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HomeMy WebLinkAbout2021-2022 Adopted Budget2021-2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton • 1055 South Grady Way • Renton, WA 98057 • rentonwa.gov CITY OF RENTONBusiness Plan 2021–2026 GOALS VISION Renton: The center of opportunity in the Puget Sound Region where families and businesses thrive MISSION The City of Renton, in partnership and communication with residents, businesses, and schools, is dedicated to: Provide a safe, healthy, vibrant community Promote economic vitality and strategically position Renton for the future Support planned growth and influence decisions to foster environmental sustainability Build an inclusive informed city with equitable outcomes for all in support of social, economical, and racial justice Meet service demands and provide high quality customer service Provide a safe, healthy, vibrant community Promote safety, health, and security through effective communication and service delivery Facilitate successful neighborhoods through community involvement Encourage and partner in the development of quality housing choices for people of all ages and income levels Promote a walkable, pedestrian and bicycle- friendly city with complete streets, trails, and connections between neighborhoods and community focal points Provide opportunities for communities to be better prepared for emergencies Promote economic vitality and strategically position Renton for the future Promote Renton as the progressive, opportunity-rich city in the Puget Sound region Capitalize on opportunities through bold and creative economic development strategies Recruit and retain businesses to ensure a dynamic, diversified employment base Nurture entrepreneurship and foster successful partnerships with businesses and community leaders Leverage public/private resources to focus development on economic centers Support planned growth and influence decisions to foster environmental sustainability Foster development of vibrant, sustainable, attractive, mixed-use neighborhoods in urban centers Uphold a high standard of design and property maintenance Advocate Renton’s interests through state and federal lobbying efforts, regional partnerships and other organizations Pursue transportation and other regional improvements and services that improve quality of life Assume a crucial role in improving our community’s health and environmental resiliency for future generations Pursue initiatives to increase mobility, promote clean energy in our existing buildings and in new development, preserve and expand open spaces and tree coverage, and other efforts to reduce CO2 and greenhouse gas emissions Building an inclusive informed city with equitable outcomes for all in support of social, economic, and racial justice Achieve equitable outcomes by eliminating racial, economic and social barriers in internal practices, city programs, services, and policies such as hiring and contracting Improve access to city services, programs and employment, provide opportunities and eradicate disparities for residents, workers and businesses Promote understanding and appreciation of our diversity through celebrations, educational forums and festivals Seek out opportunities for ongoing two-way dialogue with ALL communities, engage those historically marginalized, and ensure that we lift every voice, listen and take action on what we learn Build capacity within the city to implement inclusion and equity by providing the knowledge, skills, awareness, and tools to integrate anti-racism approaches into daily work Meet service demands and provide high quality customer service Plan, develop, and maintain quality services, infrastructure, and amenities Prioritize services at levels that can be sustained by revenue Retain a skilled workforce by making Renton the municipal employer of choice Develop and maintain collaborative partnerships and investment strategies that improve services Respond to growing service demands through partnerships, innovation, and outcome management 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington i Updated 09/09/2020    Boards, Commissions, and Committees Location Day Time  AIRPORT ADVISORY COMMITTEE Meetings scheduled as needed  BUDGET ADVISORY COMMITTEE Meetings scheduled as needed  BENSON HILL COMMUNITY PLAN ADVISORY BOARD Meetings scheduled as needed  CITY CENTER COMMUNITY PLAN ADVISORY BOARD Meetings scheduled as needed  CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 1st Flr. HR Training. Rm. 4th Tuesday 4:15 p.m.  FIREFIGHTER’S PENSION BOARD 7th Flr. Mayor’s Conf. Rm. 3rd Thursday 2:00 p.m.  HISTORICAL SOCIETY BOARD Renton Museum 4th Wednesday 5:30 p.m.  HUMAN SERVICES ADVISORY COMMITTEE 7th Flr. Council Conf.Rm. 3rd Tuesday 3:00 p.m.  INDEPENDENT SALARY COMMISSION      Meetings scheduled as needed  LEOFF BOARD 1st Flr. HR Conf. Rm. 4th Tuesday 9 a.m.  MUNICIPAL ARTS COMMISSION 7th Flr. Conf. Center. 1st Tuesday 6:00 p.m.  NON‐MOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE      Meetings scheduled as needed  PARKS COMMISSION Locations vary 2nd Tuesday 4:30 p.m.  PARKS, TRAILS, AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMITTEE Meetings scheduled as needed  PLANNING COMMISSION Council Chambers 1ST and 3RD  Wednesdays  6:00 p.m.  RENTON HOUSING AUTHORITY 2900 NE 10th St. 2nd Monday  9:00 a.m.  SENIOR CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE Senior Activity Center  1st Monday 10:00 a.m.  SISTER CITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Meetings scheduled as needed    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington ii  Mayor Armondo Pavone    Judge Terry Jurado     Judge Kara Murphy Richards   Serving as Mayor since 2020 Serving since 1998 Serving since 2020       City Council 2014‐2019      Renton City Council    Angelina Benedetti       Randy Corman         Ryan McIrvin    Valerie O’Halloran     Serving since 2020   Serving since 1994    Serving since 2016      Serving since 2019  Ruth Pérez          Ed Prince              Kim‐Khánh Văn     Serving since 2014   Serving since 2012     Serving since 2020  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington iii The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA)  presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to City of Renton, Washington for its  biennial budget for the biennium beginning January 1, 2019. In order to receive this award, a  governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy  document, as a financial plan, as an operations guide, and as a communications device.  This  award is valid for a period of two years only. We believe our current budget continues to  conform to program requirements, and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility  for another award.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington iv Table of Contents  Page   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  Budget Message from the Mayor 1‐1  2021/2022 Budget Highlights 1‐8  Budget at a Glance 1‐16  Long Range Plan 1‐26  Financial Management Policies 1‐47  RENTON RESULTS  Budget Framework 2‐1  Renton Results Overview 2‐4  Safety and Health ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐6  Representative Government ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐11  Livable Community ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐15  Mobility ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐20  Utilities and Environment ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐23  Internal Services ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐29  Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area 2‐35  Reconciliation to Total Budget 2‐42  BUDGET BY DEPARTMENT  Legislative 3‐1  Executive 3‐6  City Attorney 3‐24  Court Services 3‐28  Administrative Services (AS) 3‐32  Community and Economic Development (CED) 3‐41  Community Services 3‐58  Human Resources and Risk Management (HR&RM) 3‐81  Other City Services 3‐88  Police 3‐90  Public Works (PW) 3‐104  DEBT MANAGEMENT  Overview 4‐1  Outstanding Debt 4‐2  Computation of Limitation of Indebtness & Debt Service to Maturity by Funding Sources 4‐3  Debt Service Coverage Ratio 4‐4  General Obligation Debt 4‐5  Waterworks Debt 4‐7  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington v Table of Contents  Page   CAPITAL INVESTMENT PROGRAM  City Wide Narrative 5‐1  City Wide Summary 5‐5  General Government 5‐6  Transportation 5‐79  Airport 5‐109  Golf Course 5‐121  Water 5‐129  Wastewater 5‐153  Surface Water 5‐163  BUDGET BY FUND  Summary All Funds 6‐1  General Governmental 6‐11  Special Revenue 6‐12  Debt Service 6‐16  Capital Investment Program 6‐17  Enterprise 6‐26  Internal Service 6‐33  Investment Trust 6‐40  APPENDIX  General Information 7‐1  Largest Taxpayers/Principal Employers 7‐2  Full‐Time Employee Staffing 7‐3  Comparison of Taxes and Rates 7‐4  2020/2021 Index of Positions and Pay Ranges (2020 represented pending development) 7‐5  2021/2022 Rates and Fees Schedule 7‐17  2021/2022 Utility Rates Brochure  7‐34  Budget Glossary 7‐38  Adopted Legislations (Budget, Taxes, Fees, and etc)  7‐44  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington vi Readers Guide to the Budget  The following Reader's Guide lists each major section of this document in the order that it appears and provides  a brief description of what you will find in that section.  Please refer to the Table of Contents for specific section  locations and content details.  Section 1:  Executive Summary  The Introduction presents the Mayor’s budget message.  His letter articulates City initiatives and issues for the  2021/2022 Biennial Budget.  Following this are the 2021/2022 Budget Highlights, Budget at a Glance, Long  Range Plan, and Financial Management Policies.  Included in the Executive Summary section is a condensed view  of the budget, covering everything from a summary of the budget process to summaries for fund types,  department expenditures and employment history, and revenue sources and levels.  Section 2:  Renton Results  In this section we present the City of Renton’s performance management initiative originated in 2007 to clearly  illustrate the services provided by the City of Renton, the resources needed to provide these services, and the  results of the service efforts to facilitate policy decisions and provide accountability to the community.  Section 3:  Budget by Department  In this section we present budget information organized by department and division. Each department, and  each division within that department, presents its mission statement, expenditure budget, staffing levels, and  funding decisions.  Section 4:  Debt Management  An extensive overview of Renton’s debt program is presented here.  This includes financial data on debt  limitations, property tax rates and revenues, long‐term debt service requirements, and a schedule of the City’s  overall outstanding debt.  Section 5:  Capital Investment Program (CIP)   This project listing provides a summary of the six‐year CIP plan.  We list projects by activity and by managing  department.  Section 6:  Budget by Fund  This section gives a display for each fund’s revenue, expenditures, and fund balance that compares current  program levels with those of past years.  Section 7:  Appendix  In this appendix, we provide selected demographics, economic statistics, an index of salaries and pay ranges,  and some general information about the City of Renton.  We have also included here a glossary of commonly  used budget terms.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington vii This page is intentionally left blank 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  Budget Message from the Mayor 1‐1  2021/2022 Budget Highlights 1‐8  Budget at a Glance 1‐16  Long Range Plan 1‐26  Financial Management Policies 1‐47  ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Jan Hawn, Administrator 425‐430‐6858 RENTON CITIZENS MAYOR Armondo Pavone 425‐430‐6500 MUNICIPAL COURT JUDGES Terry Jurado Kara Murphy Richards 425‐430‐6550 CITY COUNCIL Ruth Pérez, President Angelina Benedetti, Randy Corman,  Ryan McIrvin, Valerie O'Halloran,      Ed Prince, Kim‐Khánh Văn 425‐430‐6500 CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVEOFFICER Vacant 425‐430‐6500 COMMUNITY SERVICES Kelly Beymer, Administrator 425‐430‐6600 PUBLIC WORKS Martin Pastucha, Administrator 425‐430‐7394 EXECUTIVE COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC  DEVELOPMENT Chip Vincent, Administrator 425‐430‐6580 POLICE Ed VanValey, Chief 425‐430‐7503 HUMAN RESOURCES & RISK MANAGEMENT Ellen Bradley‐Mak, Administrator 425‐430‐7650 Facilities Jeffrey Minisci, Director Renton History Museum Elizabeth Stewart, Manager Golf Course Doug Mills, Manager Maintenance Services Michael Stenhouse, Director Utility Systems Ronald Straka, Director Transportation Systems Jim Seitz, Director Economic Development Cliff Long, Director Long Range Planning Angie Mathias, Manager Planning Mayor's Office City Clerk / Cable Manager Jason Seth, City Clerk Public Affairs Preeti Shridhar, Deputy Public  Affairs Administrator Support Operations Bureau Field Operations Bureau Emergency Management Deborah Needham, Director Human Resources Kim Gilman, Manager Risk Management Kelsey Ternes, Manager Benefits Wendy Rittereiser, Manager Finance Kari Roller, Director Information Technology Mehdi Sadri, Director Staff Services Special Operations Investigations Administrative  Services Patrol Services Patrol Operations CITY ATTORNEY Shane Maloney, Administrator 425‐255‐8678 Parks and Trails Cailin Hunsaker, Director Human Services Guy Williams, Manager Parks Planning and Natural  Resources Leslie Betlach, Director Recreation and  Neighborhoods Jennifer Henning, Director Airport Vacant, Manager Building Official Craig Burnell Organizational Development Kristi Rowland, Manager EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT    M   E   M   O   R   A   N   D   U   M       DATE: October 5, 2020     TO: Ruth Pérez, Council President  Members of Renton City Council     FROM: Armondo Pavone, Mayor     SUBJECT: 2021‐2022 Proposed Budget      Council President, Councilmembers, and members of the Renton Community,    The past year has been difficult for everyone. We have stayed home and created  physical distance from one another. Businesses have shut their doors and many workers  have lost their jobs. Some of us have even lost loved ones to COVID‐19. Renton  residents and businesses have felt the impact of this pandemic and we at City Hall have  had to find new ways to do business.     During these times, I want to assure you that while the city has had to adapt and find  new and more efficient ways of doing business the city is doing well.    We continue to provide all our core services. In fact, we continue to set higher goals in  the level of service we provide.    We are making sure that residents and businesses are aware of the assistance and  support that’s available to them, so they can recover from the current hardships.    I am pleased to present to you my budget proposal for the 2021‐2022 biennium.    First, I want to thank Jan Hawn and her staff for all their work in preparing the budget  document that you have received.    And special thanks to our department administrators for their effort and collaborative  spirit in preparing this budget.    Throughout the process, they focused on our ability to continue providing quality  services citywide as defined in your Business Plan.    Thanks to smart and strategic actions delivered by our department‐heads we can  remain financially strong in the upcoming biennium, not compromise our priorities, and  still plan for some of the key areas of focus that are important to our community.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 1Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor Ruth Pérez, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 2 of 7  October 5, 2020  Our commitment to serving our citizens is defined by the city’s Business Plan and each  department operates with these goals in mind.  They are:  Providing a safe, healthy, vibrant community Promoting economic vitality and strategically positioning our community for the future Supporting planned growth and influencing decisions to foster environmental sustainability Building an inclusive informed city with equitable outcomes for all in support of social, economic, and racial justice for all And meeting service demands and providing high quality customer service As part of our commitment to being an inclusive informed city with equitable outcomes  for all, this year we specifically strengthened and expanded our strategic goal of  inclusion by adding an emphasis of equity, accountability, and community input.   In addition, we have built strong relationships with leaders from every ethnic and  religious group in our community.  Our internal departments will be working to enhance our systems to improve access to  city purchasing and contracting services for women‐ and minority‐owned businesses.  And our Human Resources Department has led the region in launching several new  hiring policies to provide more opportunities for all applicants.  We will continue with an enhanced mandatory all‐employee training that addresses  implicit bias, race and social justice as well as emphasizes high performance.  Our success with the Census this year has been incredible. With our recent count at just  under 75%, we have gone from being one of the most undercounted cities in the  country to now claiming the top spot in South King County! In fact, we are now one of  the top in the country, and the long‐term positive impacts on our budget because of this  increase and the funds and resources we will get for our community is very encouraging.  We were able to do this by actively seeking grants from the state and other  organizations to help us with our outreach.   Much of the credit goes to our community and members of our task force, the  mobilization of Census ambassadors, our partners, and stakeholders. Thank you.  In order to build our city for the future, we are investing federal and state funding  where it will make the most difference.   2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 2Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor Ruth Pérez, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 3 of 7  October 5, 2020        Using CARES funding, we have been able to provide significant funding for rental  assistance, feeding programs, and business assistance, all of which support our Business  Plan.    The City will be allocating $388,880 in CARES Act rental assistance funding to nine local  agencies.    Another $401,178 in Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) Coronavirus funding  will be distributed to Renton Housing Authority ($250,000), St. Vincent de Paul/St.  Anthony’s ($50,000) and Renton Salvation Army Food Bank ($101,178). And the city has  earmarked $1,380,000 in CARES grants for 188 qualified Renton small businesses.    None of the challenges implementing the Business Plan of the City has been more  difficult than advancing the City’s economic development agenda. With the support of  the City Council, committed staff, and strong partnerships with the business and  development community, we have not only persevered but advanced the city’s  economic development agenda. Within two weeks of the Governor’s Stay at Home  Order, staff in Community & Economic Department and other departments were  completely operational, albeit remotely. This was an incredible feat, and one that could  not have been accomplished without the leadership and staff in the Administrative  Services and Human Resources Departments.    The Pandemic has had a catastrophic economic impact on much of the business  community. Restaurants, bars, and other businesses closed under the Governor’s Order  amid fears and concerns of the future. CED staff resources were redirected and  deployed to assist the business community with State and Federal funding applications,  enhanced communication and marketing tools, and implementation of new public  health guidelines, as well as rental support and assistance.     For the first time, permits and Land Use Applications are almost entirely processed  online. Engineering and Building Inspectors vehicles have been transformed into offices,  and inspections that cannot be performed in person are conducted virtually. The  Planning Commission and the Hearing Examiner continue to do their important work  and keep the processes moving. Staff communicate, collaborate and meet the daily  expectations to support local business, new development and businesses that want to  make Renton their home.    Community and Economic Development continues to cross train and work with other  departments to streamline our work and find effective ways to ensure the public dollars  go further.     2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 3Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor Ruth Pérez, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 4 of 7  October 5, 2020      These collective efforts are reflected in the initiatives and projects being advanced in  2021/2022 budget cycle.  We anticipate the completion of many permitted  development projects including the opening of Valley Medical Center’s new cancer  treatment facility, Top Golf, and the Sunset Terrace Apartments.  Two new affordable  workforce housing projects, Sunset Oaks and Willowcrest Townhomes, are expected to  come online in the coming year.    And multiple investments are being made in our Downtown core, building on the work  already underway to rebuild intersections, enhance pedestrian amenities and return  two‐way travel to our streets.  This ongoing work will enhance safety and beautify our  historic business district with new lighting, landscape, signage and public art.    Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in Renton on new projects that vary  from the beautiful Hyatt Regency Hotel at Southport, to new office developments and  housing projects.    Partnerships remain a vital part of our successes in furthering the Business Plan.  Partnerships with Renton Housing Authority, KCLS, and private developers, plus support  from the State Legislature, help us to continue the transformation of the Sunset area  into a beautiful new neighborhood, teaming with investment. The opening of the Sunset  Neighborhood Park is a testament to what can be achieved in working with long‐term  partners to build our community.      The Family First Community Center, which will improve the quality of life for thousands  of our residents in the Cascade area, is another example of what can be accomplished  through strong partnerships. We continue to work with Renton School District,  HealthPoint, the Doug Baldwin Foundation, Renton Regional Community Foundation  and other generous donors and supporters to make the community center a reality.    Investing in our infrastructure and capital improvements projects is critical to the long‐ term health and well‐being of our city.     One of the key priorities that we have identified for the upcoming 2021‐22 budget is a  North WaterWalk at Gene Coulon Memorial Beach Park. Not only will this provide a  significant amenity for our residents and community, but it is also an especially  important safety feature for the park.  Another key capital project is a two‐way protected bike lane on SE 168th Street in the  Cascade Benson area that will provide connection between two schools. This area needs  significant infrastructure investment, and this project will highly benefit the community  with increased safety and accessibility.     For both these projects, we will seek grant funding from the state.   2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 4Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor Ruth Pérez, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 5 of 7  October 5, 2020        Some other transportation priorities include:  • Finish right‐of‐way and construction for 405/N. 8th Direct Access Ramp; the cost  estimate is approximately $240‐$250M  • 405/167 Area Transit improvements – Grady Way Overcrossing: $40‐$50M  • Complete the 405/44th Structured Parking: amount TBD  • Rainier/Grady Way Transit Oriented Development Initiative   • King County work on the Renton Extension of Eastrail   • I‐405 Renton‐to‐Bellevue Project    In Renton, we have committed ourselves to a public safety strategy that places the  safety of our community and the partnership with our residents first. In a time of  unprecedented challenges to our City and community, our Police Department remains  dedicated to their stated mission: “Working together to provide professional and  unbiased law enforcement services to our community”. Throughout the nation, the  expectation of law enforcement is to be transparent, accountable and fair. I am  confident the Renton Police Department will meet those expectations.      The City of Renton maintains the lowest crime rate in major South County cities by using  its full complement of police services and partnering with our community. By providing  proactive and responsive resources and programs to address crime and safety issues,  Renton often sets the example for others to follow.     There are several examples of how Renton Police work in collaboration with the  community to provide such outstanding services. The department’s Take Me Home  Program is a community‐driven program designed for the safe return of loved ones who  may have difficulty communicating or may need special assistance during an emergency  situation.     Safe Place is an initiative that was born out of a need to address low reporting of anti‐ LGBTQ+ crimes and school bullying incidents. By partnering with local businesses who  will provide a safe place for victims to shelter while a crime is reported, we hope to  increase the feeling of, and opportunity for, safety in our community. I would like to  thank the members of our Mayors Inclusion Task Force, and in particular Kevin Poole,  for bringing the idea to us and supporting our efforts in this program.     Recently, the police department held a series of online polls to create a baseline of  interest, concerns, and expectations of the department and what residents feel policing  should look like in Renton. With this data, they will now engage the community through  a series of forums and discussions specific to the communities of Renton. The goal of  this engagement will be to provide education, information, and most importantly, gain  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 5Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor Ruth Pérez, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 6 of 7  October 5, 2020      community perspective and feedback on our policies and practices to ensure the  department is providing the services our community expects.    Programs and efforts like these make me proud and give me the confidence that our  police department will not only rise to these necessary challenges but set the example  on collaborative community engagement and public safety.    This balanced budget proposal will allow us to continue to meet the service needs of our  growing community, albeit under some rather challenging circumstances due to  revenue losses associated with COVID‐19.    Other than the 1% property tax adjustment allowed by state law, this budget does not  require any new taxes for the next two years to meet our service level objectives.     This is despite the end of a $3 million sales tax subsidy we have been receiving from the  state for annexing the Cascade/Benson community in 2008, which ended in mid‐2018.    This two‐year budget proposal shows revenue of $494.2 million, with revenues  projected to rebound slightly starting in 2021 after a significant loss of $16.9 million in  2020 due to COVID‐19.     The largest loss of revenue due to COVID is from B&O tax, sales tax, and permit and  recreation fees due to closures.     Like all government agencies, we continue to see costs of labor and materials increasing  at a higher percentage than revenues.    With those exceptions, we have been fortunate to have a strong economy the past  several years.     As a result of the revenue loss in 2020 and the undetermined depth or duration of the  impacts of COVID‐19, we have decided to hold the line and are proposing a baseline  budget for 2021.  This will help us focus on stabilizing and maintaining core City services  at a level that is expected by our residents and businesses while ensuring that the city  remains in a financially stable position.     The proposed budget reflects the use of reserves during 2021 and 2022, again due in  large part to the impact of COVID‐19, but also as a result of the fact that expenditures  tend to grow at a higher percentage than revenues.  It will be challenging in future years  to maintain service levels without new sources of income as we discussed during the  2020 Council retreat.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 6Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor Ruth Pérez, Council President  Members of Renton City Council  Page 7 of 7  October 5, 2020      As many of you recall, we reduced our staffing in 2009 to address the impact of the  recession, despite significant increases in population.  We learned from that experience  and it has helped us with our cost containment efforts in 2020 and in planning for this  budget cycle.      Again, we are proposing a baseline budget for 2021.  There are no new positions  proposed for the upcoming biennium.      The only changes proposed for the 2021‐2022 Preliminary Budget are due to:   Amendments to the original Adopted 2019‐2020 Budget made during that  timeframe.   Increases to costs for medical and employee benefits.   A proposed small living adjustment in 2022.     If we continue to work together, I'm confident that we can solidly navigate a city budget  and far more important, a pathway to the future that truly reflects our values and our  collective love for this phenomenal city.    Thank you.      2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 7Executive Summary - Budget Message from the Mayor   City of Renton  2021‐2022 Budget Highlights      Budget Overview                                The total adopted 2021‐2022 budget has revenue of $494.2 million and  a total expenditure of $507.5 million. This is 4.0% less in revenue and a  3.4% decrease in expenditures when compared with the 2019‐2020  adopted budget.    The majority of the City’s revenue sources are projected to decrease in  2021 due to closures resulting from COVID‐19, particularly retail sales  and use tax, utility tax, other licenses and permits, and other  intergovernmental and miscellaneous revenues. There is also a  significant decrease in grant revenue in the Transportation CIP. These  revenues are expected to stabilize by 2022.  The primary reason for the  decrease in expenditures is lower expenditures related to capital  improvements.   Given the revenue losses associated with COVID‐19, the City is using a  “baseline” budget for the first year of the upcoming biennium.  As a  result, there are no additional positions in this budget.  This adopted  budget includes the elimination of 2.5 positions (1.5 for limited term  employees and 1.0 full‐time position) for a total authorized number of  614.03 FTEs for 2021 and 614.03 for 2022.   Projected Budget Gap  The adopted budget reflects a fund balance decrease of $23.4 million  at the end of 2022 in the City’s General Fund, in large part due to the  loss of revenue due to COVID‐19 and the fact that the City’s costs grow  faster than the pace at which revenues grow. With an inflationary  adjustment for future wages and projected employee medical benefit  cost increases, a gap will occur in 2022 and continue to grow larger  beyond the current biennium. The ongoing gap requires long‐term,  sustainable solutions.  The 2021‐2022 Budget will  stabilize and maintain core  services   The adopted 2021‐2022 budget does not contain any citywide cuts.  There are also no new budget requests in this adopted budget as a  result of 2021 being a “baseline budget,” but the focus is to continue to  stabilize and maintain core City services at a level that is expected by  our residents and businesses, and will position Renton for the future.  Fund Balance                        The overall 2021‐2022 adopted expenditures exceed the adopted  revenues by $13.3 million and results in a projected overall fund  balance of $138.2 million, approximately 8.8% less than the estimated  2020 estimated ending fund balance.  The decrease in the fund balance is primarily attributable to projected  loss of revenue associated with COVID‐19 and increases in medical and  dental rates.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 8Executive Summary - 2021/2022 Budget Highlights    The General Fund balance will be maintained at $15.3 million, just  above the 12% of General Fund operating expenditures, as targeted by  our fiscal policy.    Overall, the City is in sound financial condition.     General Government  Overview             Of the $494.2 million total revenue, $203.1 million is in the City’s  General Fund. The $203.1 million revenue is $2.4 million or 1.2% greater  than the 2019‐2020 budget.  The increase is due to an increase in  property taxes, business & occupation tax, and other taxes in 2022.      Personnel makes up the largest single category of expenses for the City  at 41% of the total citywide budget. Wage adjustments, medical  premiums, and pension increases tend to rise at a higher percentage  increase than revenues grow.    Given various costs increases to maintain existing services, even with  accompanying revenues and fee adjustments, the General Fund  continues to show persistent budget gaps into the future. The gap starts  at $9.4 million in 2020 and will grow over time to $14.8 million by 2026.   This is due to the loss of revenue in 2020 associated with COVID‐19 and  the fundamental imbalance between the revenue options available to  local governments and the services local governments are expected to  provide.  Renton is not an exception. This issue has been a high priority  topic for the State Legislature and citizen advisory panels for various  past State Governors. But, in the end, this is a problem left for local  governments to solve themselves with the limited tools available.       General Fund Revenues      Business and Occupation  (B&O) Tax/Business License  Fees                                 To bridge the gap and to address the structural imbalance, the City  implemented one of the tools available to help generate the amount of  sustainable revenue needed in the near future, and beyond the current  biennium. The City engaged businesses and community leaders in the  process and received valuable input that allowed us to structure and  implement the B&O tax effective January 1, 2016 in a way that would  minimize impact to the business community.      The adopted 2021‐2022 budget continues the B&O tax implemented on  January 1, 2016.  The key provisions of the B&O tax are:   Businesses with $500,000 or higher annual gross receipts are  required to pay B&O tax.   The 2020 B&O tax maximum amount paid is capped at $4.723  million per year. This cap is automatically adjusted annually by  inflation.   The tax rate is 0.085% for all business activities other than  retail, which have a rate of 0.05%.   Limits the non‐profit and government exemptions for both  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 9Executive Summary - 2021/2022 Budget Highlights             As noted above, budgeted expenditures for 2021 have been set at a  baseline level due to the impact of revenue losses related to        COVID‐19.  The only changes for the 2021‐2022 Preliminary Budget  are due to:     Amendments to the original Adopted 2019‐2020 Budget made  during that timeframe;   Increases to costs for medical and employee benefits; and   A budgeted cost‐of‐living adjustment in 2022 of 2%.                                                            Property Tax                                                         Sales Tax                                          Utility Tax        Fee Adjustments        B&O tax and Business License fee.   A three‐year, new employer tax credit for new businesses with  50 or more employees in Renton.     The B&O tax was the only revenue option that the City Council could  implement without going to voters, which could generate the funds  needed to maintain General Fund City services into the future. It will  provide approximately $6.5 million in revenue in 2021 and is projected  to increase to approximately $9.5 million in 2022.  Most of the revenue  generated will be needed for the General Fund, although a portion will  help fund capital improvement projects.     Property tax revenue is projected to grow by just over $4.0 million  based on the 1% growth limit plus 1% for new construction. The City  also increased its levy in 2019 by approximately $1.0 million in property  tax for debt service payments related to the bonds for major  maintenance projects for parks, and will continue until the bonds are  fully paid. The total levy collection for 2021 is projected to be $21.5  million.    Sales tax is projected to decrease by 9.9% in 2021 and then increase by  8.7% in 2022 (as the economy recovers from the impact of COVID‐19).   Utility taxes are projected to decrease by 8.3% in 2021 and then  increase by 4.8% in 2022.  The decrease is also due to the impact of  COVID‐19.    Consistent with prior year practices, the fee schedule has been  reviewed and the adopted budget includes various fee increases, as  outlined in the adopted fee schedule.       General Fund Expenditures     2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 10Executive Summary - 2021/2022 Budget Highlights   The highlights of any major budget amendments to the Adopted 2019‐ 2020 Budget are noted below.    Legislative                    No additional budget requests other than those noted above.       Executive    $517k for court public  defenders   The Executive Department budget reflects an increase of $517k due to  increase in public defense services cases and contract costs.         Community & Economic   Development    $34k for SKCHHP member  contributions  $20k for recording fees   The adopted budget for Community and Economic Development  includes $34k member contribution to South King County Housing and  Homeless Partners.  It also includes $20k in recording fees paid to King  County, offset by fees charged to applicants.     Community Services         No additional budget requests other than those noted above.      Police                         $600k in overtime     The adopted budget for Police includes an increase of $600k in overtime  budget to more accurately reflect actual costs.  Public Works  No additional budget requests other than those noted above.  Administrative Services      No additional budget requests other than those noted above.  Human Resources &   Risk Management      City Attorney       No additional budget requests other than those noted above.      No additional budget requests other than those noted above.      2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 11Executive Summary - 2021/2022 Budget Highlights   Court  $20k for security officers      The Court Services budget reflects an increase of $20k to the security  officers’ budget.      Capital Funds  Governmental Capital  Improvements Fund (316)  2‐Year Total $5.4M     The adopted 2021‐2022 budget includes $5.4 million in General  Governmental capital projects.  The funds are needed to preserve and  enhance over $80 million of sports courts and fields, outdoor  structures, buildings and amenities in our community.  This budget will  continue to dedicate the B&O taxes to supplement the Real Estate  Excise Tax, King County Parks Levies, grants, donations, and general  fund transfers.    Details of the $5.4M million projects and use of City resources for these  projects can be found in the CIP section (5) of this budget.    Transportation Improvements  Fund (317)   2‐Year Total $1.6 million     The Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) includes $1.3 million in  Governmental capital projects, and has been presented at public  hearings and been approved by the City Council. Details of the projects  and use of City resources for these projects can be found in the CIP  section of this budget.      Enterprise Funds    The City has several enterprise type (or business type) operations,  that must be self‐sustaining.  These include the Water, Wastewater,  and Surface Water utilities; the Solid Waste utility; the Maplewood  Golf Course, and the Renton Municipal Airport.      Utilities  $2.5M in payment to garbage  contractor  $168k in local hazardous  waste management program  fee  $600k in King County waste  water charge    Rate increases         The Water, Wastewater, and Surface Water utility funds are  accounted for and budgeted separately, but are managed as a system  in accordance with the City’s financial management policies.  The  system conducts a comprehensive rate study every six years with the  assistance of outside consultants, with biannual updates performed  by City staff.   The adopted budget for Utilities includes an increase of $2.5M for   payment to garbage contractor (Republic Services), $168k for local  hazardous waste management program fee, $600k for King County  wastewater charge to align with the updated wastewater and solid  waste utility rate model.    The 2021 and 2022 update shows 2% increase for Water, Wastewater,  and Surface Water.     2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 12Executive Summary - 2021/2022 Budget Highlights   King County Metro is raising the sewer treatment charge by 4.5%  effective 2021.  King County solid waste disposal fee will remain the  same for 2021 as the 2020 rate of $140.82/ton.  The Solid Waste Utility is proposing a 2% rate increase in residential  rates for 2021/2022.  Maplewood Golf Course       The adopted budget shows no increase for the Maplewood Golf  Course.  Internal Service Funds         The City operates several “businesses” that provide service internally  to other City departments.  These include the Equipment Rental Fund  (501), Insurance Fund (502, property, liability, worker’s comp, and  unemployment), Information Technology Fund (503), Facilities Fund  (504), Communications Fund (505, print, mail, and general  communication), Healthcare Insurance Fund (512), and LEOFF1  Retiree Healthcare Fund (522).  All of the costs identified herein are paid for and included in the  operating departments’ budget.  The charges are calculated based on  either specific charges or by systematic cost allocation.  The health  insurance charge (for both active and retired employees) is part of  personnel benefit costs. The remaining internal service funds (Fleet,  Property/Liability Insurance, Technology, Facilities, and  Communications) services are paid as internal service charges.   About 80% of all internal service charges are paid by the General  Fund; therefore, the cost of internal service fund operations directly  affects the General Fund’s bottom line.     Equipment Rental Fund  Operating: $2.9M in  2021/$2.9 M in 2022  $2.1M in 2021 and $1.4M in  2022 for equipment  replacements/new additions        The Equipment Rental fund maintains nearly 733 pieces of  equipment, of which approximately 500 are vehicles and mobile  equipment used intensively in delivering City services.  The Fund also  accumulates replacement reserves for the replacement of vehicles  when needed.    The adopted budget includes $2.1M in 2021 and $1.4M in 2022 for  equipment replacements and new acquisitions. See Public Work’s  Budget by Department (section 3) for the full detailed listing.  Information Technology  Operating: $6.1M in  2021/$6.2M in 2022   Capital:$659k    The Information Technology (IT) Fund was created in 2007 to allocate  the costs of the City’s centralized IT services costs.  This fund provides  for citywide communication and data processing systems  improvements, maintenance and support including phone and  computer hardware and software, data center servers, storage and  network systems, business application systems development,  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 13Executive Summary - 2021/2022 Budget Highlights   implementation and support, Geographic Information Systems and  services, and mobile devices, copier and printer equipment for the  City.    The adopted budget of $6.4 million in 2021 and $6.6 million in 2022  includes a total of $659k in IT capital projects over the 2‐year budget  period. This includes major replacement and enhancement of existing  core networking, servers and storage equipment, end‐user  computers, copiers and printers.     Risk Management  Operating: $17.2M in 2021  /$18.4M in 2022       The City’s Risk Management program consists of three funds: the  Property and Liability Insurance Fund (502), the Employee Health  Insurance Fund (512), and the LEOFF I Retiree Medical Fund (522).   The 502 Fund’s annual budget totals $3.3 million in 2021 and $3.3  million in 2022, consisting of property and liability insurance, workers  compensation, unemployment insurance, and program  administration.  In 2020, all of the remaining portion of the  Annexation Sales Tax reserve were transferred to the General Fund to  help offset the revenue losses related to COVID‐19.   The City self‐insures employee health benefits with stop‐loss  coverage of $250k per incident. The 2021 and 2022 budget and  charges are based on projected plan costs by the number of  employees.  The 2021 premium increase is based on actual plan cost  increases for the prior year (from July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2020),  with an actuarial analysis and the need to maintain 30% in reserves  taken into account.  The 2022 premium increase is calculated based  on a projected 9% increase.   Providing retiree health care is required by state law for LEOFF I  retirees.  The City’s contribution is determined actuarially and re‐ evaluated every other year.  The most recent actuarial study put the  City’s obligation at approximately $39.4 million in present value;  therefore, the City is contributing $2.6M per year to fund this  obligation in 2021 and 2022.  Facilities  Operating: $6.1 million for  2021/$6.4 million for 2022     The Facilities Fund (504) was fully implemented in 2010 to accumulate  costs for maintaining and operating the City’s offices, public facilities  (primarily used by the general public), and operational facilities  (primarily used for City operations purposes), and charges the costs  to the appropriate functions/departments.      Communications  Operating: $1.2 million/year      The Communications Fund was also created in 2010 by pooling  citywide communications resources for the central print shop,  interoffice mail, external postage and printing services, and the  Government TV channel operation.  These were put in one place for  consistent coordination of brands, messages, and better prioritization  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 14Executive Summary - 2021/2022 Budget Highlights         of workload.  The annual operating cost is at $1.2 million per year,  which is allocated based on actual services demand by departments.      Pension Trust Fund      Firemen’s Pension  $210k in 2021; $200k in 2022  for Pension benefit payment       The City is the custodian of the Firemen’s Pension Fund, a trust fund  managed by appointed Trustees consisting of City elected officials and  retired pensioners.  The Fund accumulates resources and pays current pension benefits  per state law.  The Fund has sufficient assets to fully fund the City’s  pension obligation.  Currently the plan assets generate more than  sufficient earnings to cover the benefits; and the City also receives a  distribution of a state fire insurance premium surcharge that is  restricted exclusively for fire pensions.  The fund balance is expected  to grow due to the “overfunded” status of the Pension. After the plan  is closed and all beneficiaries are expired, the balance may be moved  to LEOFF 1 retiree medical.        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 15Executive Summary - 2021/2022 Budget Highlights The Budget Process    Washington state law requires that cities must adopt a balanced budget prior to the beginning of the fiscal year.    The adopted budget appropriates funds and establishes legal expenditure limits for the upcoming fiscal year.   Washington state law also allows for the adoption of biennial budgets provided the City Council also adopts a  second ordinance for a mid‐biennial review and modification prior to the end of the first year in the fiscal  biennium.  In 2011, the City of Renton moved from an annual budget to a biennial budget with mid‐biennial  review.      Budget Development and Adoption    The City of Renton’s development of the biennial budget occurs every two years from February through October.   Development begins with the Mayor and the Council’s review of the City’s current service levels and projected  revenues into the new biennium to determine if they need to make significant changes to the budget.  During this  review, the Mayor’s first priority is to ensure that the City is able maintain the current levels of service.  As costs  to maintain service levels continue to rise, additional funding may need to be identified to preserve the current  levels of service.   Alternatively, if revenues are expected to decline, cost‐cutting measures may be implemented.        The Mayor and the Council hold a strategic planning retreat in February of each year in order to determine  whether the City’s current levels of service are meeting the needs of our community, adopt the City’s Business  Plan Goals, and sets policy direction and priorities for the next budget cycle.      During June and July, City departments prepare and submit budget proposals with the estimates for providing  existing service levels for each year in the biennium.  In addition, they submit capital improvement program (CIP)  budgets.  In a typical biennial budget development, departments also requests for new programs that they would  like the Mayor to consider, which include current service level expansion and new services.  However due to the  pandemic and the City’s current budget status, there are no new program requests during this budget cycle. The  Mayor then evaluates the departments' proposals to ensure they align with Council’s adopted Business Plan Goals  and recommends to Council for approval.    The Mayor must provide a proposed biennial budget to the Council no later than October 31.  The Mayor’s  proposal also includes the estimated revenue to support the costs of providing City services.  Proposed  expenditures cannot exceed the reasonably anticipated revenue sources, unless new revenue sources are also  being proposed, in which case, proposed legislation to authorize the new revenue sources must be submitted to  the City Council along with the proposed budget.     After the Mayor submits the proposed budget, the Council conducts a public hearing in October.  During the same  time frame, the Council holds committee meetings in open sessions to discuss budget requests with department  representatives and make subsequent amendments to the Mayor’s proposed budget. Once the public hearings  have been held, the deliberative process is complete, and the Council has made their changes, the City Council  will adopt the budget ordinance in November.    Once the Council adopts the budget, the Mayor must ensure that expenditures are made within legal limits.  If the  economy changes or the City identifies unanticipated needs during the year that require changing the budget, the  Mayor will recommend those changes.  A Council‐adopted ordinance must accompany all budget increases.  If  revenues fall short, the Mayor can make decreases to the budget to ensure that the City does not overspend  available resources.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 16Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance     Biennial Budget Calendar    The following table illustrates a typical biennial budget calendar for both the initial budget development year and  the mid‐biennium adjustment year.  The process and legal deadlines in Year 1 is identical to the annual budget  process.  Year 2 is the simplified mid‐year review process.      123456789101112123456789101112 1. Administration Planning Retreat 2. Council sets budget priorities and guidance in workshop 3. First quarter financial report to Council Committee of  the Whole updates revenue projections 4. Administration develops budget parameters 5. Staff provide Capital Facilities Plan update to Council 6.    Departments submits budget requests 7. Finance reviews requests to ensure consistency with  Council’s and Mayor’s directions  8.  Departments identify necessary mid‐biennium  adjustments 9. Finance updates revenue estimates and compiles with  department submittals 10. Preliminary budget document prepared, printed, and  filed with City Clerk and presented to the City Council (at  least  60 days prior to the ensuing fiscal year) 11. City Clerk publishes notice of the filing of preliminary  budget and notice of public hearing to be held during  preliminary budget deliberations 14. City Council adopts an ordinance to establish the  amount of property taxes to be levied in the ensuing year  15. Final budget/Mid‐biennium adjustments, as adopted, is  published and distributed within the first three months of  the following year 13. City Council makes modifications to the proposed  budget/mid‐biennium adjustments  Process Description Year 1Year 2 12. City Council conducts workshops and public hearings on  the preliminary budget including  revenues and property tax  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 17Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance Budgetary Basis and Basis of Accounting     Basis of accounting refers to the point at which revenues or expenditures/expenses are recognized.  The City’s  budget is adopted on the modified accrual basis of accounting: revenue is reported when it is both measurable  and available and expenditures are reported when the liabilities are incurred.  Property tax, sales taxes, and other  tax‐payer assessed revenues due for the current year are considered both measurable and available for budgetary  purposes, even though a portion may be collected in the subsequent year.  Licenses, fines, penalties, and  miscellaneous revenues are recorded as revenue as they are received in cash since this is when they are both  available and can be accurately measured.     The budgetary basis of accounting does vary slightly from the City’s financial statement reporting.  Both  governmental activities and business‐type activities in the government‐wide statements, the proprietary fund,  and the fiduciary fund statements are presented on the full accrual basis of accounting.  Revenues are recognized  when earned and expenses are recognized when incurred.  Whereas, the governmental fund financial statements  are presented on the modified accrual basis of accounting, similar to the budgetary basis of accounting except for  the following differences:      Perspective differences – the General Fund is structured differently for budgeting purposes than it is for  reporting under GAAP. This City maintains various management funds that are reported within the  General Fund.  Consolidation of the funds results in the elimination of transfers between the consolidated  funds for GAAP reporting.       Basis difference – certain payments and receipts are budgeted for in a manner that is inconsistent with  GAAP.  Interfund payments for indirect cost allocations and reimbursement of payroll costs associated  with capital projects are budgeted as interfund revenues; however, these payments are reclassified as a  reduction of the expenditure for GAAP reporting.   In addition, interfund loan payments are budgeted as  debt service expenditures; however, these payments are reclassified as a reduction of the interfund loan  payable for GAAP reporting.     The budget, as adopted, constitutes the legal authority for expenditures.  The budget is adopted with budgetary  control at the fund level, by year. Expenditures may not legally exceed appropriations at the fund level of detail  for each year of the biennium.  Transfers or revisions within funds are allowed, but only the City Council has the  legal authority to increase or decrease a given fund’s budget.  Any unspent operating appropriations automatically  lapse at the end of each fiscal year, except for any amounts that are continued through the City’s annual adopted  carry‐forward ordinance.  The carry‐forward ordinance also identifies unspent capital appropriations to be carried  forward into the following year.                        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 18Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance Governmental Funds *General Government General Fund 000 Community Services  Fund 000‐001 Street Fund 000‐003 CD Block Grant Fund 000‐004 Leased City Properties  000‐108 Economic Development Reserve 000‐098 Museum Fund 000‐005 Debt Service LTGO 215 Special Revenue Special Hotel/Motel  Tax 110 Municipal Art 125 Cable Communication  127 Springbook Wetlands  Bank Fund  135 Police Seizure Fund 140,141 Capital Projects Mitigation Funds 303, 304, 305 REET Funds  308, 309 *Municiple Facilities  CIP 316, 336, 346 *Transportation CIP 317 Proprietary Funds Enterprise *Waterworks Utilities Utility Operations 405,406,407, 416 Utility Construction 425,426,427 Utility Debt Service Airport Airport Operations 402 Airport Construction 422 Solid Waste Utility 403 Golf Course Golf Operations 404 Golf Construction 424 Internal Service Equipment Rental 501 Insurance Services 502, 512, 522 Information  Technology 503 Facilities 504 Communication 505 Budgetary Fund Structure     Financial Structure  The City’s budget comprises seven major fund types, as shown below: General Government, Special Revenue,  Debt Service, Capital Projects, Enterprise, Internal Service, and Fiduciary Funds. The following pages provide a  general overview of each fund type.         Major Funds are those with budgets representing ten percent or more of the City’s overall budget.  They are  marked with an asterisk (*).  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 19Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 1. General Governmental Funds  These funds are used to account for resources that are generally not dedicated for a specific purpose. They  are used to meet the basic services that your local government provides.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Taxes • Police protection  • Fees, licenses, and permits • Parks and recreation  • Fines and forfeitures • Municipal Court / legal services  • Intergovernmental (Federal, State, and Local) • Street maintenance planning   • Economic development / planning   • Administrative functions    2. Special Revenue Funds  These funds are used to account for revenues that are to be used for a specific purpose as required by law or  administrative action.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Federal, State, and Local Grants • Economic development  • Taxes • Cable communications   Drug seizure funds • Police drug enforcement   • Art fund    3. Debt Service Funds  These funds are used to account for accumulation of dedicated revenue and payment of principal and  interest related to the City’s general obligation bond issues.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Property tax levies • Payment of principal and interest on  outstanding bonds  • Real estate excise tax   • Special assessments                       2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 20Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance 4. Capital Investment Funds  These funds are used to account for the acquisition and construction of major capital facilities and  equipment. All projects supported by these funds can be found in the 2019‐2024 City of Renton Capital  Investment Program section.      5. Enterprise Funds  These funds are used to account for operations that are financed and operated in a manner similar to private  business enterprises.  Services are financed primarily through user fees.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Service (user) charges • City utilities  • Federal, State, and Local Grants • Renton Municipal Airport  • Revenue bonds • Maplewood Golf Course  • State loans     6. Internal Service Funds  These funds are used to account for the goods and services furnished by one city department for another  department on a cost reimbursement basis.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Charges to other city departments • Fleet management   • Insurance, health / property liability   • Information technology   • Facilities   • Communications    7. Fiduciary Funds  These funds are used to account for assets held by the City in a trustee capacity.    