice Expense as computed in (a) above has been paid. , If the amount of the billing to the District is less than the annual share of the District's Joint Facilities Debt Service Expense as calculated in (b) above, the City shall pay the difference and is entitled to a rate of return on this difference at a rate equal to the interest rate on the bo�ds until the District•s share as determined in (a) above has been paid by the District. d. The District's share of the Joint Facilities Maintenance and Operation Expense shall be computed. by dividing the entire City's Watec Supply Maintenance and Opecatioos cost by the volume of vater supplied to the City's service area and then multiplying by the volume of Water supplied to the District. e. The District's annual billings Eor the Joint Facilities Cost shall be the sum oE (c) and (d) above. Such charges shall be divided into equal monthly amounts for each calendar year or pact thereof remaining and shall commence on the first day of the month first Eollowirtg the month in which Joint Faciltties , Maintenance and Operation Expenses are initially incurred. The City shall bill the District on the first day �f each calendar month. The District shall pay by the cwentieth day ' F-4 of the nezt month. after which time the billing shall be deliaquent. Chargea oa�itted ia one month may be billed in ' the folloving vonth. - Delinquent chargea shall accrue � intecest on the unpaid balance at the rate of 12 percent per annuo fro■ date of delinquency until paid. By October 1 of esch year� the City shall notify the District of the propoaed budget for the Joint Pacilities ahowing the estimate of the Joint Facilities Debt Service Expense for the Joint Facilities Bonds and the estimate of the Joint Facilities Maintenance and Operation Expenses for the ensuing calendar year. The budqet amounts will be for informational purposc:s o�ly Co ptovide Jt�VJIICtS notice oE anticipated chanbes, Lf any. By March 1 (or as soon as pcactical thereafter) of each year following the year for which the budget estimatea apply� the City shall determine and notify the Diatrict of the actual Joint Facilities Debt Service Expenses. ' the actual Joint Facilities Maintenance and Operation Expenses, and the ' actual water consumption by the Dietrict and the City for the immediately preceding calendar year or part thereof covered by this Contract. If the actual requirements and expenses exceed Che total payments made by the District, the District within 30 days after such notification shall pay to the City its share of that deficit. If the actual requirements and expenses for the District were less than the total payments made by the ' District for that pceceding calendar year, the City shall retain those , excess payments and credit the excess payments against the next payments due from the District. . DurinR any year, [he City shall opecate within the Joint Facilities budget. Should Joint Facilities Debt Service Expense increase above budget ' estimates, the City may amend the Joint Facilities budget and increase the charges to the District after notifying the Distcict at least 90 days before the increase shall take effect. Such notification shall state the reasons for such increase. 9. Covenants to Make Payments The District irrevocably covenants, obligates. and binds itself to pay to the City the �applicable payments and charges reEerred to in Pacagraph S as water secvice� charges out of the gross water revenues. and/or vater and sewer revenues of the District or from such other money legally available to the District for such purpose as determined by the District. The water service charges shall, subject to the qualiEication below, be treated as coaintenance and opecation expenses artd shall expcessly be made a part of the maintenance and operacion expenses oE the District ' s System in any futuce bond issue or other Einancing payable in vhole or in pact from [he revenues of the System. Further, the water service charges shall be payable and constitute a chacge prior and superioc to any charge or lien of any revenue bonds issued by the District payable from the gross revenues of the System� unless such f►�ture bond issue oc other Einancing shall be on a parity oE lien on such revenues with presently outstanding revenue bonds and such ou[standi�� bo�ds do not permit such pciority of payment. r-5 ' Zt is recogaized the District �ay have autstandiag revenue handa . � ' papable ia whoie or iA part �rom the gross revenues af the Systea. Nathiag i in this sectian is Latendcd ta vialate. nor shall i[ be coastrued to violate, a�y caveaanCs resgectiag Chose outstanding boads, and such ' covenants, to the exte�t there is a conElict between them and this section, shall control wxth respect to such outstanding bonds and bonds issued on a partty therevith. 