Major Revenues Primary Services  • Investment interest • Fire pension fund  Major Revenues Primary Services  • Federal, State, and Local Grants • Capital investment projects  • Special assessments   • Property tax   • B&O tax & business licensing fee   • Real estate excise tax   • Impact mitigation   2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 21Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance Employment History – City of Renton         The total authorized FTE count is for regular full‐time, part‐time and limited term positions.  Refer to the Budget by Department section for additional  detail.     General Government Enterprise Total FTE's 2021/2022 Adopted Staffing Changes Regular (full‐time and part‐time) 497.94 117.09 615.03 Community Services ‐1.00 ‐1.00 Total Regular (full‐time and part‐time) 496.94 117.09 614.03 Authorized Limited Term Staffing 1.50 0.00 1.50 Executive ‐1.00 ‐1.00 Community Services ‐0.50 ‐0.50 Total Limited Term Staffing 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 2022 Adopted Staffing (Regular + Limited Term)496.94 117.09 614.03 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 22Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance Employment History – City of Renton (continued)        General Government Enterprise Total FTE's 2019/2020 Adopted Staffing Changes Regular (full‐time and part‐time) 463.82 105.09 568.91 Court Services 2.00 2.00 City Attorney 0.12 0.12 Community Services 5.00 5.00 Community & Economic Development 5.00 5.00 Administrative Services 3.00 3.00 Human Resources and Risk Management 1.00 1.00 Public Works 4.003.007.00 Police 1.50 1.50 Total Regular (full‐time and part‐time) 485.44 108.09 593.53 Authorized Limited Term Staffing 2.50 0.00 2.50 Community Services ‐1.50 ‐1.50 Community & Economic Development ‐1.00 ‐1.00 Total Limited Term Staffing 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total 2020 Adopted Staffing (Regular + Limited Term)485.44 108.09 593.53 2019/2020 Adjustments  Regular (full‐time and part‐time)485.44 108.09 593.53 Court Services 1.00 1.00 Community Services 10.00 9.00 19.00 Admistrative Services 1.00 1.00 Public Works 0.50 0.50 Total Regular (full‐time and part‐time) 497.94 117.09 615.03 Authorized Limited Term Staffing 0.00 0.00 0.00 Executive 1.00 1.00 Community Services 0.50 0.50 Total Limited Term Staffing 1.50 0.00 1.50 Total 2020 Authorized Staffing (Regular + Limited Term)499.44 117.09 616.53 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 23Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance Staffing (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees – FTE) Comparison by Department (1 of 2)     See Budget by Department (3‐1) for details.     2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Department Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Legislative Services City Council Members 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.00 City Council Liaison 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 0.00 0.00 Executive Mayor’s Office 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 0.00 0.00 Communications 5.63 5.63 6.63 5.63 6.63 5.63 5.63 0.00 0.00 Emergency Management 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 13.63 13.63 14.63 13.63 14.63 13.63 13.63 0.00 0.00 Court Services Municipal Court 14.00 16.00 17.00 16.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 1.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 14.00 16.00 17.00 16.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 1.00 0.00 City Attorney City Attorney 13.88 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 0.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 13.88 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 0.00 0.00 Community Services Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 ‐1.00 0.00 Park Maintenance 27.00 27.00 26.85 27.00 34.85 34.85 34.85 7.85 0.00 Recreation Services 19.17 19.17 19.75 19.17 19.75 19.25 19.25 0.08 0.00 Human Services/CDBG 4.33 4.33 4.50 4.33 4.50 4.50 4.50 0.17 0.00 Library Services 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Museum 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 Municipal Golf Course 9.75 9.75 9.00 9.75 12.00 12.00 12.00 2.25 0.00 Parks Plan and Nat Res 5.00 4.00 7.40 4.00 7.40 6.40 6.40 2.40 0.00 Facilities 25.25 28.75 29.00 28.75 35.00 35.00 35.00 6.25 0.00 Total Regular FTE 93.50 96.00 99.50 97.00 116.50 115.00 115.00 18.00 0.00 Community and Economic Development Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 Economic Development 4.00 5.00 6.00 5.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 1.00 0.00 Planning 29.50 31.50 30.50 31.50 30.50 30.50 30.50 ‐1.00 0.00 Development Services 19.00 19.00 19.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 54.50 57.50 57.50 58.50 58.50 58.50 58.50 0.00 0.00 Administrative Services City Clerk 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 0.00 0.00 Finance 20.50 21.50 21.50 21.50 22.50 22.00 22.00 0.50 0.00 Information Systems 18.50 20.50 20.50 20.50 20.50 21.00 21.00 0.50 0.00 Total Regular FTE 45.00 48.00 48.00 48.00 49.00 49.00 49.00 1.00 0.00 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 24Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance Staffing (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees – FTE) Comparison by Department (2 of 2)      See Budget by Department (3‐1) for details.  2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Department Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Human Resources/Risk Management Admin/Civil Svc Commission 7.008.008.008.008.007.707.70‐0.30 0.00 Risk Management 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 2.75 2.75 ‐0.50 0.00 Benefits 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 2.55 2.55 0.80 0.00 Total Regular FTE 12.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 0.00 0.00 Public Works Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 Maintenance Services 88.00 92.00 92.00 92.00 92.00 92.00 92.00 0.00 0.00 Transportation Services 28.50 30.50 31.00 30.50 31.00 31.00 31.00 0.50 0.00 Utility Systems 27.50 28.50 28.50 28.50 28.50 28.50 28.50 0.00 0.00 Airport 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 155.00 162.00 162.50 162.00 162.50 162.50 162.50 0.50 0.00 Police Administration 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 0.00 0.00 Patrol Operations 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 0.00 0.00 Special Operations 22.00 22.00 22.00 22.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 ‐2.00 0.00 Patrol Services 14.50 15.00 15.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 0.00 0.00 Investigations 22.00 22.00 22.00 22.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 2.00 0.00 Administrative Services 16.00 16.00 16.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 0.00 0.00 Staff Services 16.40 17.40 17.40 17.40 17.40 17.40 17.40 0.00 0.00 Total Regular FTE 161.90 163.40 163.40 163.40 163.40 163.40 163.40 0.00 0.00 Total All Staffing (Regular FTE) 571.41 591.53 597.53 593.53 616.53 614.03 614.03 20.51 0.00 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 25Executive Summary - Budget at a Glance CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW    Citywide Revenues and Sources                  2018 2019 2020 2019 2020 2021 2022 2021‐22 vs. 2019‐20 Adp Citywide Revenue & Resources Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Revenue: Property Tax 19,463,461$       20,885,254$       21,280,959$       20,978,323$       21,280,959$       21,494,697$       21,709,653$       1,038,137        2.4% Sales Tax 33,653,313          30,770,813          31,848,434          32,458,666          27,648,434          28,648,434          31,139,645          (2,831,168)       ‐4.7% Utility Taxes 16,405,034          16,282,153          16,442,011          15,601,647          14,792,011          15,100,639          15,815,967          (1,807,559)       ‐5.8% B&O Tax 10,689,216          8,000,000            8,280,000            11,078,932          4,500,000            6,500,000            9,500,000            (280,000)          ‐1.8% Real Estate Excise Tax 7,815,124            4,000,000            4,000,000            6,737,711            4,000,000            4,500,000            4,600,000            1,100,000        12.1% Other Taxes 4,821,661            4,027,174            4,035,174            4,864,526            2,953,666            3,468,666            4,532,519            (61,163)            ‐0.8% Sub‐total ‐ Taxes 92,847,809          83,965,394          85,886,578          91,719,804          75,175,070          79,712,436          87,297,784          (2,841,753)       ‐1.7% Business License Fee 1,032,670            681,455               1,033,780            1,098,584            918,780               918,780               927,968               131,513           7.1% Licenses & Permits 111,940               265,674               265,674               123,250               140,674               140,674               140,674               (250,000)          ‐88.9% State Shared Revenue 4,469,681            4,563,592            4,610,277            4,363,063            5,624,226            4,627,277            4,632,277            85,685              0.9% Development Services 5,270,109            5,333,776            5,334,427            5,192,753            3,946,427            3,676,588            4,642,706            (2,348,909)       ‐28.2% Utility Service Charges 74,493,084          77,731,991          78,723,031          76,597,631          78,723,031          79,813,861          82,300,125          5,658,964        3.5% Other Charges for Services 4,254,140            4,380,039            3,815,900            4,318,381            2,480,690            3,224,372            3,303,652            (1,667,915)       ‐25.6% Fines and Forfeits 7,947,995            7,759,216            5,935,387            8,647,104            4,975,587            5,543,507            5,751,054            (2,400,042)       ‐21.2% Interest Earnings 10,284,241          6,609,451            6,570,171            9,985,113            6,185,370            6,028,409            6,753,329            (397,884)          ‐3.1% Miscellaneous Revenue 2,028,525            3,838,945            2,784,540            1,729,718            4,458,470            298,722               298,722               (6,026,041)       ‐1008.6% Subtotal Operating Revenue 202,740,193       195,129,533       194,959,765       203,775,401       182,628,325       183,984,626       196,048,291       (10,056,382)    ‐2.6% Other 1x Revenue ‐                        ‐                        ‐                        ‐                        ‐                        ‐                        ‐                        ‐                    N/A Intergovernmental Grants 7,173,760            16,132,300          13,647,065          5,734,268            35,842,159          500,564               434,677               (28,844,124)    ‐3084.1% Mitigation Fees/Capital Contri.6,768,844            1,368,500            1,783,975            4,316,689            1,868,861            1,168,500            1,168,500            (815,475)          ‐34.9% Bond/Loan/Capital Proceeds 175,000               175,000               175,000               23,613,852          175,000               ‐                        ‐                        (350,000)          N/A Subtotal Capital Sources 14,117,604          17,675,800          15,606,040          33,664,809          37,886,020          1,669,064            1,603,177            (30,009,599)    ‐917.1% Interfund Services 35,128,056          35,985,368          40,324,415          37,746,120          36,156,653          44,482,295          45,899,929          14,072,441      15.6% Interfund Transfers 4,344,005            8,882,576            6,373,170            39,159,223          40,044,413          11,772,387          8,719,459            5,236,100        25.6% Subtotal Interfund Transactions 39,472,061          44,867,944          46,697,585          76,905,343          76,201,066          56,254,682          54,619,388          19,308,541      17.4% Total Rev/Other Svcs 256,329,858$     257,673,277$     257,263,390$     314,345,553$     296,715,411$     241,908,372$     252,270,855$     (20,757,440)    ‐4.2% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 26Executive Summary - Long Range Plan OVERVIEW CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET    Citywide Expenditures & Uses   by Department            2018 2019 2020 2019 2020 2021 2022 2021‐22 vs. 2019‐20 Adp Citywide Expenditure & Uses Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Legislative 377,512$             414,410$             429,907$             359,238$             420,924$             512,544$             526,945$             195,173           18.8% Court 2,221,909            2,646,159            2,750,176            2,385,767            2,706,695            3,102,930            3,215,462            922,056           14.6% Executive*4,041,124            4,146,897            4,262,890            4,583,261            5,082,290            4,977,882            5,039,971            1,608,065        16.1% Administrative Services 11,064,929          11,778,561          12,130,423          11,163,987          13,324,625          12,688,572          13,015,899          1,795,487        7.0% City Attorney 2,216,692            2,393,230            2,503,762            2,349,370            2,421,421            2,611,347            2,700,512            414,868           7.8% Community & Eco Development 8,292,882            9,703,958            10,341,490          8,830,870            12,731,142          10,808,262          11,186,070          1,948,884        8.9% Community Services 31,161,774          30,531,759          29,712,123          35,551,307          53,550,719          30,535,030          30,221,141          512,289           0.8% Police 38,525,178          40,278,922          42,849,585          41,523,529          42,589,454          42,530,483          43,642,136          3,044,113        3.5% Public Works 99,155,836          126,210,634       119,997,176       106,245,837       212,943,243       97,620,437          109,916,775       (38,670,598)    ‐18.6% Human Resource Risk Management 15,937,907          17,436,117          18,507,795          15,066,158          18,608,294          18,877,237          20,133,146          3,066,471        7.9% Other City Services**8,702,840            10,378,849          10,394,115          9,829,146            9,758,065            12,958,012          10,144,791          2,329,839        10.1% Total Operating Expenditures 221,698,581       255,919,495       253,879,443       237,888,471       374,136,872       237,222,737       249,742,847       (22,833,353)    ‐4.7% Subtotal Uses 221,698,581       255,919,495       253,879,443       237,888,471       374,136,872       237,222,737       249,742,847       (22,833,353)    ‐4.7% Inter‐Fund Transfers/Loans (various)4,344,005            8,882,576            6,373,170            39,159,222          40,044,413          11,772,387          8,719,459            5,236,100        25.6% Total Exp/Other Uses 226,042,586       264,802,071       260,252,613$     277,047,693$     414,181,285$     248,995,124$     258,462,306$     (17,597,253)    ‐3.5% In(De)crease in Fund Balance 30,287,272          (7,128,793)           (2,989,223)           37,297,859          (117,465,874)      (7,086,753)           (6,191,451)            Beginning FB 201,313,616       127,655,169       120,526,876       231,600,888       268,898,747       151,432,873       144,346,120        Ending FB 231,600,888       120,526,376       117,537,653       268,898,747       151,432,873       144,346,120       138,154,670        *Emergency Management is reported under Executive effective July 2016 ** Debt Service is reported under Other City Services 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 27Executive Summary - Long Range Plan CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW    Citywide Expenditures & Uses by Line Item            2018 2019 2020 2019 2020 2021 2022 2021‐22 vs. 2019‐20 Adp Citywide Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Expenditure by Line item Wages 49,152,270$       53,305,376$       56,114,303$       51,846,610$       56,386,715$       58,636,958$       60,504,765$       9,722,044                8.9% Overtime 2,931,108            1,580,515            1,580,915            3,001,168            2,028,083            2,172,115            2,172,515            1,183,200                37.4% Retirement 5,435,636            5,883,860            6,161,159            5,745,397            6,056,105            7,627,125            7,913,773            3,495,878                29.0% Social Security 3,753,143            3,986,417            4,164,911            3,990,694            4,083,745            4,389,299            4,505,050            743,022                   9.1% Medical 9,394,072            11,311,149          12,348,716          10,154,770          12,133,666          13,443,330          14,653,262          4,436,727                18.8% LEOFF Medical 2,591,684            2,591,684            2,591,684            2,591,684            1,591,684            2,591,684            2,591,684             ‐                            0.0% Payroll Taxes 1,596,924            2,169,539            2,217,582            1,763,857            2,184,605            2,301,287            2,348,761            262,927                   6.0% Intermittent Pay / Benefit 2,627,314            2,481,087            2,486,045            2,710,737            553,190               1,881,262            1,882,826            (1,203,044)                ‐24.2% Total Personnel Costs 77,482,151          83,309,626          87,665,315          81,804,918          85,017,793          93,043,059          96,572,636          18,640,753              10.9% Materials/Supplies & Small Eq 5,606,008            5,895,926            5,752,067            6,077,696            7,535,662            5,594,328            5,593,217            (460,448)                   ‐4.0% Services 53,446,660          52,882,394          52,624,088          72,007,007          76,034,693          75,645,045          76,673,176          46,811,740              44.4% Intergovernmental 16,706,564          17,005,234          17,424,972          ‐                        1,423,152            ‐                        ‐                        (34,430,206)            ‐100.0% Debt Service 9,425,122            10,595,498          10,595,767          10,859,832          10,959,717          10,773,594          7,929,644            (2,488,027)                ‐11.7% Interfund‐IDC & Services 3,609,388            4,014,281            4,182,109            3,998,455            4,570,883            4,373,267            4,499,582            676,459                   8.3% IS‐IT 4,579,533            4,952,889            5,766,490            4,968,389            5,371,015            6,435,900            6,578,379            2,294,900                21.4% IS‐Communication 1,101,300            1,104,816            1,133,441            1,104,816            499,428               1,154,732            1,186,600            103,075                   4.6% IS‐ER M&O 2,318,681            2,434,146            3,080,531            2,508,322            2,963,270            2,890,489            2,940,243            316,055                   5.7% IS‐ER RR 1,932,253            2,821,580            2,594,285            2,536,580            604,778               3,502,287            3,263,371            1,349,793                24.9% IS‐Insurance 1,729,676            1,688,665            1,717,565            1,688,665            1,698,109            1,740,148            1,767,616            101,534                   3.0% IS‐Facilities 4,104,771            4,424,369            5,318,506            4,402,269            4,149,775            5,992,730            6,179,470            2,429,325                24.9% IS‐EE Medical 11,604,389          12,811,989          13,708,707          10,886,977          13,924,707          13,924,752          15,056,476          2,460,532                9.3% Transfer out (capital/Reserves)4,344,005            8,882,576            6,373,170            39,159,217          40,044,413          11,772,387          8,719,459            5,236,100                34.3% Subtotal Non‐Personnel Cost 120,508,350       129,514,364       130,271,697       160,198,226       169,779,602       143,799,658       140,387,234       24,400,831              9.4% Exp Before Capital 197,990,500       212,823,990       217,937,013       242,003,144       254,797,395       236,842,717       236,959,869       43,041,584              10.0% Capital 28,052,085          51,978,081          42,315,600          35,044,550          159,383,890       12,152,407          21,502,437          (60,638,837)            ‐64.3% Exp Before Interfund 28,052,085          51,978,081          42,315,600          35,044,550          159,383,890       12,152,407          21,502,437          (60,638,837)            ‐64.3% Grand Total 226,042,586$     264,802,071$     260,252,613$     277,047,693$     414,181,285$     248,995,124$     258,462,306$     (17,597,253)$          ‐3.4% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 28Executive Summary - Long Range Plan OVERVIEW CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET    General Fund Revenues and Sources           *Note:  An additional property tax of $1.1 million was levied in 2019 to fund the annual debt service for bonds issued for a $14.5 million in Parks Major  Maintenance LTGO bonds.   Property  Tax 18% Sales Tax 31% Utility  Tax 16% B & O  Taxes 8% Other  Taxes 2% Intergovt 3% Dev. Svs 5% Svc Chrgs 4% Court  Fines 4% Interfund 5% Misc. 4% 2019‐20 General Fund Revenue &  Sources $200.7 million  Property  Tax 21% Sales Tax 29% Utility Tax 15% B & O Taxes 8% Other  Taxes 4% Intergovt 4% Dev. Svs 4% Svc Chrgs 4% Court Fines 4% Interfund 5% Misc. 2% 2021‐22 Adopted General Fund Revenue   & Sources $203.1 million  2018 2019 2020 2019 2020 2021 2022 2021‐22 vs. 2019‐20 Adp General Government Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Revenue: Property Tax 17,838,993$     17,392,662$     17,429,367$     20,978,323$     21,280,959$     21,494,697$     21,709,653$     8,382,321                   25.6% Sales Tax 33,139,208       30,570,813       31,648,434       31,927,080       26,948,434       28,448,434       30,939,645       (2,831,168)                  ‐4.5% Utility Taxes 16,365,034       16,242,153       16,402,011       15,561,647       14,792,011       15,100,639       15,815,967       (1,727,559)                  ‐5.6% Business & Occupation Tax 10,689,216       8,000,000         8,280,000         11,078,932       4,500,000         6,500,000         9,500,000         (280,000)                     ‐2.0% Less: Transfer to CIP (1,379,314)        (2,000,000)        (2,040,000)        ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      4,040,000                   ‐104.8% Real Estate Excise Tax 7,815,124         4,000,000         4,000,000         6,737,711         4,000,000         ‐                      ‐                      (8,000,000)                  ‐90.5% Less: Transfer to CIP (7,815,124)        (4,000,000)        (4,000,000)        ‐                      (4,000,000)        ‐                      ‐                      8,000,000                   ‐90.5% Other Taxes 4,754,853         3,955,500         3,963,500         4,779,349         2,895,992         3,410,992         4,474,845         (33,163)                       ‐0.4% Subtotal Taxes 81,407,990       74,161,128       75,683,312       91,063,040       70,417,396       74,954,762       82,440,110       7,550,431                   5.2% Business License (GF portion)676,041             681,455             1,033,780         1,098,584         918,780             918,780             927,968             131,513                      9.8% Building Permit/Development Services 4,682,058         5,223,637         5,223,637         4,598,496         3,460,637         3,460,637         4,426,190         (2,560,447)                  ‐22.9% Other Lic. and Permits 93,050               108,174             108,174             82,935               94,174               94,174               94,174               (28,000)                       ‐13.0% InterGov 3,853,293         3,295,735         3,332,420         4,355,024         4,242,381         4,507,277         4,507,277         2,386,399                   33.1% Other Charges for Svcs 4,568,702         4,204,600         4,233,861         4,850,245         2,360,828         3,079,638         4,034,696         (1,324,127)                  ‐16.6% InterFund Service Charge 3,900,407         4,431,371         4,599,200         4,194,724         4,987,974         4,789,667         4,918,634         677,730                      7.9% Court Fines 4,273,192         4,259,187         4,259,187         4,688,980         3,232,187         3,829,782         3,829,782         (858,810)                     ‐15.0% Miscellaneous Revenue 1,946,451         1,132,122         1,127,122         1,969,278         1,237,870         1,132,122         1,132,122         5,000                           0.2% General Fund Operating Rev 105,401,185     97,497,409       99,600,693       116,901,306     90,952,226       96,766,839       106,310,953     5,979,689                   3.1%  Transfer 9,167                 ‐                      ‐                      12,226,453       13,606,386       ‐                      ‐                      ‐                               N/A Capital and Other Grants ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                               N/A 1X Revenue 375,866             1,815,120         1,834,502         1,826,735         10,208,733       ‐                      ‐                      (3,649,622)                  ‐468.1% Subtotal Other Sources 385,033             1,815,120         1,834,502         14,053,188       23,815,119       ‐                      ‐                      (3,649,622)                  ‐468.1% Total Rev/Other Svcs 105,786,218     99,312,529       101,435,195     130,954,493     114,767,345     96,766,839       106,310,953     2,330,067                   1.2% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 29Executive Summary - Long Range Plan CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW    General Fund Expenditures by Department and Change in Fund Balance                   2018 2019 2020 2019 2020 2021 2022 2021‐22 vs. 2019‐20 Adp General Government Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Expenditures by Dept: Legislative 377,512$          414,410$          429,907$          359,238$          420,924$          512,544$          526,945$          195,173                      26.2% Executive*2,010,913         2,302,698         2,309,263         2,532,776         2,562,066         2,945,767         2,952,372         1,286,178                   32.4% Court Services 2,222,633$       2,646,159$       2,750,176$       2,406,014$       2,706,695$       3,102,930$       3,215,462$       922,056                      20.6% City Attorney 2,216,692         2,393,230         2,503,762         2,353,520         2,421,421         2,611,347         2,700,512         414,868                      9.4% Community & Economic Devl.8,151,701         9,327,234         9,964,766         8,380,740         11,240,359       10,808,262       11,186,070       2,702,332                   15.4% Administrative Services 4,702,202         4,932,881         5,234,532         4,614,165         4,884,924         5,402,784         5,583,700         819,072                      9.1% Human Resources 1,268,733         1,506,283         1,626,606         1,438,605         1,530,267         1,656,832         1,703,366         227,309                      8.5% Police 37,793,319       40,229,463       42,849,585       41,345,053       42,598,484       42,530,483       43,642,136       3,093,572                   4.3% Fire & ES*590,655             645,858             726,748             564,098             729,951             781,615             805,202             214,210                      17.9% Public Works 11,645,555       12,143,885       12,969,759       12,612,311       12,383,390       13,716,809       14,039,956       2,643,121                   11.4% Community Services 15,610,341       15,917,978       16,840,681       15,831,033       15,256,245       18,346,426       18,769,206       4,356,973                   13.7% Other City Services**3,064,656         3,335,181         3,338,179         25,560,746       19,993,322       5,133,270         5,131,148         3,591,058                   48.3% General Fund Operating Exp 89,654,911       95,795,260       101,543,964     117,998,300     116,728,049     107,549,070     110,256,077     20,465,922                 11.5% 1‐Time **3,087,548         5,429,704         3,030,743         9,477,588         7,434,573         5,192,098         3,434,823         166,474                      2.6% Grant Expenses ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                      ‐                               N/A Subtotal Other Uses 3,087,548         5,429,704         3,030,743         9,477,588         7,434,573         5,192,098         3,434,823         166,474                      2.6% Total Exp/Other Uses 92,742,459       101,224,964     104,574,708     127,475,888     124,162,621     112,741,168     113,690,900     20,632,396                 11.1% In(Decrease) in FB 13,043,758       (1,912,435)        (3,139,513)        3,478,606         (9,395,276)        (15,974,329)      (7,379,947)         Beginning Fund balance 31,534,619       30,807,162       28,895,226       44,578,377       48,056,982       38,661,706       22,687,377        Ending Fund Balance (EFB)44,578,377       28,894,727       25,755,713       48,056,982       38,661,706       22,687,377       15,307,430        EFB as % of Operating Budget 50%30%25%41%33%21%14% *Emergency Management is reported under Executive effective July 2016 ** Includes Debt Service 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 30Executive Summary - Long Range Plan OVERVIEW CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET    General Fund Expenditures by Line Item                 2018 2019 2020 2019 2020 2021 2022 2021‐22 vs. 2019‐20 Adp General Fund Actual Adopted Adopted Actual Yr End Est Adopted Adopted  $ % Expenditure by Line item Wages 35,132,243$       38,654,827$       40,792,785$       37,445,824$       41,029,824$       42,565,430$       43,916,110$       7,033,929                8.9% Overtime 2,654,648            1,351,771            1,352,171            2,687,020            1,836,568            1,943,371            1,943,771            1,183,200                43.8% Retirement 3,741,527            3,998,127            4,195,854            3,924,943            4,134,958            5,264,192            5,461,599            2,531,811                30.9% Social Security 2,761,392            2,882,380            3,013,913            2,928,189            2,958,868            3,183,888            3,264,697            552,291                   9.4% Medical 6,701,738            8,024,710            8,789,007            7,197,113            8,626,526            9,382,816            10,227,293          2,796,392                16.6% LEOFF Medical 2,591,684            2,591,684            2,591,684            2,591,684            1,591,684            2,591,684            2,591,684             ‐                            0.0% Payroll Taxes 1,017,961            1,490,230            1,529,026            1,139,751            1,507,238            1,598,533            1,641,853            221,130                   7.3% Intermittent Pay / Benefit 1,788,526            1,860,049            1,845,803            1,924,386            234,839               1,478,279            1,463,279            (764,295)                   ‐20.6% Total Personnel Costs 56,389,719          60,853,779          64,110,243          59,838,911          61,920,505          68,008,193          70,510,286          13,554,458              10.8% Materials/Supplies & Small Eq 1,514,511            1,801,905            1,748,846            1,762,852            1,590,637            1,669,177            1,668,066            (213,508)                   ‐6.0% Services 9,914,970            10,525,350          10,474,860          20,021,956          22,813,345          21,429,240          21,383,038          21,812,069              103.9% Intergovernmental 9,125,549            9,546,878            9,965,507             ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                        (19,512,385)             ‐100.0% Debt Service 175,000               175,000               175,000               175,000               175,000                ‐                         ‐                        (350,000)                   ‐100.0% Interfund‐IDC & Services 41,353                  12,342                  12,342                  91,476                  12,342                  12,342                  12,342                   ‐                            0.0% IS‐IT 3,707,534            3,904,788            4,547,586            3,920,288            4,223,192            5,044,242            5,157,664            1,749,532                20.7% IS‐Communication 900,609               875,222               899,703               875,222               403,909               926,117               954,543               105,735                   6.0% IS‐ER M&O 1,707,426            1,850,756            2,372,674            1,900,467            2,256,913            2,138,604            2,178,413            93,587                      2.2% IS‐ER RR 1,128,338            1,837,393            1,716,692            1,552,393            385,380               2,172,004            2,052,011            669,930                   18.8% IS‐Insurance 1,412,542            1,356,995            1,379,931            1,356,995            1,364,300            1,373,629            1,395,537            32,240                      1.2% IS‐Facilities 3,929,471            4,086,357            4,848,124            4,086,357            3,819,722            5,324,145            5,492,799            1,882,463                21.1% Subtotal Non‐Personnel Cost 33,557,303          35,972,986          38,141,265          35,743,006          37,044,739          40,089,500          40,294,413          6,269,663                8.5% Exp Before Capital 89,947,022          96,826,764          102,251,508       95,581,917          98,965,244          108,097,693       110,804,700       19,824,121              10.0% Transfer out (capital/Reserves)2,795,437            4,398,200            2,323,200            31,893,971          25,197,377          4,643,475            2,886,200            808,275                   12.0% Early Ret./Refunding Escrow ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                            N/A Exp Before Interfund 2,795,437            4,398,200            2,323,200            31,893,971          25,197,377          4,643,475            2,886,200            808,275                   12.0% Grand Total 92,742,459$       101,224,964$     104,574,708$     127,475,888$     124,162,621$     112,741,168$     113,690,900$     20,632,396$           10.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 31Executive Summary - Long Range Plan CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW      Change in Fund Balance       The 2021‐22 adopted budget will result in a net decrease in fund balance of $13.3 million citywide.  The change is  a combination of projected loss of revenue associated with COVID‐19 pandemic, capital project funding timing (all  capital project related funds, as well as enterprise funds), planned increase in reserves for replacements  (Equipment Rental Fund), planned use of reserve contingencies (Insurance Fund) and increases to employee  benefits.     Fund   Beginning  Fund Balance  2021‐2022  Adopted  Revenue 2021‐2022  Adopted  Expenditure 2021‐2022  Change $ 2021‐2022  Change % Ending Fund  Balance 000 General Governmental 38,661,706        203,077,791         226,432,068          (23,354,276)           ‐60% 15,307,430             110 SPECIAL HOTEL‐MOTEL TAX 677,327              400,000                  ‐                           400,000                  59%1,077,327               125 MUNICIPAL ART FUND 7,735                   235,800                 235,800                   ‐                           0%7,735                       127 CABLE COMMUNICATIONS DEVELOPMENT 603,760              195,348                 195,348                   ‐                           0%603,760                   135 SPRINGBROOK WETLANDS BANK 345,658              ‐                          ‐                           ‐                           0%345,658                   215 GENERAL GOVERNMENT MISC DEBT SVC 4,897,482           11,478,987           11,494,939            (15,952)                   (0)                 4,881,530               303 COMMUNITY SERVICES IMPACT MITIGATION 1,027,590           173,000                 316,000                  (143,000)                ‐14%884,590                   304 FIRE IMPACT MITIGATION 2,105,750           198,000                 937,621                  (739,621)                ‐35%1,366,129               305 TRANSPORTATION IMPACT MITIGATION 2,566,232           400,000                 400,000                  ‐                           0%2,566,232               308 REET 1 FUND 1,368,855           4,550,000              5,180,000              (630,000)                ‐46%738,855                   309 REET 2 FUND 1,451,451           4,550,000              5,998,650              (1,448,650)             ‐100%2,801                       316 MUNICIPAL FACILITIES CIP 1,105,075           5,165,025              5,410,395              (245,370)                ‐22%859,705                   317 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT 777,424              4,400,000              1,258,250              3,141,750              404%3,919,174               336 NEW LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT 16,408                 ‐                          ‐                           ‐                           0%16,408                     346 NEW FAMILY FIRST CENTER DEVELOPMENT 7,977,453           ‐                          500,000                  (500,000)                ‐6%7,477,453               4x2 AIRPORT 1,462,745           6,103,534              5,922,074              181,460                   ‐71% 1,644,205               403 SOLID WASTE UTILITY 2,515,860           45,750,089           45,927,557            (177,468)                 ‐7%2,338,392               4X4 MUNICIPAL GOLF 569,988              5,885,930              5,345,066              540,864                  198% 1,110,852               4X5 WATER 7,145,207           37,079,429           32,376,995            4,702,434              101% 11,847,641             4X6 WASTEWATER 5,662,785           23,964,799           23,407,667            557,132                  16% 6,219,917               416 KING COUNTY METRO 5,961,906           35,303,715           35,303,715             ‐                           0%5,961,906               4X7 SURFACE WATER 12,784,171        25,265,201           27,569,051            (2,303,850)             ‐68% 10,480,321             501 EQUIPMENT RENTAL 5,636,326           12,920,389           9,328,407              3,591,982              64%9,228,308               502 INSURANCE 14,637,136        7,095,018              6,578,812              516,206                  4%15,153,342             503 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 2,364,514           13,328,280           12,993,767            334,513                  14%2,699,027               504 FACILITIES 454,366              12,180,200           12,525,378            (345,179)                 ‐76%109,187                   505 COMMUNICATIONS 717,150              2,343,332              2,337,548              5,784                       1%722,934                   512 HEALTHCARE INSURANCE 5,301,437           26,044,360           26,264,262            (219,902)                 ‐4%5,081,535               522 LEOFF1 RETIREES HEALTHCARE 14,795,948        5,416,000              2,807,110              2,608,890              18%17,404,838             611 FIREMENS PENSION 7,833,427           675,000                 410,950                  264,050                  3%8,097,477               All Other Funds 112,771,166      291,101,436         281,025,361          10,076,075            9% 122,847,241          TOTAL ALL FUNDS 151,432,872$    494,179,227$       507,457,429$       (13,278,202)$        ‐9% 138,154,670$        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 32Executive Summary - Long Range Plan OVERVIEW CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET      Change in Fund Balance        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 33Executive Summary - Long Range Plan CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW      General Fund Long Range Projection                      2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 Summary ($ in Million)Actual Actual Actual Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Beginning Fund Balance 24.4$              31.5$              44.6$              48.1$              38.7$              22.7$              15.3$              7.0$                (3.4)$              (15.9)$             Operating Revenue 103.8$           105.4$           129.1$           104.6$           96.8$              106.3$           108.0$           109.6$           111.3$           113.0$            Base Operating Expenditure1 (86.3)              (89.7)              (118.0)            (116.7)            (107.5)            (110.3)            (116.4)            (120.0)            (123.8)            (127.8)             Operating Surplus (Deficit) 17.5$              15.7$              11.1$              (12.2)$            (10.8)$            (3.9)$              (8.4)$              (10.4)$            (12.5)$            (14.8)$             1X Sources2 0.9$                0.4$                1.8$                10.2$               ‐$                 ‐$                 ‐$                 ‐$                 ‐$                 ‐$                 1X Uses3 (11.3)              (3.1)                 (9.5)                 (7.4)                 (5.2)                 (3.4)                  ‐                  ‐                  ‐                  ‐                   Net Resources ‐ Uses 7.1$                13.0$              3.5$                (9.4)$              (16.0)$            (7.4)$              (8.4)$              (10.4)$            (12.5)$            (14.8)$             Ending Fund Balance 31.5$              44.5$              48.1$              38.7$              22.7$              15.3$              7.0$                (3.4)$              (15.9)$            (30.7)$             Ending Bal as % of Opr Budget (Target=12 36.52% 49.68% 40.73% 33.12% 21.09% 13.88% 5.97%‐2.85%‐12.87%‐24.03% Key Revenue Assumptions:2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 Sales Tax Growth4 0.3% 2.7%‐3.7%‐15.6%5.6% 8.8% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% Property Tax1 ‐41.6%‐9.5%17.6% 1.4%1.0% 1.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% B&O/Business License 2.0% 2.0%2.0% 2.0%2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% Overall Operating Revenue Growth ‐11.7% 1.5% 22.5%‐19.0%‐7.5% 9.9% 1.6% 1.5% 1.5% 1.5% Key Expenditure Assumptions:2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 Wage Increase 2.5% 2.5% 3.0% 3.0% 0.0% 2.0% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% Medical Cost Growth Rate 0.0% 5.0% 8.0% 8.0% 8.0% 9.0% 8.0% 8.0% 8.0% 8.0% PERS (Pension) Contribution Rate 12.9% 12.9% 13.9% 13.9% 14.9% 14.9% 14.9% 14.9% 14.9% 14.9% Overall Operating Expense Growth ‐17.6% 3.8% 31.6%‐1.1%‐7.9% 2.5% 5.6% 3.1% 3.2% 3.2% 1Large 2017 decrease is due to the formation of the Renton Regional Fire Authority (RRFA). 2019 and 2020 includes a $900K and $4.5M transfer respectively from Annexation Sales Tax Reserve (Fund 502). 3Includes $250k for inflationary contingency and $0 for capital contingency starting in 2019. 4 Beginning in 2018 reduced  growth of overall sales tax revenue reflect the end of annexation sales tax credit starting September 2018 and overall slower growth in economy.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 34Executive Summary - Long Range Plan OVERVIEW CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET    The City’s fiscal policy requires the City to prepare a long‐term projection for General Governmental and other  funds as deemed necessary.  The City prepares projections for tax‐supported Governmental funds as well as rate‐ supported utility funds.  The purposes are similar:  to ensure operations, as well as maintaining capital assets, are  sustainable with taxes and utility rate revenues.  These plans allow the City to proactively manage and implement  corrective measures over time to avoid sudden drastic changes in service levels or in revenue/tax policies.      In addition, the City’s fiscal policy requires a balanced budget, with operating costs covered by operating revenues.   While the policy does not require a balanced budget in the projected period beyond the current budget years, the  intent is to adjust current operations to a sustainable level within the projected horizon.    Approximately 77% of General Fund Revenue is from taxes, 29% from sales tax and 21% from property tax alone.   The key revenue assumptions shown in the table above reflect a projection for a healthy economy that will  generate 1.0% of new construction value per year to be added to the property tax roll over the next four years;  however, the property tax levy rate reflects a $1.10/$1,000 AV decrease in 2017 and a $0.46/$1,000 AV decrease  in the levy in 2018 due to the formation of the Regional Fire Authority (RFA).  From 2019 forward, the City is  levying an additional $1.1 million in property taxes to fund the annual debt service for a parks capital  improvements LTGO bond issued in 2019.    The key assumptions include a strong sales tax growth rate of 2.5%  per year and a B&O tax growth rate of 2% per year.  Key expenditure growth drivers are wages, employee  healthcare costs, and state pension costs. The assumption is that wages will grow by the rate of inflation, that  employee healthcare costs will grow by the historical average used as a gauge and taking into account an actuarial  analysis and the need to maintain a minimum of 30% in reserves, and that state pension contributions will increase  from 13.9% to 14.9% over the planning period. These underlying assumptions cannot bring the overall revenue  growth to match the projected expenditure growth. This is the structural deficit that local governments are faced  with and have visited again and again, but no permanent fix is in sight. Unless the State Legislature takes action  to allow property tax to grow by inflation and population growth, this issue will persist into the future.    To solve this problem locally, the City implemented the B&O tax effective January 1, 2016, discussed more fully  below in the “B&O Tax/Business License Fee” section, which allowed General Fund revenue to grow at a rate more  similar to the projected operating expenditures.        MAJOR REVENUES    Property Tax (RCW 84.52)  Annexations and new construction have contributed to substantial growth in the City’s property tax base in the  past decade, but was eroded by the Great Recession. The City’s assessed value (AV) peaked in 2009 at $13.2 billion  when the $2 billion (or 24%) value from Benson Hill annexation was added to our tax base.  The Great Recession  eroded the tax base to $10.6 billion by 2013 or by 19% during this period.  The valuation improved incrementally  each year by an average of 10.6%.  The City’s 2020 assessed value from the King County Assessor’s Office was  $19.9 billion.  Preliminary information for the City’s 2021 assessed value was not available at the time of the  printing of this document.    While the assessed value often increases or decreases by a large percentage from year to year, the City’s property  tax revenues do not. This is due to the manner in which Washington State’s property tax collection is determined  and the limitations placed on the amount that can be raised by a governmental entity as determined by state law.   Two basic limitations are the limitation on the tax rate and the limitation on the rate of growth in property tax  revenue.         2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 35Executive Summary - Long Range Plan CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW    1. The Tax Rate Limit:  The state constitution establishes the maximum regular property tax levy increase for all taxing districts  combined at 1%, or $10 per $1000, of assessed value of the property.  This limitation is further divided by the  RCW to the various taxing districts.  For cities served by library and/or fire districts, the tax rate limit is  calculated by deducting the amount levied by the library district (up to $0.50 per thousand dollars AV) and  the fire district (up to $1.50 per thousand dollars AV) from the $3.60 local portion of the levy.  For cities that  have a fire pension fund, as does Renton, an additional $0.225 may be levied.  Based on this calculation,  Renton’s property tax rate is limited to $3.325 per $1,000 of assessed value.     2. The 1% growth limit in property tax revenue:   Before 2002, a taxing district could increase the property tax levy amount annually by 6% of the amount levied  in the previous year, up to the applicable tax rate limit discussed above.  This growth limit was established in  1973 as the Legislature responded to people's concerns that property taxes were rising too fast due to the  real estate boom occurring at that time.      Initiative 747, approved by voters in 2001 and taking effect in 2002, lowered the limit to the lesser of 1% or  inflation. Property tax growth resulting from new construction, changes in value of state‐assessed utility  property, and newly annexed property are exempt from this limit and may be added to the base tax levy.  This  growth limit can be "lifted" by voters with a simple majority approval, and the amount can be added to the  levy base permanently for future years if the intent is clearly stated in the ballot measure.         Distribution of Property Tax  Most properties in Renton pay $11.08 per $1000 AV in  2020, of which 10% goes to City services.  The  remaining 90% goes to the Renton Regional Fire  Authority (7%), Sound Transit (2%), Renton School  District (32%), King County (12%) for regional services,  the State School fund (27%), King County Library  System (3%), Valley Medical (4%), Port of Seattle (1%),  and Emergency Medical Services (2%).  The City’s  portion of property tax is $489 in 2020 on an average  home.      Past and Projected Property Tax Revenue      Year Assessed  Value  (millions) % change Property Tax  Revenue %  change 2017 Actual 15,035$        8.8% 19,714,626$       ‐41.6% 2018 Actual 16,831$        11.9% 17,838,993$       ‐9.5% 2019 Actual 19,061$        13.2% 20,978,323$      17.6% 2020 Est 19,919$        4.5% 21,280,959$      1.4% 2021 Adop. 20,517$        3.0% 21,494,697$      1.0% 2022 Adop. 21,132$        3.0% 21,709,653$      1.0% 2023 Proj. 21,766$        3.0% 22,143,846$      2.0% 2024 Proj. 22,419$        3.0% 22,586,723$      2.0% 2025 Proj. 23,092$        3.0% 23,038,457$      2.0% 2026 Proj. 23,784$        3.0%23,499,227$      2.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 36Executive Summary - Long Range Plan OVERVIEW CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET    Sales Tax (RCW 82.14)  Sales tax is the second largest taxing source for  Renton representing approximately 29% of  General Fund revenue. Renton’s economy  generates approximately $282 million in sales  taxes, but similar to property tax, the City only  receives approximately 10% of the sales tax  revenue generated within Renton. The remaining  90% goes to other government entities and to  support public transit and public facility agencies.     In addition to the local sales tax, the City also  receives a distribution of a voter‐approved  criminal justice sales tax. Up until mid‐2018, the  City also received a 0.1% annexation sales tax for the  annexation of the Benson Hill area in 2008.      The sales tax receipts starting in 2020 were lower due to  closures due to the impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic, but  are expect to rebound starting in 2021.     Criminal Justice Sales Tax (RCW 82.14.340)  Criminal justice sales tax is a 0.1% voter‐approved optional  sales tax in King County, collected countywide and  distributed based on population.  Because it employs a  more diverse tax base and different distribution formula  than regular sales taxes, this source is typically more stable  and is projected to grow by the inflationary growth plus  population growth.    Composition and Projected Growth  The current year composition of the City’s sales tax is  relatively diverse with general retail representing the  largest portion at 30%, followed by service industry  at 26%, automotive at 17%, construction at 12%,  wholesaling at 7% and manufacturing and  miscellaneous at 6% and 2%, respectively.  This is  relatively consistent with historical average with the  exception of services and contracting sectors.         Like many other cities in the state, Renton’s sales tax was one  of the hardest hit revenue sources by the Great Recession with  an overall peak‐to‐through reduction of 18% and a revenue  loss of $3.8 million, and took six years after the recession  Sector Average  2012‐2019 2020  Projected Difference Retail 29.8% 30.5% 0.7% Manuf.6.9% 5.9%‐1.0% Services 22.7% 25.6% 2.9% Construction 14.0% 11.6%‐2.4% Wholesale 5.6% 6.7% 1.1% Auto 18.5% 17.4%‐1.1% Misc.2.6% 2.4%‐0.2% Total 100.0% 100.0% State  64% City 10%Sound  Transit  14% KC Transit 9% KC General 2% Criminal  Justice  1% Sales Tax Distribution  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 37Executive Summary - Long Range Plan CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW    ended in 2014 for the sales tax revenue to exceed the peak reached in 2008.  As noted above, sales tax was hard  hit again in 2020 as a result of closures due to COVID‐19 pandemic.    The projection of future sales tax growth is based on inflation and population growth. The slower and negative  growth in 2019 reflects the end of the distribution of annexation sales tax credit (mid‐2018).   In 2020 the sales  tax has decreased significantly due to the COVID ‐19 pandemic.  Many businesses were operating at a lower  capacity during this time.  The projection for 2021‐2022 is to show a slow rebound from the impacts of the  pandemic.         Utility Taxes (RCW 82.16)  Cities and towns in Washington State  are authorized to levy a tax on the  gross income derived from sales of  utility services generated within the  city or town; this is known as a utility  tax.  The tax rate for electric, phone,  and gas utilities are limited to 6%  without voter approval, with no  limitation on other public utilities.   The City currently levies a 6% utility  tax on phone (both landline and  cellular services), electric, natural gas,  and cable services.  City utilities  (water, sewer, storm drainage, and solid waste), pay an interfund utility tax.  The current tax rates are 6% for  sewer and 6.8% for water, storm drainage, and garbage (both City operated and franchise provider operated)  services.  The additional 0.8% was added during the 2013‐14 budget to generate additional revenue for general  governmental capital projects.          Projections in revenues over the next few years anticipate a slight decrease due to the COVID‐19 pandemic.    The tax revenues are sensitive to overall consumer consumption levels, weather conditions and the general  overall economic conditions.   The projections for future years anticipate these revenues will stabilize by 2022  and are projected to grow by population plus inflation.    Year Electric Natural Gas  Brokered  NG City Utilities Cable TV Phone Cell Phone Non‐City  Garbage Total % Change 2017 Actual        5,721,366      1,630,375        180,456     4,840,530      1,651,405          866,519      1,481,298       627,254      16,999,203 6.9% 2018 Actual        5,592,795      1,446,693        141,408     4,925,046      1,525,625          830,975      1,159,489       743,003      16,365,034 ‐3.7% 2019 Actual        5,125,961      1,324,323        224,519     4,976,990      1,457,008          858,927         797,541       796,379      15,561,647 ‐4.9% 2020 Est        4,342,500      1,307,000        230,900     5,067,500     1,535,524         858,041         667,146       783,400      14,792,011 ‐4.9% 2021 Adop.       4,999,175      1,223,009        230,900     5,050,477      1,436,847          802,901         624,273       733,057      15,100,639 2.1% 2022 Adop.       5,574,163      1,229,124        232,055     5,199,416      1,451,215          762,756         630,516       736,722      15,815,967 4.7% 2023 Proj.       5,657,775      1,235,270        233,215     5,277,407      1,465,727          724,618         636,821       740,406      15,971,239 1.0% 2024 Proj.       5,742,642      1,241,446        234,381     5,356,568      1,480,384          688,387         643,189       744,108      16,131,106 1.0% 2025 Proj.       5,828,782      1,247,653        235,553     5,436,917      1,495,188          653,968         649,621       747,828      16,295,510 1.0% 2026 Proj.       5,916,213      1,253,891        236,731     5,518,470      1,510,140          621,270         656,117       751,567      16,464,401 1.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 38Executive Summary - Long Range Plan OVERVIEW CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET      B&O Tax and Business License Fee  The City of Renton first  implemented a per employee based  business license fee in 1998 with  the rate set at $55 per full‐time  equivalent employee in response to  transportation infrastructure needs  in Renton.  Non‐profit and  government organizations are  required to obtain a license but are  exempt from paying this fee. The  $55 per employee rate was  adjusted in 2013 to create a 1) a base fee registration fee of $45; and 2) an increase from $55 per FTE to $65 per  FTE (FTE is defined as each 1,920 worker hours). The 2015 fee increase generated approximately an additional  $625k annually, which is dedicated to Capital Projects. Effective January 1st, 2018, the City repealed the Per  Employee Business License Fee (while concurrently decreasing the threshold for B&O tax from $1.5 million to  $500,000).  All businesses are required to pay a business license registration fee at the time of application of $150.    B&O Tax  The adopted budget includes the B&O tax implemented on January 1, 2016. The B&O tax is based on gross receipts  of a business. The key provisions of the B&O tax are:     Businesses with $500,000 or higher annual gross receipts are required to pay B&O tax.   The B&O tax maximum amount paid is capped at $4,723,140 a year (2020) and will automatically be  adjusted annually by inflation.   The tax rate is 0.085% (maximum allowed is 0.2%; statewide average is 0.15%) for all business activities  other than retail, which has a rate of 0.05%; these rates cannot be adjusted by more than the rate of  inflation in any given year.   Provides a three‐year, new employer tax credit for new businesses with 50 or more employees in Renton.     The B&O tax was the only revenue option that City Council could take which generated the funds needed to  maintain general City services. It will provided $3.8 million in additional revenue (net of per employee business  license fee loss) in 2016 and increased to $11 million in 2019.  The 2020 year end estimate is projected to  decrease significantly and is estimated to be $4.5 million.  The decrease is due to the fact that many local  businesses were impacted by the COVID‐19 pandemic, as well as the grounding of the 737Max which has halted  production at the local Boeing plant in Renton.  As businesses begin to open back up, the B&O tax is projected to  rebound slowly over the next 2 years.  Most of the B&O tax is needed for the General Fund operations. Without  this funding source, the City would need to reduce services from General Fund operations, which would result in  significantly reducing services to the community. The B&O tax and business licenses fees are also used to  partially pay for transportation and general governmental capital improvements.               Year Business License B&O Tax Total Revenue % change General Fund Transp. CIP Gen Gov  CIP Total  Allocated 2017 Actual 857,535                   9,633,034       10,490,568       56.6% 8,016,594        2,088,770     1,000,000    11,105,364     2018 Actual 676,041                   10,689,216    11,365,257       8.3% 9,985,943        1,735,943      ‐                11,721,886     2019 Actual 1,098,584               11,078,932    12,177,516       7.1% 12,177,516      2,000,000      ‐                14,177,516     2020 Est 918,780                   4,500,000       5,418,780         ‐55.5% 5,418,780        2,040,000     ‐                7,458,780        2021 Adop.918,780                   6,500,000       7,418,780         36.9% 7,418,780        500,000        500,000       8,418,780        2022 Adop.927,968                   9,500,000       10,427,968       40.6% 10,427,968      500,000        500,000       11,427,968     2023 Proj.937,248                   9,690,000       10,627,248       1.9% 10,627,248      ‐                 ‐                10,627,248     2024 Proj.946,620                   9,883,800       10,830,420       1.9% 10,830,420      ‐                 ‐                10,830,420     2025 Proj.956,086                   10,081,476    11,037,562       1.9% 11,037,562      ‐                 ‐                11,037,562     2026 Proj.965,647                   10,283,106    11,248,753       1.9% 11,248,753      ‐                 ‐                11,248,753     2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 39Executive Summary - Long Range Plan CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW      Real Estate Excise Tax (REET) The State of Washington levies a real estate excise tax (REET) on all sales of  real estate (measured by the full selling price, including the amount of any  liens, mortgages, and other debts given to secure the purchase) at a rate of  1.28%. Local governments are also authorized to impose REET.  All cities  and counties may levy a quarter percent tax (described as "the first quarter  percent of the real estate excise tax" or "REET 1"). Cities and counties  planning under the Growth Management Act (GMA) have the authority to  levy a second quarter percent tax (“REET 2”). The statute further specifies  that, if a county is required to plan under GMA or if a city is located in such  a county, the tax may be levied by a vote of the legislative body.  If,  however, the county chooses to plan under GMA, the tax must be approved  by a majority of the voters.       REET 1 (RCW 82.46.010):  Initially authorized in 1982, cities and counties can use the receipts of REET 1 for all capital purposes.  An  amendment in 1992 states that cities and counties with a population of 5,000 or more planning under the GMA  must spend REET 1 receipts solely on capital projects that are listed in the capital facilities plan element of their  comprehensive plan. Capital projects are: “public works projects of a local government for planning, acquisition,  construction, reconstruction, repair, replacement, rehabilitation, or improvement of streets; roads; highways;  sidewalks; street and road lighting systems; traffic signals; bridges; domestic water systems; storm and sanitary  sewer systems; parks; recreational facilities; law enforcement facilities; fire protection facilities; trails; libraries;  administrative and judicial facilities.” Receipts pledged to debt retirement prior to April 1992 and/or spent prior  to June 1992 are grandfathered from this restriction.       REET 2 (RCW 82.46.035):  The second quarter percent of the real estate excise tax (authorized in 1990) provides funding for cities and  counties to finance capital improvements required to occur concurrently with growth under the Growth  Management Act. An amendment in 1992 defines the "capital project" as: "Public works projects of a local  government for planning, acquisition, construction, reconstruction, repair, replacement, rehabilitation, or  improvement of streets, roads, highways, sidewalks, street and road lighting systems, traffic signals, bridges,  domestic water systems, storm and sanitary sewer systems, and planning, construction, reconstruction, repair,  rehabilitation, or improvement of parks.” Because of this amendment, acquisition of park land was no longer a  permitted use of REET 2 after March 1, 1992.      Another amendment was made in 2011 to allow cities using REET for maintenance purpose for a period of 3 years  as a way to assist cities to cope with general revenue losses due to the Great Recession.                  Year REET Revenue % change 2017 Actual 7,211,736     17.8% 2018 Actual 4,420,000      ‐38.7% 2019 Actual 6,737,711     52.4% 2020 Est 4,000,000      ‐40.6% 2021 Adop. 4,500,000     12.5% 2022 Adop. 4,600,000     2.2% 2023 Proj. 4,600,000     0.0% 2024 Proj. 4,600,000     0.0% 2025 Proj. 4,600,000     0.0% 2026 Proj. 4,600,000     0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 40Executive Summary - Long Range Plan OVERVIEW CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET    Trend and Projection  The combined two quarter‐percent of the REET  is expected to generate $4.5 million and $4.6  million for 2021 and 2022 respectively.  This is  consistent with past amounts with the  exception of 2016, 2017,  and 2019 when  several large transactions increased REET  revenue. REET revenue is used for the General  Governmental Debt Service Fund (215),  Transportation CIP Fund (317) and General  Governmental CIP Fund (316).       Gambling Excise Tax (RCW 9.46.110 & 9.46.113)  The City levies gambling taxes as follows:    5% on net receipts for bingo and raffles    2% for amusement games    5% on net receipts for for‐profit  punchboards and pull‐tabs    10% on gross receipts for card rooms  All rates are the maximum authorized by state  statute, except for the card rooms, which has a  maximum rate of 20%.  The State Legislature began  allowing the operation of "enhanced card rooms" or  mini‐casinos on non‐tribal land on a pilot basis in 1997 and on a permanent basis in the spring of 2000.  This  activity provided a significant revenue source for Renton, which generates about 80% of the City’s gambling taxes.   The remaining 21% are made up of pull‐tabs and bingo.      Revenues from these activities are required to be used primarily for the purpose  of gambling enforcement (RCW 9.46.113).  Case law has clarified that "primarily"  means "first be used" for gambling law enforcement purposes to the extent  necessary for that city.  The remaining funds may be used for any general  government purpose.  The City designates Gambling Tax revenue as a law  enforcement resource.     Gambling revenues remained relatively stable for many years until 2010 when  two gambling establishments went out of business.  The City’s 2013 revenue took another hit as one of the  remaining card rooms had financial problems and went into bankruptcy protection in early 2014.  A buyer acquired  the business and gambling tax revenue reached $1.6 million in 2014, and stabilized at approximately $2.8 million  thereafter.  Gambling revenues are expected to decrease significantly in 2020 due to the gambling establishments  forced to close during the pandemic.  This tax is expected to stabilize at $2.0 million and $2.4 million for the  planning period.      The City’s current gambling tax also exempts raffles and bingos held by non‐profit organizations insofar as the  revenue received is used for charitable purposes.  This modification has a negligible effect on gambling tax  revenue.    Year Gambling Tax % change 2017 Actual 2,695,368      7.8% 2018 Actual 2,831,045      5.0% 2019 Actual 2,883,506      1.9% 2020 Est 1,385,000      ‐52.0% 2021 Adop. 1,900,000      37.2% 2022 Adop. 2,485,000      30.8% 2023 Proj. 2,485,000      0.0% 2024 Proj. 2,485,000      0.0% 2025 Proj. 2,485,000      0.0% 2026 Proj. 2,485,000      0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 41Executive Summary - Long Range Plan CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW    LICENSES AND PERMITS    Permit and Development Fees    Permit and development revenues were one of the most severely impacted revenues by the Great Recession.  The  overall decline peak‐to‐trough is 54%.  The bottom was reached in 2009 and has since seen a gradual recovery.  There was a small market rate fee adjustment in 2019.  After making a significant adjustment after two decades  of no‐adjustments in 2010, the City changed its practice to maintain a more gradual, stable pattern of fee  adjustments for the future. The adopted 2021‐2022 budget project a decrease in development fees in 2020 and  2021 due to the COVID‐19 pandemic.  Projections beyond the current budget reflect a rebound in revenue for  2022 and cyclical fluctuations in anticipation of potential economic changes.        Franchise Fees       Franchise fees are charges levied on private utility companies to recoup  the City’s costs for their use of City streets and other public properties.   The franchise fees on electric, natural gas, and telephone utilities are  limited by statute to the actual administrative expenses incurred by the  City directly related to receiving and approving permits, licenses, or  franchisees.  Cable TV franchise fees are governed by the Federal Cable  Communications Policy Act of 1994 and are negotiated with cable  companies for an amount not to exceed 5% of gross revenues, which is  the primary source of the City’s franchise fee revenue. We are estimating  a decrease in 2020 due to the impacts of the pandemic but expect to see a gradual rebound in the next few years  with a long‐term projection of a relatively flat revenue increase.      Intergovernmental Revenues (State‐Shared Revenues)  Intergovernmental revenues include state‐shared revenues, governmental grants and miscellaneous transfers  and, up until the formation of the Regional Fire Authority in 2016, revenue from inter‐governmental service  contracts such as the Fire and Emergency Services contracts with Fire District 25 (since 1996) and Fire District 40  (since 2008). The following information is primarily intergovernmental revenues in the City’s operating funds.   There are also substantial grant revenues in the capital project funds, particularly for transportation and parks  improvement projects.     The state‐shared revenues are from taxes and fees collected by the state and disbursed to municipalities based  on population or other criteria.  In the past, the primary sources of these state‐shared revenues are fuel tax (tax  Year  Building & Fire  Permits    Plan Review  Total % change 2017 Actual            3,464,550             1,491,294             4,955,844 ‐7% 2018 Actual            3,221,195             1,460,863             4,682,058 ‐6% 2019 Actual            3,048,398             1,550,097             4,598,496 ‐2% 2020 Est            2,432,231             1,028,406             3,460,637 ‐25% 2021 Adop.           2,432,231             1,028,406             3,460,637 0% 2022 Adop.           2,852,973             1,573,217             4,426,190 28% 2023 Proj.           2,938,562             1,620,414             4,558,976 3% 2024 Proj.           2,938,562             1,620,414            4,558,976 0% 2025 Proj.           2,938,562             1,620,414             4,558,977 0% 2026 Proj.           2,938,562             1,620,414             4,558,978 0% Year Franchise % change 2017 Actual       1,562,100 11.1% 2018 Actual       1,508,915 ‐3.4% 2019 Actual       1,520,143 0.7% 2020 Est       1,231,692 ‐19.0% 2021 Adop.      1,231,692 0.0% 2022 Adop.      1,659,950 34.8% 2023 Proj.      1,668,250 0.5% 2024 Proj.      1,676,591 0.5% 2025 Proj.      1,684,974 0.5% 2026 Proj.      1,693,399 0.5% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 42Executive Summary - Long Range Plan OVERVIEW CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET    on gasoline consumption), liquor sales profit, and excise tax.  This resource once provided 14% of the City’s  operational funds, but has decreased to just a little over 3%, mainly due to the elimination of the Motor Vehicle  Excise Tax (MVET) and the $30 limit on vehicle license fees. The remaining intergovernmental revenues (fuel taxes,  liquor tax, liquor profits, and criminal justice) reflect consistent or slight increases since 2015.       The amount of grant revenue fluctuates greatly from year to year.  The base grant amount reflects the Community  Development Block Grant (CDBG) and a couple of small public safety grants. The higher amount in 2014‐2015  timeframe reflects the SAFER and COPS grants used to restore six police and 9 firefighter positions during the  Great Recession.   Charge for Services  Charges for services include revenue  generated from services provided to the  general public (including recreation fees,  facility rental fees), certain public safety  services, as well as services provided  internally between City departments  (Interfund Services) that are not operated  through Internal Service Fund structure.  This source has been impacted by the  pandemic with an expected overall  decrease of 23% in 2020 and is expected to  rebound in 2022 to generate  approximately $9 million per year.    Parks and Recreation Fees  Overall, recreation fees are generated from recreation classes, athletic programs, leagues and field rentals, senior  activity center, community center, and aquatic center fees and rentals.  In 2020 this revenue source is projected  to decrease 70% from prior years as the City was required to close its recreation centers in March due to the  pandemic.  This revenue source is expected to rebound to the pre‐pandemic figures in 2022.    Year State Shared  Revenue Grants &  Misc. 2017 Actual        3,272,879             569,397  2018 Actual        3,352,872             309,561  2019 Actual        3,991,818             543,726  2020 Est        3,332,420         1,053,949  2021 Adop.       4,042,420                        ‐    2022 Adop.       4,042,420                        ‐    2023 Proj.       4,090,306                        ‐    2024 Proj.       4,138,911                        ‐    2025 Proj.       4,188,245                        ‐    2026 Proj.       4,238,318                        ‐    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 43Executive Summary - Long Range Plan CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW    Public Safety Services  Public Safety services revenue includes private  security, electronic home detention, passport  processing, court cost recovery and miscellaneous  services.  The revenue is projected to be $1.4  million for 2020, a decrease of 10% from prior year  as many of these services have not been available  due to the pandemic.  A rebound of these revenues  are expected over the next two years.      Interfund Services  In addition to activities accounted for in the Internal Service Funds that are fully allocated to all operating  departments, the City also has two types of interfund transactions that are intended to reimburse service costs  incurred by one fund while services are consumed by another.    1) Indirect Cost:  All enterprise funds are required to reimburse the General Fund for overhead costs such as  accounting, human resources, records management, legal, and administrative expenses; and   2) Soft Capital Transfer: This is for staff time spent on capital projects for design, engineering, inspection,  project management and sometimes small project construction.      The indirect cost is determined through a cost allocation model using transaction volume, number of full‐time  employees, and size of budget as determining factors.  The “soft capital” transfers are based on actual labor and  material costs incurred.  The revenue is projected to be $4.7 million for 2021, slightly lower than 2020 projected.      Fines and Forfeits    Fines and forfeits account for civil and  criminal penalties as authorized by the  state and adopted by the City code and  collected through the Renton Municipal  Court.     The City implemented the Photo‐ Enforcement system at high collision  intersections and at school zones during  the fall of 2008, and 2009 revenue was  the first full year’s operation of the system.  The revenue declined in 2013 and 2014 due to the temporary  suspension of enforcement in one major intersection because of road construction and the removal of one school  zone camera.  In 2015, the City added a few more cameras, which resulted in a small increase in revenues.  In  2018, the City added eight more cameras which resulted in an additional $1.1 million projected revenue increase.   The 2020 decrease of 30% from prior year was again from the suspension of school zone cameras with schools  closed from the COVID‐19 pandemic.  These revenues are expected to rebound once schools are open to students  again.      Year Public Safety % change Year Parks and  Rec % change Year Interfund  Services %  change 2017 Actual       1,116,882 ‐8.4% 2017 Actual     3,556,113 8.1% 2017 Actual      3,916,334 8.9% 2018 Actual       1,302,913 16.7% 2018 Actual     3,230,399 ‐9.2% 2018 Actual      3,900,407 ‐1.8% 2019 Actual       1,572,938 20.7% 2019 Actual     3,277,304 1.5% 2019 Actual      4,194,724 7.2% 2020 Est       1,411,200 ‐10.3% 2020 Est        949,628 ‐71.0% 2020 Est      4,987,974 ‐18.8% 2021 Adop.      1,324,327 ‐6.2% 2021 Adop.    1,691,663 78.1% 2021 Adop.     4,789,667 6.2% 2022 Adop.      1,594,768 20.4% 2022 Adop.    2,439,928 44.2% 2022 Adop.     4,918,634 14.7% 2023 Proj.      1,594,768 0.0% 2023 Proj.    2,439,928 0.0% 2023 Proj.     4,918,634 0.0% 2024 Proj.      1,594,768 0.0% 2024 Proj.    2,439,928 0.0% 2024 Proj.     4,918,634 0.0% 2025 Proj.      1,594,768 0.0% 2025 Proj.    2,439,928 0.0% 2025 Proj.     4,918,634 0.0% 2026 Proj.      1,594,768 0.0% 2026 Proj.    2,439,928 0.0% 2026 Proj.     4,918,634 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 44Executive Summary - Long Range Plan OVERVIEW CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET    Miscellaneous Revenues  Miscellaneous revenues include interest income, cellular tower site rentals, donations, sales of documents, etc.   The majority of the revenue is investment interest income; however, the Treasury note is yielding near the  historical low.  Revenue is expected to remain low in the near future.           Enterprise Funds    UTILITY RATES   Water and Sewer Rates   The water, sewer, and  surface water rates fund all  of the costs associated with  providing these services, as  well as necessary capital  improvements to these  utility systems. Other  sources, including hookup  fees, development charges,  grants, etc., are also  available, but are limited,  unpredictable, and primarily  related to the capital programs. Due to the increased costs of maintaining the systems, regulatory requirements,  and higher general operating costs, the City continuously reviews these rates and makes adjustments as needed.      Rate Related Fiscal Policy  During the summer of 2010, the City Council adopted a set of fiscal policies to guide future rate setting for all City  utilities. These policies address minimum fund balances, as well as the financing of capital improvements in the  future.  Specifically, the policies rely on rates to finance preservation of existing systems and only use bonding to  finance system capacity improvements.  This capital financing policy required a substantial rate increase in 2011  and 2012 to provide for consistent system replacement/reinvestment. The rate model was updated in 2020  showing a rate increase for 2021 to include a 4% increase in residential garbage rates and a 2% increase for all  other City utilities.  Modest rate increases beyond 2021‐22 biennium are projected and are in line with the utilities’  historical rate increases.     In addition to the adopted City rate increases, King County Metro (which provides sewer treatment) is proposing  a 4.5% rate increase in 2021 and no increase in 2022.    Year Miscellaneous % change 2017 Actual            1,815,393 18.0% 2018 Actual            1,946,451 7.2% 2019 Actual            1,969,278 1.2% 2020 Est            1,237,870 ‐37.1% 2021 Adop.           1,132,122 ‐8.5% 2022 Adop.           1,132,122 0.0% 2023 Proj.           1,093,854 ‐3.4% 2024 Proj.           1,061,326 ‐3.0% 2025 Proj.           1,033,677 ‐2.6% 2026 Proj.           1,010,175 ‐2.3% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 45Executive Summary - Long Range Plan CITY OF RENTON 2021‐2022 BIENNIAL BUDGET OVERVIEW           Maplewood Golf Course  The City’s Maplewood Golf Course Fund was created by  Ordinance 3884 in 1985.  Maplewood Golf Course is owned  and operated by the City.  The golf course is also a water utility  resource as it is the location of City wells that provide drinking  water to our community.  The use of this space as a golf course  helps preserve the quality of the well water for future  generations.    The course is managed by the Community Services Department and is operated as a separate enterprise fund of  the City as a fully self‐sustained operation.  The Golf Course refunded $1.85 million in revenue bonds with an  interfund loan from the City at the true interest cost of 2.24% in 2010.  This interfund loan was repaid in full by  2015 and freed up around $400,000 per year for operations and capital programs.  The capital funds are used  primarily on a pay‐as‐you‐go basis for additional  improvement to the golf course.     The green fees are in line with other municipal courses  in neighboring communities.  Utility Revenue & Rate Increases 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021  Adopted 2022  Adopted 2023  Projected 2024  Projected 2025  Projected 2026  Projected Water Rate Revenue 17,483,723    17,683,513    17,139,317        18,772,649        16,896,642   18,030,511   18,391,121    18,758,944    19,134,123    19,516,805     Rate Increase 0.0% 0.0%0.0%2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% Sewer Rate Revenue 10,286,228    10,581,156    10,668,423        11,067,654        11,081,573   11,473,089   11,702,551    11,936,602    12,175,334    12,418,841     Rate Increase 4.0% 4.0%0.0%2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% Storm Revenue 10,820,568    11,202,339    11,196,321        12,524,641        11,583,746   11,989,269   12,229,054    12,473,635    12,723,108    12,977,570     Rate Increase 4.0% 4.0%0.0%2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% Garbage Revenue 19,471,376    18,519,997    20,305,164        19,338,494        22,631,694   23,099,011   24,022,971    24,983,890    25,983,246    27,022,576     Rate Increase (residential)0.0% 1.0%4.0%4.0% 4.0% 4.0% 4.0% 4.0% 4.0% 4.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 46Executive Summary - Long Range Plan   Financial Management Policies    I. Executive Summary  The City of Renton is committed to maintaining the highest standards of responsible financial management.  The City, including the City Council, Mayor and staff will work together to ensure that all financial matters of  the City are addressed with care, integrity, and in the best interest of the City. The rules and procedures  contained in this section are designed to:     Protect the assets of the City of Renton;    Ensure the maintenance of open and accurate records of the City’s financial activities;   Provide a framework of operating standards, behavioral expectations, and performance measures;   Ensure compliance with federal, state, and local legal and reporting requirements; and   Provide a means for the City Council to update and monitor these policies with the assistance and  cooperation of the Mayor’s office and the Finance and Information Services Administrator.    The following lines of authority are to enable the City of Renton to ensure its policies are meeting their goals   and promoting the financial wellness of the City.  1. The Renton City Council has the authority to execute such policies as it deems to be in the best interest  of the City within the parameters of federal, state, and local law.  2. The Finance Committee has the authority to perform reviews of the organization’s financial activity,  determine the allocation of investment deposits, and insure that adequate internal controls are in place.  3. The Mayor and Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) have the authority to oversee the development of the  biennial budget, make spending decisions within the parameters of the approved budget, enter into  contractual agreements, make capital asset purchase decisions and make decisions regarding the  allocation of expenses within designated parameters.  Unless otherwise specified in this document,  principal responsibility for complying with the directives enumerated herein shall be vested in the  Mayor.  4. Each Department Administrator has the authority to expend City funds within approved budget  authority and in accordance with procedures prescribed by the Mayor’s Office, and to recommend  spending requests within the parameters of the approved budget process to the Mayor.  II. Financial Management Policies  1. Investment Policy (210‐07): Applies to the investment of available City funds, excluding fire pension  funds.  a. The City has the responsibility to manage these invested funds through diversification of funds,  attaining the highest interest rate available, and maintaining a sufficient level of liquidity to meet  operating requirements that can be reasonably anticipated. This responsibility is delegated out to  the Fiscal Services Director who shall act as the City’s Investment Officer. The actions taken by the  City’s Investment Officer will be reviewed quarterly by the City Council’s Investment Committee,  which is comprised of the Mayor, the Chief Administrative Officer, the Finance and Information  Services Administrator, and a member of the City Council.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 47Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   2. Purchasing, Bidding, and Contracting Requirements Policy (250‐02): Applies to selection, bidding,  leasing, and contracting requirements for goods, services and public works projects throughout the City.  a. The City encourages funds expended by the City be reinvested in the local economy whenever it is  possible and practical to do so. The City must also utilize uniform, efficient, and competitive bidding,  purchasing, quoting, Request for Proposals (RFPs), cooperative purchasing, and Statements of  Qualifications (SOQs) consistent with State law. This is to ensure that all public purchases and  contracts for services, equipment, materials, supplies, and public works are executed and managed  at the highest professional and ethical standard while achieving the greatest attainable level of  quality and value permitted by law.    3. Bad Debt Policy (220‐03): Applies to handling the collection of bad debt.  a. The City has designated the responsibility of formulating, implementing, and conducting the  collection of bad debt to the Finance Department. When accounts are determined to be  uncollectable by the Finance Department the accounts are then referred to the City’s designated  collection agent. The Renton Municipal Court is responsible for conducting their own collection  efforts and refer to their own designated collection agent.    4. Administration of Grants Policy (210‐09): Applies to the identification, application, administration, and  reporting of grants from various external sources.  a. Each department within the City will actively pursue opportunities to obtain grant resources,  maintain an active and diverse portfolio, and utilize grant funds to supplement and enhance the  long term goals and objectives of the City. The grant administration and applications shall be  coordinated through the Grant Analyst. This policy includes all government grants, regardless of  dollar amount, and all private grants over $30,000.    5. Surplus & Disposal of Surplus Personal Property Policy (250‐10): Applies to the efficient use and disposal  of surplus personal property.  a. The City’s surplus personal property that retains commercial value will be disposed of in the most  cost effective and efficient manner that achieves the highest value for the City. The surplus property  will first be transferred between departments as needed. After that the surplus property may be  traded in, sold, or donated. A donation of property can only occur if the organization receiving the  property serves or benefits the public in accordance with RCW 39.33.010.    6. Cash Control Policy (210‐05): Applies to the proper procedures for receipting and depositing cash and  checks received by city departments.  a. To facilitate citizens/customers doing business with the City of Renton, receipts will be written by  each department who accepts payments. The departments will then remit the payments to the  Finance Department to insure the safety of cash deposits and to maximize the investment of cash to  its full potential. No checks shall be cashed or written for more than the amount of the purchase.    7. Purchasing Cards Policy (250‐18): Applies to the proper use of purchasing cards to procure goods or  services for official City business purposes.  a. Authorized cardholders can make purchases using a City issued purchasing card (“Card” or “ Cards”)  to provide efficient, cost effective means to pay for goods and services for official City business.  b. The Card is designed to be a cost effective alternative to the traditional invoice payment process; it  does not affect requirements to comply with State or Local procurement laws, regulations, or  policies.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 48Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   c. The Card is not intended to replace effective procurement planning which can result in quantity  discounts, reduced number of trips and more efficient use of City resources.  d. The Administrative Services Administrator may establish additional rules and procedures from time  to time consistent with this Policy and provide the appropriate forms and instructions.  e. Exceptions to the rules may be made under declared emergencies upon written directive of the  Mayor, Chief Administrative Officer, designated Emergency Management Official or their designee.    8. Budget Preparation & Control Policy (220‐01): Applies to the budget preparation responsibility and  provides guidelines and procedures for expenditure control and budget amendments.    The goal of this policy is to provide a comprehensive process for financial planning, control and  evaluation of the City’s revenues and expenditures which complies with legal requirements and provides  adequate financial information and controls.  a. Budget Preparation: Department heads are required to prepare line item budgets requests, the  Mayor and Finance staff use the requests to prepare and submit a preliminary budget for City  Council to consider. The City Council will then adopt the final budget at the fund level by ordinance.  b. Budget development: The City shall prepare a biennial budget that is consistent with state law, the  long‐term financial planning model, the financial management policies, and industry best practices.  i. The City of Renton’s biennial budget shall be prepared using the following schedule and process  as a general guide:  (a) Review stakeholder input such as surveys, public forums, neighborhood meeting notes and  business community communication.  (b) The Mayor, City Council and Chief Administrative Officer will conduct a goal‐setting retreat  with the Department Administrators updating the Business Plan and other policy guidance.  (c) The City Council and Administration will meet to review and discuss the prior year’s audited  results, current year budget status, next budget schedule, process, budget guidelines and  budget preparation items of interest.  (d) The Administrative Services Administrator prepares the budget preparation instructions and  meets with Department Administrators to distribute budget instructions and discuss budget  preparation.  (e) The instructions will include policy priorities, estimates of compensation adjustments,  internal service and indirect charges.  (f) Departments will provide to the Administrative Services Department budget estimates and  requests conforming to the budget instructions.  (g) The Mayor submits a proposed balanced Preliminary Budget to the City Council in  conformance with state law.  (h) A balanced budget should be comprised of funding recommendations for the operating and  capital budgets that do not exceed the estimated resources of the entity.  (i) The City Council conducts public hearings on the proposed budget in conformance with  state law.  (j) The City Council sets the City’s property tax levies.  (k) The City Council adopts the final budget ordinance.  (l) The Final Budget Document is published and posted to the City website.  ii. Budget amendments should be presented for consideration when the need arises.  (a) Budget authority shall be at the fund level.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 49Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   (b) Changes resulting in a need to revise the appropriation authority shall be presented as they  occur.  c. Revenues  i. Revenue forecasts shall assess the full spectrum of resources available to finance City programs  and services.   ii. The City shall consider the diversification of revenue as a strategy when developing its financial  plans.   iii. Should an economic downturn develop that results in (potential) revenue shortfalls or fewer  available resources, the City will make appropriate adjustments to its budget.   iv. Revenue estimates shall be based on forecasting methods recommended by the Government  Finance Officers Association (GFOA) and will typically be conservative rather than aggressive.  d. Expenditures: Priority shall be given to expenditures that will improve productivity.    In addition to the policies above the City of Renton also adheres to the following policies that are currently  adopted and reviewed on a biennial basis along with the budget document.  9. Accounting Records and Reports  a. Basis of Accounting  i. The City’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) on its financial activity shall be  presented in compliance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) as defined by  the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB).  b. Basis of Budget  i. The City budget is presented on a GAAP basis of accounting.  c. Fund Accounting  i. The City of Renton’s accounting and budgeting systems use a fund accounting consistent with  guidance provided by the GASB and the Washington State Auditor’s Office.    ii. The funds are grouped into categories: General Fund, Special Revenue, Debt Service, Capital  Projects, Enterprise, Internal Service, and Fiduciary/Trust.  iii. The City Council shall create and eliminate funds as appropriate by separate ordinance, or  through the budget ordinance.  iv. Funds shall either be “external” or “internal” for financial reporting purposes.    (a) Internal funds shall be separate sets of accounts for the purpose of enhancing internal  management control only.  These funds shall reside within an external fund.  For cash  management purposes, internal funds may rely on their related external fund without  payment of interest or violation of the City’s cash management policies. (See Interfund Loan  policy for further clarification).  v. The City’s financial accounting system shall insure that the status and transactions of each  account and their relationship to budget authority is clear.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 50Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   d. Financial Reporting  i. The CAFR shall be timely and comprehensive and meet or exceed professional industry  standards.  ii. The City’s budget documents shall provide for comparison with prior years.  iii. Revenue and expenditure reports shall be prepared monthly and be available on the City’s  website.  iv. A written analysis of the City’s monthly report shall be prepared quarterly, coordinated with the  Chief Administrative Officer and Mayor, reviewed with the City Council, and available on the  City’s website.  v. All budget amendments shall be included in the monthly report.  vi. Any outstanding interfund loans shall be disclosed in the quarterly report.  e. Audit  i. The City shall commission an annual audit of its financial reports and related records to be  conducted by the Washington State Auditor’s Office.  ii. At the conclusion of the audit, the auditor shall be available to brief the City Council on the  results.   iii. The results of the audit shall be available to the public.     10. Financial Planning  a. The City shall maintain a long‐term (five year) financial planning model.    i. The financial planning model shall:   (a) be based on the currently adopted budget;  (b) utilize these policies;  (c) be based on assumptions and drivers realistically expected to occur;  (d) clearly document the assumptions and drivers used and the results of the use of such  assumptions and drivers;  (e) be designed in such a way to permit analysis of alternative strategies;  (f) relate to the related plans of the City to include Service Delivery Plans, Comprehensive  Plans, Master Plans, etc.; and  (g) shall be prepared for the General Government and such other funds as the deemed  necessary.  b. Capital Improvements  i. A comprehensive six‐year plan for City capital investments shall be prepared biennially and  adopted by the City Council as part of the City budget.   (a) All projects included in the Capital Investment Program (CIP) shall be consistent with the  City’s Comprehensive Plan.   (b) The Capital Investment Program shall be prepared in consultation with Council Committees  for ongoing capital investments.  ii. All proposed capital improvement projects shall include a recommended or likely source of  funding.  iii. Private development (including residential, commercial and industrial projects) shall pay its fair  share of the capital investments that are necessary to serve the development in the form of  system development charges, impact fees, mitigation fees, or benefit districts.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 51Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   iv. Capital project proposals should indicate the project's impact on the operating budget,  including, but not limited to, long‐term maintenance costs necessary to support the investment.  v. Capital projects shall be budgeted for on a project life basis (rather than fiscal year).    11. Policy on Stabilization Funds: Sufficient fund balances and reserve levels are important in the long‐ term financial stability of the City.    a. The City shall maintain reserves required by law, ordinance and/or bond covenants. In addition, the  City of Renton has its own minimum requirements on reserve levels that are detailed below.    i. General Government  (a) The City shall maintain reserves in the General Government Funds at least 8% of total  budgeted operating expenditures with a target of 12%.  (b) In addition, the City shall maintain an additional reserve as a part of the City’s Risk  Management Funds in a minimum amount of at least 8% of General Fund operating  expenditures.   (c) In addition, the City shall maintain an “Anti‐Recessionary Reserve” in an amount of at least  4% of General Government budgeted operating expenditures.  Expenditures utilizing the  “Anti Recessionary Reserve” require a two‐thirds majority vote of the City Council and will  be replenished within three (3) years.  (d) In addition, the City shall accumulate reserves of $5,400,000 for the Annexation Sales Tax  Credit Expiration/Transition using year‐end savings, until fully funded.  Expenditures utilizing  the “Annexation Sales Tax Credit Expiration/Transition Reserve” require a two‐thirds  majority vote of the City Council.  (e) In addition, the City shall reserve $2,500,000 for the Economic Development Revolving Fund  using year‐end savings until funded.  Expenditures utilizing the “Economic Development  Revolving Fund Reserve” require a two‐thirds majority vote of the City Council.  ii. Debt Service  (a) The City shall maintain one year payments in voted general obligation debt service funds  and revenue bonds.  (b) In addition, a one year payment reserve will be established for all councilmanic general  obligation bonds issued after 2013.  iii. Enterprise Funds   (a) Water, Wastewater, and Surface Water Utility Fund shall each maintain reserves of 12% of  total budgeted operating expenses or 30 to 45 days.  (b) King County Wastewater Treatment Fund shall maintain reserves of $380,000  (approximately 3% of total operating expenses).  (c) Solid Waste Fund shall maintain reserves of $400,000.  (d) Golf Fund shall maintain reserves of 25% of total budgeted operating expenses.  (e) All other Enterprise Funds shall maintain reserves of 10% ‐ 20% of total budgeted operating  expenses.  iv. Reserve balances of other funds shall be set through the budget process in an amount  consistent with the purpose and nature of the fund.  b. Replacement reserves shall be established for equipment, and computer software should the need  continue beyond the estimated initial useful life, regardless of whether the equipment is acquired  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 52Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   via lease, gift or purchase. Service charges paid by City departments to the appropriate Internal  Service funds should include an amount to provide for replacements.  i. The City shall establish a Public Safety Small Equipment Reserve as a sub‐fund to the Equipment  Rental Fund.  Beginning 2015, the City shall contribute $200,000 a year to accumulate reserves  specifically for Public Safety small equipment items.  12. Policy on Fees and Charges  a. The City shall biennially review all fees for licenses, permits, fines, rates and other miscellaneous  charges as part of the budget process.    b. User charges and fees shall be established based on a percentage of the full cost of providing the  service, unless otherwise provided by statute or regulation.    i. Full cost incorporates direct and indirect costs, including operations and maintenance,  overhead, and charges for the use of capital facilities.    ii. Other factors for fee or charge adjustments may also include the impact of inflation, other cost  increases, the adequacy of the coverage of costs, and current competitive rates.    c. Proposed rate adjustments, user charges and fees shall be presented to the City Council for approval  for each year as part of the Mayor’s proposed Preliminary Biennial Budget to the Council.  d. The City shall rigorously collect all amounts due.    13. Policy on Utility Funds  a. The City shall establish and maintain separate utility operating and capital investment funds and  budgets for each of its utility operations.   b. Utility rate studies shall be conducted every six years to update assumptions and ensure the long‐ term solvency and viability of the City’s Utilities.  c. Utility rates and capital fees shall be reviewed biennially and necessary adjustments made to avoid  major rate increases.  d. The City shall use system development charges, grants and low interest loans to fund capital  projects where possible.  Overall, the utilities should maintain a debt to equity ratio of 60/40.    e. Each Utility should fund an amount of the cost equal to the annual “depreciation expense” of capital  assets less debt service principal payments.  f. System Development Charges (SDCs) shall be established at levels to ensure that all customers  seeking to connect to the City’s utility systems shall bear their equitable share of the cost of both  the existing and future systems.  g. Debt financing of utility improvements will be consistent with the utility master plans, council rate  policies and other factors so as to smooth the effect of major improvements on utility rates.  h. The City shall strive to maintain minimum debt service “coverage” with the net revenue (gross  operating revenue of the Utilities less operating and maintenance expenses) of the combined  Utilities being 1.25 ‐ 1.5 times the actual debt and the net revenue of the individual Utility being at  least 1.25 times the actual debt.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 53Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   i. Capital Contingency as System Reinvestment and Debt Service:  i. Surface Water:  1.25 DSC and approximately $3 million annual system reinvestment  ii. Wastewater:  1.25 DSC and approximately $3 million annual system reinvestment  iii. Water:  1.25 DSC and approximately $4 million annual system reinvestment  j. Bonds Versus Cash Funded Projects  i. All non‐CIP projects should be paid for using rates (programs, system plans, education materials,  etc.)  ii. All system reinvestment, maintenance, replacement and rehabilitation CIPs should be paid for  using rates.  iii. CIPs for new infrastructure, growth, or increased capacity can be paid for using bonds.    14. Policy on Debt Issuance and Management  a. Long‐term borrowing shall be confined to capital investments or similar projects with an extended  life when it is not practical to be financed from current revenues. The City shall not use long‐term  debt to finance current operations.  b. Debt payments shall not extend beyond the estimated useful life of the project being financed.  The  City shall keep the average maturity of general obligation bonds at or below fifteen years, unless  special circumstances arise warranting the need to extend the debt schedule.  c. The City shall work to maintain strong ratings on its debt including maintaining open  communications with bond rating agencies concerning its financial condition.  d. With Council approval, interim financing of capital projects may be secured from the debt financing  market place or from other funds through an interfund loan as appropriate in the circumstances.   e. The City may issue interfund loans when appropriate and consistent with a separately adopted City  Council policy on the subject.  f. When issuing debt, the City shall strive to use special assessment, revenue or other self‐supporting  bonds in lieu of general obligation bonds.   g. Long‐term general obligation debt shall be utilized when necessary to acquire land or capital assets  based upon a review of the ability of the City to meet future debt service requirements. The project  to be financed should also be integrated with the City’s long‐term financial plan and Capital  Investment Program.  h. General obligation debt should be used when the related projects are of a benefit to the City as a  whole.   i. General Obligation Bond (Voted):   (a) Every project proposed for financing through general obligation debt should be  accompanied by a full analysis of the future operating and maintenance costs associated  with the project.  ii. Limited Tax General Obligation Bond (Non‐Voted):  (a) The City should avoid issuing general obligation (non‐voted) debt beyond eighty percent  (80%) of its general obligation debt capacity.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 54Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   i. The City shall use refunding bonds where appropriate when cost savings can be achieved of at least  4% (NPV), restructuring its current outstanding debt and/or improving restrictive bond conditions.    j. The City’s financial team for the issuance of debt shall consist of the Council, Mayor, CAO,  Administrative Services Administrator, applicable department management (related to the projects  to be financed), City Legal Counsel, designated bond counsel, financial advisor and underwriter in  order to effectively plan and fund the City’s capital investment projects.  i. Through a competitive selection process conducted by the Administrative Services  Administrator with consultation with the Mayor, Chief Administrative Officer and Legal Counsel,  the City shall select the most qualified financial advisor / underwriter and bond counsel.   ii. These services shall be regularly monitored by the Administrative Services Administrator.   k. The City shall evaluate the best method of sale for each proposed bond issue.  i. When a negotiated sale is deemed advisable (in consultation with the Mayor and City Council)  the Administrative Services Administrator shall negotiate the most competitive pricing on debt  issues and broker commissions in order to ensure the best value to the City.  ii. When a negotiated sale is used, the City shall use an independent financial advisor to advise the  City’s participants in matters such as structure, pricing and fees.  l. The City shall comply with IRS regulations concerning use of, and reinvestment of bond proceeds.   i. The City shall monitor and comply with IRS regulations with regard to potential arbitrage  earnings.  If arbitrage earnings are believed to be above amounts provided by IRS regulations,  the City will set aside earnings in order to pay the appropriate amount to the federal  government as required by IRS regulations.  m. The City shall provide full secondary market disclosure related to outstanding debt.    15. Policy on Post‐Issuance Compliance for Tax‐Exempt Bonds  a. Purpose  The purpose of these post‐issuance compliance policies and procedures ("Compliance Policy") for tax‐ exempt bonds issued by The City of Renton, Washington (the "City") is to ensure that the City will be in  compliance with requirements of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"), that  must be satisfied with respect to tax‐exempt bonds and other obligations ("bonds") after the bonds are  issued so that interest on the bonds will be and remain tax‐exempt.  b. Responsibility for Monitoring Post‐Issuance Tax Compliance.   The City Council of the City has the overall, final responsibility for monitoring whether the City is in  compliance with post‐issuance federal tax requirements for the City's tax‐exempt bonds. However, the  City Council assigns to the Administrative Services Administrator of the City the primary operating  responsibility to monitor the City's compliance with post‐issuance federal tax requirements for the City's  tax‐exempt bonds.  c. Arbitrage Yield Restriction and Rebate Requirements.   The Administrative Services Administrator shall maintain or cause to be maintained records of:  i. purchases and sales of investments made with bond proceeds (including amounts treated as  "gross proceeds" of bonds under section 148 of the Code) and receipts of earnings on those  investments;  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 55Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   ii. expenditures made with bond proceeds (including investment earnings on bond proceeds) for  the governmental purposes of the bonds, such as for the costs of purchasing, constructing  and/or renovating property and facilities;   iii. information showing, where applicable for a particular calendar year, that the City was eligible  to be treated as a "small issuer" in respect of bonds issued in that calendar year because the City  did not reasonably expect to issue more than $5,000,000 of tax‐exempt bonds in that calendar  year;  iv. calculations that will be sufficient to demonstrate to the Internal Revenue Service ("IRS") upon  an audit of a bond issue that, where applicable, the City has complied with an available spending  exception to the arbitrage rebate requirement in respect of that bond issue;  v. calculations that will be sufficient to demonstrate to the IRS upon an audit of a bond issue for  which no exception to the arbitrage rebate requirement was applicable, that the rebate  amount, if any, that was payable to the United States of America in respect of investments  made with gross proceeds of that bond issue was calculated and timely paid with Form 8038‐T  timely filed with the IRS; and  vi. information and records showing that investments held in yield‐restricted advance refunding or  defeasance escrows for bonds, and investments made with unspent bond proceeds after the  expiration of the applicable temporary period, were not invested in higher‐yielding investments.  d. Restrictions on Private Business Use and Private Loans.   The Administrative Services Administrator shall adopt procedures that are calculated to educate and  inform the principal operating officials of those departments, including utility departments, if any, of the  City (the "users") for which land, buildings, facilities and equipment ("property") are financed with  proceeds of tax‐exempt bonds about the restrictions on private business use that apply to that property  after the bonds have been issued, and of the restriction on the use of proceeds of tax‐exempt bonds to  make or finance any loan to any person other than a state or local government unit.  In particular,  following the issuance of bonds for the financing of property, the Administrative Services Administrator  shall provide to the users of the property a copy of this Compliance Policy and other appropriate written  guidance advising that:  i. "private business use" means use by any person other than a state or local government unit,  including business corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies, associations, nonprofit  corporations, natural persons engaged in trade or business activity, and the United States of  America and any federal agency, as a result of ownership of the property or use of the property  under a lease, management or service contract (except for certain "qualified" management or  service contracts), output contract for the purchase of electricity or water, privately sponsored  research contract (except for certain "qualified" research contracts), "naming rights" contract,  "public‐private partnership" arrangement, or any similar use arrangement that provides special  legal entitlements for the use of the bond‐financed property;  ii. under section 141 of the Code, no more than 10% of the proceeds of any tax‐exempt bond issue  (including the property financed with the bonds) may be used for private business use, of which  no more than 5% of the proceeds of the tax‐exempt bond issue (including the property financed  with the bonds) may be used for any "unrelated" private business use‐that is, generally, a  private business use that is not functionally related to the governmental purposes of the bonds;  and no more than the lesser of $5,000,000 or 5% of the proceeds of a tax‐exempt bond issue  may be used to make or finance a loan to any person other than a state or local government  unit;  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 56Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   iii. before entering into any special use arrangement with a nongovernmental person that involves  the use of bond‐financed property, the user must consult with the Administrative Services  Administrator, provide the Administrative Services Administrator with a description of the  proposed nongovernmental use arrangement, and determine whether that use arrangement, if  put into effect, will be consistent with the restrictions on private business use of the bond‐ financed property;   iv. in connection with the evaluation of any proposed nongovernmental use arrangement, the  Administrative Services Administrator should consult with nationally recognized bond counsel to  the City as may be necessary to obtain federal tax advice on whether that use arrangement, if  put into effect, will be consistent with the restrictions on private business use of the bond‐ financed property, and, if not, whether any "remedial action" permitted under section 141 of  the Code may be taken by the City as a means of enabling that use arrangement to be put into  effect without adversely affecting the tax‐exempt status of the bonds that financed the  property; and  v. the Administrative Services Administrator and the user of the property shall maintain records of  such nongovernmental uses, if any, of bond‐financed property, including copies of the pertinent  leases, contracts or other documentation, and the related determination that those  nongovernmental uses are not inconsistent with the tax‐exempt status of the bonds that  financed the property.  e. Records to be Maintained for Tax‐Exempt Bonds.   It is the policy of the City that, unless otherwise permitted by future IRS regulations or other guidance,  written records (which may be in electronic form) will be maintained with respect to each bond issue for  as long as those bonds remain outstanding, plus three years. For this purpose, the bonds include  refunding bonds that refund the original bonds and thereby refinance the property that was financed by  the original bonds.  The records to be maintained are to include:  i. the official Transcript of Proceedings for the original issuance of the bonds;   ii. records showing how the bond proceeds were invested, as described in ci above;  iii. records showing how the bond proceeds were spent, as described in cii above, including  purchase contracts, construction contracts, progress payment requests, invoices, cancelled  checks, payment of bond issuance costs, and records of "allocations" of bond proceeds to make  reimbursement for project expenditures made before the bonds were actually issued;  iv. information, records and calculations showing that, with respect to each bond issue, the City  was eligible for the "small issuer" exception or one of the spending exceptions to the arbitrage  rebate requirement or, if not, that the rebate amount, if any, that was payable to the United  States of America in respect of investments made with gross proceeds of that bond issue was  calculated and timely paid with Form 8038‐T timely filed with the IRS, as described in ciii, civ and  cv above; and  v. records showing that special use arrangements, if any, affecting bond‐financed property made  by the City with nongovernmental persons, if any, are consistent with applicable restrictions on  private business use of property financed with proceeds of tax‐exempt bonds and restrictions on  the use of proceeds of tax‐exempt bonds to make or finance loans to any person other than a  state or local government unit, as described in 4 above.  The basic purpose of the foregoing record retention policy for the City's tax‐exempt bonds is to  enable the City to readily demonstrate to the IRS upon an audit of any tax‐exempt bond issue that  the City has fully complied with all federal tax requirements that must be satisfied after the issue  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 57Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   date of the bonds so that interest on those bonds continues to be tax‐exempt under section 103 of  the Code.  f. Identification and Remediation of Potential Violations of Federal Tax Requirements for Tax‐Exempt  Bonds.   i. So long as any of the Issuer’s tax‐exempt bond issues remain outstanding, the Administrative  Services Administrator will periodically consult with the users of the Issuer’s bond‐financed  property to review and determine whether current use arrangements involving that property  continue to comply with applicable federal tax requirements as described in these Compliance  Procedures.  This may be accomplished, for example, by periodically meeting with users,  providing questionnaires to users about current use arrangements, or adopting other protocols  reasonable calculated to ensure compliance with applicable federal tax requirements on a  continuing basis.  This periodic review may be scheduled, for example, at or before the times  that the Issuer is required to file with Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board the annual  financial information and operating data pursuant to the Issuer’s undertaking, if any, to provide  continuing disclosure with respect to outstanding bond issues.  ii. If at any time during the life of an issue of tax‐exempt bonds, the Issuer discovers a violation of  federal tax requirements applicable to that issue may have occurred, the Administrative Services  Administrator will consult with bond counsel to determine whether any such violation actually  has occurred and, if so, take prompt action to accomplish an available remedial action under  applicable Internal Revenue Service under the Voluntary Closing Agreement Program described  under Notice 2008‐31 or other future published guidance.  g. Education Policy With Respect to Federal Tax Requirements for Tax‐Exempt Bonds.   It is the policy of the City that the Administrative Services Administrator and his or her staff, as well as  the principal operating officials of those departments of the City for which property is financed with  proceeds of tax‐exempt bonds should be provided with education and training on federal tax  requirements applicable to tax‐exempt bonds. The City recognizes that such education and training is  vital as a means of helping to ensure that the City remains in compliance with those federal tax  requirements in respect of its bonds. The City therefore will enable and encourage those personnel to  attend and participate in educational and training programs offered by, among others, the Washington  Municipal Treasurers Association and the Washington Finance Officers Association with regard to the  federal tax requirements applicable to tax‐exempt bonds.            2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 58Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   City Funds and Fund Structure   Key Report  000    General A E  001    Community Services A I (000)  003    Streets A I (000)  004    Community Development Block Grant A I (000)  005    Museum A I (000)   098    Economic Development Fund A I (000)  108    Leased City Properties A I (000)  Total General Government    SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS:    110    Special Hotel‐Motel Tax  E  125    One Percent for Art  E  127    Cable Communications Development  E  135    Springbrook Wetlands Bank  E  140    Police Seizure Fund  E  141    Police CSAM Seizure Fund  E  DEBT SERVICE FUNDS:    215    Gen Govt Misc Debt Service  E  CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS (CIP):    303    Community Services  Impact Mitigation  E  304    Fire Impact Mitigation  E  305    Transportation Impact Mitigation  I (317)  308    REET 1 Fund   E  309    REET 2 Fund  E  316    Municipal Facilities CIP  E  317    Transportation CIP   E  336    New Library Development  I (316)  346    Family First  I (316)  A. General Government Funds share general revenues.  