2he Dfstxict irrevacab2y cavenants aad agrees to� establish rates and co2lect fees for �ater service� which will be sufficient to pay Che �ater ' service charges to Che Ctty and to meet the caveaanCs af sxisting band issues which canstituCe a charge upan the gross reve�ues of the System. The City agrees ta establish rates and collect fees for water service which will be at leasC sufficient to pay the expenses af vaintenance and operation of the water utiltty of the City and meet the principal , I interest. and caverage requirements af any and alI revenue hands af the City which caastitnte a charge upaa the grass revenue af such water utility. 10. �se oE Payments Made for Covera�e and Hand Reserve Paymeats to the City oade under this contract by the District which represent the District's share of the coverage requirement oa any Joint Facilities Bonds � shall be identified a sepacate account within the office af the Director of Finance af the City and may be usad at the Cfty•s aption o�2y for any of the fal2awing purgases: (1) Funding the reserve accouc�t in the Boc�d Redemgtion Fund for any,Joint Facilitie"s Bonds; I� (2) Redeeming prioc to maturity any Joint Facilities Bonds; II . (3) Making extraardinary repairs or replacing any Jaint Facilities; (4) Acquiric�g, constructing, and installing additional Jaiat Facilities; or (53 Paying any debC servtce for Which the District is responsible and the City has paid. ({y} paying a portion or all af the I2istrict's share of the Joint Facitities Maintenance and OperaCion Expenses. (7) Any other pucpase stipulated by the District. � Until used* awney in the coverage fund or accounL shall be invested in I any legal investaient far cities and earcxings fram such investments shalt he � deposiCed i�tta such fuad ac account. After a21 Joint Faciiities Bonds have been redeemed, any moaey in such coverage fund accaunt shall be returned ta Che District on the basis of the District's then share of the covera�e requirement under PacaAraph 8 or used in accordance with the abave purparses. - . F-6 I — — — � Paymenta oade by the Diatrict to the City or transfera from the ' coverage fund or account for the purpose of funding the required reserve in � any Joint Pacilities Bond Redemptioa Fuad. and earnings on the investments of such funds attributable to such paymente or transfers, shall be used by ' the City only for any of the following purposes: (1) To satiafy the required obligations of the reserve; or (2) To cedeem pcioc to a�aturity any Joint Facilities Bonds, if ' permitted; or (3) To be used in any plan for refunding Joint Facilities Bonds vith new Joint Facilities Bonds; and ' (4) If not used otherwise ia (2) and (3) . to pay the last remaining Joint Pacilities Bonds payable from that Bond Redemption Fund. � � Earnin s i� a full funded bond reserve (attributable to a ments made S Y P Y by the District transferred into a principal and interest account, or an equivalent account shall be credited against paymeats required to be made for debt service by the Districts pursuant to Paragraph 8. ' 11. FurnishinR of Books and Records The District Will make available at reasonable times Co the City for inspection and copying its books and records relating to the operation of its water utility. At a reasonable time prioc to the sale of any �oint Facilities Bonds, the District shall ' furnish to the City and its representatives all public information which the City may cequire having a bearing on the issuance and sale of such , bonds. , 12. Covenant AAainst Assi�nment, Conveyance, Merger The District shall not assign its obligations under this contract or assig� or convey its local facilities to any person or entity without first receiving the written consent for such action from the City Council. The City shall not assign its obligations under this contract or convey the Joint Facilities to any person or entity without first providing the written notice •to the District. The District shall not permit the merger of it or its local facilities into another municipal eocporation without the vritten coasenc of the City Council unless the entity resulting from the merger shall assume and agree to perform all obligations of the mergiRg entities under this Contract. 13. Holders of Joint Facilities Bonds The obliAatiorts of the District under this contract shall cun to the benefit of the holders of the Joint Facilities Bonds and bonds issued oa a parity therevith. 