Therefore, no interest shall be charged for loans between funds.  E.  External Fund for Reporting Purposes  I.     Internal Fund for Management Purposes  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 59Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies   City Funds and Fund Structure (continued)  ENTERPRISE FUNDS: Key External  Reporting  Internal  Reporting  402   Airport Operations  E   403   Solid Waste Utility  E   404   Municipal Golf Course System  E   405   Water Operations B E   406   Wastewater Operations  B I (405)   407   Surface Water Operations B I (405)   416   King County Metro B I (405) (406)  422   Airport Capital Investment  I (402)   424   Municipal Golf Course System CIP  I (404)   425   Water CIP B I (405)   426   Wastewater CIP B I (405) (406)  427   Surface Water CIP B I (405) (407)  INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS:     501   Equipment Rental  E   502   Insurance   E   503   Information Technology  I (501)   504   Facilities   I (501)   505   Communications  I (501)   512   Healthcare Insurance  I (502)   522   Leoff1 Retirees  Healthcare  I (502)   FIDUCIARY FUNDS:     611   Firemen's Pension  E   B. Water Utility Funds shall be managed as a system such that balance sheet accounts are merged for management and reporting purposes.  E.  External Fund for Reporting Purposes  I. Internal Fund for Management Purposes      2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 1 - 60Executive Summary - Financial Management Policies 2 RENTON RESULTS  Budget Framework 2‐1  Renton Results Overview  2‐4  Safety and Health ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐6  Representative Government ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐11  Livable Community ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐15  Mobility ‐ Programs, Resources and Results 2‐20  Utilities and Environment ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐23  Internal Services ‐ Programs, Resources and Results  2‐29  Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area  2‐35  Reconciliation to Total Budget 2‐42  Introduction Renton Results began as the City of Renton’s budget framework and performance improvement initiative that originated in 2007. Our intent has been to clearly inform the community about the various services provided by the City, the costs of those services, and the results of our efforts. The purpose was also to inform policy decisions and provide transparency and accountability to our community. Since then, the Renton Results effort has expanded beyond data collection to include organizational elements such as high performance leadership development, process improvement, inclusive facilitation and engagement, and more. These elements are designed to equip and empower employees (at all levels) to bring necessary change and innovation to their service of both internal and external customers. As the Business Plan goals have changed over time, so has the focus of the Renton Results effort, demonstrating the City’s ability to be responsive and resilient through change and our commitment to continuous learning and improvement. How are we doing? In the following pages you’ll see the metrics gathered by programs that may demonstrate their productivity and/or effectiveness. While data alone cannot offer a complete picture of each program, it can help tell the story of the city’s efforts to serve the community while reflecting the impact of events or circumstances over time. Who is involved in Renton Results? All levels of staff are involved in identifying and/or tracking performance measures and data. City Goals The City Council adopts a six year strategic plan to focus City efforts in the direction of the City’s vision to be the center of opportunity in the Puget Sound Region where families and businesses thrive. The current Business Plan can also be found on our website by searching for Business Plan. The City’s Mission Statement identifies the following goals towards which all City operations, in partnership and communication with residents, businesses, and schools are aligned: •Provide a safe, healthy, vibrant community •Promote economic vitality and strategically position Renton for the future •Support planned growth and influence decisions to foster environmental sustainability •Build an inclusive informed city with equitable outcomes for all in support of social, economic, and racial justice •Meet service demands and provide high quality customer service Renton Results 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 1Renton Results - Budget Framework City Service Areas The City’s budget, through the Renton Results framework, is the mechanism in place to ensure the work of the City is aligned with the City’s Mission and Business Plan goals. Because City departments perform a wide variety of work, often partnering with other departments, the true cost of these services can be difficult to identify in a traditionally presented budget, by fund and/or department, which requires citizens to piece together the overall cost. To solve this problem, we prepare our budget in a manner that allows us to present the full cost of the services provided within each of our six service areas. Per our adopted 2021-2022 budget (operating plus capital): Safety and Health: Seven of our departments operate seventeen programs in support of this City Service Area. It makes up about 28% of the operating budget and employs about 203 people to perform the work. This is approximately $474-$487 per person. Representative Government: Six of our departments operate thirteen programs in support of this City Service Area. It makes up about 5% of our operating budget and employs 43 people to perform the work. This is approximately $88-92 per person. Livable Community: Two of our departments operate seventeen programs in support of this City Service Area. It makes up about 11% of our operating budget and employs 77 people (excluding seasonal) to perform the work. This is approximately $208-210 per person. Mobility: A single department operates twelve programs in support of this City Service Area. It makes up about 9% of our operating budget and employs 68 people (excluding seasonal) to perform the work. This is approximately $167-169 per person. Utilities & Environment: Three of our departments operate seventeen programs in support of this City Service Area. It makes up about 44% of our operating budget and employs 123 people to perform the work. This is approximately $797-922 per person. Internal Support: Seven of our departments operate twenty four programs in support of this City Service Area. It makes up about 4%* of our operating budget and employs 101 people to perform the work. This is approximately $89-93 per person. *excluding debt, separation benefits and retiree medical. How much do these services cost per person annually? The chart below shows a comparison of costs per person at the 2021-2022 adopted service levels by City Service Area. The total cost in 2021-2022 is about $1,831-$1,966 per person based on current population count of 104,076. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 2Renton Results - Budget Framework Resource Allocation by City Service Area versus traditional budget Renton Results program expenses are presented by City Service Area as consolidated costs across departments and funds. Within Renton Results, we have adjusted for transfers and inter-fund transactions where double counting occurs in traditional “Fund” based budgeting. As a result, the dollar amounts for Renton Results and the traditional budget are not the same. For example, the costs of the City’s internal service funds are shown under “Internal Support” category and are also included in the direct service areas by those Departments that use these internal services. To compensate for this, we are deducting the amount that has been accounted for in direct services at the bottom line level to show the net operating and capital budget only in the Renton Results section. How much do these services cost in total? 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 3Renton Results - Budget Framework 2021-2022 Renton Results Summary and Detail Desired Results – Strategies – KPI’s – Programs - Measures - Resources As described earlier, the City Service Areas are broad in nature and are supported by a number of City programs across multiple City departments. The following pages will provide summary and detailed information for each of our City Service Areas. You will find a complete list of programs, the adopted budget and performance measurements with results where available. Some of the terms you will see are defined below. Desired Results Each City Service Area is best defined by the associated “I want” statement or the desired Results. •Safety and Health: I want a safe and healthy community •Representative Government: I want a responsive and responsible government •Livable Community: I want access to high quality facilities, services and public resources that enrich the lives of everyone in the community •Mobility: I want safe and efficient access to all desired destinations, now and in the future •Utilities and Environment: I want to live, learn, work and play in a clean and green environment with reliable, affordable utility service •Internal Support: I want City departments to have the means to operate efficiently and effectively in a safe and sustainable manner Strategies Strategies answer the question: “How does the City plan to work toward and achieve these desired results. You will find these listed above each of the summary and performance measure sections of the City Services. This visual representation of the Safety and Health City Service Area, for example, illustrates the relationship between the defined strategies and reaching the desired result. Programs within this Service Area are aligned with these strategies. I want Renton to be a safe and healthy community Encourage the community to comply with local, state and federal laws Encouragement of a self reliant community through programs and education Timely responsiveness and “projection of effort,” when the community cannot help itself Recovery and restoration of the community after a disaster 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 4Renton Results - Renton Results Overview Programs Programs are an organizational or work unit of a City department or division that provides a specific service or product to citizens or other customers. Many employees are assigned and budgeted across multiple programs and many of these programs work together to provide a product or service to the citizens and other City customers. Not all work performed by the City is specifically identified as a Program; however, all programs are budgeted based on services provided by the program’s core mission or purpose. Program Metrics Program metrics are tools put into place by the program staff and managers and reviewed by the Administrators and Executive office in order to assure alignment of efforts within the Departments. As stated before, not all work processes are captured within Renton Results but rather Program Metrics are select points of data that represent the work performed in a way that can be a useful illustration of effectiveness or impact when tracked and monitored. Targets Program Targets are a guideline or goal for each Program Measure. We work hard to communicate that targets are not to be used as a “hammer” but rather as a standard which staff can strive to achieve within the framework of their resources. There are many factors that may influence the results for Programs such as weather, the economy, staff turnover and demand. Conclusion Renton Results is the framework of our budget process that allows for transparent, informed and thoughtful consideration in the allocation of our resources. It allows decision makers to see the cost of services in a meaningful way and allows program prioritization and resources allocation to be based on the priorities established by the City’s Mission and Goals. In addition, the Renton Results effort seeks to develop and support efforts that will enable the City to quickly identify and respond to opportunities for improvement in processes and service delivery. Because the Budget by Department and Budget by Fund sections of this document include such transfers and inter-fund transactions the last page of this section includes a full reconciliation to the Total Budget. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 5Renton Results - Renton Results Overview 2021 2022 202.90 202.90 $ 49,347,522 $ 50,684,751 28%28% 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:180.83 179.33 179.83 179.83 196.33 196.33 202.50 203.50 202.90 202.90 Dollars:34,613,848$ 35,812,446$ 36,336,698$ 37,824,001$ 40,485,130$ $42,636,579 48,205,345$ 49,645,700$ 49,347,522$ 50,684,751$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Residents report feeling somewhat or very safe during the day in their neighborhood. next survey 2015 next survey 2015 next survey 2015 90 next survey 2017 90.4 next survey 2021 next survey 2021 TBD Residents report feeling somewhat or very safe during the night in their neighborhood. next survey 2015 next survey 2015 next survey 2015 69.6 next survey 2017 72.8 next survey 2021 next survey 2021 TBD Community report feeling somewhat or very safe during the day in the downtown area. next survey 2015 next survey 2015 next survey 2015 81.4 next survey 2017 84 next survey 2021 next survey 2021 TBD Community report feeling somewhat or very safe during the night in the downtown area.next survey 2015 next survey 2015 next survey 2015 69.6 next survey 2017 72.8 next survey 2021 next survey 2021 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 Dollars:4,513,858$ 4,552,469$ 5,235,625$ 5,313,703$ 6,349,491$ 6,600,834$ 8,692,469$ 7,884,503$ 7,864,729$ 7,976,891$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Average response time (in minutes) to Priority I calls.3.07 3.81 4.64 4.52 4.43 4.61 4.66 4.06 TBDAverage response time (in minutes) to Priority II 7.32 6.50 7.64 8.13 7.62 7.35 6.80 6.59 TBD Average response time (in minutes) to Priority III 10.48 8.81 10.87 11.75 11.62 10.94 10.73 10.01 TBDAverage response time (in minutes) to Priority IV 21.05 16.01 20.91 23.94 26.08 23.54 23.82 21.99 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:64.0 64.0 63.0 63.0 67.0 67.0 67.0 67.0 67.0 67.0 Dollars:8,982,138$ 9,191,931$ 9,792,900$ 10,159,956$ 9,900,191$ 10,338,556$ 11,225,287$ 12,007,857$ 12,958,172$ 13,392,798$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDAverage number of training hours per commissioned employee 98 108 117 139 124 108 117 97.6 TBD Average number of training hours per non-commissioned employee 25 33 43 16 24 57 18.3 32 TBD Number of neighborhoods involved in community education through block/business watch 48 43 39 36 39 41 63 63 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:10.5 9.0 8.0 8.0 15.0 15.0 14.0 14.0 13.0 13.0 Dollars:1,675,957$ 1,569,696$ 1,454,208$ 1,505,138$ 2,373,476$ 2,460,047$ 2,406,157$ 2,499,612$ 2,631,945$ 2,688,719$ City Resources budgeted to support theSafety and Health City Service Area minimum of 100 hours minimum of 24 hours minimum of 50 count Police Administration, Police Department The Administration division is responsible for the overall leadership of the Renton Police Department. Target minimum of 90 percent minimum of 90 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent Targetless than 3.5 minutesless than 8 minutesless than 12 minutesless than 21 minutes Department resources budgeted for this program Department resources budgeted for this program Patrol Operations, Police Department Uniformed, first responders to emergency and non-emergency calls for service. When available, uncommitted time is spent providing pro-active policing throughout the city to reduce crime and the perception of crime. Responsible for enforcing laws, arresting offenders, resolving community problems, and improving the quality of life for the residents and visitors of Renton. Department resources budgeted for this program Administrative Services, Police Department The Administrative Services division consists of three training officers, three community programs coordinators, three school resource officers, one secretary, two police sergeants, and one police commander. The Electronic Home Detention unit is also a part of the Administrative Services division but is administered under a different program. Target Note: Year-over-year data provided only for reference. Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents. Programs, Resources and ResultsThe following programs have provided metrics ("Results") to indicate the results of their efforts. Each metric is unigue - some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show efficiency and effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked "N/A" indicate a metric for which data is not yet available. This could be due to a number of reasons including changes in staffing and/or information systems in place to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible. The staff within the programs develop their own metrics and provide the data for reporting purposes. Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve this desired resultEncouragement of a self reliant community through programs and education AdoptedTimely responsiveness and “projection of effort,” when the community cannot help itself FTE'sRecovery and restoration of the community after a disaster OperatingEncourage the community to comply with local, state and federal laws Percent of Operating Budget Desired Result: I want a safe and healthy community City Service Area: Safety and Health $0 $10 $20 $30 $40 $50 $60 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 AdoptedMillionsAnnual Budgets 180.8 179.3 179.8 179.8 196.3 196.3 202.5 203.5 202.9 202.9 165 170 175 180 185 190 195 200 205 210 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's Budgeted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 6Renton Results - Safety and Health Programs, Resources and Results Desired Result: I want a safe and healthy community City Service Area: Safety and Health Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Percent of collision incidences resolved by Patrol Services during regular hours of service to reduce resources needed in Patrol Operations.84.49 55.42 76.00 50.86 31.80 44.62 100.00 100.00 TBD Average percent of traffic safety camera notices of violation are provided within fourteen days. 95.72 58.75 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 29.65 52.00 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:14.0 14.0 14.0 14.0 14.5 14.5 15.0 15.0 16.0 16.0 Dollars:2,503,671$ 2,538,020$ 2,622,607$ 2,707,749$ 2,997,063$ 3,036,562$ 3,747,418$ 3,860,730$ 4,175,438$ 4,276,359$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDAnnual percent of successful resolution or clearance of assigned cases 82.00 84.19 76.83 83.21 88.00 55.51 68.00 82.00 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 22.0 22.0 22.0 22.0 24.0 24.0 Dollars:2,639,554$ 2,696,607$ 2,815,279$ 2,940,571$ 3,247,139$ 3,308,069$ 3,516,861$ 3,699,534$ 4,184,172$ 4,326,131$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBD Number of arrests due to Special Operations' identification and investigation of repeat offenders and/or trends of criminal activity. 87 80 58 51 44 95 46 73 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:22.0 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.0 21.0 22.0 22.0 20.0 20.0 Dollars:3,115,313$ 3,177,244$ 3,446,817$ 3,594,363$ 3,227,507$ 3,359,743$ 3,579,522$ 3,797,211$ 3,724,857$ 3,869,265$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDNew Concealed Pistol Licenses will be completed within 30 days new 2016 new 2016 new 2016 new 2016 1293 1220 1176 1206 TBD Number of Public Records Requests new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 2359 2504 2686 2855 3596 TBD Number of Cases processed by staff 13566 14118 14721 15517 16665 16367 16179 14643 TBDNumber of warrants processed by staff 2544 2356 2357 2161 1575 1526 1687 1695 TBDNumber of Citations processed by staff 13924 16867 14550 11766 11462 11438 11047 8629 TBDNumber of Orders process by staff 1671 1441 1432 1438 1630 1644 1679 1587 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:15.4 15.4 15.4 15.4 16.4 16.4 17.4 17.4 17.4 17.4 Dollars:1,403,208$ 1,450,477$ 1,668,902$ 1,776,066$ 1,799,964$ 1,898,169$ 1,968,803$ 2,071,599$ 2,158,266$ 2,267,688$ Special Operations, Police Department The Special Operations division of the Renton Police Department is the primary proactive arm of the department. This includes both uniformed and undercover proactive units. The division is also the lead for the Renton contingent of the Valley Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team. minimum of 50 count Department resources budgeted for this program Department resources budgeted for this program Investigations, Police Department The Investigations division consists of sixteen detectives, two evidence technicians, two sergeants, one secretary, one domestic violence victim advocate, one crime analyst, and one commander. The Investigations division conducts follow-up investigations of crimes against persons (assault, homicide, missing persons, rape, robbery, sex offenders, internet crimes against children, domestic violence, and runaways) and property crimes (auto theft, fraud, forgery, burglary, theft, malicious mischief, identity theft, unlawful issuance of bank checks, and pawns). Detectives conduct investigations and submit them to the Prosecutor's Office for charges. Once charges are filed, they prepare the case for trial and assist the Prosecutor's Office. The Investigations division secretary processes all payables, assists the crime analyst with statistical reports, transcribes tapes for detectives, tracks AFIS records, tracks case dispositions from King County courts, tracks FIRs, coordinates volunteers for second floor reception, and tracks registered sex offenders with the King County Sheriff's Office and the Renton Police Department. The evidence technicians are responsible for the intake of property and evidence, as well as assisting with criminal investigations at crime scenes and major collisions. Once in the control of the evidence section, the evidence technicians are responsible for tracking the movement and location of the items. Certain pieces of evidence require special handling and are placed in refrigerators, freezers, or are sent out for special processing by various entities such as the WSP Crime Lab, AFIS, etc. Target minimum of 80 percent Department resources budgeted for this program Target Patrol Services, Police Department Uniformed, first responders to emergency and non-emergency calls for service relating to safe, coordinated, and accessible roadway and neighborhood traffic concerns, animal safety, and parking violations. The Patrol Services division acts as a support service to Patrol Operations, responding for collision reporting and investigating, clearing the roads, and moving traffic safely through Renton. The division works collaboratively with intra-departmental teams to coordinate a traffic plan to safely move hundreds of thousands of vehicles through the city on any given day. The Patrol Services division emphasizes a traffic plan that focuses on traffic safety through engineering, education, and enforcement. The Patrol Services division handles all serious injury and fatality collision investigations and employs the use of Unmanned Air Systems-Drone (UAS) technology and software to efficiently map and recreate collisions and scenes. The division also uses this technology to fly and map crime scenes for Renton and other agency's Investigations divisions for serious crimes and officer involved shootings. Target minimum of 80 percent minimum of 100 percent Staff Services, Police Department number of citationsnumber of orders Department resources budgeted for this program Staff Services division maintains all police department crime reports, traffic collision reports, court orders, federal uniform crime reporting (UCR), missing persons, stolen/recovery stolen vehicles, concealed pistol license (CPL) applications/denials, officer safety entries, Renton Municipal Court warrants, protection orders, ACCESS certification for department members, police public disclosure requests, insurance requests, prosecutor requests, and defense attorney case report requests. Staff Services division receives all electronic reports from mobile data computers deployed with police officers on the street, checks/corrects errors, and then merges officer reports into the police records management system. Receives COPLOGIC online reports from victims referred by dispatch. COPLOGIC reports are processed and the victim is sent a case number for their report once it has been manually entered into police records management system. Staff Services division must follow strict guidelines from WSP, WACIC/NCIC, and FBI to maintain certification when they make required entries into the state and federal system. All entries must be audited by a second specialist. All after-hours calls go through Staff Services for any emergency and non-emergency requests for other city or police department notifications. Target number of licenses number of requestsnumber of cases number of warrants 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 7Renton Results - Safety and Health Programs, Resources and Results Desired Result: I want a safe and healthy community City Service Area: Safety and Health Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Provide Electronic Home Detention (EHD) services to reduce jail costs. EHD referrals and revenue increases, resulting in a cost savings to the inmate house budget. $ 1,312,708 $ 1,227,828 $ 1,765,785 $ 2,038,155 $ 2,479,924 $ 2,871,132 $ 4,593,750 $ 5,199,250 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1 1 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 Dollars:99,851$ 103,093$ 366,629$ 379,743$ 397,087$ 406,139$ 495,059$ 510,515$ 526,603$ 537,983$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0.00 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:5,583,718$ 6,333,307$ 4,200,000$ 4,500,000$ 4,850,000$ 5,698,750$ 6,237,344$ 6,518,024$ 4,306,301$ 4,306,301$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDDiscovery provided to the Defense Attorney by prosecutors within 20 calendar days of a receipt of a request for discovery and a request is sent out for needed materials from the police and involved agencies or businesses. 97 100 N/A N/A 100 100 100 100 TBD Increase the scope and extent of electronic exchanges of information, including discovery, to the Defense Attorney. new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 N/A 100 100 100 100 TBD Be prepared for hearings and trials in all cases new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 N/A 100 100 100 100 TBDPrepare complete and adequate discovery in all cases, as measured by motions granted by the court for inadequate discovery. new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 N/A 100 100 100 100 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:6 6 7.0 7.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 Dollars:622,055$ 657,530$ 873,909$ 929,599$ 979,228$ 1,041,806$ 1,112,339$ 1,160,306$ 1,210,931$ 1,254,397$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDNumber of Emergency Management Accreditation Program (EMAP) standards that are met completely, as a measure of emergency management excellence.new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 25 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 Dollars:323,570$ 331,623$ 377,272$ 392,868$ 587,790$ 610,012$ 645,858$ 726,748$ 781,615$ 805,202$ Department resources budgeted for this program Emergency Management, Executive Department The activities of the program are driven both by mandates and by best practices in the emergency management profession. The primary activities of the program address the legal requirements specified in the WAC and in the grant guidance and the result is development and coordination of emergency plans, design and deployment of required training and exercises, maintenance of certain communication and warning capabilities, public education and relay of emergency information, emergency response through the activation of the Emergency Operations Center, identification and analysis of local hazards, and hazmat response and notification. The ultimate outcome is a more effective and coordinated emergency response on the part of the City, increased disaster resilience of residents and businesses, the engagement of volunteers, and leveraging of public and private partnerships to serve the community better and more cost- effectively during and after a disaster. No change is Adopted to the Emergency Management budget. A recent change in 2019 resulted in shifting one FTE who was partially grant-underwritten to be fully funded by the city budget. This has continued in 2020 and will be maintained in the 2021-22 budget. Target percent of total Target Department resources budgeted for this program Auxiliary Services - Jail, Police Department South Correctional Entity (SCORE) Regional Jail. Department resources budgeted for this program City Attorney Prosecution, City Attorney Department Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 99 percent minimum of 95 percent minimum of 95 percent minimum of 95 percent The City Attorney Department - Prosecution Division handles criminal misdemeanor, traffic infraction, impound and code violation matters in the City of Renton Municipal Court and all appeals therefrom. The work load and requirements for Prosecution Division is directly affected by Renton Police Department staffing, the policies and procedures of the presiding judge of the Municipal Court, the number of cases filed or referred to the prosecutors for filing review and directed emphasis enforcement goals. The Prosecution Division continues to review and prosecute declined felony cases, in addition to an overall increase in DUI and DV case referrals. minimum of 600000 dollar Electronic Home Detention Program, Police Department The Electronic Home Detention (EHD) program provides an alternative to incarceration for non-violent offenders. With approval from the sentencing court, offenders are placed in the EHD program at no cost to the agency. The EHD program eliminates the expense to house inmates in jail. EHD costs are paid for by the offender, which eliminates housing offenders with health restrictions requiring expensive treatment. The EHD program allows offenders to live at home, go to work, and still provide for their families. Target 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 8Renton Results - Safety and Health Programs, Resources and Results Desired Result: I want a safe and healthy community City Service Area: Safety and Health Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDPermit review for single family applications completed within 2 weeks 75 40 90 90 51 61 58 45 46 Permit review for commercial applications within 4 weeks 100 100 62 100 90 95 88 87 95 Inspection requests receive response within 24 hours 98 97 97 95 96 93 94 95 94 Completed responses to a customer service questionnaire rate their overall experience as "Good" or better survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:12.5 12.5 13.0 13.0 13.0 13.0 16.0 17.0 16.0 16.0 Dollars:1,440,261$ 1,472,285$ 1,593,442$ 1,687,594$ 1,669,636$ 1,738,620$ 2,238,415$ 2,406,224$ 2,308,971$ 2,395,462$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Code compliance is achieved within 3 weeks of date of initial request 88 91 90 88 80 81 81 89 TBD Sites remain in compliance one year after Code Enforcement action. data not available at this time 95 N/A N/A N/A 78 80 80 TBD Code compliance is achieved through voluntary action upon notification of violation 85 95 N/A N/A N/A 83 80 80 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:3 3 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 Dollars:328,729$ 338,602$ 397,253$ 419,537$ 531,790$ 534,908$ 522,600$ 552,391$ 576,561$ 598,859$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDComposite of results from survey of probationer's understanding of probation process reflected as "Good" or better. 83 81 84 85 88 88 85 84 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1 1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Dollars:99,851$ 103,093$ 120,680$ 126,987$ 126,253$ 130,467$ 138,841$ 144,236$ 148,714$ 153,823$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Number of compliance audits performed annually new 2017 new 2017 new 2017 new 2017 new 2017 500 349 375 TBD Business License renewals will be issued within one day of receipt of payment. 99 45 85 94.75 87 89.25 92 95 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 Dollars:94,478$ 97,559$ 108,061$ 114,395$ 105,456$ 109,005$ 315,617$ 411,799$ 410,556$ 428,770$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:63,133$ 63,133$ 63,133$ 63,133$ 63,133$ 63,133$ 63,133$ 63,133$ 63,133$ 63,133$ Community Development Block Grant, Community Services Department The City of Renton receives Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). These are federal funds that go from HUD to King County to Renton via an agreement. It is money in/money out at no cost to the City. Funds can be used for public services, community development, economic development, and construction of public facilities. There are very specific and stringent requirements at the federal and county level for what activities the funds can be used. Since 2015, CDBG funding has been used to promote economic development activities. From 2015-2019 the City offered the Downtown Commercial Rehabilitation and Façade Improvement Loan Program (FILP) using CDBG funds. The program was closed out in 2019 after providing $601,497 in matching funds for façade improvements. Funding was then shifted to the Public Facilities and Improvements Program for Downtown/South Renton ("Downtown Streetscapes improvements"). 2017 baseline Department resources budgeted for this program Department resources budgeted for this program Business Licensing, ASD Department The Business License and B&O Tax coordinates the review/approval process of over 6,000 business licenses (new and renewals) annually and collects approximately $3 million in business license fees, B&O taxes and penalties. Approximately $2,000,000 and $2,040,000 for 2019 & 2020 respectively of the business license and tax fees are designated for transportation improvement programs, the remainder go to fund general fund operations. The business data collected from businesses also serves as a local economic indicator, provides tools for business outreach, and other economic development activities. Target minimum of 95 percent Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 80 percent Target minimum of 70 percent minimum of 95 percent Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 95 percent minimum of 95 percent minimum of 80 percent Probation, Court Services Department Probation is a period of supervision over an offender, ordered by the court in lieu of serving time in jail. Offenders must follow certain conditions of sentence set forth by the court under the supervision of a Probation Officer. Target minimum of 95 percent Department resources budgeted for this program Code Enforcement program, CED Department The Code Enforcement program ensures compliance with the City's laws and regulations for land use, zoning, building, housing, and environmental health. The City places a high priority on code compliance as a means of accomplishing adopted community goals, such as maintaining the quality of neighborhoods, avoiding nuisances, and protecting the environment. Target minimum of 70 percent Building Inspection, CED Department This program provides plan review, building permits and field inspection services for all private and public development building projects within the City of Renton. Permits include building, electrical, plumbing, mechanical, sprinklers, demolition and signs. Enforcement of the building codes ensures the safety of our residents in the built environment. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 9Renton Results - Safety and Health Programs, Resources and Results Desired Result: I want a safe and healthy community City Service Area: Safety and Health Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDIncrease the percentage served in the Housing Repair Assistance Program (HRAP) of the low-to-moderate income, owner-occupied households that are eligible for the program. N/A N/A N/A 4% of 5315 N/A N/A N/A N/A TBD Increase the percentage of total served in HRAP that are non–senior (applicant less than 65 years of age) households. N/A N/A N/A 22 N/A N/A N/A N/A TBD Increase the total number of Housing Repair services provided. N/A N/A N/A 985 N/A N/A N/A 999 TBD Number of unduplicated Renton residents served by agencies that are funded by City of Renton.N/A N/A N/A 18136 27122 N/A N/A N/A TBD Percentage of unduplicated Renton residents served by agencies that are funded by City of Renton.N/A N/A N/A 0.1895 0.2677 N/A N/A N/A TBD Per capita spending for human services. N/A N/A N/A $ 5.54 $ 5.60 $ 5.67 $ 5.67 $ 5.67 TBDThe percentage of Housing Repair clients that complete surveys whose experience is better or slightly better than expected.95.8 69 69 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A TBD Percentage of Housing Repair survey respondents who agree that their health or safety hazard was resolved by doing the repair or service.100 97 98 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A TBD Number of unduplicated households served new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 217 N/A N/A N/A N/A TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.0 4.0 4.5 4.5 Dollars:1,124,503$ 1,135,777$ 1,199,981$ 1,212,599$ 1,279,927$ 1,301,760$ 1,299,619$ 1,331,278$ 1,316,559$ 1,342,967$ minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent number of households Department resources budgeted for this program increase of 0.5% increase of 3% increase of 10% number of residents percentage of residents cost per capita Serving vulnerable/low income, Community Services Department Helping Renton residents and vulnerable populations be self- sufficient, contributing members of society and able to maintain their independence to the best of their abilities is what the Human Services Division is all about. We provide information and referrals to connect people to services and refer them to 211 for additional assistance. Typical calls cover landlord tenant issues, food assistance, housing repair needs or how to get assistance with rent or utilities as well as where to find shelter or a place to shower. Renton funds are allocated to agencies that are contractually obligated to serve Renton residents. These agencies help provide resources so children can be ready for school, they provide for basic quality of life needs and help prevent homelessness, as well as addressing domestic violence and sexual assault. Target 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 10Renton Results - Safety and Health Programs, Resources and Results 2021 2022 43.00 43.00 $ 9,227,611 $ 9,495,456 6%6% 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:40.7 39.7 38.70 38.70 40.18 40.18 42.00 42.00 43.00 43.00 Dollars:6,071,863$ 6,169,853$ 6,319,972$ 6,576,090$ 7,281,264$ $7,461,413 7,973,392$ 8,195,173$ 9,227,611$ 9,495,456$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDInformation requests/concerns from residents are acknowledged within three days.90.25 92 97 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Information requests/concerns are resolved within two weeks.90 95 92 99 92 97.5 90 92 TBD Residents surveyed rate the value of services for the taxes paid to Renton as "good" or better. next survey 2015 next survey 2015 next survey 2015 51 next survey 2017 51 next survey 2021 next survey 2021 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 Dollars:868,832$ 890,745$ 985,593$ 1,023,307$ 1,426,801$ 1,508,885$ 1,497,833$ 1,490,587$ 1,525,787$ 1,575,912$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDNumber of Legislative documents (agenda, minutes, ordinances, resolutions, etc) published & available 187 144 142 148 121 140 173 204 TBD Number of internal documents (contracts including lease agreements, MOU's, etc.) that are executed and recorded 411 601 579 722 725 714 874 693 TBD Internal Customer service survey indicates Good or Better customer satisfaction.N/A 86 N/A 87 N/A 85 N/A 87 TBD Number of Public Records Requests 366 342 453 332 616 678 608 691 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:5 5 5.0 5.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 Dollars:1,016,822$ 1,062,166$ 942,862$ 992,720$ 1,081,537$ 1,119,660$ 1,301,087$ 1,362,852$ 1,433,840$ 1,477,120$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Routine legislation review will be performed within seven calendar days of receipt.new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 92 92 TBD Complete routine contract review within 7 calendar days of receipt.new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 95 95 TBD Complete routine contract addendums, amendments and change orders within 2 business days of receipt.new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 new 2018 95 95 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:3.88 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 Dollars:577,349$ 594,181$ 654,880$ 693,479$ 677,867$ 700,477$ 719,671$ 746,356$ 792,781$ 816,384$ City Attorney Department resources budgeted for this program City Attorney Civil, City Attorney Department The City Attorney Department - Civil Division drafts, reviews, revises and/or edits all legislation for the City; provides legal advice and guidance to all departments, stays current on the law and provides affected City departments notices of changes in the statutory or case law, helps negotiate and review contracts for all departments, interacts with other legal departments and municipalities on matters of joint interest, including interlocal agreements, and represents the City or oversees outside counsel in civil litigation and hearings (including defense of lawsuits, land use hearings, prosecution of code enforcement matters, and defense/initiation of police department property seizures). Target Executive Operations, Executive Department This program offer consists of the support for resident inquiries and policy development and implementation functions provided by the Mayor's Office. Generally the Mayor's Office provides executive leadership and management for the City of Renton government to act strategically, implement decisions efficiently and accurately, represent Renton effectively, apply city policies uniformly, and carry out city goals expeditiously. Target Target ASD Department resources budgeted for this program Executive Department resources budgeted for this program City Clerk, ASD Department The City Clerk's Office strives to provide consistently high levels of service that advance and strengthen Renton's government so it is prepared to meet the needs of the 21st century. The vision is to fundamentally improve the quality of life for residents and the community at large by providing the best customer service in King County. The mission of the City Clerk's Office is to encourage civic education and participation, and to create a climate and culture of openness and transparency in Renton city government through effective facilitation of the legislative process, and through accountable stewardship of public information and official city records. The City Clerk's Office also strives to provide the highest quality customer service, understanding and helpfulness to our residents. We hold ourselves accountable by honoring our commitments and responsibilities to our community and colleagues. We value the diversity and collaboration of opinions and backgrounds and have created an environment that is inclusive of everyone. We ensure that public records and information entrusted to us are preserved and accessible to the highest standards through stewardship and continual innovation. City Service Area: Representative Government minimum of 90 percent minimum of 90 percent minimum of 51 percent number of documents number of documents minimum of 80 percent number of requests minimum of 95 percent minimum of 95 percent minimum of 90 percent Programs, Resources and ResultsThe following programs have provided metrics ("Results") to indicate the results of their efforts. Each metric is unigue - some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show efficiency and effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked "N/A" indicate a metric for which data is not yet available. This could be due to a number of reasons including changes in staffing and/or information systems in place to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible. The staff within the programs develop their own metrics and provide the data for reporting purposes. City Resources budgeted to support the Safety and Health City Service Area Desired Result: I want a responsive and responsible government Note: Year-over-year data provided only for reference. Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents. Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve this desired resultPolicy and program decisions reflecting community valuesAdvocate community interest in regional, state, and federal forumsOpen accessible and consistent (administrative and judicial) decision processClear and effective communicationsPolicy and fiscal accountabilityPartnership with community organizations to leverage resources AdoptedFTE'sOperatingPercent of Operating Budget $0 $2 $4 $6 $8 $10 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 AdoptedMillionsAnnual Budgets 40.7 39.7 38.7 38.7 40.2 40.2 42.0 42.0 43.0 43.0 3637 383940 4142 4344 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's Budgeted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 11Renton Results - Representative Government Programs, Resources and Results City Service Area: Representative Government Desired Result: I want a responsive and responsible government Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Department's expenditures are within budget.100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Number of training hours per FTE provided to court employees.8 6 8 9 8 8 8 8 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 5.0 5.0 4.0 4.0 Dollars:654,292$ 677,775$ 788,888$ 805,573$ 839,900$ 820,429$ 1,241,332$ 1,296,334$ 1,371,173$ 1,412,717$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:450,000$ 450,000$ 450,000$ 450,000$ 450,000$ 450,000$ 450,000$ 450,000$ 883,000$ 883,000$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDDefendant satisfaction with their understanding of the criminal case process is rated as "Good" or 83 84 84 83 85 83 80 82 TBD Ongoing Juror Survey's reflect an approval rating that indicates satisfaction and understanding of the jury experience by non-criminal citizens of Renton. 81 85 82 80 80 84 82 82 TBD Defendant’s satisfaction with the ability to obtain access to court record information related to criminal case processing is rated “Good” or better.new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 87 92 92 90 90 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:7.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 Dollars:738,919$ 690,064$ 727,334$ 760,705$ 669,096$ 697,370$ 624,524$ 647,455$ 676,430$ 703,524$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBD Coordinate and leverage civic engagement opportunities to conserve financial resources through the use of volunteers, resulting in annual cost avoidance. $ 1,368,412 $ 1,423,321 $ 1,229,458 $ 1,179,835 $ 1,267,820 $ 1,480,792 N/A $ 1,268,800 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Dollars:286,362$ 291,999$ 302,776$ 322,780$ 312,631$ 312,631$ 125,652$ 130,089$ 133,972$ 137,011$ Court Administration, Court Services Department In accordance with Washington State Court Rule #GR 29, the Presiding Judge and as delegated, the Court Services Director, shall manage and administer the court's business, including: - Supervise the business of the court to ensure the expeditious and efficient processing of cases; - Supervise all Judicial Branch personnel; - Accounting and auditing of revenues and expenditures; - Development and coordination of statistical and management information; - Preparation and filing of daily, weekly, monthly and annual reports as required by statute and court rule; - Act as official spokesperson for the court with the Legislative and Executive branch of government and the community and - Select, train and assign Pro Tem judges Target Criminal Case Processing, Court Services Department Renton Municipal Court is a court of limited jurisdiction, handling all misdemeanor and gross misdemeanor crimes that occur within the city limits of Renton. After a case is filed by the prosecutor or police department, the court holds a series of hearings (in person or via Zoom) in order to obtain a resolution or disposition to a charge. Detailed information regarding the individuals involved, charges alleged, hearings scheduled, judgments rendered and conditions of sentence imposed are gathered in the court's case management and document management system. Accuracy of information is a paramount responsibility of the court. Target Court Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 8 count minimum of 80 percent minimum of 90 percent minimum of 1260000 dollar minimum of 99.5 percent Court Department resources budgeted for this program Court Public Defenders, contracted Renton has a contract with a public defense firm to represent those individuals charged with crimes under the Renton Municipal Code. Court Department resources budgeted for this program Volunteer Program, Community Services Department minimum of 80 percent The Volunteer program engages over 5,000 people annually to steward different parts of the City and assist with City-sponsored programming. A program of the Parks and Trails Division, it functions as a hub to recruit and connect people with different City departments according to their service interests. In the Community Services Department, the Volunteer Coordinator leads service events at Renton parks and annual events such as Arbor & Earth Day, 'Day of Service' and the City-wide annual Volunteer Appreciation Banquet. This program meets the service demands of a growing community by using best management practices and supporting other divisions and departments. VOLUNTEER PROGRAM activities include:CERVIS software - Volunteer Coordinator is software administrator and liaison to IT Division, marketing and volunteer recruitment, communication too, volunteer registration, timekeeping and reporting; Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) - backup support, as needed, at Renton Farmers Market;Events - coordination and facilitation of over 50 City-wide service and education opportunities; Recreation Scholarship Program - solicitation for donations for sponsorships to use toward Renton recreation programs; Summer Lunch Program - develop marketing materials, delivery of meals and snacks, coordinate special events and free book giveaways with King County Library System and coordinate recreation activities with AmeriCorps volunteers; in partnership with United Way of King County, Renton School District, community organizations and apartment management. Target Community Services Department resources budgeted for this program 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 12Renton Results - Representative Government Programs, Resources and Results City Service Area: Representative Government Desired Result: I want a responsive and responsible government Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Defendant's satisfaction with the ability to get access to court information related to infraction processing is rated "Good" or better. 87 83 86 87 92 90 88 88 TBD Resident's satisfaction with understanding the court infraction process.74 78 85 85 86 84 84 82 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:5 5 4.0 4.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 7.0 7.0 Dollars:516,601$ 528,590$ 474,419$ 494,445$ 585,407$ 611,935$ 641,463$ 662,151$ 906,613$ 945,398$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Percent of survey responses that rate the City's job of keeping residents informed as "good" or better. Survey not available Survey not available Survey not available 65 Survey not available 67 no data no data TBD Composite increase in residents' rating for each of the City's various information resources provided by the Communications Department (e-communication, print, advertising and media). Survey not available Survey not available Survey not available 52 Survey not available N/A no data no data TBD Internal Customer satisfaction rating of Communications Department services will be "good" or better. Survey not available Survey not available Survey not available Survey not available Survey not available Survey not available no data no data TBD The percent of the City's Public Relations efforts and advertising covered by local and regional media. 80 N/A N/A N/A 95 N/A no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 Dollars:571,172$ 586,817$ 554,982$ 582,520$ 759,814$ 753,724$ 751,422$ 773,442$ 687,797$ 713,771$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0.00 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:40,000$ 40,000$ 40,000$ 40,000$ 40,000$ 40,000$ 40,000$ 40,000$ 40,000$ 40,000$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDAmount of Intergovernmental funding collected by the City to fund programs and projects increases year over year.75 N/A N/A N/A 75 N/A no data no data TBD Accomplishment or significant progress made on each of the major priorities of the annually adopted State Legislative Agenda 87.5 N/A N/A N/A 75 N/A no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:62,400$ 62,400$ 62,400$ 62,400$ 70,000$ 70,000$ 166,000$ 166,000$ 166,000$ 166,000$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:see Exec see Exec see Exec see Exec see Exec see Exec see Exec see Exec 0.0 0.0 Dollars:see Exec see Exec see Exec see Exec see Exec see Exec see Exec see Exec 97,674$ 97,674$ minimum of 65 percent minimum of 5 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent Citywide Communications, Executive Department Citywide communications offer a dynamic and integrated one-stop communications shop. The communications division realignment of the functions leverages the strengths of communications professionals working across all communications platforms. This results in cost savings and efficiencies to the city when staff with similar skill sets can balance out the communications priorities and provide a synergistic approach to content creation and delivery. Specifically, the communications program will: - Provide effective and strategic communication through clear and concise messaging to the public to protect community during emergencies and emphasize safety and preparedness in advance.- Develop and maintain extensive media contacts, answer or direct all media inquiries, coordinate interviews with public officials, and provide informational press releases in a timely and effective manner. - Work closely with all city departments to implement strategic communication strategies that better communicate key issues and city priorities both internally and with the public. - Utilize new and emerging communication technologies to keep the public and city staff well informed. Target Target minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent Channel 21, the city's government access cable channel and the related programming, strives to:- Inform and engage citizens in the governmental, civic and cultural affairs of Renton through compelling use of television and other related media. - Provide opportunities for the public to understand, participate, and influence city government. - Offer transparency in the government process by showcasing council meetings and offering open, accessible, and consistent decision processes.- Provide programming and content, thereby informing and engaging our residents, and creating a multimedia resource that provides linkages to public information and opportunities for citizens to interact with their government and each other across all media platforms. Executive Department resources budgeted for this program Cable Communications Fund, Executive Department The intergovernmental relations program coordinates advocacy with regional, state and federal policymakers in order to help advance the City's business plan. Particular priority is placed on maximizing funding opportunities in order to maintain and develop quality infrastructure and promote economic development. The Mayor and Council as well as multiple City staff actively participate in numerous statewide and regional associations, interest groups and coalitions to advance the City's objectives and position the City as an established voice in intergovernmental policymaking. The intergovernmental relations team helps coordinate communication across City departments to ensure that the City reflects a unified voice and focuses on a strategic agenda for each level of government. Target minimum of 5 percent minimum of 75 percent City Attorney Department resources budgeted for this program Executive Department resources budgeted for this program Hearing Examiner, Contracted; Executive Department The function of the Hearing Examiner program is to hold hearings and issue decisions and recommendations to the City Council on original land use matters as well as hear appeals by those who wish to appeal the administrative decisions of the City regarding land use decisions, impoundment cases, and other matters. The Hearing Examiner is also delegated by the Police Chief to hear property forfeitures arising out of illegal drug transactions. Executive Department resources budgeted for this program Intergovernmental Relations, Executive Department Infraction Processing, Court Services Department Court Department resources budgeted for this program The role of the Court in this program is "...to secure the just, speedy and inexpensive determination of every infraction case." per Washington State Court Rule IRLJ 3.2. An infraction is a non-criminal violation of the law determined by statute or city ordinance. In Renton infractions consist mostly of traffic citations, parking tickets, photo enforcement tickets, impound hearings and building code violations. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 13Renton Results - Representative Government Programs, Resources and Results City Service Area: Representative Government Desired Result: I want a responsive and responsible government 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 Dollars:289,114$ 295,116$ 335,838$ 348,161$ 368,211$ 376,303$ 414,410$ 429,907$ 512,544$ 526,945$ Executive Department resources budgeted for this program Legislative Operations, Legislative Department This program offer consists of assessing the needs of the public and setting priorities; developing and adopting the annual budget, ordinances, resolutions, and policy alternatives to meet those needs, consistent with City goals and objectives; and provides coordination and evaluation of programs and service objectives.. By City code required to provide a forum for appeals. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 14Renton Results - Representative Government Programs, Resources and Results 2021 2022              76.94              76.94  $  19,840,142  $  20,357,585  11% 11% 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's: 60.12 60.12 61.80 61.80 64.26 64.26 66.10 67.10 76.94 76.94 Dollars: 13,392,241$ 13,534,361$ 14,926,310$ 15,378,322$ 17,150,795$ $17,190,774 17,409,115$ 18,485,149$ 19,840,142$ 20,357,585$  Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBDPercentage of occupancy rate for Swimming Lesson  registrations 88 86 86 79 72 N/A no data no data TBD Henry Moses Aquatics Center customers rate their experience and satisfaction as Good to Excellent 99 99 96 97 95 N/A no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 Dollars:774,745$ 777,883$ 774,928$ 786,791$ 867,727$ 873,141$ 937,637$ 949,586$ 963,276$ 975,821$  Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBDAverage Market‐Day booth space occupancy as percentage of available space.new 2015 new 2015 83.00 99.00 96.00 85.00 82.00 83.00 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0.8 0.8 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.3 Dollars:81,314$                     82,399$                     59,454$                     63,314$                     66,854$ 69,646$ 131,219$ 134,938$ 183,264$ 188,695$  Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBDAverage daily attendance for drop‐in programs at  Highlands and North Highlands Neighborhood 67.00 79.00 59.00 78.00 65.00 60.00 no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:11.8 11.8 12.1 12.1 12.1 12.1 6.9 6.9 7.2 7.2 Dollars:3,590,304$ 3,620,605$ 3,815,191$ 3,920,611$ 4,024,733$ 3,954,927$ 3,031,845$ 3,134,428$ 1,877,391$ 1,918,397$  Programs, Resources and Results The following programs have provided metrics ("Results") to indicate the results of their efforts.  Each metric is unigue ‐ some are simply counts of data points,  others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show efficiency and effectiveness.  It should be noted for those that are  marked "N/A" indicate a metric for which data is not yet available.  This could be due to a number of reasons including changes in staffing and/or information  systems in place to collect the data.  These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible.  The staff within the programs develop their own metrics and provide the data for reporting purposes. City Resources  budgeted to support the Safety and Health City Service Area Note: Year‐over‐year data provided only for reference.  Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents.  Education and Recreational Activities, Community Services Department The Educational and Recreational programming offered by the Recreation and Neighborhood Division to the public, through our recreational facilities and parks, includes a wide variety covering the following interest areas:  athletic programming, outdoor programming, health, fitness, and wellness programs, social activities, educational programs, art programs, youth and civic engagement, summer camps, intergenerational programs, adaptive programming, pre‐school programming, and adult and senior programming. Target Department resources budgeted for this  program** minimum of 120 count Target Department resources budgeted for this  program minimum of 95 percent Department resources budgeted for this  program Farmers Market, Community Services Department Every Tuesday June through September, the Renton Farmers Market (RFM) is held in Downtown Renton's Piazza Park. An average of over 3,000 people attend the Market each week and have access to more than 60 unique vendors who sell a wide array of fresh, locally grown products, including fruits and vegetables, cut flowers, meats, herbs, baked goods and honey in addition to artisan and craft vendors and Washington wineries and  breweries . There is live entertainment each week, as well as a Kids Patch, which allows children and their parents to engage in activities such as art projects. Master Gardeners are available to help visitors with questions and a Taste of Renton program allows Renton restaurants to showcase their business and menu items and cooking demonstrations featuring market fresh produce. A community booth allows community organizations to share information.  To help meet the needs of all of our customers, the RFM accepts Women, Infants and Children (WIC) vouchers as well as Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP) vouchers that can be used at the markets. Additionally, an EBT (Electronic Benefits Transfer) token program allows shoppers to use SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program)  benefits at the Market, and a 'SNAP Market Match' incentive gives those shoppers a dollar‐for‐dollar match of those benefits to be used on fresh produce at the Market. City Service Area: Livable Community Aquatics, Community Services Department The Aquatics Program consists of the seasonal operations and staffing of Henry Moses Aquatic Center (HMAC) the city's owned and operated public water park, and the beach lifeguard program that provides lifeguard oversite of both public beaches located at Gene Coulon Memorial Park and Kennydale Beach, with public safety as its first priority for the entire program. Target minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent Adopted FTE's Operating Percent of Operating  Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve this desired result: Encourage and foster a vibrant and diverse economy Provide or make available diverse learning and enrichment opportunities Provide clean, safe, healthy and well‐maintained places Desired Result:  I want access to high quality facilities, services and public resources that enrich the lives of everyone in the community $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 $25 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 AdoptedMillionsAnnual Budgets 60.1 60.1 61.8 61.8 64.3 64.3 66.1 67.1 76.9 76.9 0 20 40 60 80 100 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's Budgeted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 15Renton Results - Livable Community Programs, Resources and Results City Service Area: Livable Community Desired Result: I want access to high quality facilities, services and public resources that enrich the lives of everyone in the community Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Average daily attendance at the Senior Center 222.00 261.00 219.00 401.00 394.00 400.00 no data no data TBD Senior Center customers rate their experience and satisfaction as Good to Excellent 98.00 91.00 93.00 92.00 N/A 99.00 no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:3.3 3.3 3.3 3.3 3.3 3.3 4.7 4.7 4.9 4.9 Dollars:575,965$ 583,607$ 610,795$ 631,561$ 781,973$ 796,164$ 966,961$ 987,099$ 1,067,944$ 1,078,775$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBD Percentage of evaluations of services and/or experience rate satisfaction as good or better.98 next survey 2015 next survey 2015 87 N/A N/A no data no data TBD Maintain or increase the number of officially recognized neighborhoods/ associations participating in the program.69 69 70 74 74 90 no data no data TBD Estimated percentage of residents served based on households within recognized neighborhoods/associations. 55 55 55 N/A N/A 42 no data no data TBD Increase the number of attendees at neighborhood picnics, trainings and forums.0 20 2600 455 3560 no data no data TBD Participant satisfaction rated good to excellent experience with overall program new 2013 83 N/A 87 N/A no data no data no data TBD Percent attendees at 4th of July, Renton River Days, and Holiday Lights events that report overall experience satisfaction of 3 or better in a 1-5 scale. 97 96 97.5 96 98 no data no data no data TBD Number of businesses/public/private relationships engaged & providing support to produce 4th of July, Renton River Days and Holiday Lights events maintained or increased. 81 75 84 82 78 no data no data no data TBD Percentage of the TOTAL cost of Holiday Lights, Renton River Days and 4th of July that is funded by sponsors. new 2015 new 2015 37 32 31 no data no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0.98 0.98 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 3.2 3.2 3.9 3.9 Dollars:276,838$ 278,378$ 345,672$ 359,219$ 367,426$ 376,567$ 674,972$ 708,019$ 926,740$ 950,556$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Number of visitors and people served by outreach 5199 4671 5571 5887 4747 7988 no data no data TBDPercentage of visitors expressing high satisfaction 86 86 94 100 94 97 no data no data TBDNumber of days in responding to research & photo orders 6 4 5 3.5 1.5 3 no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Dollars:209,903$ 211,281$ 227,761$ 235,281$ 236,275$ 241,550$ 252,298$ 265,248$ 289,701$ 297,273$ minimum of 3 percent minimum of 70 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 60 count minimum of 30 percent minimum of 4800 count Cultural & Community Engagement, Community Services Department Department resources budgeted for this program Senior Activity Center, Community Services Department The Renton Senior Activity Center connects older adults, and individuals with disabilities to vital community services that help them stay healthy and independent. The Center offers older adults access to multiple services in one convenient place with a variety of programs and services including meal and nutrition programs, information and assistance, health, fitness, and wellness programs, transportation services, public benefits counseling through workshops and speakers, volunteer and civic engagement opportunities, field trips, social and recreational activities, educational and arts programs, and adaptive recreational programming (for all ages). Target minimum of 80 percent minimum of 250 count The Recreation and Neighborhoods Division creates, produces, and executes City coordinated events, non-city permitted events, cultural programs, neighborhood grants, and engagement with the community. Events that are coordinated by the City are inclusive of all ages, abilities and cultures, promote civic participation, foster community pride and build community connections for all. Examples of city produced events include 4th of July at Coulon, Holiday Lights, Renton River Days (co-coordinated with Renton River Days Board),summer movie and concert series, bike rodeo, Truck-or-Treat, neighborhood events, and other such events, both large and small. Non-City permitted events bring revenue and new audiences to the City, to help promote Renton as a progressive, opportunity-rich city in the Puget Sound region. The Recreation and Neighborhood Division manages this permitting process by leading a multi-departmental committee to ensure the event is safe for both the public, and reduces risk and mitigates exposure to the city. Over 70 non-city events are permitted each year, such as Seahawks Training Camp, large scale running events and bike rides, cultural programs, and Return to Renton Annual Car Show. The Recreation and Neighborhoods Division community engagement efforts serve as on outlet to provide critical and relevant information on a timely basis, and helps facilitate two-way dialogue between the City of Renton and its residents. The Division hosts community conversations and solicits public feedback in variety of ways for the purposes of improving and guiding our operations to be a reflection of our community's interests. Another form of community engagement is The City of Renton Neighborhood Grant Program. This program provides engagement opportunities and grant resources for creating vibrant, healthy, and connected communities through collaborative efforts between residents and the City. Target Department resources budgeted for this program Museum, Community Services Department The Renton History Museum is the City's only organization dedicated to the preservation, documentation, and education about Renton history in ways that are accessible to diverse people of all ages. Until COVID-19 the Museum was also Renton's only cultural organization with regular open hours for the public; these will resume after the pandemic has passed. With the support of the Renton Historical Society (RHS), a 501(c)3 nonprofit, the Museum provides changing and permanent exhibits, classroom curricula, programs, publications, online programming, and research assistance for those interested in local history. The Museum also cares for a collection of 25,000+ objects and over 19,000 historic photos. The Museum provides these services under a formal Museum Management Agreement between the City of Renton and the Renton Historical Society, a 501(c)3 nonprofit. Target minimum of 85 percent minimum of 80 percent equal to or greater than 72 count % of residents less than 7 days Department resources budgeted for this program** 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 16Renton Results - Livable Community Programs, Resources and Results City Service Area: Livable Community Desired Result: I want access to high quality facilities, services and public resources that enrich the lives of everyone in the community Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBD Average daily attendance for drop-in programs at Highlands and North Highlands Neighborhood 67 79 59 78 65 60 no data no data TBD Renton Community Center customers rate their experience and satisfaction as Good to Excellent N/A 91 94 89 N/A 84 no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:see above see above see above see above see above see above 1.7 1.7 1.9 1.9 Dollars:see above see above see above see above see above see above 352,538$ 364,303$ 1,589,398$ 1,641,680$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBD Overall customer satisfaction rating is good to excellent In cleanliness and appearance of Parks & Trail System 89 93 89 84 N/A 88 N/A 64 TBD Average number of days to complete Cityworks service requests that are assigned to the Parks Maintenance team via ‘Renton Responds. new 2020 new 2020 new 2020 new 2020 new 2020 new 2020 new 2020 new 2020 TBD Customers surveyed feel safe in parks and trails 82 87 N/A N/A N/A N/A Next Survey 2021 Next Survey 2021 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:22.8 22.8 22.8 22.8 24.8 24.8 24.6 24.6 32.6 32.6 Dollars:4,046,158$ 4,095,896$ 4,722,541$ 4,914,394$ 5,271,700$ 5,242,739$ 5,113,786$ 5,530,737$ 6,428,197$ 6,615,715$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Percent of market value of lowest-yielding property per market analysis. new 2013 10 10 10 N/A N/A 1075 3683 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.0 1.0 1.5 1.5 Dollars:629,657$ 647,061$ 663,404$ 671,980$ 839,996$ 845,755$ 1,007,970$ 1,012,141$ 849,878$ 860,534$ The Parks and Trails Division maintains for public safety and enjoyment 32 developed parks totaling 274 acres, 457 acres of natural areas and 13 miles of developed trails that attract millions of visitors each year. Piazza and Gateway Parks are activated each year by the Farmers Market for its 4 month season, and the Volunteer program engages over 5,000 people annually to steward different parts of the City . The Division meets the service demands of a growing community by retaining a skilled workforce, using best management practices and supporting other divisions and departments at City-wide programs and events. PARKS MAINTENANCE activities include:Cityworks software - daily work management and reporting system Courts maintenance - 23 basketball and tennis courts Events support - 20 City-sponsored Special Events like Renton River Days, 4th of July, etc.Green waste and trash removal - over 10,000 cubic yards removed each year Irrigation maintenance - turf fields and 29 different Right-of-Way (ROW) areasInspections - 22 playgrounds and one skate board park on routine schedule Landscaping - six acres of shrub beds weeded and mulched year-roundSports fields - 1,200 athletic field preparations on 20 reservable sports fields Tree maintenance - parks, natural areas and street Right-of- Ways; support Urban Forestry ProgramTurf management - mow, fertilize, aerate and edge over 180 acres on continuous rotationVolunteer support - facilitate over 50 projects and events such as Arbor Day/Earth Day Target Parks and Trails Program, Community Services Department minimum of 80 percent within 10 percent Fund 108 was created for the purpose of identifying Leased City Properties revenue and expenditures. Target Department resources budgeted for this program Department resources budgeted for this program** Leased Facilities, Community Services Department minimum of 120 count minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 85 percent Recreational Facilities, Community Services Department Our Recreation facilities, which includes the Renton Community Center, Highlands Neighborhood Center, along with several smaller neighborhood park buildings (North Highlands, Tiffany, Teasdale, and Kennydale Parks) are all community assets. The Renton Community Center is a central resource center for the community offering a place where patrons can conduct a wide variety of City business transactions and information. This requires staff to be versatile and aware of all the City has to offer in addition to knowledge of the Recreation and Neighborhoods Division. Programming offered to the public at the Renton Community Center includes: adult and youth athletic programming, outdoor programming, information and assistance, health, fitness, and wellness programs, social and recreational activities, educational and arts programs, intergenerational programs, adaptive programming, pre-school programming, private rentals, public meetings, and special events. The Community Center is a connector to the City providing a gathering space that is used by the Renton School District, local non-profits, regional and state government agencies, businesses, and the City of Renton itself. The center does so by providing space for meetings, celebrations, forums, and trainings. Our Highlands Neighborhood Center and North Highlands Neighborhood Center provide quality afterschool programming and youth summer camps. The North Highlands Neighborhood Center houses in one wing of the center the Co-op Sunshine Preschool Program during the school year. The larger portion of the center with the classrooms and gymnasium houses recreational programming during afterschool hours and summer camps. The Highlands Neighborhood Center in 2017 received a King County Best Starts for Kids grant over 3 years in the amount of $520,560 for its STREAM program (Science, Technology, Recreation, Engineering, Arts, and Math). The Highlands Neighborhood Center is the backbone of programming by providing space for recreation services, a nutritious snack (lunch during the summer program), and coordination of enrichment activities, for a low-resource section of the community. Target Department resources budgeted for this program** 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 17Renton Results - Livable Community Programs, Resources and Results City Service Area: Livable Community Desired Result: I want access to high quality facilities, services and public resources that enrich the lives of everyone in the community Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDBudget Management - efficiency monitoring - Annual 100 100 100 100 100 100 no data no data TBD Staff serving on minimum number of local, regional and state Boards to support grant and educational opportunities. 5 5 N/A 5 5 5 no data no data TBD No late fees in processing of invoices 85 95 N/A 90 95 95 no data no data TBD Current information on web site 75 75 N/A 80 85 90 no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2 2 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 2.0 2.0 Dollars:448,556$ 445,032$ 545,712$ 562,434$ 505,154$ 524,771$ 528,906$ 769,204$ 592,057$ 606,402$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBD Responses to an interdepartmental survey rate overall experience in working with CED as "good” or better survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time no data no data TBD CED employees rate CED as a “Good” or better place to work survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time no data no data TBD Number of organizations in which CED staff represents the City in local, regional and statewide organizations focused in areas such as land use, economic development , building regulation 24 27 27 29 N/A 29 29 29 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2 2 2.5 2.5 1.8 1.8 5.8 5.8 1.8 1.8 Dollars:1,017,853$ 1,006,430$ 1,128,965$ 1,173,838$ 1,285,338$ 1,312,272$ 2,118,182$ 2,254,111$ 1,473,798$ 1,512,849$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Process land use applications requiring a decision by the Hearing Examiner within 12 weeks of receipt of complete application. 45.3 50 83 76 72 87.5 0.92 1 TBD Process land use applications requiring an Administrative Decision within 8 weeks.57.5 88 82 84 75 81.5 0.91 0.92 TBD Development projects will be rated as adding value, quality, and character to the community by the Planning Commission following land use decisions.new 2017 new 2017 new 2017 new 2017 new 2017 67 No Data No Data TBD Completed responses to a customer service questionnaire rate their overall experience as "Good" or better survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time No Data No Data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:6 6 6.7 6.7 7.6 7.6 8.6 8.6 8.3 8.3 Dollars:676,661$ 696,159$ 844,508$ 904,394$ 1,163,676$ 1,220,824$ 1,135,859$ 1,199,902$ 1,228,210$ 1,279,777$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019Results 2020TBD Ensure all City of Renton planning laws are current, compliant with state laws (such as GMA, SMA, EPA and Subdivision) and meet the long term vision for N/Aat this time 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Process all requests for annexation within Washington State Law timelines N/Aat this time 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Process all Adopted amendments to the City's comprehensive plan and development regulations through the Planning Commission to Council within established timelines N/Aat this time 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:4 4 2.8 2.8 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 Dollars:529,701$ 545,081$ 444,016$ 468,421$ 523,500$ 543,932$ 538,774$ 559,463$ 603,256$ 624,747$ minimum of 80 percent Administration/Com Svcs, Community Services Department The Mission of the Community Services Department is to promote a more livable community by providing recreation, museum, golf course, human service programs, planning and capital improvement projects, modern parks and trails, facilities, urban forestry and undisturbed natural areas. We are a department comprised of eight divisions. We are the conduit for Community involvement and overseeing quality of life experiences. Target Department resources budgeted for this program** Department resources budgeted for this program Target Department resources budgeted for this program** minimum of 80 percent minimum of 8 count minimum of 90 percent minimum of 90 percent minimum of 100 percent minimum of 4 count minimum of 100 percent minimum of 80 percent The Long Range Planning division primarily provides for legislative development of policies and regulations that implement Washington State Laws and help to ensure a high quality of life for residents. The regulations relate to land use, environment, and governance and include the Growth Management Act, Shoreline Management Act, State Environmental Policy Act, and the annexation laws related to governance. The program also facilitates development of the City's Comprehensive Plan and associated Community Plans and works collaboratively with the Planning Commission and Advisory Boards to oversee implementation of those adopted plans. minimum of 100 percent minimum of 100 percent minimum of 100 percent minimum of 100 percent minimum of 80 percent Target Department resources budgeted for this program CED Administration, CED Department CED Administration provides leadership, resources and regional influence to enable the Department to meet its responsibilities in a manner that is responsive to the needs of its customers and consistent with the City's Business Plan, Goals and Action Items. CED Administration is responsible for budget development, as well as financial monitoring and reporting for the entire Department. In addition to the general administration of the Department, the Administrator directly oversees the Economic Development Divsion, the Development Services Division, Long Range Planning, and the Planning Division, serves on the Mayor's Cabinet, and works on numerous special projects within the Department, interdepartmentally, and regionally. Target This program provides for review, analysis and the development of written findings and determinations expressed in staff reports for discretionary land use permits, including but not limited to: Plats, Rezones, Conditional Use Permits, Site Plan Review, Variances, and Shoreline Permits. In addition, this program provides review of building and public works permits, general planning and permitting information to the public at the customer service counter, inspections, and conducts Long Range Planning, CED Department Current Planning, CED Department 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 18Renton Results - Livable Community Programs, Resources and Results City Service Area: Livable Community Desired Result: I want access to high quality facilities, services and public resources that enrich the lives of everyone in the community Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD The City's annual sales tax revenue growth rate (excluding one-time items)4.71 6 9.4 9 7 N/A no data no data TBD Continue to diversify Renton’s employment base to ensure no single employment sector exceeds targeted percent of employment base. 30 40 N/A 15.6 15.6 N/A no data no data TBD Annual property tax revenue associated with new construction increases. 1.09 1.13 1.29 2.82 -2.12 623987 no data no data TBD Total number of employees working in Renton (measured by FTE) increases year over year 60 -1.4 16 14 -2.25 N/A no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2.75 2.75 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 1.0 1.0 6.0 6.0 Dollars:446,705$ 455,737$ 604,469$ 648,403$ 751,718$ 772,559$ 138,545$ 136,346$ 1,169,508$ 1,208,842$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDPercent increase grant and intergovernmental revenues in support of arts and culture in Renton 24 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A no data no data TBD Percent increase number of volunteers supporting the Arts & Culture Master Plan 90 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0.25 0.25 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:37,881$ 38,812$ 35,944$ 37,679$ 88,000$ 39,202$ 102,900$ 102,900$ 117,900$ 117,900$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0.00 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:50,000$ 50,000$ 102,950$ -$ 15,000$ 15,000$ 15,000$ 15,000$ 117,900$ 117,900$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Number of successfully completed public art projects through the 1% for Art program (as established by City ordinance) each biennium.0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:-$ -$ -$ -$ 361,724$ 361,724$ 361,724$ 361,724$ 361,724$ 361,724$ Department resources budgeted for this program Economic Development, CED Department Mayor Pavone and Renton City Council have set clear direction for economic development in our community. They have made addressing economic development priorities one of their five "key areas of focus." Their policies are ambitious and meant to position Renton businesses for success and set the stage for future job creation and investment. Department resources budgeted for this program** minimum of 1 count Target The City of Renton receives Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). These are federal funds that go from HUD to King County to Renton via an agreement. It is money in/money out at no cost to the City. Funds can be used for public services, community development, economic development, and construction of public facilities. There are very specific and stringent requirements at the federal and county level for what activities the funds can be used. Since 2015, CDBG funding has been used to promote economic development activities. From 2015-2019 the City offered the Downtown Commercial Rehabilitation and Façade Improvement Loan Program (FILP) using CDBG funds. The program was closed out in 2019 after providing $601,497 in matching funds for façade improvements. Funding was then shifted to the Public Facilities and Improvements Program for Downtown/South Renton ("Downtown Streetscapes improvements"). CDBG - CED, Community & Economic Development Department greater than 1.5 percent minimum of 1 percent maximum of 40 percent Department resources budgeted for this program** Target Department resources budgeted for this program** 1% for the Arts, Community & Economic Development Department The One Percent for Art Fund Program ("Program") provides the opportunity to enhance municipal projects with the addition of public art or artistic treatments. The Program ordinance requires that all Capital Improvement Projects (excluding water and wastewater) include an amount not less than one percent of the actual total project cost to be used for the selection, acquisition, and installation of works of art. A Capital Improvement Project may also deposit funds into the Program account to be invested in other public art projects. minimum of 1 percent minimum of 3 percent minimum of 3 percent Arts & Culture, CED Department The Renton Municipal Arts Commission (RMAC) is administered by the Department of Community and Economic Development. The RMAC is overseen by the Community Services Committee of the Renton City Council . The RMAC was created by ordinance to serve as an advisory group to the Administration on the development of arts and culture in the City. The primary responsibility of the Commission is to support the ongoing development of arts programs and projects in Renton. Its primary programs include the funding of artists and arts and culture organizations to provide services for the residents of Renton, and oversight and implementation of the Arts and Culture Master Plan. The Commission provides leadership, supports collaborative efforts that enhance the aesthetic environment of Renton through public art, and promotes cultural opportunities and experiential arts immersion throughout the community. Target 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 19Renton Results - Livable Community Programs, Resources and Results 2021 2022 67.71 67.71 $ 15,702,514 $ 16,103,066 9%9% 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:71.39 71.39 70.39 70.39 56.85 56.85 66.31 66.31 67.71 67.71 Dollars:11,759,816$ 12,022,870$ 13,457,994$ 13,996,424$ 11,722,925$ $11,941,955 14,263,350$ 14,814,122$ 15,702,514$ 16,103,066$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDNo takeoff or landing delay for any aircraft longer than 30 minutes due to inclement weather, routine surface maintenance operations, the presence of Foreign Object Debris (FOD), or wildlife 3 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 TBD Percent of leaseable airport property that is leased to aviation business and/or aircract owners 90 90 94 96 96 96 96 96 TBD Total number of airport operations 92761 93785 100544 112335 123013 137788 139041 127336 TBD Number of reports of bird damage or foreign object damage to aircraft.0 0 0 0 2 3 3 3 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:10.37 10.37 10.4 10.4 3.7 3.7 6.9 6.9 9.0 9.0 Dollars:1,357,977$ 1,391,561$ 1,597,719$ 1,688,986$ 509,857$ 526,723$ 1,748,646$ 1,794,466$ 2,167,840$ 2,250,234$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDArterial Corridor Travel Time new 2015 new 2015 0 10 10 -9 -9 -9 TBD percent of changePromote public safety by minimizing signal downtime as measured by annual count of new 2015 new 2015 43 60 37 52 50 70 TBD count of failures Number of pedestrian or bicycle accidents annually new 2015 new 2015 42 44 55 28 28 28 TBD count of accidents 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:10.37 10.4 10.4 10.4 3.7 3.7 6.9 6.9 5.0 5.0 Dollars:1,357,977$ 1,391,561$ 1,597,719$ 1,688,986$ 509,857$ 526,723$ 1,748,646$ 1,794,466$ 1,470,288$ 1,492,867$ Note: Year-over-year data provided only for reference. Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents. Department resources budgeted for this program maximum of 0 count minimum of 90 percent number of operations maximum of 0 count Trans Operations Engineering Section, Public Works Department The Transportation Operations Engineering Section is responsible for the safe and efficient flow of traffic on all City of Renton streets. This group develops traffic engineering solutions and adjusts traffic signal timing in response to citizen requests, accident prone locations, traffic congestion and special events. This Section operates the Traffic Management Center, which observes and controls the traffic signal timing at each of the 136 signalized intersections in the City of Renton. This Section reviews and approves traffic control plans for construction and special events within City right -of-way. The section performs annual traffic counts and speed studies for the public and maintains proper signal timings throughout the City. Target Department resources budgeted for this program City Resources budgeted to support theSafety and Health City Service Area Airport Operations, Public Works Department Airport Operations is the overall daily operation, maintenance and management of the Airport, which includes the planning and construction of the projects in the Airport Capital Improvement Program. Target Environmental conservation, education and outreach Programs, Resources and ResultsThe following programs have provided metrics ("Results") to indicate the results of their efforts. Each metric is unigue - some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show efficiency and effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked "N/A" indicate a metric for which data is not yet available. This could be due to a number of reasons including changes in staffing and/or information systems in place to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible. The staff within the programs develop their own metrics and provide the data for reporting purposes. Desired Results: I want safe and efficient access to all desired destinations, now and in the future Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve this desired result:AdoptedWell maintained neighborhoods, properties and environment FTE's City Service Area: Mobility Manage solid waste OperatingOperate and maintain piped utility infrastructure Percent of Operating $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 AdoptedMillionsAnnual Budgets71.4 71.4 70.4 70.4 56.9 56.9 66.3 66.3 67.7 67.7 010 203040 50607080 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's Budgeted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 20Renton Results - Mobility Programs, Resources and Results Desired Results: I want safe and efficient access to all desired destinations, now and in the future City Service Area: Mobility Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDAnnual number of feet of sidewalk added or replaced. new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 2,950 linear feet approx 7,900 LF (approx)7,900 LF (approx)7,900 LF (approx)TBD Maintain safe bridges by having no load-restricted bridges.0 0 N/A N/A 1 0 0 0 TBD Annual number of projects awarded grants annually to fund Transportation Investment Projects new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 6 TBD Dollars obtained in grants annually to fund Transportation Investment Projects/Programs 7.8 mill 5.96 mill 10.76 mill N/A 6,994,978 5,984,000 13,778,939 4,507,450 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:10.37 10.37 10.4 10.4 9.5 9.5 10.5 10.5 9.1 9.1 Dollars:1,357,977$ 1,391,561$ 1,597,719$ 1,688,986$ 1,514,969$ 1,561,564$ 1,793,011$ 1,854,222$ 1,551,514$ 1,604,912$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Composite rating by Public Works Department employees in the annual Employee Survey. survey not available at this time 77.4 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A TBD Citizen requests referred to Public Works by the Mayor's Office will be responded to within the requested time frame. 96 100 95 95 95 95 95 97 TBD Public Works Administrator will respond to customer inquiries/complaints by the next business day.96 97 97 97 97 97 97 97 TBD Division's expenditures are within budget.N/Aat this time 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD City's combined residential utility rates (water, wastewater, surface water, solid waste) shall be in the lower 50 percentile as compared with the rates of our neighboring jurisdictions. 25 lower 25 percentile lower 25 percentile lower 25 percentile lower 25 percentile lower 25 percentile lower 25 percentile lower 25 percentile TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:3 3 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 Dollars:479,503$ 488,760$ 395,867$ 413,579$ 406,398$ 418,614$ 425,954$ 479,048$ 497,991$ 511,941$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Develop Transportation workforce by providing training opportunities to staff.new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 8hrs/Year 20hrs/year N/A N/A TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 3.0 3.0 Dollars:631,352$ 648,054$ 830,160$ 856,076$ 763,885$ 787,837$ 821,814$ 888,441$ 1,051,713$ 1,078,813$ greater than 95 percent greater than 95 percent minimum of 100 percent less than 50 percent hours per FTE number of feet maximum of 0 count count of projects Total dollars greater than 70 percent Executive Department resources budgeted for this program Building the Mobility Network, Public Works Department The City Council, through a public hearing process and in compliance with state law, annually adopts a program for creating the linked, comprehensive network for mobility which is called the 6- Year Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). The TIP is a multi-year planning tool that identifies transportation-related projects and programs which are, or may become, eligible for federal, state and/or local funding. The TIP updates transportation projects and programs within the City that support the mission and vision of the City, must include new or enhanced bicycle or pedestrian facilities or other applicable changes that promote non-motorized transit, and reflect the involvement of the public and the City's elected officials. This program is based on mandated City commitments that are in compliance with the state's Growth Management Act (GMA) and requires that the City provide transportation facilities (the mobility network) to serve the projected growth. Transportation projects include streets, bridges, and trails. Once adequate funding has been obtained for a project, the design process begins. Most of the City's Transportation capital improvement projects are partially funded with Federal Highway Administration grants. The design of such projects must meet the requirements of the Local Agency Guidelines (LAG) Manual in both process and design. The Washington Department of Transportation Design Manual must be followed as well as various publications of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. A consultant is acquired following the process set forth in the LAG Manual and used to design and prepare construction documents for the project. The design process includes environmental permitting, compliance with ADA requirements (2011 PROWAG, 36 CFR Part 1190), and right of way acquisition. Acquisition of property for right of way must follow the Uniform Act (23 CFR 710 and 42 USC Ch. 61) and the Washington Department of Transportation Right of Way Manual. Once the environmental permitting is complete, the Right of Way has been certified, and the plans, specifications, and engineer's estimate have been approved, the project can be advertised for bids. The bidding process is controlled by the LAG Manual, the Washington Department of Transportation Standard Specifications, the APWA General Special Provisions, the Revised Code of Washington, and City of Renton Municipal Code and Policies. Bids are received and evaluated for compliance with the above. The Washington Department of Transportation Local Programs reviews the apparent low bid for compliance with Underutilized Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (UDBE) regulations and the presence of Form FHWA-1273. Because construction documentation has become so complex and demanding, a consultant is also acquired Target Department resources budgeted for this program Public Works Administration, Public Works Department Public Works Administration provides internal support and guidance to ensure City infrastructure is properly operated and maintained, needed infrastructure capital projects are built, the City's Business Plan Goals are met and City policies and procedures are regularly followed. Target Department resources budgeted for this program Transportation Systems Admin, Public Works Department Public Works Transportation Systems Administration provides administrative services, leadership and guidance to enable the Transportation Division to operate, plan, design, construct and maintain the City's transportation system to ensure the public health and safety of the general public in a skillful, professional and caring manner, enhancing the lives of Renton residents and businesses. Target 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 21Renton Results - Mobility Programs, Resources and Results Desired Results: I want safe and efficient access to all desired destinations, now and in the future City Service Area: Mobility 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:see above see above see above see above see above see above see above see above 0.3 0.3 Dollars:see above see above see above see above see above see above see above see above 44,310$ 45,739$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 Dollars:969,059$ 986,193$ 1,134,631$ 1,174,218$ 1,296,588$ 1,326,694$ 1,154,354$ 1,427,876$ 1,507,572$ 1,558,898$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 10.9 10.9 10.6 10.6 11.3 11.3 Dollars:2,271,970$ 2,273,726$ 2,215,442$ 2,276,977$ 2,599,438$ 2,647,703$ 1,867,088$ 1,918,320$ 2,009,067$ 2,030,503$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:see above see above see above see above see above see above see above see above 0.5 0.5 Dollars:see above see above see above see above see above see above see above see above 86,689$ 89,129$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:see above see above see above see above see above see above see above see above 0.7 0.7 Dollars:see above see above see above see above see above see above see above see above 242,743$ 246,570$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Reduce or maintain the number of insurance claims against the City resulting from road damage N/A 23 23 3 18 15 15 15 TBD Maintain a reasonable Overall Condition Index (Pavement) rating.70 72 73 N/A N/A 68 68 68 TBD Respond to all emergencies including snow/ice storms within the first hour of receiving the call, limiting the hazards to our citizens, and providing mobility during all weather conditions. N/A 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:19.4 19.4 19.4 19.4 19.1 19.1 21.5 21.5 21.5 21.5 Dollars:3,334,001$ 3,451,454$ 4,088,735$ 4,208,615$ 4,121,932$ 4,146,097$ 4,703,837$ 4,657,283$ 5,072,787$ 5,193,463$ Department resources budgeted for this program Active Transportation, Public Works Department The Active Transportation Program is an umbrella program that includes planning, designing, and construction phases for CIP expenditures on pedestrian and bicycle networks along City streets are developed with complete streets principles. Complete streets principles are to plan, design, and operate streets to enable safe and convenient access and travel for all users including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders, and people of all ages and abilities. The City of Renton's Barrier Free Program is also administered under this program. The Barrier Free Program is a federal mandate to make all public facilities within public right-of-way accessible to people of all abilities. greater than or equal to 70 rating minimum of 90 percent Transportation Maintenance, Public Works Department The Transportation Operations Maintenance Section installs , maintains and repairs over 138 traffic signals, 5200 street lights, 90 school beacons, 38 crosswalk flashers, 58 radar signs, 24 Pan/Tilt/Zoom cameras, communication devices, electronic equipment in government vehicles, Radio systems, traffic management center, Transportation fiber optic and school beacon networks, GIS transportation assets, over 20,800 signs, 1.8 million linear feet/450 lane miles of roadway markings, 3,763 thermal plastic arrows, channelization devices, LED signs, 58 radar signs, graffiti removal, hanging banners and assists with the city's special events. Repairs and manages contracts for damaged city assets. Maintains city art in public right away. The Section is responsible for keeping the City up to date with the most current, efficient hardware and electronic components. The Section responds to citizen complaints and maintenance requests as they arise. Department resources budgeted for this program Target less than 10 count Department resources budgeted for this program Bridges, Public Works Department Bridge condition inspection of all City owned bridges, located within the public right-of-way, open to public use. The inventory is presently 27 bridges. This program does not include bridges that fall under the responsibility of Community Services (e.g. bridges in City Parks and/or on City trails). This program does not include bridges located within the City limits that are owned by other agencies such as the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT). Police Department resources budgeted for this program Department resources budgeted for this program Street Maintenance, Public Works Department Street section maintains, repairs, and constructs roadways, alleys, and all rights-of-way. Other duties include the control of vegetation, repair of guardrails and safety devices and responds to all emergencies including snow & ice, flooding, wind storms and earthquakes. Transit Coordination/Transportation Demand Management, Public Works Department The Transit Coordination/Transportation Demand Management Program supports actions to reduce single-occupant vehicle commuting at all major worksites in the City of Renton, which includes helping major employers implement their own programs. The Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) Law was passed by the Washington State Legislature to address traffic congestion, air pollution and fuel consumption. Commute trip reduction laws target worksites with 100 or more full-time employees who commute during peak hours. Worksites develop and manage their own programs based on transportation demand management (TDM) strategies identified as having the highest impact for their employees, and locally adopted goals for reducing vehicle trips and miles traveled. TDM describes programs and projects that emphasize using existing transportation infrastructure to enhance mobility and transportation system efficiency. These projects use techniques like education, incentives and disincentives to reduce the need for vehicles trips, the distance of trips, and to shift to higher occupancy modes like transit and other forms of ridesharing. Department resources budgeted for this program** Public Works Maintenance Administration, Public Works Department Public Works Maintenance Administration provides clerical, data entry, dispatching, inventory control, purchasing, scheduling and records keeping for all 7 sections at the Maintenance Shops. They are the first line of communication the public has with our maintenance crews. All customer service and emergency related calls come through our Administrative front office. Purchasing controls all inventories for all sections, purchases products, supplies, vehicles and equipment for the entire city to include Police, Fire, Community Services and Maintenance. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 22Renton Results - Mobility Programs, Resources and Results 2021 2022 122.62 122.62 $ 77,407,136 $ 79,091,883 43%43% 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:88.75 88.75 92.75 92.75 100.75 100.75 105.03 105.03 122.62 122.62 Dollars:57,506,769$ 58,578,999$ 60,803,111$ 62,205,629$ 66,880,266$ $67,792,031 68,451,540$ 69,494,455$ 77,407,136$ 79,091,883$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDInfrastructure project plan review is completed within an average of 3 weeks 90 53 60 75 90 47 54 44 TBD Completed responses to a customer service questionnaire rate their overall experience as "Good" or better survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time survey not available at this time TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.4 1.4 14.6 14.6 Dollars:774,745$ 777,883$ 774,928$ 786,791$ 867,727$ 873,141$ 937,637$ 949,586$ 2,318,879$ 2,412,385$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Overall condition of the golf course is rated good to excellent in customer satisfaction survey 90 92 90 90 N/A N/A no data no data TBD Overall value of driving range facility is rated good to excellent in customer satisfaction survey 89 99 N/A N/A N/A N/A no data no data TBD Level of service in pro shop is rated good to excellent in customer satisfaction survey 94 100 N/A N/A N/A N/A no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 10.5 10.5 9.8 9.8 12.0 12.0 Dollars:2,065,108$ 2,103,697$ 2,165,392$ 2,233,479$ 2,356,042$ 2,623,003$ 2,261,504$ 2,353,249$ 2,566,000$ 2,638,766$ Development Engineering, CED Department This program, Development Engineering, provides plan review, construction permits and field inspection services for all private and public utilities, transportation, franchise utilities, storm water, and grading projects within the City of Renton. Permits include franchise permits for gas, electricity, telephone, communications, and cable. Enforcement of the construction standards and associated codes ensures the safety of our residents in the built environment. Inspection of newly installed facilities reduces long term maintenance costs, as well as proper operations of the new facilities. Plan review and inspection of new storm drainage facilities ensures proper environmental protection of downstream water resources and minimizes flood hazards to the community. Reviewed projects ensure public safety, the environment and long term maintenance are not compromised. Inspection testing of new water and sewer systems safeguards future users. Target Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 95 percent minimum of 80 percent Golf Course, Community Services Department The Maplewood Golf Course is managed, maintained and operated through an Enterprise Fund, all fees collected support the golf course operations and capital and major projects identified in the adopted Long Range Plan (2000 - 2015) to ensure a financially solvent facility.The golf course operation includes maintaining 110 acres of developed 18-hole /par 72 golf course, 80 acres of open space land, an 11,560 sq. ft., 30-stall driving range/cart storage facility, a fleet of 50 golf carts, maintenance office, maintenance facility with 45 pieces of rolling stock, a 15,508 square foot clubhouse that includes a full service pro shop, restaurant, bar, patio and banquet facilities. The entire facility serves over 300,000 people annually, some of which includes: Serving 48,000 to 56,000 golfersProcessing 90,000+ driving range tokens/ cards Serving 125,000+ restaurant and bar guests Serving 24,000+ banquet guests Serving 1,500+ people in Clinics/Lessons/ Jr. Camps Hosts four high school golf teams annually Target Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 85 percent minimum of 85 percent minimum of 85 percent Programs, Resources and ResultsThe following programs have provided metrics ("Results") to indicate the results of their efforts. Each metric is unigue - some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show efficiency and effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked "N/A" indicate a metric for which data is not yet available. This could be due to a number of reasons including changes in staffing and/or information systems in place to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible. The staff within the programs develop their own metrics and provide the data for reporting purposes. Desired Results: I want to live, learn, work and play in a clean and green environment with reliable, affordable utility service.Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve this desired result:Well maintained neighborhoods, properties and environmentManage solid wasteOperate and maintain piped utility infrastructure Note: Year-over-year data provided only for reference. Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents. AdoptedFTE'sOperatingPercent of Operating BudgetEnvironmental conservation, education and outreachCompliance with environmental standards and laws City Resources budgeted to support the Safety and Health City Service Area City Service Area: Utilities & Environment $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 AdoptedMillionsAnnual Budgets 88.8 88.8 92.8 92.8 100.8 100.8 105.0 105.0 122.6 122.6 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's Budgeted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 23Renton Results - Utilities and Environment Programs, Resources and Results Desired Results: I want to live, learn, work and play in a clean and green environment with reliable, affordable utility service. City Service Area: Utilities & Environment Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Customer satisfaction surveys rate the quality of ROW landscaping as average or higher.94 76 77 73 N/A 86 no data no data TBD Percentage of backlogged tree request work completed new 2017 new 2017 new 2017 new 2017 new 2017 19 no data no data TBD Customer satisfaction surveys rate the distribution (location) of parks as good or higher. 83 75 90 77 N/A 76 no data no data TBD Customer satisfaction surveys rate the level or trail connectivity and access in Renton as good or higher.83 74 83 74 N/A 63 no data no data TBD Customer satisfaction surveys rate the cleanliness and appearance of Renton’s open space and natural areas as good or higher. 87 82 87 84 N/A 73 no data no data TBD Customer satisfaction surveys rate the range/type of park amenities offered as good or higher.87 86 91 80 N/A 86 no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 4.4 4.4 6.4 6.4 Dollars:696,886$ 717,440$ 837,640$ 890,862$ 854,070$ 873,836$ 1,245,784$ 1,274,515$ 2,064,918$ 2,092,249$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDRespond to citizen inquiries or requests for information within one business day.96 95 96 96 96 95 100 95 TBD Utility costs at midpoint or less when compared to other local jurisdictions.Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes TBD Protect Renton’s utility interests in the region by participating in a high percentage of regional meetings, forums, and advisory groups.91 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 TBD Develop Utility Systems workforce by providing training opportunities to a minimum percentage of staff annually.96 84 72 93 93 90 90 84 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:3 3 3.0 3.0 5.0 5.0 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 Dollars:805,441$ 815,842$ 930,125$ 995,954$ 1,734,039$ 1,331,550$ 1,384,975$ 1,526,874$ 1,632,992$ 1,669,661$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Number of times the Solid Waste Litter Control Staff works through the entire city per year.N/A N/A 8 times per year 6 6 7 7 7 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1 1 1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 Dollars:281,948$ 298,711$ 295,421$ 304,842$ 391,179$ 409,771$ 390,874$ 414,508$ 312,195$ 316,172$ Parks Planning, Urban Forestry and Natural Resources, Community Services Department The Parks Planning and Natural Resources Division promotes a healthy and welcoming atmosphere for families and businesses, and maintains for public safety, environmental protection, education and enjoyment 711 acres of natural areas, 140,000 street, park and natural area trees, and facility and right-of-way landscaping at 50 locations. Current and future population growth needs are met through planning, acquisition, development and major maintenance. Staff leverages budgeted funds and activities with grants, donations, partnerships and volunteers. The Division meets the service demands that contribute to the livability of the community and manages growth through sound urban planning by influencing decisions that impact the community. Some of these activities include: -Sunset Neighborhood Park, Phase 2 projected for completion in September 2020.-Park Bond Improvement Projects including Kiwanis Park, Philip Arnold Park, Coulon Trestle Bridge Replacement and Coulon North Waterwalk Phase 1 Corrosion Control. -Leveraging City funding with federal, state and local grants and state legislative appropriations.-Parks, Recreation, and Natural Areas Plan development and implementation; Plan certified with State Recreation and Conservation Office. -Capital improvements including planning, acquisition, development, and major maintenance.-Citywide Urban Forestry Program Management (programming, new inventory, management plan, tree planting, training, inspections, volunteer restoration projects, site plan reviews, Arbor Day/Earth Day Event, etc.). Target Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 70 percent minimum of 75 percent minimum of 75 percent minimum of 25 percent Utility Systems Administration, Public Works Department The Utility Administration provides administrative services, leadership and guidance to enable the Utility Systems Division to function in a safe, reliable, and cost-effective manner. The Utility Systems Division manages solid waste, and planning, engineering, construction and database functions for the City's water, wastewater, and surface water systems in a manner that ensures public health and safety, meets all regulatory requirements, protects environmental resources, is financially sound, and supports the City's Business Plan Goals. Target Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 80 percent minimum of 50 percent minimum of 75 percent minimum of 4 count minimum of 95 percent Yes/No minimum of 90 percent Solid Waste Litter Control, Public Works Department Solid Waste Litter Control Staff works through the entire city once every three months. 100% TBD Target Department resources budgeted for this program 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 24Renton Results - Utilities and Environment Programs, Resources and Results Desired Results: I want to live, learn, work and play in a clean and green environment with reliable, affordable utility service. City Service Area: Utilities & Environment Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Percent increase residential recycling annual tons collected per capita.1 -2 1 0.54 1.1 20 7 -6 TBD Increase residential organics collection per capita.5 -12 -5 1.9 5.8 29 -1.5 5 TBDDecrease solid waste tons disposed per capita.2 -1 2 -4 3.3 22 38 -4 TBD Increase commercial recycling annual tons collected.14 1 3 15 28 -47 -7 -8 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2 2 2.0 2.0 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 1.5 1.5 Dollars:15,592,129$ 15,899,898$ 16,044,163$ 16,481,620$ 18,341,316$ 18,678,837$ 18,682,262$ 18,699,955$ 21,815,269$ 22,574,057$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.0 1.0 Dollars:0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 153,841$ 160,266$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Capital Improvement Program completed within schedule and budget.85 64 63 69 98 80 81 93 TBD Development plan and permit reviews completed within 10 business days of receipt.80 90 85 95 90 100 100 100 TBD Requests for system information provided within 2 business days.85 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Maintain asset inventory – input data within 10 business days receiving approved construction plans or final as-built construction plans.90 95 85 95 90 100 100 100 TBD Maintain Surface Water NPDES permit compliance in the Surface Water Utility.100 100 100 90 100 100 100 100 TBD Maintain a Community Rating System (CRS) classification rating of 6 or better which results in a 20% (or better) discount on federal flood insurance rates. 