14. Effective Date - Term of Contract The effective date oE this contcact shall be when a State of Washington Referendum 38 grant is committed to pay part oE the Joint Facilities Costs. but in ao event witl F-7 . . . . �his contrac[ take eEfect unless a Referendum 38 Rrant is offered by the � State and accepted by the City. This contract shall terminate if the KinR � County Council shall not approve of the District's and the City's plans of , additiona and betteriaents to their respective original general comprehensive plans for water supply incorporatinq the Joint Facilities but tn the event the County shall not approve such plans, the District shall reimburse the City Eor costs of desiRn of the Joint Facilities incurred in the same p�oportia� as che Distctct's share of the Joint Facilities Debt Service Expenses as set focth in Paragraph 8. Because Chis contract Aives the District and the City riRhts to use. and. therefore, interest in the Joint Facilities, such riKhts must continue until by aRreement Chey are terminated. CommencinR an the efEective date specified above. [his contract shall be for a tetm of 25 years oc such lonRer period as any Joint Facilities Bo�ds ace outstendi�g or the payment thereof is not fully provided for, secured. a�d funded, and shall continue thereafter until terminated. The District may. vithdraw from the obligations of this contract with the consent of the City after all boads are retired or payment thereof is fully provided foc, secured,. and funded: Such aithdrawal shall not be eEfective until at least 90 days after the consent of the City is obtained. 15. Participati�� by Others Provision is hereby made� for consideratioa of providing service [o a third party or parties by the use of the joint facilities or supply from the City's or the District's system . from the joint faeilities. Such consideration would be based upon: I) a sufftcient amoun[ of unused capacity of the joint facilities to provide the service requested, 2) payment amounts that provide compensation to the City and the District that is adequate as determined mutually by the City and District. and 3) a mutually aqreed �upon distribution of such compensation between the City and the District. ' IN i�ITNESS WHEREOF, the Districts and the City have executed this contract as of the da[e and year first above 4rritten. CITY OF RENTON. {�IASHtNGTON KING COUNTY WATER DISTRICT NO. 63 BY aa1�.W�W �S 41. BY � t _�� ���..��. Barbara Y. SZ►inpoch, Mayor Hruce L. Gould, President BY � � BY �`+.� Maxine E. Mot�r� City Clerk ar es L. Ta�mage,Secretary ��r�sc�.l��o�9�'3 � Russell F, Storwick, Commissioner ATTEST �//f� ATTEST �/��¢ , / , _ TIT� T1TLB �_g - EXHISIT A JOINT PACLLtTiES DESCRtPTION The joint facilities consist of the following components: 1. The portion of Well No. 9 used to supply the District and City West Hill service area. 2. The {�Jest Hill Supply Pump Station vhich pumps water from Che City's 196 pressure zone to the West Hill Reservoir. 3. The 12-inch diameter tcansmission pipeline from the West Hill Supply Pump Station to the West Hill Reservoir. . 4. The 1.35 milliou gallon West Hill Reservoic located on the Dimmitt � Middle School i e s C . 5. The 12-inch diameter transmission pipeline from the West Hill , reservoir to the Distric� including meter vault(s) and meter(s). � 6. The telemetry link and supervisory control equipment for the Joint Use Facilities. ' Legal descriptions of the sites and locations of thse facilities shall be a described and shown oa the design plans Eor the construction of these facilities. � F-9 EXHIBtT 8 UATER SERVICE at3ANTITIES ` The valumes, floa catcs, and quantittes alloc�[�d Co the City and the District acr. as � stated Ln the follawing table. MAXiMUN ' STORAGE CAPACiTY �' SERVICE DAY WELL N0,9 ' POPUTATION BEMAND SUPPLY F'tRS PARTtCIPANT YEAR 2000 (GALLONS) (GALLONS/L1AY) EOUALIZLNG (GALLONS) STANDBY TOTAL CITY 3�4p0 715�000 980�000 1b5�000 170�Q00 430�000 765*00 i r OISTttLLT 2.600 54b.004 750.004 I25,080 t30,000 330�000 585,00" TOTAL 5,Q4Q 1,261,Q00 1,730,40Q 290,Q40 340,040 760,040 t ,350,OQ� . . I � . �il , I � i � I i � F-10 I � � � . • _. EXNIBtT C ALLOCATED COST AND SCHEDULE OF PAYMENTS The allocated cost to the District and City is based on the current estimated cost of the joint—use facilties. This estimated cost is to be adjusted based on the actual project costs following completion of the project. Por the purposes of establishing a pcoject budget and allocation of costs to the City and the District� the following costs are provided: Facility Estimated Projecr Cost ($) Well No. 9 S 241,200 Transa�ission Pipelines 387,600 � West Hill Pump Station 308,400 West Hill Reservoir 508,800 Total • $1 ,446.000 • Grant A�ount 482,000 City•s and District's Share (Est.) $964�000 Financing S Attorneys' Fees 38,600 " Total 1,002.600 City's Share 5751.950 (Estimated) District's Share S250.650 (Estimated) F-11