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:8 8 9.0 9.0 9.5 9.5 9.0 9.0 7.8 7.8 Dollars:2,764,213$ 2,908,399$ 3,257,199$ 3,399,537$ 3,517,168$ 3,614,657$ 3,549,076$ 3,652,868$ 3,781,895$ 3,895,504$ Target Surface Water Engineering and Planning, Public Works Department Surface Water Utility Engineering ProgramThe Surface Water Utility Engineering Section is responsible for the planning, design, permitting, and construction of drainage improvement, water quality treatment, and flood control projects; developing policies, watershed management plans/studies and other programs to reduce flooding, property damage, protect public safety, protect surface water quality and habitat, which preserves the recreational and aesthetic uses of the City's streams, lakes, rivers and wetlands. The program is needed to effectively manage the quantity and quality of runoff from existing land use and future growth as allowed by the City's adopted Comprehensive Land Use Plan and manage regional flood hazards from the Cedar River, Green River, and May Creek. The programs contribute to the livability of the community and provide a healthy environment that promotes a safe and welcoming atmosphere for businesses and residents. The Surface Water Utility also is required to implement regulatory programs to comply with state and federal regulations related to the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Phase II Municipal Stormwater Permit requirements, FEMA floodplain requirements, Endangered Species Act and other regulatory requirements to protect the City's natural environment. The Surface Water Utility Engineering Section also provides customer service to the public, assists other City departments with surface water reviews, and coordinates with other agencies and jurisdictions on regional surface water management programs. The Section provides technical assistance regarding surface water management design, permitting and support to City departments and divisions including the Community and Economic Development Department, Transportation Division, Community Services Department, Finance Utility Billing Section, and Public Works Maintenance Division. The Section implements the FEMA community rating system program that enables property owners to get a 25% reduction on their flood insurance premiums. Department resources budgeted for this program equal to or better than classification of 6 rating minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 100 percent minimum of 80 percent Department resources budgeted for this program increase of 3 percentreduction of 1 percentincrease of 2 percent Solid Waste Education The Solid Waste Education program supports the waste reduction and recycling goals and objectives of the Section in concordance with the Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Plan for King County and the Local Hazardous Waste Management Plan in King County. The program provides education and outreach to residents and businesses such as the Waste Prevention Program, the Multifamily Recycling Education Program, and the Business Recycling Education Program, and by maintaining current information on the website, and other efforts as needed. This program provides useful information to residents and businesses helping them learn about strategies they can implement at home that reduce waste, increase recycling, and improve the quality of life and the environment. The education efforts also support the Section's goals for reducing disposal and have the ability to reduce the financial impact to the Utility through reduced disposal costs. Residents and businesses are also supported with education via the Section's response to customer calls, online website education, and print media. Department resources budgeted for this program increase of 3 percent Solid Waste Collection, Public Works Department The Solid Waste Collection program is a comprehensive program consisting of mandatory collection of residential and commercial garbage, recycling, and organics. Included in the program are in-house recycling, recycling events for large or unusual items, a reuse exchange event, and contract management. Target 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 25Renton Results - Utilities and Environment Programs, Resources and Results Desired Results: I want to live, learn, work and play in a clean and green environment with reliable, affordable utility service. City Service Area: Utilities & Environment 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.2 1.2 Dollars:0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 235,640$ 240,137$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBD The percent increase in cost of pipe system and lift station major maintenance and emergency repairs will not increase substantially over the prior three-year average. N/A 10 10 10 10 Met target Met target Met target TBD Reduce or maintain the number of insurance claims against the City resulting from Surfacewater damage.N/A 3 N/A N/A 2 6 6 6 TBD Respond to surface water emergencies within one hour.N/A 100 100 100 Met target Met target Met target Met target TBD Surface water catch basins in all circuits are cleaned in compliance with NPDES Permit requirements new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 N/A N/A Met target Met target TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:13.2 13.2 15.2 15.2 15.2 15.2 16.2 16.2 17.2 17.2 Dollars:2,332,169$ 2,587,013$ 2,609,633$ 2,764,002$ 2,969,971$ 3,052,049$ 3,309,260$ 3,467,949$ 3,970,031$ 3,980,789$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDCapital Improvement Program completed within schedule and budget.83 54 64 60 60 100 75 83 TBD Meet Department of Ecology regulations.100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Manage asset inventory – input data within 10 business days of notice of completion.96 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Requests for Wastewater system information provided within 2 business days of receipt.75 100 100 98 100 98 98 100 TBD Development Plans and permit reviews completed within 5 business days of receipt.99 100 95 98 98 100 100 100 TBD Maintain or reduce the number of insurance claims against the City resulting from grease plug backups.new 2015 new 2015 3 1 0 2 1 0 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:4.5 4.5 5.5 5.5 5.0 5.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 Dollars:2,643,236$ 2,717,613$ 2,784,635$ 2,878,279$ 3,019,946$ 3,064,545$ 3,402,493$ 3,465,336$ 3,719,570$ 3,808,081$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD The percent increase in cost of pipe system and lift station major maintenance and emergency repairs will not increase substantially over the prior three-year average. N/A 10 10 N/A 10 10 10 10 TBD Reduce or maintain the number of insurance claims against the City resulting from Wastewater damage.N/A 3 3 N/A 3 3 3 3 TBD Respond to wastewater emergencies within one hour.N/A 100 100 100 Met target Met target Met target Met target TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:6.95 6.95 7.0 7.0 9.0 9.0 11.7 11.7 10.7 10.7 Dollars:1,304,856$ 1,328,754$ 1,564,527$ 1,615,558$ 2,069,394$ 2,128,635$ 2,390,768$ 2,375,905$ 2,464,842$ 2,553,582$ minimum of 80 percent less than 2 percent Department resources budgeted for this program less than or equal to 5 count Wastewater Engineering and Planning, Public Works Department NPDES Phase II Municipal Stormwater Permit Public Education, Outreach and Public Involvement and Participation Program This program consists of the development and implementation of a public education outreach and involvement program as required by the Department of Ecology's National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Phase II Municipal Stormwater Permit issued in accordance with the Federal Clean Water Act and Washington State Water Pollution Control Law. The NPDES permit requires the Surface Water Utility, in coordination with other City departments, to implement an education and outreach program that is designed to achieve measurable improvements in the public's understanding of surface water management; associated water quality; habitat and flow control problems; and what they can do to solve or reduce the problems. The education and outreach efforts are to be targeted to the general public, businesses, residents, landscapers, property managers, engineers, contractors, developers, development permit review staff and planners. Additionally, the program needs to measure the understanding and adoption of targeted behaviors for at least one target audience in at least one subject area. The public involvement and participation has to include ongoing opportunities for public involvement through advisory councils, public hearings, watershed committees, participation in developing rate-structures, stewardship programs, environmental activities or other similar activities. It shall include providing required state and local public notice as part of the Stormwater Management Program (SWMP) required by the NPDES permit. The NPDES permit required annual report and SWMP must be made available to the public on our website. Department resources budgeted for this program yes/no Wastewater Maintenance, Public Works Department The Wastewater Maintenance Section maintains, repairs and constructs sewer lines, manhole structures and other structures that aid in the collection of sewage. Additional responsibilities are TV/line inspection and lift station monitoring, repairs and maintenance. Crew is on-call 24 hours a day for emergency response. minimum of 95 percent minimum of 100 percent within 100 percent less than or equal to 6 count minimum of 90 percent Surface Water NPDES Education Target Department resources budgeted for this program Surface Water Maintenance, Public Works Department Surface Water maintains, repairs, and constructs storm water collection systems eliminating flooding issues citywide. Surface Water operates and maintains storm water lift stations. Surface Water also manages vegetation control in City rights-of-way and for public works facilities. The Surface Water crew is on call 24 hours a day for all emergencies pertaining to storm water run-off, pollution control, and flooding. Target Target Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent number of claims The Wastewater Engineering and Planning program consists of six primary functions to meet the needs of the Wastewater Collection System. The Capital Improvement Program provides for infrastructure needs including sewer mains and lift stations. Planning activities provide the ability to evaluate current operations of the system as well as identify future needs both from growth and aging system replacement. Another critical element to this program is our GIS/Mapping/Hydraulic Modeling functions that provide the data needs and hydraulic analysis for the system. A fats/oil/grease (FOG) and industrial waste element helps to maximize existing system capacity/ efficiency through a combination of regulatory and educational program methods. Technical assistance to other work groups such as the Wastewater Maintenance Division and the Department of Community and Economic Development helps to ensure that the system standards are being applied and that the system is well maintained. Customer service functions provide the information needed by our various customers, including, the public, developers, engineers, and other public agencies. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 26Renton Results - Utilities and Environment Programs, Resources and Results Desired Results: I want to live, learn, work and play in a clean and green environment with reliable, affordable utility service. City Service Area: Utilities & Environment Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Capital Improvement Program completed within schedule and budget.85 90 85 60 75 75 80 75 TBD Water quality meets all health-related and aesthetic drinking water regulations administered by the State Department of Health as indicated by number of violations. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TBD Maintain valid Public Water System annual operating permit with highest category ranking.100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Development plans and permit reviews completed within 5 business days of receipt.95 100 95 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Requests for water system information provided within 2 business days of receipt.90 100 90 90 90 95 95 96 TBD Maintain asset inventory – input data within 5 days of completion 70 95 95 95 100 100 100 100 TBD Reduce annual average per capita water consumption 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 TBD Annual percent reduction of water that is not revenue generating (e.g., pumped, leaks, or otherwise not billed) 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:6 6 6.0 6.0 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.3 7.3 Dollars:3,503,071$ 3,655,101$ 3,533,158$ 3,705,990$ 3,699,252$ 3,766,207$ 3,968,930$ 4,046,112$ 3,836,594$ 4,018,957$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.2 0.2 Dollars:0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 196,074$ 197,234$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDWater quality to meet or exceed federal and state regulatory requirements.N/A 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Restore water service within 4 hours during emergency shut downs.N/A 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Drop-in meters are installed within 5 working days from the customer's request.N/A 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD New water service meters are installed within 3 weeks from the customer's request. N/A 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD Complete (respond and repair) customer requests for service on water leaks within 3 business days.N/A 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:25.3 25.3 25.3 25.3 25.3 25.3 26.1 26.1 26.1 26.1 Dollars:5,076,597$ 5,196,183$ 5,418,443$ 5,629,599$ 5,876,341$ 6,008,054$ 6,228,736$ 6,466,489$ 6,908,325$ 7,028,723$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Average Utility Billing aged accounts receivable (over 90 days) as percent of annual billing.0.07 0.0625 0.09 0.08 0.38 0.0047 0.00415 0.003116667 TBD New Utility Billing accounts will be set up within five business days of notification (via final permit, email, etc.).94 82 97.75 99 98 100 100 96.74166667 TBD A minimum satisfaction rating from internal Utility Billing customers N/A 80 N/A 80 N/A 79 N/A 84 TBD Average Utility Billing customer calls will be answered within 5 minutes. [THIS METRIC IN 96 96 97.5 99 100 100 100 100 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9 5.0 5.0 Dollars:556,250$ 574,037$ 602,159$ 631,145$ 641,448$ 664,454$ 669,799$ 691,551$ 721,659$ 741,720$ less than 1 percent Utility Billing provides billing, customer service, and collection of the City's water, wastewater, and storm water, as well as King County's wastewater treatment charges and contracted garbage services to over 28,530 customers. Collection for water, wastewater, and storm water support the administration, maintenance, and capital improvements to the City's waterworks systems. The Cashier receipts a wide variety of payments, audits and balances deposits, and issues petty cash. minimum of 100 percent Utility Billing and Cashiering, ASD Department minimum of 98 percent minimum of 80 percent reduction of 1 percent minimum of 95 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 95 percent Water Engineering and Planning, Public Works Department The Water Utility is responsible for the long-term planning and development of strategies for securing and developing adequate water supply and infrastructure to meet future water demand from growth in development and in population with the City's water service area. The Water Utility is also responsible for the planning, design, permitting and construction management of water capital improvement projects and programs to deliver good quality of safe drinking water at a reasonable cost to our customers and in sufficient and reliable quantity for fire protection to Renton's residences and businesses. The Water Utility also implements mandated regulatory programs to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act and with other federal and state drinking water regulations and water use efficiency standards. Target Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 80 percent Target reduction of 1 percent Target Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 98 percent minimum of 98 percent minimum of 98 percent Water Education This program consists of the development and implementation of a public education program on water conservation and water resources protection in conjunction with the City Water Utility's participation in the regional conservation program managed by the Saving Water Partnership. Washington State Department of Health and Department of Ecology requires the City of Renton, as owner and operator of a public water system, to adopt and implement a Water Conservation/Water Use Efficiency program and a Wellhead Protection program, to protect and preserve water resources and to reduce water use per capita in all City's water customer classes. Public Education is one of the recommended elements of the state mandated programs. Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 80 percent Department resources budgeted for this program Water Maintenance, Public Works Department Water Maintenance maintains, repairs and constructs all systems used in water distribution, metering and treatment. This includes all main line, meters, reservoirs, well pump stations, telemetry systems and treatment plants citywide. The Water Maintenance crew is on call 24 hours a day to respond to all water related emergencies. maximum of 0 count minimum of 100 percent minimum of 80 percent 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 27Renton Results - Utilities and Environment Programs, Resources and Results Desired Results: I want to live, learn, work and play in a clean and green environment with reliable, affordable utility service. City Service Area: Utilities & Environment 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:15,126,703$ 15,202,336$ 16,638,722$ 16,638,722$ 17,505,693$ 17,505,693$ 16,922,613$ 17,007,226$ 17,607,838$ 17,695,877$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:918,149$ 740,036$ 728,557$ 627,673$ 408,619$ 357,039$ 355,309$ 353,578$ 351,852$ 319,821$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:3,065,268$ 3,056,056$ 2,618,408$ 2,621,576$ 2,628,060$ 2,840,558$ 2,751,521$ 2,748,753$ 2,748,723$ 2,747,903$ Waterworks Revenue Bond Debt, Public Works Department resources budgeted for this program This is the City's agreement with King County's Wastewater Treatment Division Department resources budgeted for this program The public works trust fund loan debt of the City has been incurred through eight (8) different loans. The debt service for these loans is accounted for in the Waterworks Utility Funds. See the Debt section later in this document for details. Department resources budgeted for this program King County Metro Fund, Public Works This revenue bond debt of the City has been incurred through six (6) different bond issues. The debt service for all Water/Sewer Revenue Bonds is accounted for in the Waterworks Revenue Bonds Funds. See the Debt section later in this document for details. Public Works Trust Fund Loan Debt, Public Works 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 28Renton Results - Utilities and Environment Programs, Resources and Results 2021 2022 100.86 100.86 $ 7,119,965 $ 7,281,030 4%4% 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:71.9 71.9 80.56 80.56 83.06 83.06 91.91 91.91 100.86 100.86 Dollars:4,005,649$ 2,069,915$ 3,298,238$ 2,097,187$ 5,478,401$ $5,462,608 6,630,885$ 5,970,968$ 7,119,965$ 7,281,030$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDCross-Departmental Teams will be formed to address Business Plan Goals new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 2 TBD Transparent data collection and reporting new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 TBD Internally provided training and Development opportunities are rated Good or Better by attendees new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 90 TBD Training hours/Learning opportunities provided per FTE will increase.new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 4,365 TBD Innovation/Improvement Projects supported will increase.new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 TBD Employee engagement and satisfaction rates increase, City-wide.new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 new 2021 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:------------------1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Dollars:------------------188,865$ 202,676$ 370,980$ 327,460$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 Dollars:400,686$ 403,728$ 420,448$ 428,218$ 439,334$ 444,511$ 446,919$ 453,437$ 465,029$ 470,951$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Average customer satisfaction rating of IT services per biannual internal customer survey.N/A 77 N/A 75 NA 72 NA 78 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2 2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 2.0 Dollars:323,131$ 328,479$ 439,829$ 460,921$ 524,688$ 539,281$ 539,014$ 554,838$ 393,408$ 404,108$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin 1.0 1.0 Dollars:see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin see IT Admin 585,241$ 590,782$ Safeguard assetsEquipment and data that is reliable and accessible Note: Year-over-year data provided only for reference. Due to department, division, and programmatic reorganizations over this period of time, some information will differ from prior budget documents. Programs, Resources and ResultsThe following programs have provided metrics ("Results") to indicate the results of their efforts. Each metric is unique - some are simply counts of data points, others are more qualitative indicating customer satisfaction, and many intend to show efficiency and effectiveness. It should be noted for those that are marked "N/A" indicate a metric for which data is not yet available. This could be due to a number of reasons including changes in staffing and/or information systems in place to collect the data. These metrics remain in this report as it is the intent of the program to provide the data when possible. The staff within the programs develop their own metrics and provide the data for reporting purposes. Desired Result: I want City departments to have the means to operate efficiently and effectively in a safe and sustainable manner. Strategies Renton is using to work toward and achieve this desired result:AdoptedFTE'sOperatingPercent of Operating Budget Highly qualified, healthy, well-trained and productive workforceFunctional work environmentFiscal Support and Accountability City Resources budgeted to support the Safety and Health City Service Area Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 85 percent Telecommunications, ASD Department Maintain and support all telecommunication systems, including VOIP phone switches, Voice mail, unified communications, automated call distribution systems. Maintain all staff phone moves, additions, and changes, coordinate/support new wiring and phone system programming. Other communication services include tracking and maintaining all City cell phones and cellular data services, various connections to voice service provider, long distance services, and various security lines. Although no major capital improvement project is projected for 2021/2022, the number of City's staff using smartphones, data cards, cell phones, and IPad's have increased significantly. IT Administration, ASD Department This program is responsible for the City's Information Technology operations administration and services. This division is responsible for approximately $5.7M yearly budget supporting the City's goals and needs through technology and automation, along with the city-wide technology needs assessment, project planning, and prioritization is responsible for representation in local and regional technology efforts, oversees 18 FTE's and 3 Interns. Target Department resources budgeted for this program Communications - Print and Mail Services, Executive Department Print and Mail Services exclusively serves the City of Renton. From projects that support the operation of the city to those that contribute to better communication with our community, we are committed to promoting and enhancing the city with the highest quality printed materials we can provide. The Print Shop produces the monthly utility bill (also handles the bulk mailing), stationery and business cards, technical handouts, brochures, flyers booklets and forms as well as more elaborate full-color publications. Mail Delivery services are responsible for sorting the mail, delivery and pickup of mail to and from the city's external facilities, and coordinating various mailing options such as bulk mail, carrier routes, first class postage, and more. Department resources budgeted for this program Department resources budgeted for this program City Service Area: Internal Support Organizational Equity, Inclusion, and Development, Executive Department This program facilitates systemic, team, and individual improvement within and across departments by directly leading city-wide projects or creating and supporting collaborative efforts that align with our City's Business Plan Goals. Target count of teams yes/no minimum of 80% total hours new 2021 baseline $0 $1 $2 $3 $4 $5 $6 $7 $8 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 AdoptedMillionsAnnual Budgets 71.9 71.9 80.6 80.6 83.1 83.1 91.9 91.9 100.9 100.9 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budgeted 2018 budget 2019 budgeted 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's Budgeted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 29Renton Results - Internal Services Programs, Resources and Results Desired Result: I want City departments to have the means to operate efficiently and effectively in a safe and sustainable manner. City Service Area: Internal Support Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Average customer satisfaction rating of Applications and Database Services per biannual internal customer survey. N/A 75 N/A 70 NA 68 NA 79 TBD Average customer satisfaction rating of IT Project management per biannual internal customer survey.N/A 72 N/A 67 NA 64 NA 64 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:4 4 4.0 4.0 6.0 6.0 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.0 Dollars:1,325,742$ 1,290,078$ 1,391,720$ 1,374,484$ 1,938,209$ 1,979,976$ 2,242,039$ 2,256,805$ 2,519,745$ 2,561,310$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Average customer satisfaction rating of Enterprise GIS services per biannual internal customer survey.N/A 81 N/A 78 NA 76 N/A 85 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2 2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 Dollars:323,131$ 328,479$ 439,829$ 460,921$ 524,688$ 539,281$ 539,014$ 554,838$ 539,599$ 559,429$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Average customer satisfaction rating of Service Desk Support per biannual internal customer survey.N/A 82 N/A 84 N/A 79 N/A 86 TBD Number of service desk tickets recorded N/A N/A N/A 2738 3761 4514 no data no data TBD Respond to user Service Desk Support calls within expected timeframe.N/A N/A N/A 85 85 83 no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2 2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 Dollars:536,696$ 542,262$ 613,366$ 582,697$ 609,901$ 626,795$ 766,144$ 794,403$ 736,729$ 770,822$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDAverage customer satisfaction rating of System Services per biannual internal customer survey.N/A 77 N/A 76 NA 73 N/A 76 TBD Percent of system availability (network "uptime") as provided by System Services. 98 99 99 99 97 99 99 99 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:3 3 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 Dollars:474,898$ 485,017$ 626,110$ 659,576$ 599,200$ 614,714$ 817,771$ 842,883$ 866,729$ 902,866$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD A minimum rating for services provided by Finance Administration as measured through a Department Survey.N/A 81 N/A 84 N/A 81 N/A 82 TBD Maintain or improve the City's credit rating of AA (S&P's) for General Obligation Bonds and AA+ (S&P's) for Revenue Bonds. AA/AA+AA/AA+AA+/AA+AA+/AA+AA+/AA+AA+/AA+AA+/AA+AAA/AA+TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 2.5 2.5 2.0 2.0 Dollars:450,211$ 463,022$ 503,301$ 517,068$ 540,693$ 554,698$ 861,698$ 919,985$ 912,744$ 936,213$ minimum of 100 percent Count minimum of 90 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 99.5 percent minimum of 80 percent Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 90 percent minimum of 90 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent Applications and Database Services, ASD Department System Services, ASD Department Information Technology Core Systems and Services; This group is responsible for the design, procurement, implementation, configuration, operation, monitoring, and maintenance (Life Cycle) of the City's; - Network infrastructure, including; fiber, twisted pair and wireless networks- Connectivity and access to voice/data/video networks and systems among city facilities Target Department resources budgeted for this program Target Department resources budgeted for this program Enterprise GIS, ASD Department Enterprise GIS manages the City's Geographic Information System (GIS) and the City's cooperative, multi-department, enterprise GIS efforts. The Enterprise GIS team provides efficient, high-quality GIS leadership, coordination, infrastructure, and services to meet the business needs of our customers and clients within the City and the communities we serve. Finance Administration, ASD Department The Administration section manages the Finance Division (total 20.5 FTE, including Administration) of the Finance and Information Technology Department to provide: a high level of support to the City's customers and operations; customer service; training; monitoring; oversight; accountability; and transparency in order to enhance the efficient use of community resources and maintain high credibility in City financial management. Target Department resources budgeted for this program Target Department resources budgeted for this program Service Desk Support, ASD Department The Service Desk program provides 1st and 2nd tier customer support services on all technologies used by City staff. This program is responsible for the purchase, configuration, deployment and support of all computer workstations, in-car video equipment, conferencing A/V equipment, mobile devices, printers, scanner and all other edge devices. This group manage the network user accounts, network objects, workstation policies and the assets inventory and surplus. The Service Desk assists in after hour mission critical IT support requests, (on-call services). Target Applications, data bases and business systems services: This program helps individual departments to improve their business process and City's services through automation. The applications support group helps analyze and define the business needs, develop functional requirements, coordinate software and vendor evaluation, issue RFPs and system selection process. This group also works with other IT divisions to implement the new systems by proving the servers, storage systems, security and access controls. Also work with staff to configure, test, train, deploy and support the systems. Current systems implementations include; the asset/work order management Systems for Parks and Facilities, recreation management system, email archival system, and citizen request management systems with emphasis on ability to access the systems remotely and providing public portals. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 30Renton Results - Internal Services Programs, Resources and Results Desired Result: I want City departments to have the means to operate efficiently and effectively in a safe and sustainable manner. City Service Area: Internal Support Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Internal customers of Accounts Payable rate overall customer services as good or better.N/A 84 N/A 83 N/A 81 N/A 82 TBD External customers of Accounts Payable rate overall customer services as good or better. N/A N/A 99 N/A N/A NA N/A n/a TBD Internal customers of Accounts Receivable rate overall customer services as good or better.N/A 75 N/A 78 N/A 82 N/A 82 TBD Vendors will be paid within 45 days of invoice date. 93 92 93 92 91 89 90 92 TBD Percent of average aged accounts receivable balances over 90 days versus annual billing of non-intergovernmental customers.new 2014 0.2 N/A N/A 2.50 3 0.08 0.09 TBD Total dollar amount of Accounts Receivable balances written off annually. $ 15,856 $- N/A N/A $4,400 $- $7,687 $- TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 2.5 2.5 3.7 3.7 Dollars:450,211$ 463,022$ 503,301$ 517,068$ 540,693$ 554,698$ 861,698$ 919,985$ 453,929$ 474,255$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1.3 1.3 1.5 1.5 1.4 1.4 2.5 2.5 3.0 3.0 Dollars:232,377$ 241,773$ 299,175$ 310,234$ 322,848$ 330,195$ 486,618$ 503,443$ 554,958$ 577,174$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0 0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:179,398$ 182,224$ 677,499$ 683,866$ 954,998$ 954,539$ 771,650$ 783,500$ 771,650$ 783,500$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:3.3 3.3 4.1 4.1 3.7 3.7 2.5 2.5 3.0 3.0 Dollars:388,585$ 409,165$ 570,258$ 601,226$ 525,909$ 544,067$ 388,963$ 405,788$ 457,303$ 479,519$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Minimum rating on overall employee satisfaction with Payroll services as measured through a departmental survey. N/A 76 N/A 82 N/A 80 N/A 82 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.3 Dollars:118,159$ 124,461$ 143,283$ 151,195$ 132,673$ 141,169$ 201,976$ 216,986$ 294,008$ 310,835$ minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 80 percent minimum of 95 percent Department resources budgeted for this program Asset, Debt, and Treasury Management, Administrative Services Department Asset Management:Maintain the list of Capital Assets of the City under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles established by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board. Debt and Lease Obligations: Maintain the City's obligation to repay outstanding debt and contracted leases in order to stay compliant with bond covenants, contracts, and regulations. Department resources budgeted for this program Target Department resources budgeted for this program Department resources budgeted for this program Payroll, ASD Department Payroll processes semi-monthly payrolls that include benefit processing for all City employees. The City has 3 labor contracts, as well as 99 non-represented and management employees, and more than 350 supplemental/seasonal employees. The payroll process requires knowledge of every labor contract to ensure that all special pays for overtime, longevity, and premiums are accurate. In addition to ensuring that wages are accurate, Payroll is responsible for ensuring that medical benefits, retirement, deferred compensation, and various other employee reimbursement programs are filed and paid in a timely manner. minimum of 80 percent Accounting and Auditing, ASD Department The Budget, Accounting, and Reporting section of Finance prepares financial statements that reflect the financial status of the City. These statements are for the use of customers, both internal and external, to evaluate financial health and ascertain that public assets are being well managed. Budgeting and Financial Planning, ASD Department On behalf of the Community and all City Departments, the Budgeting, Accounting and Reporting section of Finance works to encourage stewardship, promote financial accountability, and ensure fiscal compliance with federal, state and local laws by providing financial consulting services for all departments on programmatic issues, such as identifying appropriate fees for service, fiscal contract reviews, financial problem solving, revenue analysis, as well as monitoring and tracking of budgetary line-items. The Budgeting, Accounting, and Reporting section leads the annual budget process and development of the six-year Capital Improvement Program (CIP). Finance Operations, ASD Department The Operations section of Finance ensures accurate and timely: collection of customer accounts (Accounts Receivable); payment of City bills (Accounts Payable), contract and project accounting for Departments. Operations are also responsible for filing WA state tax forms such as the combined excise tax return, leasehold tax and unclaimed property. Target Department resources budgeted for this program less than 1 percent less than 10000 dollar 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 31Renton Results - Internal Services Programs, Resources and Results Desired Result: I want City departments to have the means to operate efficiently and effectively in a safe and sustainable manner. City Service Area: Internal Support Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDHiring Process is rated as "good or excellent" by New Hires and Promoted employees. new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 83 25 97 89 93 TBD Hiring process is rated as "good or excellent" by Hiring Managers new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 71 N/A 16 86 82 TBD Percentage of new hires or promotions retained past their probationary period. new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 89 94 92 94 93 TBD Number of training courses provided by HR/RM new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 9 10 12 9 8 TBD Number of business days to recruit and fill non-civil service positions new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 71 47 45 67 55 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:5 5 6.0 6.0 7.0 7.0 8.0 8.0 7.7 7.7 Dollars:968,935$ 988,962$ 1,198,020$ 1,239,612$ 1,319,084$ 1,364,758$ 1,504,082$ 1,624,358$ 1,654,688$ 1,701,170$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Complete a safety inspection of each City-owned facility annually 42 78 50 89 45 73 100 87 TBD Maintain or reduce the annual number of Workers Compensation Claims 120 98 96 98 72 36 55 42 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2.25 2.25 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 3.3 3.3 2.8 2.8 Dollars:3,060,354$ 3,100,376$ 3,596,844$ 3,511,859$ 3,573,432$ 3,168,604$ 4,202,884$ 4,231,786$ 3,279,123$ 3,304,171$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDClaims processing, Healthcare Management Administrator customer service will result in "good or excellent" rating by employees.N/A N/A 75 75 75 N/A >80 >80 TBD Maintain or improve participation by employees in Wellness events new 2014 new in 2014 41 46.5 38 > 40% > 40% > 40%TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:1.75 1.75 2.8 2.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 2.6 2.6 Dollars:12,640,169$ 13,795,876$ 14,656,608$ 15,888,711$ 9,197,238$ 9,668,725$ 12,629,151$ 13,551,651$ 13,943,427$ 15,127,804$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Performance evaluations are timely completed and filed with Human Resources.100 100 75?33.33 45 100 100 100 TBD Department expenditures are within budget.98 100 100 99.75 100 100 100 100 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2 2 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 Dollars:673,569$ 435,909$ 472,632$ 485,691$ 506,233$ 520,059$ 561,220$ 597,100$ 607,635$ 629,731$ minimum of 80 percent minimum of 40 percent minimum of 98 percent minimum of 95 percent minimum of 90 percent number of courses number of days minimum of 100 percent number of claims Benefits, HRRM Department The Benefits division administers and maintains the City's self-funded medical, dental and vision plan, 457 deferred compensation plans, the DRS retirement plans, life insurance, long term disability insurance, 125 flexible spending plan, and the employee assistance program. The Wellness program provides resources for City employees to develop and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Wellness activities include employee education, wellness competitions, health fair, healthcare screenings, and flu shots. The program also allows employees opportunities for on-site exercise. Another component to the Benefits division includes administering the City's self-funded Workers' Compensation program, and managing leaves of absence such as FMLA, and providing accommodation under the ADA. Target Department resources budgeted for this program HR/RM Administration, HRRM Department City Attorney Administration, City Attorney Department The City Attorney Department - Administration consists of the City Attorney (1.0 FTE) and an Administrative Assistant (1.0 FTE). Target Department resources budgeted for this program Target Department resources budgeted for this program Target Department resources budgeted for this program Risk Management, HRRM Department The Risk Management division of the Human Resources and Risk Management Department protects against the loss of or damage to City physical assets such as buildings, property, vehicles, equipment, inventory, and monetary funds as well as protects the City's non-monetary assets by promoting the safety and health of employees while working, and the safety of the public while using City facilities. baseline baseline Human Resources (HR) Administration provides programs and services that address recruitment and selection, new hire orientation, classification and compensation, employee and labor relations, grievance processing, employment policies and laws, training, employee recognition, and human resources/payroll data entry and maintenance. Through these programs and services, City Administrators, directors, managers, and supervisors are able to stay informed regarding the best practices in recruitment and selection techniques; how to coach and assist in the development, inclusion and retention of a highly skilled and diverse work force; and how to manage effectively within a Union environment. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 32Renton Results - Internal Services Programs, Resources and Results Desired Result: I want City departments to have the means to operate efficiently and effectively in a safe and sustainable manner. City Service Area: Internal Support Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Property and Technical Services review of development proposals are processed within two weeks. 95 95 N/A 95 98 95 98 98 TBD City's property (zoning, right of way, annexations) database is updated within two weeks of notification are updated within two weeks of notification.100 99 N/A 95 98 100 95 98 TBD The Survey Control Network is fully updated. N/A N/A N/A 60 65 50 50 60 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:2 2 3.7 3.7 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 Dollars:248,355$ 258,077$ 449,327$ 476,833$ 557,650$ 583,854$ 566,273$ 597,017$ 649,456$ 673,526$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBD Square feet of coverage per employee (IFMA 60th percentile)21832 23141 23141 23141 N/A N/A no data no data TBD Employee satisfaction survey % positive 76 64 72 78 N/A N/A no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:14 14 14.0 14.0 16.0 16.0 15.8 15.8 22.5 22.5 Dollars:1,223,992$ 1,261,643$ 1,463,447$ 1,540,100$ 1,729,991$ 1,794,981$ 1,761,220$ 1,870,828$ 2,450,152$ 2,566,751$ Performance Metrics and Data 2012results 2013results 2014results 2015results 2016results 2017Results 2018Results 2019Results 2020TBDCustomer service survey satisfaction - turnaround time 80 48 51 57 N/A N/A no data no data TBD Customer service survey - timeliness of response 78 52 57 63 N/A N/A no data no data TBD Number of Helpdesk Projects complete 1737 2158 2384 2756 N/A N/A no data no data TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 8.5 8.5 12.0 12.0 11.0 11.0 Dollars:3,006,530$ 2,808,811$ 3,454,553$ 3,386,845$ 2,961,064$ 2,965,198$ 3,697,189$ 3,710,575$ 3,718,018$ 3,790,456$ minimum of 95 percent Department resources budgeted for this program Facilities Technical Maintenance, Community Services Department Facilities Technical Maintenance Group provides the following services: Building systems repair and maintenance - 52 buildings, 839,304 square feet: o Control systems o Heating/Ventilation/Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)o Safety, Security, Fire Protection Systems, including Closed Circuit TV(CCTV) and Locks o Electrical distribution systems o Roof and surfaces maintenanceo Prioritized individual service requests from all levels of employees o Employee moves, adds, and changes Target Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 75 percent number of projects (data) Custodial Services, Community Services Department The Custodial Maintenance Group provides high quality services benchmarked per IFMA (International Facility Management Association), BOMA (Building Owners and Managers Association), and GSA (General Services Administration) standards. Target maximum of 20424 count minimum of 78 percent minimum of 74 percent Technical and Property Services, CED Department The Technical Services and Property Services work group is an internal support group responsible for a variety of mapping, land surveying and technology support functions, relating to the work of several departments. Specifically these functions include: development and maintenance of the City's right of way monumentation, including the City's coordinated Survey Control Network, review of all subdivision survey documents and the review and preparation of legal descriptions for various land /property activities, responsible for address management within City limits, management of bonds and cash sureties, development and maintenance of the City's LAND & PLANNING GIS geodatabases, the preparation of maps, geographic and demographic analyses, and reports, and providing technical support, including process development, implementation, integration and documentation for the City's permit system as well as other departmental software systems. Target Department resources budgeted for this program minimum of 95 percent minimum of 70 percent 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 33Renton Results - Internal Services Programs, Resources and Results Desired Result: I want City departments to have the means to operate efficiently and effectively in a safe and sustainable manner. City Service Area: Internal Support Performance Metrics and Data 2012 results 2013 results 2014 results 2015 results 2016 results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results 2020 TBD Minimize the number of unscheduled repairs for City vehicles and motarized equipment fleet as as percent of the total repairs. N/A 10 N/A N/A 23 7.57 7.57 7.57 TBD Minimize “comeback” repairs, as a percentage of the total repairs new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 4.60 5.39 5.39 5.39 TBD Turn-around time, percentage of work orders completed in less than 72 hours new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 new 2015 71 71 71 71 TBD 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:10.9 10.9 10.9 10.9 10.9 10.9 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Dollars:2,755,598$ 2,853,224$ 2,925,894$ 2,992,979$ 3,041,000$ 3,092,437$ 2,848,476$ 2,914,180$ 2,900,803$ 2,951,187$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:1,490,000$ 1,041,000$ 2,831,000$ 1,473,000$ 4,367,000$ 2,538,000$ 4,176,000$ 1,804,000$ 2,057,000$ 1,419,417$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:see above see above see above see above see above see above see above see above 1.2 1.2 Dollars:see above see above see above see above see above see above see above see above 182,140$ 187,171$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted FTE's:0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dollars:240,475$ 225,475$ 210,475$ 200,475$ 210,475$ 200,475$ 210,475$ 200,475$ 210,475$ 200,475$ 2013 budget 2014 budget 2015 budget 2016 budget 2017 budget 2018 budget 2019 budget 2020 budget 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Dollars:(27,505,553)$ (29,961,148)$ (34,588,681)$ (35,846,391)$ (29,638,600)$ (28,258,406)$ (34,638,454)$ (34,540,570)$ (34,455,003)$ (35,420,053)$ less than or equal to 10 percent less than or equal to 5 percent minimum of 80 percent Department resources budgeted for this program Department resources budgeted for this program Fire Pension, Administrative Services Department The Firemen's Pension Fund is a closed system with membership limited to firefighters employed prior to March 1, 1970, when the LEOFF Retirement System was established. This plan provides retirement and disability benefits, annual cost-of-living adjustments, and death benefits to plan members and beneficiaries. Fleet Services provides safe, reliable vehicles and equipment for Maintenance, Police, Fire, Community Services, and City Hall. They provide quick, complete repairs of all vehicles and equipment, and perform preventative maintenance to reduce the number of repairs and ensure safe reliable operation. They also provide in and out service of new and old equipment and vehicles, record and schedule fuel deliveries and internal coordination with other divisions citywide on vehicle purchases. Department resources budgeted for this program Internal Service Fund/Interfund Transactions only, Non departmental Services provided through internal business units (Internal Service Funds). Expenditures are deducted to show the net impact on City's resources. Fleet Services provides safe, reliable vehicles and equipment for Maintenance, Police, Community Services, and City Hall. They provide quick, complete repairs of all vehicles and equipment, and perform preventative maintenance to reduce the number of repairs and ensure safe reliable operation. They also provide in and out service of new and old equipment and vehicles, record and schedule fuel deliveries and internal coordination with other divisions citywide on vehicle purchases. Target Department resources budgeted for this program Fleet Services Capital Recovery, Public Works Department Fleet Services Operation & Maintenance, Public Works Department Transportation Operations Maintenance Section, Public Works Department The Transportation Operations Maintenance Section installs and maintains 933 VHF/800MHZ radios , vehicle remote modems (VRM), GPS, laptop trays, warning lights and other electronic devices in all City-owned vehicles. All maintenance of this equipment, including the equipment installed in Police Department vehicles, is under the responsibility of the Transportation Maintenance Operations Section . The Section also maintains all of the City's FCC licenses including the maintenance of the City's VHF radio system. The Section also assists other divisions, such as Information Technology with fiber optic infrastructure, such as splicing, maintenance, cable installation and troubleshooting. In addition, we assist other departments with sign fabrication and provide traffic control for special events and emergency road closures. Department resources budgeted for this program** 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 34Renton Results - Internal Services Programs, Resources and Results FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Administrative Services Business Licensing 3.00 410,556 - 3.00 428,770 - City Attorney City Attorney Prosecution 8.00 1,210,931 - 8.00 1,254,397 - Community and Economic Development Building Inspection 16.00 2,308,971 3,446,556 16.00 2,395,462 4,409,169 Community and Economic Development Code Enforcement program 4.00 576,561 - 4.00 598,859 - Community Services CDBG - Community Services - 63,133 63,133 - 63,133 63,133 Community Services Serving vulnerable/low income 4.50 1,316,559 20,000 4.50 1,342,967 20,000 Court Services Probation 1.00 148,714 93,000 1.00 153,823 93,000 Executive Emergency Management for the COR 3.00 781,615 - 3.00 805,202 - Police Auxiliary Services - Jail - 4,306,301 - - 4,306,301 - Police Patrol Operations 67.00 12,958,172 - 67.00 13,392,798 - Police Staff Services 17.40 2,158,266 - 17.40 2,267,688 - Police Police Administration 4.00 7,864,729 - 4.00 7,976,891 - Police Investigations 24.00 4,184,172 - 24.00 4,326,131 - Police Administrative Services 13.00 2,631,945 225,000 13.00 2,688,719 225,000 Police Patrol Services 16.00 4,175,438 2,042,326 16.00 4,276,359 2,042,326 Police Special Operations 20.00 3,724,857 - 20.00 3,869,265 - Police Electronic Home Detention Program 2.00 526,603 251,941 2.00 537,983 365,045 202.90 49,347,522 6,141,956 202.90 50,684,751 7,217,673 FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $Community Services CIP General Gov't (Safey & Health)- - - 0.00 - - - - - 0.00 - - 202.90 49,347,522 6,141,956 202.90 50,684,751 7,217,673 Total Capital FTE and $ See the CIP Section of this document for detailed information of the budgeted Capital Projects. Total Operating and Capital FTE and $ Total Safety and Health Capital Programs City Service Area 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area City Service Area: Safety and Health Department Program Name 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 35Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Administrative Services City Clerk 6.00 1,433,840 - 6.00 1,477,120 - Administrative Services Hearing Examiner - 40,000 - - 40,000 - City Attorney City Attorney Civil 4.00 792,781 - 4.00 816,384 - Community Services Volunteer Program 1.00 133,972 - 1.00 137,011 - Court Services Court Administration 4.00 1,371,173 35,000 4.00 1,412,717 35,000 Court Services Criminal Case Processing 5.00 676,430 208,382 5.00 703,524 208,382 Court Services Infraction Processing 7.00 906,613 1,639,467 7.00 945,398 1,639,467 Executive Cable Communication Fund - 97,674 97,674 - 97,674 97,674 Executive Citywide Communications 4.00 687,797 689,742 4.00 713,771 715,678 Executive Court Public Defenders - 883,000 - - 883,000 - Executive Executive Operations 4.00 1,525,787 - 4.00 1,575,912 - Executive Intergovernmental Relations - 166,000 - - 166,000 - Legislative Legislative Operations 8.00 512,544 - 8.00 526,945 - 43.00 9,227,611 2,670,265 43.00 9,495,456 2,696,201 43.00 9,227,611 2,670,265 43.00 9,495,456 2,696,201 Total Representative Gov't FTE and $ Total Operating and Capital FTE and $ Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area City Service Area: Representative Government Department Program Name 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 36Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Community and Economic De Arts & Culture - 117,900 - - 117,900 - Community and Economic De Current Planning 8.34 1,228,210 98,000 8.34 1,279,777 100,940 Community and Economic De Long Range Planning 3.20 603,256 - 3.20 624,747 - Community and Economic De One Percent for Art Fund Program - 117,900 117,900 - 117,900 117,900 Community Services Administration/Com Svcs 2.00 592,057 - 2.00 606,402 - Community Services Aquatics 1.40 963,276 367,936 1.40 975,821 407,636 Community & Economic Development CED Administration 1.80 1,473,798 - 1.80 1,512,849 - Community Services Cultural & Community Engagement 3.90 926,740 48,367 3.90 950,556 210,176 Community & Economic Development Economic Development 6.00 1,169,508 - 6.00 1,208,842 - Community and Economic De CDBG - Community & Economic Development - 361,724 361,724 - 361,724 361,724 Community Services Education and Recreational Activities 7.15 1,877,391 425,161 7.15 1,918,397 469,305 Community Services Farmers Market 1.25 183,264 9,955 1.25 188,695 34,404 Community Services Leased Facilities 1.50 849,878 535,565 1.50 860,534 790,321 Community Services Museum 1.00 289,701 - 1.00 297,273 - Community Services Parks and Trails Program 32.60 6,428,197 10,000 32.60 6,615,715 10,000 Community Services Recreational Facilities 1.90 1,589,398 153,271 1.90 1,641,680 376,678 Community Services Senior Activity Center 4.90 1,067,944 128,000 4.90 1,078,775 128,000 76.94 19,840,142 2,255,879 76.94 20,357,585 3,007,084 FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Community Services CIP - General Gov't (Livable Community)- 1,716,048 1,616,000 - 1,299,646 1,462,840 Community Services Parks Impact Mitigation Fund - 316,000 - - - - - 2,032,048 1,616,000 0.00 1,299,646 1,462,840 76.94 21,872,190 3,871,879 76.94 21,657,231 4,469,924 Total Capital FTE and $ See the CIP Section of this document for detailed information of the budgeted Capital Projects. Total Operating and Capital FTE and $ Total Livable Community FTE and $ Capital Programs City Service Area 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area City Service Area: Livable Community Department Program Name 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 37Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Public Works Active Transportation Program 0.25 44,310 - 0.25 45,739 - Public Works Airport Operations 9.00 2,167,840 2,224,767 9.00 2,250,234 2,561,767 Public Works Bridges 0.53 86,689 - 0.53 89,129 - Public Works Building the Mobility Network 9.07 1,551,514 360,000 9.07 1,604,912 360,000 Public Works Public Works Administration 2.00 497,991 - 2.00 511,941 - Public Works Public Works Maintenance Administration 5.45 1,507,572 - 5.45 1,558,898 - Public Works Street Maintenance 21.46 5,072,787 763,432 21.46 5,193,463 763,432 Public Works Trans Operations Engineering Section 4.95 1,470,288 - 4.95 1,492,867 - Public Works Transit Coordination/Transportation Demand Mgmnt 0.70 242,743 40,000 0.70 246,570 40,000 Public Works Transportation Maintenance 11.30 2,009,067 - 11.30 2,030,503 - Public Works Transportation Systems Admin 3.00 1,051,713 - 3.00 1,078,813 - Total Mobility FTE and $67.71 15,702,514 3,388,199 67.71 16,103,066 3,725,199 FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Public Works T Airport Capital Improvement Program - 827,000 827,000 - 677,000 490,000 Public Works T Transportation CIP - 675,250 2,200,000 - 583,000 2,200,000 Public Works T Transportation Impact Mitigation Fund - 200,000 200,000 - 200,000 200,000 1,702,250 3,227,000 0.00 1,460,000 2,890,000 67.71 17,404,764 6,615,199 67.71 17,563,066 6,615,199 Total Capital FTE and $ Note: The first letter(s) of the CIP description title identifies the type of project. A = Airport, T = Transportation See the CIP Section of this document for detailed information of the budgeted Capital Projects. Total Operating and Capital FTE and $ Capital Programs City Service Area 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area City Service Area: Mobility Department Program Name 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 38Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Community and Economic Dev.Development Engineering 14.63 2,318,879 507,015 14.63 2,412,385 507,015 Community Services Golf Course 12.00 2,566,000 2,833,175 12.00 2,638,766 2,912,455 Administrative Services Utility Billing and Cashiering 5.00 721,659 - 5.00 741,720 - Community Services Parks Planning, Urban Forestry and Na Res 6.40 2,064,918 241,357 6.40 2,092,249 249,680 Public Works King County Metro Fund - 17,607,838 17,607,838 - 17,695,877 17,695,877 Public Works Solid Waste Collection 1.50 21,815,269 22,636,694 1.50 22,574,057 23,104,011 Public Works Solid Waste Education 1.00 153,841 - 1.00 160,266 - Public Works Solid Waste Litter Control 2.00 312,195 4,692 2.00 316,172 4,692 Public Works Surface Water Engineering and Planning 7.80 3,781,895 11,337,487 7.80 3,895,504 5,518,690 Public Works Surface Water Maintenance 17.24 3,970,031 10,700 17.24 3,980,789 10,700 Public Works Surface Water NPDES Education 1.20 235,640 - 1.20 240,137 - Public Works Utility Systems Administration 3.50 1,632,992 - 3.50 1,669,661 - Public Works Wastewater Engineering and Planning 6.00 3,719,570 9,012,746 6.00 3,808,081 6,815,573 Public Works Wastewater Maintenance 10.73 2,464,842 19,740 10.73 2,553,582 19,740 Public Works Water Education 0.20 196,074 - 0.20 197,234 - Public Works Water Engineering and Planning 7.30 3,836,594 16,502,325 7.30 4,018,957 15,416,948 Public Works Water Maintenance 26.12 6,908,325 10,078 26.12 7,028,723 10,078 Public Works Public Works Trust Fund Loan Debt - 351,852 - - 319,821 - Public Works Waterworks Revenue Bond Debt - 2,748,723 - - 2,747,903 - 122.62 77,407,136 80,723,847 122.62 79,091,883 72,265,459 FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Public Works SW Surface Water CIP - 1,326,049 1,081,525 - 7,766,170 7,306,099 Public Works T W Water CIP - 1,460,000 1,460,000 - 3,680,000 3,680,000 Public Works WW Wastewater CIP - 2,754,000 2,754,000 - 5,343,000 5,343,000 Community Services Golf Course MM - 68,100 68,100 - 72,200 72,200 - 5,608,149 5,363,625 0.00 16,861,370 16,401,299 122.62 83,015,285 86,087,472 122.62 95,953,253 88,666,758 Total Capital FTE and $ Note: The first letter(s) of the CIP description title identifies the type of project. W = Water, WW = Wastewater, SW = Surface Water See the CIP Section of this document for detailed information of the budgeted Capital Projects. Total Operating and Capital FTE and $ Total Utilities and Environment FTE and $ Capital Programs City Service Area 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area City Service Area: Utilities and Environment Department Program Name 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 39Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Administrative Services Finance Administration 2.00 912,744 - 2.00 936,213 - Administrative Services Finance Operations 3.67 453,929 - 3.67 474,255 - Administrative Services Accounting and Auditing 3.00 554,958 - 3.00 577,174 - Administrative Services Asset, Debt, and Treasury Management - 771,650 - - 783,500 - Administrative Services Budgeting and Financial Planning 3.00 457,303 - 3.00 479,519 - Administrative Services Payroll 2.33 294,008 - 2.33 310,835 - Administrative Services Fire Pension - 210,475 385,000 - 200,475 290,000 City Attorney City Attorney Administration 2.00 607,635 - 2.00 629,731 - Community and Economic De Technical and Property Services 4.53 649,456 - 4.53 673,526 - Executive Organizational Equity, Inclusion, and Development 1.00 370,980 - 1.00 327,460 - Human Resources and Risk HR/RM Administration 7.70 1,654,688 - 7.70 1,701,170 - Public Works Trans Operations Internal Support Services 1.20 182,140 - 1.20 187,171 - Administrative Services IT Administration 2.00 393,408 396,061 2.00 404,108 407,152 Administrative Services Applications and Database Services 7.00 2,519,745 2,520,523 7.00 2,561,310 2,563,298 Administrative Services Enterprise GIS 3.00 539,599 539,768 3.00 559,429 559,857 Administrative Services Service Desk Support 4.00 736,729 740,918 4.00 770,822 775,690 Administrative Services System Services 4.00 866,729 866,980 4.00 902,866 903,555 Administrative Services Telecommunications 1.00 585,241 585,405 1.00 590,782 591,233 Community Services Custodial Services 22.50 2,450,152 2,385,869 22.50 2,566,751 2,568,494 Community Services Facilities Technical Maintenance 11.00 3,718,018 3,606,861 11.00 3,790,456 3,610,976 Executive Communication - Print and Mail Services 1.63 465,029 464,990 1.63 470,951 470,922 Human Resources and Risk Risk Management 2.75 3,279,123 3,511,775 2.75 3,304,171 3,539,243 Human Resources and Risk Benefits 2.55 13,943,427 15,143,476 2.55 15,127,804 16,236,884 Public Works Fleet Services Capital Recovery - 2,057,000 3,652,287 - 1,419,417 3,413,371 Public Works Fleet Services Operation & Maintenance 9.00 2,900,803 2,890,488 9.00 2,951,187 2,940,243 Non-Departmental Internal Service Fund/Interfund Transactions only*(34,455,003) (34,455,003) (35,420,053) (35,420,053) Total Internal Services FTE and $100.86 7,119,965 3,235,398 100.86 7,281,030 3,450,865 FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Community Services CIP General Gov't (Internal Services)- 1,738,386 1,086,185 - 1,156,316 1,000,000 Administrative Services IT Capital - 786,000 936,246 - 777,000 927,594 - 2,524,386 2,022,431 0.00 1,933,316 1,927,594 Total Operating and Capital FTE and $100.86 9,644,350 5,257,829 100.86 9,214,346 5,378,459 Total Capital FTE and $ * Services provided through internal business units (Internal Service Funds). Both revenues and expenditures are deducted to show the net impact on City's resources. Capital Programs City Service Area 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted *The program costs below are budgeted in support of the Internal Support City Service Area goals; however the costs are allocated to (and budgeted) within other programs so they will be excluded from the total for this City Service Area. Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area City Service Area: Internal Support Department Program Name 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 40Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Non-Departmental Other City Svc - Employee Separation Pay - 782,516 - - 782,516 - Non-Departmental Association Dues and Contracted Services - 186,070 - - 183,948 - Non-Departmental Fire Impact Mitigation Fund - 436,987 99,000 - 500,634 99,000 Non-Departmental General Governmental Fund Transfers - 4,520,375 3,480,375 - 2,763,100 1,723,100 Non-Departmental General Government Debt - 7,153,019 551,618 - 4,341,920 545,244 Non-Departmental Indirect Cost Transfer Multi Depts - - 3,830,617 - - 3,951,261 Non-Departmental LEOFF 1 Medical Obligation - 2,624,684 - - 2,624,684 - Non-Departmental REET 1 Fund - 2,865,000 2,250,000 - 2,315,000 2,300,000 Non-Departmental REET 2 Fund - 3,248,025 2,250,000 - 2,750,625 2,300,000 Internal Service Fund/Interfund Transactions only - 34,455,003 34,455,003 0.00 35,420,053 35,420,053 Total Transfers and Interfund Transactions 0.00 56,271,679 46,916,613 0.00 51,682,480 46,338,658 FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ Revenue General Governmental Fund Revenues - 2,211,723 83,974,659 - 2,211,723 90,515,484 Revenue Non-GG Fund Revenues - - 372,500 - - 372,500 - 2,211,723 84,347,159 0.00 2,211,723 90,887,984 Total Other Programs - 58,483,402 131,263,771 0.00 53,894,203 137,226,642 Total City-Wide Revenue Estimates City-Wide Revenue Estimate Department Program Name 2021 Poposed 2022 Adopted Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area City-Wide Transfers and Other Interfund Transactions Department Program Name 2021 Poposed 2022 Adopted 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 41Renton Results - Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Budgets by City Service Area FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 202.90 49,347,522 6,141,956 202.90 50,684,751 7,217,673 43.00 9,227,611 2,670,265 43.00 9,495,456 2,696,201 76.94 19,840,142 2,255,879 76.94 20,357,585 3,007,084 67.71 15,702,514 3,388,199 67.71 16,103,066 3,725,199 122.62 77,407,136 80,723,847 122.62 79,091,883 72,265,459 100.86 7,119,965 3,235,398 100.86 7,281,030 3,450,865 614.03 178,644,890 98,415,544 614.03 183,013,771 92,362,481 FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ - - - 0.00 - - - - - 0.00 - - - 2,032,048 1,616,000 0.00 1,299,646 1,462,840 - 1,702,250 3,227,000 0.00 1,460,000 2,890,000 - 5,608,149 5,363,625 0.00 16,861,370 16,401,299 - 2,524,386 2,022,431 0.00 1,933,316 1,927,594 - 11,866,832 12,229,056 0.00 21,554,332 22,681,733 FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ - 56,271,679 46,916,613 0.00 51,682,480 46,338,658 - 2,211,723 84,347,159 0.00 2,211,723 90,887,984 - 58,483,402 131,263,771 0.00 53,894,203 137,226,642 Grand Totals 614.03 248,995,124 241,908,372 614.03 258,462,306 252,270,855 City-Wide Revenue Estimate Total Other Other City Service Area 2021 Poposed 2022 Adopted Transfers and Interfund Transactions Total Capital FTE and $ Capital Programs City Service Area 2021 Poposed 2022 Adopted Safety & Health Representative Government Livable Community Mobility Utilities & Environment Internal Support Total Operating FTE and $ Operating Programs City Service Area 2021 Poposed 2022 Adopted Representative Government Livable Community Mobility Utilities & Environment Internal Support Safety & Health Reconciliation to Budget by Fund and Department Below will reconcile the Programs within Renton Results with the Total Adopted Budget 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 2 - 42Renton Results - Reconciliation to Total Budget 3 BUDGET BY DEPARTMENT  Legislative 3‐1  Executive 3‐6  City Attorney 3‐24  Court Services 3‐28  Administrative Services (AS) 3‐32  Community and Economic Development (CED) 3‐41  Community Services 3‐58  Human Resources and Risk Management (HR&RM) 3‐81  Other City Services 3‐88  Police 3‐90  Public Works (PW) 3‐104                                     Legislative  Randy Corman Councilmember Ed Prince Councilmember Ryan McIrvin Councilmember Ruth Pérez Councilmember Valerie O’Halloran Councilmember Kim‐Khánh Văn Councilmember Angelina Benedetti Councilmember Council Liaison 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 1Budget by Department - Legislative Legislative      Mission  The City Council assesses the needs of the public and sets priorities; develops and adopts the annual budget, ordinances,  resolutions, and policy alternatives to meet those needs, consistent with City goals and objectives; and provides coordination  and evaluation of programs and service objectives.      City Councilmembers Names and Terms  Councilmember Position # Term Service  Began Term Expires  Randy Corman 1 4 years 1994 12/31/2021  Ryan McIrvin 4 4 years 2016 12/31/2023  Angelina Benedetti 2 4 years 2020 12/31/2021  Ruth Pérez 6 4 years 2014 12/31/2021  Kim‐Khánh Văn 7 4 years 2020 12/31/2023  Ed Prince 5 4 years 2012 12/31/2023  Valerie O’Halloran 3 4 years 2019 12/31/2023        List of Legislative Renton Results Decision Packages:          Legislative Performance Measures:     2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Operating Budget Summary 377,512 414,410 359,238 429,907 420,924 512,544 526,945 19.2% 2.8% Position Summary 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 0.0% 0.0% 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Package # Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 200001.0012 Legislative Operations 8.00          512,544             ‐                       8.00              526,945             ‐                        Total 8.00          512,544$           ‐$                    8.00              526,945$           ‐$                     City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results Policy and program decisions  reflecting community values Community Rates the City as heading in  the right directions (survey rate fair,  good or excellent) 64%* N/A 58%*‐‐‐next survey  2021 Policy and fiscal accountability Cost of government per capita (General Gov’t Funds, Budgeted  Expenditures/population) $1,851 $1,851 $1,514 $1,608  (budgeted) $1,644 (budgeted) Representative  Government * Residential Surveys are conducted every three‐four years 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 2Budget by Department - Legislative Highlight of Budget Changes:   Personnel Benefits increased by $28K in 2021 due to projected increases in medical/dental benefits.   Regular Salaries have increased by $50,000 due to a position reclassification.   Interfund Payments increased by $5K in 2021 due to projected increases in Information Services maintenance &  operations.          2019/2020 Accomplishments     Adopted/Authorized the following:   Ordinance authorizing collection of existing sales and use tax to be used for affordable housing purposes.   Execution of the 2020 National League of Cities (NLC) Census Grant to accept $15,000 for Census 2020 work.   Execution of the Water Quality Grant Agreement to accept $277,500 in grant funds for the Burnett Avenue South  and Williams Avenue South Water Quality Retrofit Project.   Execution of a grant with the Washington State Department of Commerce to accept $100,000 in grant funds to be  utilized to address the Renton community’s critical housing needs.   Execution of a grant agreement with King County Flood Control Zone District to accept up to $499,658 for the  Lower Cedar River Flood Risk Reduction Feasibility Study project.   Approval of the Sunset Neighborhood Center Capital Grant agreement with the Renton Housing Authority (RHA)  for a $400,000 grant to assist with renovation costs for the former Renton Highlands Library.   Approval of a Washington State Military Department Public Assistance Grant Agreement in order to receive 75% or  more of eligible non‐insurance covered damages sustained by the City during the storm period January 20 through  February 10, 2020.   Execution of an Interlocal Agreement with Puget Sound Emergency Radio Network (PSERN), which implements a  new public safety radio system and defines agencies' roles and responsibilities.   Execution of grant agreements in order to receive up to $65,000 in grant funds to supplement the City's domestic  violence victim advocate program.   Approval of a 100‐percent waiver of eligible development and impact fees for the Habitat for Humanity La Fortuna  Phase II development.   Approval of the Multi‐Family Housing Property Tax Exemption Agreement with the Renton Housing Authority,  which addresses the terms and conditions for the Willowcrest Townhomes affordable homeownership project to  receive a partial property tax exemption for twelve years.   Approval of a grant agreement with the State Department of Commerce, in order to receive $605,640 in grant  funds for the Gene Coulon Memorial Beach Park Play Equipment Replacement project.   Approval of the proposed May Creek Corridor acquisition, and the execution of a Purchase and Sales Agreement.   Approval of an agreement with King County Flood Control District to accept $125,000 in grant funds for the  Monroe Ave NE Storm System Improvement project.  Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Legislative 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 192,505 195,064 191,640 197,629 233,050 247,080 251,873 25.0% 1.9% Personnel Benefits 94,892 99,659 96,500 104,817 104,817 132,763 140,743 26.7% 6.0% Supplies 1,537 2,000 3,541 2,000 1,400 2,000 2,000 0.0% 0.0% Other Services & Charges 24,279 63,316 13,186 63,316 23,316 63,316 63,316 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 64,300 54,371 54,371 62,145 58,341 67,385 69,013 8.4% 2.4% Total 377,512 414,410 359,238 429,907 420,924 512,544 526,945 19.2% 2.8% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Legislative 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 3Budget by Department - Legislative  Execution of a contract amendment for the Airport Master Plan.   Agreement to provide professional design and construction administration support services for site improvements  to Kiwanis Park.   Professional Services Agreement to provide professional design and construction administration support services  for the replacement of the Trestle Bridge at Gene Coulon Memorial Beach Park.   Agreement to provide professional design and construction administration support services for the North  Waterwalk Improvements at Gene Coulon Memorial Beach Park.   An ordinance to adopt the 2019/2020 Biennial Budget.   An amendment to the 2019/2020 Fee Schedule.   Approval and ratification of the Standstill Agreement with DevCo in order to attempt, in good faith, to establish a  Development Agreement for the Solera project.   Execution of the Water Quality Grant Agreement WQC‐2020‐Renton‐00016 with the Department of Ecology to  accept $187,500 in grant funds for the Stormwater Facility Retrofit Study project.   The application for a $412,500 grant to assist with the design of the removal of the Panther Creek fish barrier at  the Talbot Road South crossing.   A Local Agency Agreement for the obligation of an additional $1 million in grant funds for the Williams Ave S and  Wells Ave S Conversion project.   The 2019 Title IV Docket 14.   Approval of utility billing adjustments due to water leaks in excess of $17,000.   An ordinance authorizing a franchise agreement with ExteNet System, Inc. as a purveyor of telecommunication  network for small cell technology.   An engineering services agreement for the Kennydale Lakeline Sewer System Improvement project.   An ordinance finalizing the City‐initiated Sunset Lane NE Improvement Project latecomer agreement for utility  systems and transportation/street improvements.   The 2020 Comprehensive Plan Map Amendments and concurrent rezones.   A Real Estate Disposition and Development Agreement (related to the 200 Mill Building) with Cosmos International  Corp.   An ordinance to advance economic recovery for businesses in Renton by providing no‐fee Economic Recovery  Revocable Right‐of‐Way Permits until Phase 4 of the Safe Start Plan, or December 31, 2020, whichever occurs first;  and allowance for Economic Recovery Signs until December 31, 2020.   Execution of an agreement for the obligation of grant funding in the amount of $3,150,000 to accomplish the NE  Sunset Blvd (SR 900) Corridor Improvements project.   Award the bid for the Williams Ave S and Wells Ave S Conversion project.   Execution of a professional services agreement to complete a Citywide Housing Action Plan.   Held a public hearing to solicit public input regarding the City of Renton 2021/2022 Biennial Budget.   A resolution to establish a program funding and implementation plan for the City's CARES Act Relief Funds.   Execution of an Interagency Agreement to receive $3,141,000 in Coronavirus Relief Funds to assist individuals,  businesses, and the City to respond to the COVID‐19 health crisis.   Execution of an Agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration for the obligation of CARES Act grant funding,  in the amount of $69,000, for airport operational and maintenance expenses.   Execution of a Local Agency Agreement for obligation of $3 million in grant funding, and approval of all subsequent  to accomplish the Rainier Ave S Corridor Improvements Phase 4 project.   Execution of a contract for the construction phase of the Renton Elementary and Middle School Crossing project.          2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 4Budget by Department - Legislative   Position Listing ‐  Legislative 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Legislative Services/City Council E09 City Council Members (Elected) 7.007.007.007.007.007.007.00 M19 City Council Liaison 0.000.000.000.000.001.001.00 M17 City Council Liaison 1.001.001.001.001.000.000.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 Grade Title Total Legislative Services  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 5Budget by Department - Legislative ____________________________________________________________________________________ Executive     MAYOR Armondo Pavone 13.63 FTEs CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE  OFFICER 12.63 FTEs Public Defender (contracted) Mayor's Office 3 FTEs Mayor Support Comprehensive Plan and  Annual Budget Oversight Organizational Equity,  Inclusion & Development Intergovernmental  Relations Deputy Public Affairs  Administrator Preeti Shridhar 5.63 FTEs Equity & Inclusion Hotel/Motel Advisory  Committee Communications 4.63 FTEs Media Relations Graphic Design/Multi‐ Media Website Print and Mail Cable Channel 21 Emergency Management Deborah Needham 3 FTEs Emergency Management  Staff 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 6Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________ Executive    Mission  Provide executive leadership and management for the City of Renton government to act strategically, implement decisions  efficiently and accurately, apply city policies uniformly, and achieve city goals expeditiously.      The Executive Department includes Mayor’s Office; Public Affairs – Equity and Inclusion; Intergovernmental Relations;  Organizational Equity, Inclusion, and Development; Communications; and Emergency Management. All these groups work in  concert to accomplish the mission of the department in support of the goals of the City.           List of Executive Renton Results Decision Packages:                 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Operating Budget Summary 4,041,124 4,146,897 4,583,261 4,262,890 5,119,790 4,977,882 5,039,971 16.8% 1.2% Position Summary 13.63 13.63 14.63 13.63 14.63 13.63 13.63 0.0% 0.0% 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Package #DescriptionFTETot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 200003.0044 Intergovernmental Relations ‐            166,000              ‐                            ‐                 166,000              ‐                            200003.0045 Executive Operations 4.00          1,525,787          ‐                           4.00              1,575,912          ‐                            200003.0046 Citywide Communications 4.00          687,797             689,742             4.00              713,771             715,678              200003.0047 Court Public Defenders ‐            883,000             ‐                            ‐                 883,000             ‐                            200003.0048 Cable Communication Fund ‐            97,674                97,674                ‐                 97,674                97,674                 600003.0014 Communication ‐ Print and Mail Services 1.63          465,029             464,990             1.63              470,951             470,922              600003.0015 Organizational Equity, Inclusion, and Developmen 1.00          370,980              ‐                           1.00              327,460              ‐                            100009.0049 Emergency Management for the COR 3.00          781,615              ‐                           3.00              805,202              ‐                            Total 13.63        4,977,882$       1,252,406$       13.63            5,039,971$       1,284,274$        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 7Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________ Executive Performance Measures:          Highlight of Budget Changes:   Regular Salaries increased by $67K in 2021 due to scheduled increases.   Personnel Benefits increased by $105K in 2021 due to projected increases in medical/dental rates as well as the  new Washington State Sick Leave.   Other Services and Charges increased by $517K in 2021 due to the Court Public Defenders budget being doubled.   Interfund Payments increased by $125K in 2021 due to increased costs in Information Services, Communications,  and Facilities.  City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results Safety and Health Encouragement of a self  reliant community through  programs and education. Number of Emergency Management  Accreditation Program (EMAP) standards  successfully met as an indication of  emergency preparedness.   new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 new 2019 25 Information requests/concerns from  residents are acknowledged within  three days. 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Information requests/concerns are  resolved within two weeks.99% 92% 97% 90% 92% Percent of survey respondents who rate  the value of services for the taxes paid  to Renton as "good" or better. 51% (2015 Survey)‐‐‐51% (2017 Survey)‐‐‐next survey  2021 Advocate community interest  in regional, state, and federal  forums Accomplishment or significant progress  made on each of the major priorities of  the annually adopted State Legislative  Agenda ‐‐‐N/A 75% no data no data Training hours/Learning opportunities  provided per FTE will increase.‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐new 2019 4,365 hours Internally provided development  opportunities are rated Good or Better  by attendees ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐new 2019 90% Functional work environment Cross‐Departmental Teams will be  formed to address Business Plan  Priorities ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐new 2019 2 Policy and program decisions  reflecting community values Representative  Government Highly qualified, healthy, well  trained, and productive  workforceInternal Support 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 8Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________   Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Executive 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Mayor's Office 2,073,371 2,302,698 2,559,087 2,309,263 2,562,066 2,945,767 2,952,372 27.6% 0.2% Communications 1,377,098 1,198,341 1,402,446 1,226,879 1,827,772 1,250,500 1,282,396 1.9% 2.6% Emergency Management 590,655 645,858 621,727 726,748 729,951 781,615 805,202 7.5% 3.0% Total 4,041,124 4,146,897 4,583,261 4,262,890 5,119,790 4,977,882 5,039,971 16.8% 1.2% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Executive 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,338,931 1,483,876 1,430,672 1,537,389 1,607,278 1,555,512 1,604,982 1.2% 3.2% Part‐Time Salaries 42,144 16,000 36,681 16,000 0 16,000 16,000 0.0% 0.0% Overtime 17,096 23,535 18,233 23,535 23,535 23,535 23,535 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 494,906 555,357 535,903 584,845 606,342 641,230 678,060 9.6% 5.7% Supplies 44,494 73,334 64,505 73,334 114,252 71,609 71,609 ‐2.4% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 1,504,028 1,348,647 1,890,194 1,302,341 2,194,881 1,819,216 1,769,216 39.7%‐2.7% Intergovernmental Services 30000000N/AN/A Capital Outlay 0 40,000 0 40,000 58,438 40,000 40,000 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 599,494 606,148 607,074 685,446 477,564 810,780 836,569 18.3% 3.2% Transfer Out 0 0 0 0 37,500 0 0 N/A N/A Total 4,041,124 4,146,897 4,583,261 4,262,890 5,119,790 4,977,882 5,039,971 16.8% 1.2% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Executive 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Mayor's Office 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 0.0% 0.0% Communications 5.63 5.63 6.63 5.63 6.63 5.63 5.63 0.1% 0.0% Emergency Management 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 13.63 13.63 14.63 13.63 14.63 13.63 13.63 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 1.17 0.38 1.05 0.38 0.00 0.38 0.38 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 48,571$         16,000$         43,872$         16,000$         ‐$                16,000$         16,000$         0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 9Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________ Mayor’s Office    2019/2020 Accomplishments  • Supported the Mayor and Council, with input from departments, in continuous refinement of the City’s business  plan.  • Addressed citizen concerns in an accurate, sensitive, and timely manner.  • Ensured achievement of the City’s goals and objectives by appropriately placing authority, assigning accountability,  and monitoring performance.  • Provided strategic leadership and oversight for the City’s annual budget, comprehensive plan, and business and  operational plans.  • Assessed the character of city services and programs and prepared recommendations to City Council to guide  decisions on level of effort and resource allocation.  • Strengthened relationships with senior elected and appointed leadership of King County and suburban cities.     2021/2022 Goals  • Support the Mayor and Council, and coordinate input of Department Administrators in continuous refinement of  the City’s business plan.  • Ensure achievement of the City’s goals and objectives by appropriately placing authority, assigning accountability,  and monitoring performance.  • Provide strategic leadership and oversight for the City’s annual budget, comprehensive plan, and business and  operational plans through 2022.  • Assess the character of city services and programs and prepare recommendations to City Council to guide decisions  on level of effort and resource allocation.  • Ensure that citizen concerns are addressed accurately, sensitively, and in a timely manner.        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 10Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________ Public Affairs – Equity and Inclusion    2019/2020 Accomplishments  Implemented citywide programs and services to build an inclusive city with opportunities for all and accomplished the  following:   Targeted ethnic media and provided news releases and regular information to over 13 different ethnic media  groups.   Used the Equity Lens to achieve equitable outcomes for ASD in Contracting and Vendor services.   Hired staff under the assisted employment job coach program.   Updated and expanded online resource tools and Inclusion webpage.   Inclusion Training at Quarterly Managers meeting on countering implicit bias in hiring.   Strengthened Mayor’s Inclusion Task Force with new members to represent additional community groups, and  worked with them to provide city programs and services, outreach, and civic engagement; new members included  Muslim, Somali, Chinese‐American, and youth communities.   Established work plan focus areas for Task Force to include the following key priorities: Connecting Communities;  Economic Vitality; Engage Youth, Safe Spot Safety Campaign.   Met monthly with Task Force members and worked on various key issues including input on policy, hiring  opportunities, healthcare, equitable housing conditions, emergency preparedness, budget, career fair, and Renton  Multicultural Festival.   Created a pictorial display of the Mayor’s Inclusion Task Force members on the 7th floor of City Hall.   Expanded partnership with Renton African‐American Pastors (RAAP) group; hosted several successful community  events and dialogues with police and community.   Hosted several forums including Black History Month: Realizing the Dream, Police/Community Relations, and  Police/Community Forums.   Hosted second annual Renton Juneteenth Event (2019).   Met as needed with Latino Community Forum (Latino community representatives).   Formed a Vietnamese/Chinese Community Forum to establish and enhance relationships and trust between  community members and police.   Developed regional connections and partnerships.   Worked with the Regional Equity Convening group to plan and implement their first planning retreat, which  resulted in new vision for the group shown by the name changing to Governing for Racial Equity and Inclusion.   Served on the core planning team for Governing for Racial Equity bi‐monthly meeting.   Launched a GREI virtual event quarterly series for elected and staff of all member organizations.   Presented the workshop A Virtual Tour of African American Historical Sites at the Renton History Museum.   Revised and updated Citywide Diversity and Inclusion training (mandatory) to reflect the updated Renton Business  Plan.   Updated website with language options and improved usability.   Utilized onsite interpreters and telephone LanguageLine (translation service), which is available for customer  interactions with staff.   Expanded social media to engage hard‐to‐reach populations.   Participated in community engagement programs in HR and PD (career fairs, Coffee with a Cop, etc.).   Increased participation in various job/career Fairs (RTC, RSD).   Conducted an Inclusion check‐in with Administrators and published results.   Launched the Renton Census 2020 Campaign:  o Developed a comprehensive Census 2020 Campaign plan.  o Created branding for the Census 2020 campaign and developed Census campaign and literature materials  in multiple languages.  o Applied for and were awarded four grants to support Census 2020 activities in Renton: Washington State  Office of Financial Management, Washington Census Equity Fund (Philanthropy Northwest), Washington  Census Alliance, and National League of Cities.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 11Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________ o Formed a Renton Census Complete Count Committee made up of community partners in support of  Census 2020.  o Provided training on the importance of Census 2020 for all front‐line staff.  o Recruited, trained, and provided stipends to 31 Renton Census Ambassadors to educate and engage the  City’s historically undercounted residents in participating in Census 2020.  o Purchased Census 2020 ads in a variety of ethnic print and social media forums.  o Sponsored a series of communitywide Census 2020 events, while following COVID‐19 social distancing  guidelines, to encourage completion of Census surveys.  o Sponsored creative events/activities to engage participation in Census 2020: pre‐COVID Census Movie  Night, Reyes Magos (Epiphany Celebration), Pankaj Udhas (Asian Community event), gift card raffles, art  contests for children, distribution of Census Care Packages in historically undercounted communities.  o Collaborated with community organizations hosting events and food giveaways to promote Census 2020.  o Created Census videos in multiple languages to post on the City website.  o Hired a temporary Census Program manager to coordinate activities from December 2019 to June 2020.   Assisted in drafting the first Asian American Recognition Day/Month in April 2020.   In June 2020, raised the Pride Flag at City Hall for the second consecutive year.   Assisted Mayor and City Council in updating the goal of Inclusion in the Renton Business Plan.    2021/2022 Goals  Continue to prioritize and implement citywide programs and services to build an inclusive, informed city with opportunities  for all with the following focus:   Implement 2021‐2022 work plan that addresses Inclusion priorities and strategies.   Create key indicators to measure progress; develop sample dashboard to assess advancement.    Continue to build and strengthen the relationship with the Mayors Inclusion Task Force and work with them to  provide fully inclusive city programs, services, and outreach plus enhance civic engagement. Invite new members to  participate.   Build on relationship with RAAP; host several community forums and events; conduct UNITY forum.   Debrief and review plan for 2021 Juneteenth Event.   Continue working on partnerships with Latino and Asian communities to enhance community/police relations.   Build new partnership with Vietnamese and Chinese community.   Create charter and establish work plan with Latino community.   Continue work with Renton’s inclusion and equity lens and formalize process to adopt the lens; develop written  guidelines for when and how the equity lens will be used; train administrators on equity lens. Create written record  of equity lens implementation examples.   Support next phase of HR Inclusion Tactical Plan.   Support ASD Inclusion Tactical Plan.   Create updated Inclusion Brochure.   Provide refresher training on use of LanguageLine and evaluate use of instant video conferencing for translation  services, especially ASL.   Host 2021 Career Fair and implement strategies to expand applicant pool and employment opportunities.   Continue to improve access and information sharing with social media and targeted communications, and building  relationships with ethnic media.   Continue to build on training and workshops on inclusion and equity, and build capacity within the City to co‐ facilitate the ongoing workshops through a train‐the‐trainer curriculum.   Host Renton Multicultural Festival in partnership with stakeholders and community leaders.       2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 12Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________ Intergovernmental Relations    2019/2020 Accomplishments   Successfully advocated the City’s adopted Regional, State, and Federal Legislative Agendas, including active  participation with regional and statewide associations such as Sound Cities Association (SCA) and Association of  Washington Cities (AWC), regular communications with Congressman Adam Smith and others within the  Washington Congressional Delegation, and frequent collaboration with County Councilmembers Dave Upthegrove  and Reagan Dunn and their staffs.  Accomplishments include:    Renton Specific – Regional  o $5 million through county lodging tax funds for Renton Housing Authority (2018‐19).  o Inclusion of $4 million in the 2019 King County Parks levy for extending the Soos Creek Trail, as well as a grant  funding program that would allocate dollars for the Henry Moses Aquatics Center.  o $200,000 for a citywide Access to Transit study with King County Metro, which helped the City land a recent  $1.5 million grant for transit improvements.  o 4Culture funding for the Renton Historical Museum and new seats at the Renton Civic Theatre.  o Helped secure monies and assistance through the Flood Control Zone District, including an expedited  replacement schedule for the Black River Pump Station and $1.98 million for high‐use engines replacement in  2020; $472,000 for Madsen Creek flood reduction; and 2024‐25 funding for Lower Cedar River dredging.  o $500,000 in King County COVID‐19 relief monies for mitigating the impacts of county emergency facilities  inside cities, allowing Renton, Renton Regional Fire Authority, and area businesses to receive mitigation  funding.    Renton‐Specific – State   $206,000 Capital Budget allocation for relocation of Renton’s homeless‐feeding program and cold‐weather  shelter (2020).   Secured $101,000 in funding (Office of Financial Management: $80,000, and Washington Census Alliance:  $21,000) for the 2020 Complete Census Count.   Passage of EHB 2797 to allow Renton, Kirkland, and other cities an extension through December 2021 to  potentially run an affordable housing levy and maximize SHB 1406 affordable housing monies (VETOED by  Governor, however).   Additional operating budget funds for Basic Law Enforcement Academy class—up to 21 classes.   Protected $6.7 million in RapidRide I Line funds against potential Initiative 976 cuts in State Transportation  Budget.   Acquisition of $20 million for N. 8th Street Direct Connector design and early right‐of‐way, and passage of  tolling authorization bill (ESSB 5825) in 2019 Session to allow 405 Renton‐to‐Bellevue project to proceed on  time and schedule.   Key role in securing 2019 passage of SHB 1406, which includes a state sales tax credit over 20 years to build  and rehabilitate affordable housing, providing $236,380 a year to Renton for 20 years.   $610,000 in 2019‐21 Capital Budget for Coulon Park playground replacement and drainage improvements.   $500,000 in 2019‐21 Capital Budget for early construction work on Renton Connector.   $210,000 in 2019‐21 Transportation Budget for I‐405/44th landscaping, signage, lighting, etc.   Helped secure Operating Budget funds to increase “BLEA” classes up to 19/year.   Helped secure Operating Budget provisions that, for the first time, direct the Department of Corrections to  negotiate an increased payment to the SCORE Jail for providing beds to DOC offenders.   $1 million in 2019‐21 Capital Budget for Multi‐Use Service Center (former Highlands library building) in  Renton.   Helped secure passage of SHB 1166 to expedite rape test kit processing by Washington State Patrol, which  helps local law enforcement with solving criminal cases; bill accompanied by $10.3 million in funding.   Helped secure $3 million for mental health co‐responder program in 2019‐21 Operating Budget; provides  grant funds to pair law enforcement officers with mental health professionals.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 13Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________   Renton‐Specific – Federal   Part of statewide lobbying effort on CARES Act (COVID‐19 relief) by local governments throughout Washington  – resulted in State of Washington allocating nearly $300 million to cities and counties throughout Washington  State.  Renton CARES Act allocation equaled $3.141 million.    2021/2022 Goals  • Develop, adopt, and advocate legislative priorities and policies for Renton before 2021‐22 state, federal, and regional  legislative bodies.         2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 14Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________ Organizational Equity, Inclusion, and Development     2019/2020 Accomplishments  Provided over 4,000 staff hours of in‐house training and development in 2019 and over 4,000 at mid‐year 2020 in the  following areas:      Leadership  o High Performing Organization (HPO) training:   Two three‐day workshops for over 70 attendees including administrators, directors, and managers   Ongoing continuing education for cohorts and formation of pilot‐teams  o Workshops on Mentorship, Leadership Self‐Awareness, and Emotional Intelligence:   Mentorship program launched   Regular, facilitated ad hoc learning and peer‐to‐peer mentoring opportunities   Specialized coaching skills workshop for police field training officers to address emotional intelligence  development of new officers in alignment with Renton values and social expectations  o Renton Results Library provided self‐service resources, available to all staff in support of self‐directed and  team learning on a variety of leadership, culture, race, equity, and self‐development topics.    o Expanded emphasis in equity, inclusion, and antiracism in 2020 in response to updated business plan:   Centralized and accessible location for online resources and learning opportunities   Guided learning and self‐directed learning opportunities available to all staff   Regional engagement in conversations about race and equity   o Mental Health:   Provided resources and workshops to aid in coping with stress of multiple crises and to identify and  support those requiring intervention.   Facilitation and Engagement Practices  o Full‐day workshop on Deliberative Engagement to solve “Wicked Problems.”   45+ staff and 45+ others from across the region/state   o Liberating Structures in support of creative and inclusive problem solving.  o IAP2 Public Engagement Basics.  o Formed a cross‐departmental team to improve community engagement efforts citywide.  o Formed a cross‐departmental team to implement an online platform designed to assess perceptions of city  services, community priorities, concerns, and impact of our engagement practices.    Process Improvement  o Project Management Basics in support of effectively leading or participating in project work.   40‐hour Project Management fundamentals course provided to near fifty staff.  o Lean Belting Program to expand our capacity for process improvement efforts in all departments.   32‐hour course (Yellow Belt) covering lean tools and best practices for process improvement.   40‐hour course (Green Belt) covering lean tools, best practices, and facilitation of lean projects.  o Cross‐departmental team now available to work together as a team capable of tackling systemic processes  and problems of varying size and complexity.   Organizational Awareness  o Centralized information and resources made easily accessible on the Renton Results SharePoint site for all  employees.  o Internal training (Renton 101) designed to increase competency of our internal processes, tools, and systems.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 15Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________  One to three trainings offered per week; these sessions are available to all employees and are made  possible by coordinating with subject matter experts (primarily our internal support teams) to  provide the content; sessions are often recorded and available for self‐directed learning.   This model proved to be a critical support during our rapid shift to teleworking and innovation  necessitated by the COVID‐pandemic.  o Internal Communications (Renton 101):   Renton 101 venue used to share critical information to all employees during the COVID‐pandemic.  o Ad hoc group facilitation:    Multiple teams and groups meet regularly (monthly, weekly, quarterly) for discussion, information  exchange, and relationship building across departments and levels of the organization.  o Employee Orientation:   An all‐department effort that introduces new employees to our values, expectations, and aspirations  while demonstrating our commitment to supporting their success as an employee and making a  connection between their work and our Business Plan.   Regional Leadership in Equity  o NW Women’s Leadership Academy (NWWLA)    Provided leadership, development, and logistical support for this competitive statewide program that  offers a nine‐month leadership curriculum for women seeking top management positions in local and  county governments.   Three of our staff have participated in the first two cohorts held to date.      2021/2022 Goals   Expand upon innovations that improve accessibility and inclusivity of our city services, many developed during the  pandemic, in support of each goal of our Business Plan.   Lead and support collaborations that will result in improvements, innovations, and efficiencies to build resilience  during challenging economic times.   Support continued adaptation to tele‐workforce through training on tools and communications; increasing virtual  management skills that will support this model for those employees where it will continue as a possibility and  beneficial to balance/quality of life while reducing traffic congestion and physical office space requirements.   Expand leadership development deeper into the organization, building upon the HPO model for collaborative  leadership, inclusive engagement, data literacy, and process improvement.   Increase visibility of an Equity Lens in our process improvement and engagement efforts.   Membership and active participation in regional Government Alliance of Race and Equity (GARE), NW Women’s  Leadership Academy, and other organizations whose mission is to bring equity, inclusion, antiracism, and  opportunity to the forefront.    Improve the effectiveness of our cross‐departmental teams through mastery of data literacy, storytelling, inclusive  and creative facilitation, and inclusive engagement efforts that invite dialogue and results in transformative change.        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 16Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________                                                                       Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Mayor's Office 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 535,053 644,466 651,224 667,763 665,718 678,785 701,799 1.7% 3.4% Personnel Benefits 175,963 228,082 217,525 240,273 233,486 261,392 276,493 8.8% 5.8% Supplies 1,148 8,600 9,814 8,600 8,100 7,100 7,100 ‐17.4% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 895,341 972,596 1,231,570 925,596 1,366,407 1,442,246 1,392,246 55.8%‐3.5% Interfund Payments 465,866 448,954 448,954 467,031 288,355 556,244 574,734 19.1% 3.3% Total 2,073,371 2,302,698 2,559,087 2,309,263 2,562,066 2,945,767 2,952,372 27.6% 0.2% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Mayor's Office 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 17Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________ Communications  Support the City of Renton’s Business Plan, the City Council’s vision, and the strategic goals for the City.    Mission   Provide Renton residents with critical and relevant information on a timely basis.   Make residents aware of opportunities to be involved with their community.   Position Renton as a unique urban center and destination—a great place to shop, work, live, learn, and play.   Facilitate a productive, two‐way dialogue between city government and residents.   Enhance communications at and among all levels of city government and ensure coordinated and  consistent communications.    Build an informed, inclusive city with opportunities for all.    2019/2020 Accomplishments    Developed and implemented effective communications strategies on key issues.   Continued to explore ways to adapt communications to the new “digital democracy” and the new technology of  communications.   Expanded electronic communications to enhance the flow of relevant and timely information to the public.   Updated and published Communications Guidelines manual for publications, design, and printing.   Worked on over 160 different projects or campaigns citywide, varying from simple to extensive. These projects  included press releases, copywriting, photography, videography, social media graphics for multiple platforms,  website graphics, newsletters, posters, banners, flyers, rack cards, promotional items, and more.   Encouraged and provided training and professional development opportunities for Communications staff.   Continued to improve on employee update system through ORG ALL email groups and SharePoint.     Streamlined online job request system on SharePoint; created links to communications project list, job order  requests, and job status.   Implemented internal department liaison model to better understand citywide marketing and promotional  opportunities.   Standardized the information displays in the City Hall lobby.   Provided photography/videography coverage for city events and initiatives; present at all city council meetings.   Website:  o Continued to update and improve the city website; continued to train staff in content production.  o Continued to reduce the amount of printed materials and directed visitors to the website for information.  o Continued to utilize Siteimprove to scan website for broken links, comply with ADA requirements, and highlight  typographical errors.   Media Relations:  o Averaged about one news release per week with 100% of them published in the Renton Reporter and all posted  or shared on social media; broadened subject matter to include human services initiatives and COVID‐19  announcements and updates.  o Received regional press including television coverage for major stories.   o Developed an ethnic media list and used it for targeted outreach.   Video:  o Live streamed videos of various city events.  o Implemented video technology plan for Channel 21 and enhanced operations and productions for more robust  cable programming and video streaming.  o Continued in‐house operation of Channel 21, covering all council meetings and developing more robust  programming options.  o Invested in new video technologies (cameras, lights, microphones, mixers) to better showcase city activities.   Social Media  o Worked with all departments to expand city social media presence and actively engage and inform the public,  using venues such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Flickr, Nextdoor, and LinkedIn.  o Increased Facebook page likes from 9,348 to 12,485.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 18Budget by Department - Executive ____________________________________________________________________________________ o Increased Twitter followers from 5,834 to 8,561.  o Increased Instagram followers from 894 to 1,830.  o Increased use of paid ads on social media for targeting specific communities.  o Developed and curated a citywide social media calendar allowing staff to submit content.  o Contracted with ArchiveSocial for retention of city social media accounts.   Highlight of Events and Initiatives:  o Worked closely with Census Program Manager to increase awareness of, and response to, the 2020 Census.  Contributions include graphics, marketing materials in seven languages, videography, photography, social media  content, and dedicated webpages. Renton’s response rate was the best among all cities in South King County  and fourth best in the state for cities with populations over 100,000. It also far surpassed the 2010 response  rate (67.0%).  o Worked with departments to host several key events including Renton Career Fair, Community Forums with  Renton African‐American Pastors Group (RAAP), Unity March, ribbon cuttings, dedications, groundbreakings,  and other events.   o Provided successful communications support for civic celebrations including Clam Lights, 4th of July, River Days,  Cruz the Loop, Farmers Market, Memorial Day, Multicultural Festival, Pooch Plunge, Bark in the Park, and  numerous volunteer activities.  o Designed and distributed marketing materials for the Family First Community Center, including a brochure,  banner, and display boards for fundraising meetings.  o Debuted “Renton Responds,” a web‐based app allowing residents to report issues of concern.   Newsletters & Readerboard:  o Continued to produce two citywide weekly electronic newsletters—Our Renton Weekly and This Week from the  Mayor—for distribution to the public via email to over 20,000 addresses. During the first few months of the  COVID‐19 pandemic, the mayor’s newsletter was produced daily, then went to three times a week and two  times a week before returning to a weekly publication.  o Produced seven issues of Renton CityNews (2019 name, now “Our Renton”) in 2019. COVID‐19 outbreak limited  2020 to one edition (January). Issues were emailed to families in apartments and condominiums via the  Washington Multifamily Housing Association. Issues were also distributed via utility bills.  o Effectively used the readerboard at Renton Community Center to promote programs, meetings, and  opportunities. Returned the readerboard at Fire Station 13 to the control of Renton Regional Fire Authority.  o Updated key contact lists to utilize in GovDelivery for more effective communications.   Print Shop:  o Continued to streamline print shop processes, improve customer service, and reduce costs for printed materials  throughout all city departments.  o Provided effective mail delivery to all city staff, while ensuring cost‐effective, uninterrupted outgoing mail  service.  o In conjunction with utility billing, implemented needed updates to utility bill (barcodes and format) to facilitate  banking and postal discount requirements.  o More Print Shop services include wide format banners, posters, PDF inserts to electronic utility bills, variable  date software and mail process. These services, for city departments plus REACH, CISR, and other city affiliates,  have increased the Print Shop workload.    2021/2022 Goals    Continue to enhance and improve the city’s website; investigate opportunities in contract to redesign.   Develop and implement an effective internal communications publication.   Research and stay apprised of emerging technologies that serve to improve communication with public.   Establish citywide social media policy and implement best practices for effective social media use.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 19Budget by Department - Executive  Continue with strong media relations and achieve regional and local coverage on key issues.   Help coordinate and promote key community events.   Continue to implement more video on website and in social media postings.   Continue to streamline print operations and move toward more effective electronic communications by reducing  the number of non‐essential printed materials.   Enhance Channel 21 operations and productions for more robust cable programming and video streaming.   Continue to implement unified graphic design standards and “branding” throughout all city departments and  modernize the look of all city publications.   Develop and implement strategic communication strategy for public outreach for key issues and programs  throughout the city.   Publish an inclusion brochure to explain the program and highlight activities.   Continue to prepare and train for possible large‐scale emergencies.   Maintain good communication with the general public via newsletters, website, local and regional media, and other  social media outlets.   Continue to provide high quality printed materials in a timely, cost‐efficient manner.   Continue to provide effective mail delivery to all city staff, while ensuring cost‐effective, outgoing mail service.             Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Communications 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 506,319 529,369 484,943 545,972 599,935 546,601 563,754 0.1% 3.1% Part‐Time Salaries 42,144 16,000 36,681 16,000 0 16,000 16,000 0.0% 0.0% Overtime 43003,0790000N/AN/A Personnel Benefits 205,650 212,387 205,335 223,348 251,632 248,281 262,990 11.2% 5.9% Supplies 31,487 61,734 36,955 61,734 77,652 61,734 61,734 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 584,495 335,884 632,487 335,884 817,112 335,884 335,884 0.0% 0.0% Intergovernmental Services 30000000N/AN/A Capital Outlay 0 40,000 0 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 6,543 2,967 2,967 3,941 3,941 2,000 2,034 ‐49.3% 1.7% Transfer Out 000037,50000N/AN/A Total 1,377,098 1,198,341 1,402,446 1,226,879 1,827,772 1,250,500 1,282,396 1.9% 2.6% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Communications 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 5.63 5.63 6.63 5.63 6.63 5.63 5.63 0.1% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 1.17 0.38 1.05 0.38 0.00 0.38 0.38 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 48,571$         16,000$         43,872$         16,000$         ‐$                16,000$         16,000$         0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 20Budget by Department - Executive Emergency Management     Mission   Fostering a culture of preparedness and community self‐sufficiency.   Working inclusively with our diverse community to coordinate effective disaster response.   Preparing our whole community to be uniquely resilient through adversity and recovery.  2019/2020 Accomplishments  • Negotiated and completed a Department of Homeland Security facility security assessment at no cost to the city,  saving over $50,000 in comparable services provided by the private sector.  • Provided mutual aid to other jurisdictions for significant emergency events in the region, including working in  regional command centers for severe snowstorm response and COVID‐19 response.  • Coordinated the Emergency Operations Center response to the February 2019 snowstorm, providing important  logistics and communications support to other departments.  • Monitored flooding conditions in at‐risk neighborhoods during the February 2020 flooding, and coordinated the  Emergency Operations Center response.   • Coordinated the city’s interdepartmental and interagency response to COVID‐19 impacts, including operational  measures, logistics support, policy development, and public messaging and information support in conjunction  with Communications Division (ongoing).   • Collaborated with all departments/divisions to write and publish a dynamic emergency response and recovery plan  for COVID‐19 (not addressed in pre‐existing plans or procedures), including the plan to reopen city services safely  and appropriately, which has been emulated by neighboring jurisdictions.  • Developed and delivered training on COVID‐19 safety measures, made available to all staff, on topics such as: face  covering regulations, Public Health 101, return‐to‐work expectations.  • Conducted three Preliminary Damage Assessments and participated in two Federal Emergency Management  Agency (FEMA) applicant briefings to initiate disaster reimbursements to the city following a qualifying event.  • Completed final recovery of all reimbursement monies available for disaster damages/projects related to the 2009  flooding disaster.  • Actively pursuing FEMA reimbursement for over $7 million of damages incurred in the February 2020 flooding  (ongoing).  • Conducted a comprehensive five‐year review and update of the Hazard Mitigation Plan.  • Partially revised and updated the Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP).   • Designed and delivered a Continuity of Operations Essential Function Workshop for Administrators, identifying  essential function tiers.   • Designed and conducted multi‐agency airport response exercise to a multiple plane crash event at the municipal  airport.  • Updated the Volunteer Reception Center plan and expanded the city’s Community Point of Distribution (CPOD)  capability, which during a disaster can quickly mobilize and deploy volunteers, and rapidly distribute supplies to  residents.  • Coordinated 40 amateur radio individual volunteers with the Renton Emergency Communications Service (RECS)  who served 911 hours of service to the city maintaining and testing communication systems for use in an  emergency.   • Coordinated the Renton Emergency Preparedness Academy (REPA), providing 13 classes to residents and  businesses in appropriate emergency/disaster actions adding new partners.    • Conducted customized general preparedness presentations for community groups and businesses.   • Conducted Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) trainings, providing preparedness training to 23  residents to become first responders in their own neighborhoods after a major disaster.  • Facilitated several Disaster Mental Health First Aid courses for staff, public, and volunteers to prepare them to  recognize and appropriately respond to mental health emergencies in the community.  • Delivered high‐level presentations at multiple professional conferences/forums and other large public audiences,  including an Emergency Management 101 in Leavenworth at the statewide Mayors Exchange.    • Facilitated multiple additional emergency management training classes to staff and volunteers.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 21Budget by Department - Executive • Supported the Information Technology Business Impact Analysis assessment process and supported the project  through grant funding.  • Secured grant funding to pay for installation of an uninterrupted power source (UPS system) for airport crash gates  and other important equipment for other departments.   • Contributed to regional efforts, including King County Emergency Management Advisory Committee, King County  Emergency Management Assistance Teams, Regional Planning Work Group, Regional Policy Work Group, Regional  Catastrophic Planning Work Group, Regional Public Outreach Work Group, Regional Mass Care Work Group,  Regional Critical Infrastructure Work Group, Complex Coordinated Terrorist Attack (CCTA) Planning Work Group,  Zone 3 (CERT).  • Participated in the citywide Community Engagement Team, IT Steering Committee, and Safety Committee.  • Contributed to Renton Results by developing and delivering several trainings to city staff and managers and  actively participating in organizational health offerings.  • Maintained National Incident Management System compliance, retaining grant eligibility.  • Met all requirements for and maintained professional certifications and memberships for staff.      2021/2022 Goals    Revise the Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan.   Conduct an After Action Review of the city’s COVID‐19 response and pandemic planning.   Complete revision of Continuity of Operations Plan.   Conduct annual review of the Hazard Mitigation Plan.   Facilitate and participate in Community‐specific Integrated Emergency Management Course conducted by FEMA  with 75 city employees and community partners.   Conduct one additional disaster exercise in 2022.   Migrate training to online platform delivery to increase accessibility and participation.        Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Emergency Management 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 297,559 310,041 294,505 323,654 341,625 330,126 339,429 2.0% 2.8% Overtime 16,667 23,535 15,154 23,535 23,535 23,535 23,535 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 113,293 114,888 113,043 121,224 121,224 131,557 138,576 8.5% 5.3% Supplies 11,859 3,000 17,736 3,000 28,500 2,775 2,775 ‐7.5% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 24,193 40,167 26,136 40,861 11,361 41,086 41,086 0.6% 0.0% Interfund Payments 127,085 154,227 155,153 214,474 185,268 252,536 259,801 17.7% 2.9% Total 590,655 645,858 621,727 726,748 729,951 781,615 805,202 7.5% 3.0% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Emergency Management 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 22Budget by Department - Executive   Executive Department Position Listing 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Mayor’s Office E10 Mayor (Elected) 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M53 Chief Administrative Officer 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M34 Organizational Development Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M19 Executive Assistant 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 M17 Executive Assistant 1.001.001.001.000.000.000.00 N09 Admin Secretary 1 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 N07 Secretary II 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Communications M45 Deputy Public Affairs Administrator 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M26 Communications Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A17 Web Specialist 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A13 Print & Mail Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A12 Communications Specialist I 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A03 Print & Mail Assistant 0.000.000.000.000.630.630.63 A01 Office Assistant I 0.630.630.630.630.000.000.00 M27 Censuse Program Manager 0.000.001.000.001.000.000.00 5.63 5.63 6.63 5.63 6.63 5.63 5.63 Emergency Management M38 Emergency Management Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A21 Emergency Management Coordinator 2.002.002.002.002.002.002.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Total Executive Department 13.63 13.63 14.63 13.63 14.63 13.63 13.63 Grade Title Total Mayor’s Office Total Communications Division Total Emergency Management Division 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 23Budget by Department - Executive CITY ATTORNEY Shane Moloney 14 FTEs Civil 4 FTEs Criminal 8 FTEs Administrative Support 1 FTE City Attorney  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 24Budget by Department - City Attorney City Attorney      Mission  Provide quality legal representation to the City and its employees in a timely, effective, and positive manner.    Description  The City Attorney Department provides legal advice (to the City Council, administration, boards and commissions), prepares  legislation, brings and defends lawsuits, and prosecutes cases in the Renton Municipal Court.         List of City Attorney Renton Results Decision Packages:       City Attorney Performance Measures:         Highlight of Budget Changes:   Regular Salaries increased by $40,242 in 2022 due to planned Cost of Living Adjustments (COLA).    Personnel Benefits increased by $98,651 and $43,290 in 2021 and 2022 respectively, due to projected increases in  medical and dental rates.    Interfund Payments increased by $5,633 in 2022 due to increased payments to IT to support higher technology  costs.         2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Operating Budget Summary 2,216,692 2,393,230 2,353,520 2,503,762 2,421,421 2,611,347 2,700,512 4.3% 3.4% Position Summary 13.88 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 0.0% 0.0% 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Package # Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100006.0008 City Attorney Prosecution 8.00          1,210,931           ‐                           8.00              1,254,397           ‐                            200006.0008 City Attorney Civil 4.00          792,781              ‐                           4.00              816,384              ‐                            600006.0009 City Attorney Administration 2.00          607,635              ‐                           2.00              629,731              ‐                            Total 14.00        2,611,347$        ‐$                    14.00            2,700,512$        ‐$                     City Service  Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results Discovery provided to the Defense  Attorney by prosecutors within 20  calendar days 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Representative  Government Policy and fiscal accountability Routine legislation and contract review  will be performed within one week of  receipt. 97.5% 99.4% 98.7% 92‐95% 92‐95% Timely responsiveness and  “projection of effort,” when  the community cannot help  itself. Safety and  Health 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 25Budget by Department - City Attorney     2019‐2020 Accomplishments   Achieved substantial budget savings in anticipation of COVID‐19 related revenue shortfalls.   Transitioned to full time teleworking seamlessly with minimal impacts on service levels during the COVID‐19 public  health crisis.   Participated fully in the Shared Work program with a limited reduction of service levels.    Successfully completed the City’s first Rule 9 internship program in 2019 (shelved in 2020 due to COVID‐19).   Worked closely with the Municipal Court, other City departments, and outside agencies to develop a potential  community court program.   Worked closely with the Municipal Court, SCORE, and the public defense firm to develop successful virtual hearing  procedures during the COVID‐19 public health crisis.   Assisted and advised the City in maintaining continuity of services during COVID‐19 crisis.    Successfully assisted the City with risk management and defense of claims.    2021‐2022 Goals   Continue to work closely with other City departments to support the City during the COVID‐19 public health crisis.   Manage large backlog of work created by COVID‐19 related reduced staffing, court closures, and increasing work‐ loads that are necessitated by a combination of City growth, response to the COVID‐19 emergency, and increased  involvement in risk management.     Assist with developing a procedure for safely conducting jury trials during the COVID‐19 public health crisis.   Assist in the implementation of community/diversionary court programs to the extent budget allows.   Reinstate the City’s Rule 9 program to the extent budget allows.   Continue to increase efficiencies through use of technology and proactive representation of City clients.   Remain flexible and capable of redirecting resources in light of the dynamic challenges faced by the City.        Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ City Attorney 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 City Attorney 2,216,692 2,393,230 2,353,520 2,503,762 2,421,421 2,611,347 2,700,512 4.3% 3.4% Total 2,216,692 2,393,230 2,353,520 2,503,762 2,421,421 2,611,347 2,700,512 4.3% 3.4% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ City Attorney 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,428,017 1,520,982 1,499,261 1,575,872 1,559,276 1,582,487 1,622,729 0.4% 2.5% Part‐Time Salaries 0 15,870 7,658 16,560 0 16,560 16,560 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 573,522 619,097 624,255 652,888 634,648 751,539 794,829 15.1% 5.8% Supplies 1,054 3,550 979 3,550 3,550 3,550 3,550 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 28,223 49,450 32,937 49,450 41,465 49,450 49,450 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 185,876 184,281 184,281 205,442 182,481 207,761 213,394 1.1% 2.7% Transfers Out 004,1500000N/AN/A Total 2,216,692 2,393,230 2,353,520 2,503,762 2,421,421 2,611,347 2,700,512 4.3% 3.4% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ City Attorney 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 13.88 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.00 0.42 0.20 0.43 0.00 0.43 0.43 ‐0.1% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$                17,306$         8,412$           18,060$         ‐$                18,049$         18,049$         ‐0.1% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 26Budget by Department - City Attorney   City Attorney Department Position Listing 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted City Attorney M49 City Attorney 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M42 Senior Assistant City Attorney 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 M38 Chief Prosecuting Attorney 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M35 Assistant City Attorney 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M29 Prosecuting Attorney 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A17 Paralegal 1.88 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 N14 Administrative Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to Legal 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A10 Legal Assistant 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Total City Attorney Department 13.88 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 14.00 Grade Title 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 27Budget by Department - City Attorney MUNICIPAL COURT  JUDGES Terry L. Jurado &             Kara Murphy Richards 17 FTEs COURT SERVICES Bonnie Woodrow 15 FTEs Infraction Processing   6 FTEs Criminal Case Processing 6 FTEs Probation               1 FTE Court Security Officer               1 FTE Court Services  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 28Budget by Department - Court Services Court Services    Mission  The mission of the Renton Municipal Court, as an independent and impartial branch of government, is to provide objective,  accessible, and timely resolution of all cases appropriately coming before the Court, the protection of the rights of all  individuals, and the dignified and fair treatment of all parties.  The Renton Municipal Court is a contributing partner working  toward a safe and vital community.      Description  The Renton Municipal Court is a Court of Limited Jurisdiction that handles parking citations, traffic and non‐traffic  infractions, photo enforcement citations, and misdemeanor and gross misdemeanor cases charged within the City limits.       List of Court Services Renton Results Decision Packages:      2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Operating Budget Summary 2,222,633 2,646,159 2,406,014 2,750,176 2,706,695 3,102,930 3,215,462 12.8% 3.6% Position Summary 14.00 16.00 17.00 16.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 6.3% 0.0% 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Package # Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100002.0016 Probation 1.00          148,714             93,000                1.00              153,823             93,000                 200002.0027 Criminal Case Processing 5.00          676,430             208,382             5.00              703,524             208,382              200002.0028 Infraction Processing 7.00          906,613             1,639,467          7.00              945,398             1,639,467           200002.0029 Court Administration 4.00          1,371,173          35,000                4.00              1,412,717          35,000                 Total 17.00        3,102,930$       1,975,849$       17.00            3,215,462$       1,975,849$        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 29Budget by Department - Court Services Court Services Performance Measures:          Highlight of Budget Changes:   Regular Salaries and Personnel Benefits increased by $274K in 2021 due to adding 1.0 FTE Elected Municipal Court  Judge (authorized in 2020) and medical/dental increases.   Part‐Time Salaries decreased by $20K in 2021 to help offset the 1.0 FTE Elected Municipal Court Judge.   Overtime decreased by $8K in 2021 due to moving funds to Regular Salaries to help offset the 1.0 FTE Elected  Municipal Court Judge.   Other Services and Charges increased by $20K in 2021 due to increasing the security officer budget.   Interfund Payments increased by $79K in 2021 due to overall Citywide increased Information Technology and  Facilities costs.    City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results Safety and Health Encourage the community to  comply with local, state and  federal laws. Composite of results from survey of  probationer's understanding of  probation process reflected as "Good" or  better.  85% 88% 88% 85% 84% Defendant satisfaction with their  understanding of the criminal case  process is rated as "Good" or better. 83%85% 83% 80% 82% Defendant’s satisfaction with the ability  to obtain access to court record  information related to criminal case  processing is rated “Good” or better. 87% 92% 92% 90% 90% Ongoing Juror Survey's reflect an  approval rating that indicates  satisfaction and understanding of the  jury experience by non‐criminal citizens  of Renton.  80% 80% 84% 82% 82% Defendant's satisfaction with the ability  to get access to court information  related to infraction processing is rated  "Good" or better. 87% 92% 90% 88% 88% Resident's satisfaction with  understanding the court infraction  process. 85% 86% 84% 84% 82% Open accessible and  consistent (administrative and  judicial) decision process Representative  Government 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 30Budget by Department - Court Services    2019/2020 Accomplishments   Moved in‐person hearing process to Zoom virtual platform due to COVID‐19 health concerns.   Added additional judge to address caseload issues.   Added additional staff due to increased photo enforcement caseload.   Developed an online public portal with interactive court forms.   Enhanced OCourt forms and expanded Laserfiche workflows for increased efficiency.     Added additional attorney/client conference rooms for increased privacy during negotiation process.     2021/2022 Goals   Improve use of Zoom for virtual hearing process.   Continue growth in use of Renton Results for meaningful budgets and recognizable results.   Continue ongoing staff training to keep pace with changes in laws, ordinances, and court rules.   Upgrade OCourt programs to enhance digital process for filing and hearing requests online.   Expand online public portal with additional interactive forms and e‐filing ability.   Address probation department staffing needs and explore Community Court benefits.      Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Court Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Court Services 2,222,633 2,646,159 2,406,014 2,750,176 2,706,695 3,102,930 3,215,462 12.8% 3.6% Total 2,222,633 2,646,159 2,406,014 2,750,176 2,706,695 3,102,930 3,215,462 12.8% 3.6% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Court Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,094,754 1,275,247 1,189,522 1,320,587 1,480,694 1,552,614 1,604,988 17.6% 3.4% Part‐Time Salaries 54,568 129,000 64,854 129,000 0 109,000 109,000 ‐15.5% 0.0% Overtime 2,992 8,000 117 8,000 50 0 0 ‐100.0% N/A Personnel Benefits 523,078 645,900 538,587 685,658 723,057 727,473 772,165 6.1% 6.1% Supplies 4,236 7,700 5,103 7,700 7,700 7,700 7,700 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 128,780 121,716 128,988 121,716 106,856 149,716 149,716 23.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 413,502 458,596 458,596 477,515 388,339 556,427 571,893 16.5% 2.8% Transfer Out 724020,2480000N/AN/A Total 2,222,633 2,646,159 2,406,014 2,750,176 2,706,695 3,102,930 3,215,462 12.8% 3.6% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Court Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 14.00 16.00 17.00 16.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 6.3% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 1.593.231.893.230.002.752.75‐14.9% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 66,122$         134,500$       78,796$         134,500$       ‐$                114,500$       114,500$       ‐14.9% 0.0% Court Services Department Position Listing 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Court Services E11 Municipal Court Judge (Elected)1.001.002.001.002.002.002.00 M38 Court Services Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M22 Court Services Supervisor 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A18 Probation Officer 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 A15 Judicial Specialist (Lead)0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A10 Judicial Specialist/Trainer 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A12 Judicial Specialist II 0.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A08 Judicial Specialist 7.00 9.00 6.00 9.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 A04 Court Security Officer 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 14.00 16.00 17.00 16.00 17.00 17.00 17.00Total Court Services Division Grade Title 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 31Budget by Department - Court Services   *The Utility Billing positions (4 FTEs) are funded by utility rate revenues (vs. General Fund).  ADMINISTRATOR Jan Hawn 49 FTEs FINANCEKari Roller                     21 FTEs Operations Payroll Accounts Payable Accounts Receivable Utility Billing* Cash Receipting Tax & Licensing Budget & Accounting Budget Financial Reporting General Accounting INFORMATION  TECHNOLOGY Mehdi Sadri                   20 FTEs Enterprise GIS  Implementation  Development Support Systems Services Communication and  Data Center  Operations Network Services Application Services Application Implementation  Development Support and  Maintenance Service Desk End‐user Support City Clerk Jason Seth 6 FTEs Records Management  and Imaging Legislative and  Administration  Support Public Information  Services Voter Registrations  and Elections Hearing Examiner (contracted) Administrative  Support 1 FTE Administrative Services  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 32Budget by Department - Administrative Services   Administrative Services      Mission  Provide service through efficient and accessible information.       Core Businesses Services  The Administrative Services Department provides financial management and information technology services by providing  timely and accurate financial information; efficient and reliable technologies; and preservation of current and historical  records, and the City Clerk additionally serves as the Clerk of the City Council and as the City’s Public Records Officer.         List of Renton Results Decision Packages:      2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Operating Budget Summary 11,250,461 11,778,561 11,166,538 12,130,423 13,324,625 12,688,572 13,015,899 4.6% 2.6% Position Summary 45.00 48.00 48.00 48.00 49.00 49.00 49.00 2.1% 0.0% 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Package # Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100004.0010 Business Licensing 3.00          410,556             ‐                           3.00              428,770             ‐                            200011.0010 Hearing Examiner ‐            40,000                ‐                            ‐                 40,000                ‐                            200012.0016 City Clerk 6.00          1,433,840          ‐                           6.00              1,477,120          ‐                            500004.0008 Utility Billing and Cashiering 5.00          721,659             ‐                           5.00              741,720             ‐                            600004.0105 Payroll 2.33          294,008             ‐                           2.33              310,835             ‐                            600004.0106 System Services 4.00          866,729             866,980             4.00              902,866             903,555              600004.0107 Telecommunications 1.00          585,241             585,405             1.00              590,782             591,233              600004.0108 Service Desk Support 4.00          736,729             740,918             4.00              770,822             775,690              600004.0109 Finance Operations 3.67          453,929             ‐                           3.67              474,255             ‐                            600004.0110 Applications and Database Services 7.00          2,519,745          2,520,523          7.00              2,561,310          2,563,298           600004.0111 Enterprise GIS 3.00          539,599             539,768             3.00              559,429             559,857              600004.0112 Accounting and Auditing 3.00          554,958             ‐                           3.00              577,174             ‐                            600004.0113 Budgeting and Financial Planning 3.00          457,303             ‐                           3.00              479,519             ‐                            600004.0114 Asset, Debt, and Treasury Management ‐            771,650             ‐                            ‐                 783,500             ‐                            600004.0115 IT Administration 2.00          393,408             396,061             2.00              404,108             407,152              600004.0116 Finance Administration 2.00          912,744             ‐                           2.00              936,213             ‐                            600004.0117 IT Capital ‐            786,000             936,246             ‐                 777,000             927,594              700005.0015 Fire Pension ‐            210,475             385,000             ‐                 200,475             290,000              Total 49.00        12,688,572$     6,970,901$       49.00            13,015,899$     7,018,379$        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 33Budget by Department - Administrative Services   Performance Measures:         City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results Business License renewals will be issued  within one day of receipt of payment.  95% 87% 89% 92% 82% Number of compliance audits performed  annually.new 2017 new 2017 500 349 159 Opportunities for the public  to engage and influence City  government Number of Legislative documents  (agenda, minutes, ordinances,  resolutions, etc) published & available 148 121 140 173 204 Number of Public Records Requests 332 616 678 608 691 Number of internal documents  (contracts including lease agreements,  MOU's, etc.) that are executed and  recorded 722 725 714 874 693 Utility Billing customer calls will be  answered within 5 minutes.99% 100% 100% 100% 100% Average Utility Billing aged accounts  receivable (over 90 days) as percent of  annual revenue. 0.08% 0.38% 0.0047% 0.42% 0.31% New Utility Billing accounts will be set  up within five business days of  notification (via final permit, email,  etc.). 99% 98% 100% 100% 97% Percent of system availability (network  "uptime") as provided by System  Services.   99% 97% 99% 99% 99% Safeguard public interests  and assets Maintain or improve the City's credit  rating of AA (S&P's) for General  Obligation Bonds and AA+ (S&P's) for  Revenue Bonds.   AA+/AA+ AA+/AA+ AA+/AA+ AA+/AA+ AAA/AA+ Safety and Health Encourage the community to  comply with local, state and  federal laws. Representative  Government Internal Support Functional work  environment Operate and maintain  utilities Utilities and  Environment Policy and fiscal  accountability 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 34Budget by Department - Administrative Services   Highlight of Budget Changes:   Part‐time Salaries decreased $20,000 in 2021 due to the elimination of temporary costs needed in 2020 related to  additional IT help desk assistance for new employees Citywide and IT support for the new Police take‐home vehicles.    Supplies decreased $68,611 in 2021 due to completion of additional IT small equipment purchases related to new  employees Citywide and IT equipment in the new Police take‐home vehicles in 2019 and 2020.   Other Services and Charges increased $423,722 in 2021 due to increased costs of IT service contracts, additional  licenses and applications, and due to the reclassification of voter registration costs previously included in  Intergovernmental Services.   Intergovernmental Services decreased $266,000 in 2021 as they were reclassified to Other Services and Charges in  response to the State Auditor’s Office removing the Intergovernmental classification from the BARS manual.   Interfund Payments increased by $63,602 in 2021 due to increased Finance and City Clerk payments to IT to support  the increased technology costs.        Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Administrative Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Fund/Dept Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Finance 4,150,211 4,383,622 4,089,396 4,631,749 4,513,286 4,787,282 4,932,463 3.4% 3.0% Information Technology 5,825,309 6,053,852 5,790,915 6,095,823 7,635,416 6,427,451 6,566,316 5.4% 2.2% City Clerk 1,274,941 1,341,087 1,286,227 1,402,852 1,175,923 1,473,840 1,517,120 5.1% 2.9% Total 11,250,461 11,778,561 11,166,538 12,130,423 13,324,625 12,688,572 13,015,899 4.6% 2.6% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Administrative Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 4,016,609 4,305,205 4,061,290 4,541,842 4,538,866 4,771,513 4,939,498 5.1% 3.5% Part‐Time Salaries 48,146 58,716 32,102 65,716 34,841 38,716 45,716 ‐41.1% 18.1% Overtime 35,067 51,000 35,841 51,000 36,000 51,000 51,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 1,925,950 2,178,178 2,009,597 2,333,777 2,243,333 2,521,431 2,665,667 8.0% 5.7% Supplies 496,263 642,424 528,707 607,224 999,224 559,724 558,613 ‐7.8%‐0.2% Other Services and Charges 3,374,891 3,368,317 3,568,362 3,306,667 3,862,311 3,730,389 3,731,501 12.8% 0.0% Intergovernmental Services261,695266,0000266,000000‐100.0% N/A Capital Outlay 469,498 340,000 359,367 340,000 1,068,500 334,000 325,000 ‐1.8%‐2.7% Interfund Payments 436,810 568,721 568,721 618,197 541,551 681,799 698,903 10.3% 2.5% Transfer Out 185,53202,5510000N/AN/A Total 11,250,461 11,778,561 11,166,538 12,130,423 13,324,625 12,688,572 13,015,899 4.6% 2.6% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Administrative Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Finance 20.50 21.50 21.50 21.50 22.50 22.00 22.00 2.3% 0.0% Information Technology 18.50 20.50 20.50 20.50 20.50 21.00 21.00 2.4% 0.0% City Clerk 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 45.00 48.00 48.00 48.00 49.00 49.00 49.00 2.1% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 1.411.530.961.700.961.051.22‐38.1% 16.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 58,590$         63,813$         40,048$         70,813$         39,938$         43,813$         50,813$         ‐38.1% 16.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 35Budget by Department - Administrative Services   Finance    Mission   The Finance Division is responsible for a broad range of services and information for both internal and external customers.   Core operational services include cash receipting, utility billing, business taxing and licensing, payroll, accounts payable, and  accounts receivable.  The Finance Division is also responsible for accounting and financial reporting, including the  development of the biennial budget and preparation of the City’s annual financial statements, which are audited by the  Washington State Auditor’s Office.    2019/2020 Accomplishments   Received awards for excellence in financial reporting and budgeting from the Government Finance Officers  Association (GFOA).   Implemented the state approved online filing portal of File Local for B&O tax and business license renewal as well as  transitioned to a new system of record for the tax and licensing work group.     Re‐organized the Finance Division to include four distinct work groups of budget and financial reporting, finance  operations, tax and licensing, and utility billing.   Expanded the City’s inclusion in purchasing program by gathering additional information on over 2,000 City vendors.   Expanded the use of Laserfiche for electronically filing utility billing and tax and licensing records.     2021/2022 Goals   Thoroughly review and audit various internal controls for various functions throughout the City and create  specialized training and user manuals to ensure City assets and resources are properly protected.   Continue to collaborate with IT to expand the use of Laserfiche for electronically filing cash receipting and payroll  records.   Continue receiving “clean” financial audits from the Washington State Auditor’s Office.   Enhance commitment and focus on external customer service, particularly to the underserved and vulnerable  population.   Continue refinement of Renton Results efforts through improvements in performance data collection.   Continue to receive awards for excellence in financial reporting and budgeting from the Government Finance  Officers Association (GFOA). Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Finance 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,714,694 1,761,979 1,621,706 1,892,121 1,840,074 1,949,375 2,017,396 3.0% 3.5% Overtime 1,048 21,000 96 21,000 21,000 21,000 21,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 958,344 1,069,615 963,448 1,157,842 1,102,371 1,214,473 1,278,547 4.9% 5.3% Supplies 6,518 11,975 4,683 11,975 11,975 11,975 11,975 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 1,029,895 1,121,698 1,100,328 1,123,548 1,157,521 1,121,698 1,123,548 ‐0.2% 0.2% Interfund Payments 280,545 397,355 397,355 425,263 380,345 468,761 479,997 10.2% 2.4% Transfer Out 159,16601,7810000N/AN/A Total 4,150,211 4,383,622 4,089,396 4,631,749 4,513,286 4,787,282 4,932,463 3.4% 3.0% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Finance 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 20.50 21.50 21.50 21.50 22.50 22.00 22.00 2.3% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 36Budget by Department - Administrative Services   Information Technology    Mission   Information Technology Division (ITD) in support of the Council’s vision and priorities and in partnership with the City  departments provides comprehensive IT solutions and services to all departments, focusing on optimizing the City’s  operations and enhancing services through automation. ITD’s core services include technology innovations and maintenance  in support of network infrastructure, business applications systems, Geographic Information Systems, customers and end‐ user devices, and business and operations administration.    2019/2020 Accomplishments    Established Information Technology governance, Advisory, and Steering committees.   Implemented enterprise Citizen Request Management system.   Implemented Work Order Management Systems for Public Works, Parks and Natural Resources, and Facilities.   Implemented Recreation Management System.   Implemented Business Tax and License System with integration to FileLocal.   Implemented online permitting portal.   Implemented an integration between EnerGov and Laserfiche.   Implemented new email archival/e‐discovery system.   Implemented new GIS field editing service for PW Transportation Maintenance.   Implemented NeoGov Onboarding and performance management systems.   Implemented new Police Parking Citation System.   Implemented new HVAC Control systems for City Hall and Pavilion.   Implemented digital signage displays at the Golf Course, RCC, and Senior Center.   Implemented new remote access appliance to allow employees to telework.   Implemented new Lighting Analysis software for Transportation Engineering.   Implemented vehicle turning analysis software for Transportation Engineering.   Upgraded PW Automated Meter Read system.   Expanded the use and integrated with enterprise document management system.   Expanded connectivity (fiber) through collaborating with CED, WSDOT, 5G vendors, and local and regional  partners.   Supported RRFA technology transition.   Evaluated 3D augmented reality viewer capability for Public Works Utilities.   Evaluated/implemented POC for network redundancy options via wireless connectivity.   Evaluated and implemented options for mobile device services cost containment.   Upgraded the phone system and added a new SIP trunk.   Virtualized most servers in our DMZ network.   Conducted an IT Security Assessment that resulted in the following projects to improve the City’s security posture:  o Duo Multi‐Factor Authentication  o Palo Alto network firewall replacement  o Conducted an IT Business Impact Analysis (BIA)    2021/2022 Goals   Update ITD policies, procedures, and Service Level Agreements.   Upgrade email exchange system and increase redundancy.   Support new technology trends towards Smart Cities, Internet of Things (IOT), Intelligent Transportation Systems  (ITS), and Drones.     Migrate Microsoft M365 cloud computing strategies.   Continue to implement security improvements to the City’s infrastructure and business systems.   Follow up on Business Impact Analysis study.   Develop a Disaster Recovery Plan.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 37Budget by Department - Administrative Services         Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Information Technology 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,813,611 2,025,136 1,933,527 2,107,190 2,206,125 2,224,846 2,305,089 5.6% 3.6% Part‐Time Salaries 48,146 58,716 32,102 65,716 34,841 38,716 45,716 ‐41.1% 18.1% Overtime 34,019 30,000 35,746 30,000 15,000 30,000 30,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 733,689 858,575 805,287 909,940 909,940 993,063 1,053,685 9.1% 6.1% Supplies 485,409 623,455 520,074 588,255 983,155 540,755 540,755 ‐8.1% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 2,238,063 2,116,418 2,103,260 2,052,918 2,416,051 2,266,071 2,266,071 10.4% 0.0% Intergovernmental Services2,062000000N/AN/A Capital Outlay 469,498 340,000 359,367 340,000 1,068,500 334,000 325,000 ‐1.8%‐2.7% Interfund Payments 812 1,552 1,552 1,804 1,804 0 0 ‐100.0% N/A Total 5,825,309 6,053,852 5,790,915 6,095,823 7,635,416 6,427,451 6,566,316 5.4% 2.2% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Information Technology 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 18.50 20.50 20.50 20.50 20.50 21.00 21.00 2.4% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 1.41 1.53 0.96 1.70 0.96 1.05 1.22 ‐38.1% 16.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 58,590$         63,813$         40,048$         70,813$         39,938$         43,813$         50,813$         ‐38.1% 16.0% Fund 503  ‐ Information Technology Fund Department Capital (Costs charged directly to identified department): 2021 2022 Network and Enterprise Infrastructure 59,000$          59,000$           Enterprise Capital (costs allocated city‐wide based on weighted point system) : Core systems replacement 315,000          315,000           Annual Equipment Replacement 442,000          442,000           Total IT Capital Projects/Programs 816,000$       816,000$        Desktops, laptops, mobile devices, copeirs, printers, scanners, projectors License increases and miscellaneous new software purchases Replacement of servers, storage, backup systems, network devices, switches, routers, and access points. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 38Budget by Department - Administrative Services   City Clerk    Mission  The Office of the City Clerk is dedicated to supporting governance and the legislative process, maintaining and preserving the  City’s official records, assisting and informing the public, coordinating elections, and carrying out the official duties and  sovereign authority of the City Clerk with integrity, as required by law and policy, and to meet the needs of the citizens, the  elected officials, and City administrative staff.    2019/2020 Accomplishments   Submitted the 2019 Joint Legislative Audit & Review Committee (JLARC) report, used to inform the state of the City’s  compliance with the Public Records Act two months prior to the State deadline.   Reorganized the City Clerk Division, effectively modernizing Division operations in order to comply with modern  federal, state, and local laws, to meet the evolving needs of residents and staff, and to align division work with the  City’s Business Plan.   Automated digital records‐keeping processes via Laserfiche for several additional key lines of business across the  City.   Enhanced digital recording procedures for certain document types with the King County Recorder’s Office.   Enhanced City Clerk Policy and Procedures including Records Management and Public Records Processing policies.   Trained volunteer board and commission members on the Public Records Act, the Open Public Meetings Act, and  records retention requirements.   Implemented new email archive system that streamlined email search and disclosure procedures.   In partnership with the Human Resources and Risk Management Department, successfully hired and trained the  City’s first supported employment employee.    2021/2022 Goals   Scan all permanent, vital, and historical records into Laserfiche for long‐term maintenance.   Fully implement the RMS functionality of Laserfiche by end of 2022.   Develop and implement a Five‐Year Strategic Plan for the City Clerk Division.   Enhance the City Clerk Division’s Records and Information Management (RIM) (paper records) program by  developing and implementing a 10‐step program that reduces costs and improves the efficiency of record keeping,  establishes criteria for digitizing records to reduce storage costs, provides adequate protection for City records, and  preserves City records that have historical value.   Continually upgrade Laserfiche in the pursuit of improving internal and external access to City records, while at the  same time reducing the number of public records requests received annually.   Enhance Hearing Examiner calendaring in order to simplify the process for staff and residents.   Update all City Clerk policies in order to remain aligned with City, State, and Federal law, as well as City internal  practices.   Update the City’s Purchasing and Contracting policy using the Renton Equity Lens.      Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ City Clerk 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 488,304 518,090 506,058 542,531 492,666 597,292 617,013 10.1% 3.3% Personnel Benefits 233,917 249,988 240,861 265,996 231,022 313,896 333,435 18.0% 6.2% Supplies 4,335 6,994 3,951 6,994 4,094 6,994 5,883 0.0%‐15.9% Other Services and Charges 106,933 130,201 364,774 130,201 288,739 342,620 341,882 163.1%‐0.2% Intergovernmental Services 259,633 266,000 0 266,000 0 0 0 ‐100.0% N/A Interfund Payments 155,453 169,814 169,814 191,130 159,402 213,038 218,906 11.5% 2.8% Transfer Out 26,36607700000N/AN/A Total 1,274,941 1,341,087 1,286,227 1,402,852 1,175,923 1,473,840 1,517,120 5.1% 2.9% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ City Clerk 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 39Budget by Department - Administrative Services     Administrative Services Position Listing 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Grade Title Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Finance Division M49 Administrative Services Administrator 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 M38 Fiscal Services Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M33 Budget & Accounting Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M30 Financial Services Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M28 Financial Operations Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M28 Tax & Licensing Manager 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M25 Financial Operations Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M25 Senior Finance Analyst 4.00 4.00 3.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 M25 Tax Auditor 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 N16 Finance Analyst III 0.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to ASD 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.50 0.50 N14 Administrative Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 N13 Tax & Licensing Auditor I0.000.001.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N13 Payroll Technician II 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A19 Accounting Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A09 Accounting Assistant IV 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 A07 Accounting Assistant III 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Total Regular Staffing 20.50 21.50 21.50 21.50 22.50 22.00 22.00 Total Finance Division 20.50 21.50 21.50 21.50 22.50 22.00 22.00   Information Technology Division M49 Administrative Services Administrator 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 M38 Information Technology Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M30 Application Support Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M30 GIS Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to ASD 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.50 0.50 A32 Network Systems Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A30 Client Technology Services and Support Supervisor 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A29 Senior Systems Analyst 0.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A28 Senior Network Systems Specialist 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A27 Senior Business Systems Analyst 0.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A26 Systems Analyst/Programmer 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A25 Senior Network Systems Specialist 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A25 Senior Systems Analyst 2.00 2.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A24 Service Desk Supervisor 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A24 Network Systems Specialist 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A23 Business Systems Analyst 3.00 3.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A23 GIS Analyst II 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A22 Systems Analyst/Programmer 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A21 Network Systems Specialist 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A17 Senior Service Desk Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A13 Service Desk Technician 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Total Regular Staffing 18.50 20.50 20.50 20.50 20.50 21.00 21.00 Total Information Technology Division 18.50 20.50 20.50 20.50 20.50 21.00 21.00 City Clerk Division M38 City Clerk/Public Records Officer 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M27 Deputy City Clerk/Enterprise Content Manager 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 M24 Deputy City Clerk/Enterprise Content Manager 1.001.001.001.000.000.000.00 M24 Deputy City Clerk/Public Records Officer 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 A20 Assistant Public Records Officer 1.001.001.001.000.000.000.00 A17 Public Records Specialist 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 A15 City Clerk Specialist II 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A11 City Clerk Specialist 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A11 Public Records Specialist 1.001.001.001.000.000.000.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Total Administrative Services 45.00 48.00 48.00 48.00 49.00 49.00 49.00 Total City Clerk Division 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 40Budget by Department - Administrative Services ADMINISTRATOR Chip Vincent 58.5 FTEs Development Services Rob Shuey                                                 20 FTEs Building Inspection Code Compliance Permit Services Planning                                                      Vanessa Dolbee 27.5 FTEs Current Planning Development Engineering Property and Technical  Services Economic Development  Cliff Long                                                            6 FTEs Economic Development Long Range Planning Angie Mathias 3 FTEs Long Range Planning Administrative Support 1 FTE Planning Commission Municipal Arts Commission City Center Community Plan  Advisory Board Benson Hill Community  Plan Advisory Board Community and Economic Development  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 41Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Community and Economic Development    Mission   Enhance the vitality and livability of the Renton community by promoting a prosperous economy and quality neighborhoods  through economic development, sound urban planning, and streamlined land use regulation.     Core Businesses and Services  The Department of Community & Economic Development (CED) initiates and leads economic development, land use planning  and permitting, and regulation of all aspects of the development process, while working with residents, the business  community, and other community organizations to enhance the economic prosperity, vitality, and livability for the Renton  community.  In addition, CED manages the City’s intergovernmental relations, advocating for Renton’s interests at the county, regional,  state, and federal levels, coordinates the Renton Community Marketing Campaign, which is funded in part by the City’s  Lodging Tax, and provides staff support for the City’s Planning and Municipal Arts Commissions.   Coordination and collaboration amongst the three CED divisions, Economic Development, Planning, and Development  Services, and its 12 programs is essential, as each has an important role to play in achieving the vision, mission, and goals of  the City. CED plays a leadership role in the fulfillment of a significant number of the City's Business Plan goals and action  items. Most of the five Business Plan goals are directly related to the work of CED's programs.           List of Community and Economic Development Renton Results Decision Packages:         2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Operating Budget Summary 8,234,874 9,793,958 8,982,230 10,341,490 15,322,541 10,926,162 11,303,970 5.7% 3.5% CIP Budget Summary 64,762 0 105,900 0 738,560 0 0 N/A N/A Position Summary 54.50 57.50 57.50 58.50 58.50 58.50 58.50 0.0% 0.0% 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Package # Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100007.0016 Building Inspection 16.00        2,308,971          3,446,556          16.00            2,395,462          4,409,169           100007.0017 Code Enforcement program 4.00          576,561             ‐                           4.00              598,859             ‐                            100020.0025 CDBG ‐            361,724             361,724             ‐                 361,724             361,724              300007.0056 Economic Development 6.00          1,169,508          ‐                           6.00              1,208,842          ‐                            300007.0057 Current Planning 8.34          1,228,210          98,000                8.34              1,279,777          100,940              300007.0058 Arts & Culture ‐            117,900             ‐                            ‐                 117,900             ‐                            300007.0059 CED Administration 1.80          1,473,798          ‐                           1.80              1,512,849          ‐                            300007.0060 Long Range Planning 3.20          603,256             ‐                           3.20              624,747             ‐                            300007.0061 One Percent for Art Fund Program ‐            117,900             117,900             ‐                 117,900             117,900              500007.0009 Development Engineering 14.63        2,318,879          507,015             14.63            2,412,385          507,015              600007.0008 Technical and Property Services 4.53          649,456             ‐                           4.53              673,526             ‐                            Total 58.50        10,926,162$     4,531,195$       58.50            11,303,970$     5,496,748$        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 42Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Community and Economic Development Performance Measures:                City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results Permit review for single family  applications completed within 2 weeks 90% 51% 61% 58% 45% Permit review for commercial  applications within 4 weeks 100% 90% 95% 88% 87% Inspection requests receive response  within 24 hours 95% 96% 93% 94% 95% Encourage the community to  comply with local, state and  federal laws Code compliance is achieved through  voluntary action upon notification of  violation N/A N/A 83% 80% 80% Advocate community interest  in regional, state, and federal  forums Number of organizations in which CED  staff represents the City in local,  regional and statewide organizations  focused in areas such as land use,  economic development , building  regulation 29 N/A 29 29 29 The City's annual sales tax revenue  growth rate (excluding one‐time items)9.0% 7.0% N/A no data no data Annual property tax revenue associated  with new construction increases. 2.82%‐2.12% N/A no data no data Process land use applications requiring a  decision by the Hearing Examiner within  12 weeks of receipt of complete  application. 76% 72% 88% 92% 100% Process land use applications requiring  an Administrative Decision within 8  weeks 84% 75% 82% 91% 92% Compliance with  environmental standards and  laws Infrastructure project plan review is  completed within an average of 3 weeks 75% 90% 47% 54% 44% Functional work environment Property and Technical Services review  of development proposals are processed  within two weeks.  95% 98% 95% 98% 98% Timely responsiveness and  “Projection of effort” when  the community cannot help  itself Encourage and foster a vibrant  and diverse economy Manage growth in a manner  consistent with community  values. 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development 3 - 43 Highlight of Budget Changes:   Regular Salaries increased by $187,106 in 2021 due to reclassification of various positions after the 2019/2020  budget was adopted.    Personnel Benefits increased by $198,176 in 2021 due to increase in employer‐paid taxes and retirement  contribution as a direct result of the increase in salaries, in addition to projected increase in medical and dental  rates.   Shifted budget between other categories to better align budget to where the money is actually being spent.   Interfund Payments increased by $29,000 in 2022 due to increase in Equipment Rental costs.   Transfer Out increased to $117,900 in 2021 to fund the City Arts Program.        Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Community & Economic Development 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Administration 1,347,568 1,507,929 1,598,892 1,501,451 1,560,726 1,619,213 1,659,266 7.8% 2.5% Economic Development 833,055 1,378,153 1,257,984 1,418,452 6,790,842 1,649,132 1,688,466 16.3% 2.4% Planning 3,843,116 4,395,090 3,802,894 4,670,028 4,370,938 4,772,285 4,961,916 2.2% 4.0% Development Services 2,211,136 2,512,785 2,322,460 2,751,559 2,600,034 2,885,532 2,994,321 4.9% 3.8% Operating Total 8,234,874 9,793,958 8,982,230 10,341,490 15,322,541 10,926,162 11,303,970 5.7% 3.5% CIP 64,762 0 105,900 0 738,560 0 0 N/A N/A Total 8,299,636 9,793,958 9,088,130 10,341,490 16,061,101 10,926,162 11,303,970 5.7% 3.5% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Community & Economic Development 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 4,626,575 5,303,606 4,828,127 5,654,139 5,523,718 5,841,245 6,038,395 3.3% 3.4% Part‐Time Salaries 48,060045,9900000N/AN/A Overtime 50,131 52,517 44,095 52,517 10,164 52,117 52,117 ‐0.8% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 1,820,831 2,171,721 1,916,343 2,362,799 2,263,691 2,560,974 2,712,632 8.4% 5.9% Supplies 16,377 81,650 37,537 81,650 54,950 34,750 34,750 ‐57.4% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 612,089 933,144 592,050 928,071 2,504,242 1,060,036 1,060,036 14.2% 0.0% Capital Outlay 926 15,000 194,508 15,000 1,070,404 15,000 15,000 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 1,053,132 1,146,320 1,146,320 1,247,315 1,079,873 1,244,140 1,273,140 ‐0.3% 2.3% Transfer Out 6,754 90,000 177,261 0 2,815,499 117,900 117,900 100.0% 0.0% Operating Total 8,234,874 9,793,958 8,982,230 10,341,490 15,322,541 10,926,162 11,303,970 5.7% 3.5% CIP 64,762 0 105,900 0 738,560 0 0 N/A N/A Total 8,299,636 9,793,958 9,088,130 10,341,490 16,061,101 10,926,162 11,303,970 5.7% 3.5% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Community & Economic Development 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% 0.0% Economic Development 4.005.006.005.006.006.006.0020.0%0.0% Planning 29.50 31.50 30.50 31.50 30.50 30.50 30.50 ‐3.2% 0.0% Development Services 19.00 19.00 19.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 54.50 57.50 57.50 58.50 58.50 58.50 58.50 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 1.350.001.270.000.040.000.00N/AN/A Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 56,070$         ‐$                52,729$         ‐$                1,528$           ‐$                ‐$                N/A N/A 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 44Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Administration Division    Mission   Provide leadership, resources, and regional influence to enable the Department to meet its responsibilities in a manner that  is responsive to the needs of its customers and consistent with the City's Business Plan goals.    2019/2020 Accomplishments     Maintained extremely high level of service and exceeded most performance goals.   Participated in numerous state, countywide, and regional policy boards and commissions.  2021/2022 Goals   Continue to work within CED and all city departments to maximize employee satisfaction and performance, and find  additional organizational and system improvements, innovations, and efficiencies.    Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Administration 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 250,212 257,686 258,358 265,835 273,505 273,696 278,940 3.0% 1.9% Personnel Benefits 104,323 109,783 110,339 115,897 115,897 126,700 133,815 9.3% 5.6% Other Services and Charges 0 0825 0850 0 0N/AN/A Interfund Payments 986,279 1,050,460 1,050,460 1,119,719 989,334 1,100,917 1,128,611 ‐1.7% 2.5% Transfer Out 6,754 90,000 177,261 0 181,140 117,900 117,900 100.0% 0.0% Operating Total 1,347,568 1,507,929 1,598,892 1,501,451 1,560,726 1,619,213 1,659,266 7.8% 2.5% CIP 64,762 0 105,900 0 738,560 0 0 N/A N/A Total 1,412,329 1,507,929 1,704,792 1,501,451 2,299,286 1,619,213 1,659,266 7.8% 2.5% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Administration 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 45Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Economic Development Division    Mission   Enhance the vitality and livability of the Renton community by promoting a prosperous and diverse economy.  2019/2020 Accomplishments    Continued to work with Cosmos Development for project on 200 Mill property.   Completed the design phase of Streetscape enhancements and wayfinding plan per the Council adopted Civic Core  Vision and Action Plan.   Continued focus and oversight of Lodging Tax Fund and new opportunities for tourism promotion and Renton  Community Marketing Campaign.   Successfully partnered with Port of Seattle for economic development marketing.   Continued enhancement of three state of the art websites for downtown, visitors, and economic development in  Renton.   Facebook ad campaign to promote Renton events yielded 4,102,303 impressions and 27,057 clicks.   Digital Ad Word Campaign on Renton Workforce yielded 4,137,192 impressions and 12,854 clicks.   YouTube channel to promote the City of Renton and our local businesses and events yielded 194 hours of viewed  content during 3,112 views.   Continued to strengthen ongoing business recruitment working with many companies to locate or expand.    Continued to foster redevelopment efforts in the South Lake Washington area, including working with The Landing  and its tenants.   Strengthened working relationship with the Renton Downtown Partnership in promoting downtown revitalization  through Downtown clean‐up efforts, community events, and small business support through active participation on  the board of directors and event committees.   Provided support for existing small businesses in the Downtown through public workshops and façade improvement  incentives.   Supported the development of a robust, community‐focused ecosystem on the Eastside through collaboration with  Startup 425 that served to help entrepreneurs and small businesses in three areas – Customer Discovery; Financial  Literacy; Professional Network Development.   Participated in the interdepartmental team for the Rainier/Grady Junction Subarea Plan and promoted quality  mixed‐use and commercial redevelopment in the area with property owners and potential developers.   Continued to facilitate the Sunset Area Transformation Resource Council and work with partner organizations to  implement as much of the Sunset Area Transformation Plan as possible.     Continued to work with the City interdepartmental team to implement as much of the Sunset Area Community  Revitalization Plan as possible.   Worked with the Renton Housing Authority (RHA) and Neighborhood House to help secure an additional  $1,020,000 in public and private grants for the renovation of the former Renton Highlands Library for the new  Sunset Neighborhood Center (previously referred to as the Sunset Multi‐Service and Career Development Center).   Worked with RHA, Neighborhood House, HealthPoint, Valley Cities, and the St. Vincent de Paul Society (Centro  Rendu) to help complete the design and begin the renovation of the former Renton Highlands Library for the  Sunset Neighborhood Center – now scheduled to open in late‐2020.   Partnered with RHA and Homestead Community Land Trust to help secure $1,517,000 in additional public and  private funding for the Willowcrest Townhomes (previously referred to as the Sunset Crest Townhomes), 12 new  affordable homeownership units in the Sunset Area.  The project, located adjacent to RHA’s Glennwood  Townhomes affordable rental housing, started construction in April 2020 and is scheduled to be completed in  summer 2021.   Partnered with RHA to help secure $5,700,000 in local public funds for Sunset Oaks, a new 60‐unit affordable  rental housing development project in the Sunset Area.  The project, located adjacent to the Sunset Neighborhood  Park, started construction in May 2020 and is scheduled to be completed in summer 2021.  The Sunset Oaks  project is RHA’s fourth replacement housing project for the former Sunset Terrace public housing project.   Work with the Renton School District, the Community Center for Education Results, and other partners to help hire  staff and support the development and implementation of the Renton Innovation Zone Partnership to enhance  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 46Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development educational opportunities and support for students at Highlands Elementary School and all three elementary  schools in the Skyway/West Hill community.   Participated in CED’s efforts to work with Quadrant Homes to establish an approved Solera Master Plan for the  proposed mixed‐use redevelopment project at the Greater Hi‐Lands Shopping Center.  Worked with subsequent  developers, including DevCo which purchased the shopping center property in spring 2020, to promote  redevelopment of the property.   Participated in CED’s efforts to work with iCap Equity to support the construction of the Sunset Terrace  Apartments adjacent to the Renton Highlands Library.  The 108‐unit market‐rate rental apartment project, located  adjacent to the Renton Highlands Library, is scheduled to start construction in July 2020 and be completed in the  fall of 2021.   Worked with the Housing Development Consortium, King County, and other South King County jurisdictions to  establish the South King Housing & Homelessness Partners (SKHHP) in early 2019.  Worked with the partners to  hire the SKHHP Executive Manager and create and begin to implement the SKHHP work plan for 2020‐2021.   Worked with Microsoft and Challenge Seattle to advocate for additional resources and creative partnerships to  support more low‐ and moderate‐income housing in Renton.   Participated in CED’s efforts to work with Taylor Morris Homes to utilize the City’s affordable housing density  bonus to create seven affordable townhomes for low‐ and moderate‐income households at the 50‐unit Earlington  Village project, adjacent to the Skyway community.  Worked with Current Planning staff, the developer, and/or  Homestead Community Land Trust to establish various agreements for Homestead to assist in the sale, marketing,  and stewardship of the Earlington Village affordable homes and other future for‐sale affordable housing density  bonus homes in the City.   Completed the first two years of CED’s initial three‐year AmeriCorps VISTA project and expanded the number of  volunteers from four to nine.  The expanded placements include four volunteers at the City (three in CED and one  in Community Services), plus one volunteer each at RHA, Neighborhood House, the Renton School District,  Communities in Schools of Renton – Tukwila, and the St. Vincent de Paul Society (Centro Rendu).     Partnered with the King County Housing Authority, RHA, and Rebuilding Together Seattle to complete the  weatherization, exterior façade, and other improvements on a WWII‐era duplex in the Sunset Area as a  demonstration project.   Partnered with the Renton Innovation Zone, HUD Region X, and other organizations to pursue the development of  a HUD EnVision Center in the Skyway/West Hill community.  The Center would focus on four pillars: economic  empowerment, educational advancement, health and wellness, and character and leadership.    Arts & Culture (Activities of the Renton Municipal Arts Commission)  • Activated and enhanced public buildings and civic spaces through the acquisition, stewardship, and presentation of  the City’s art collection, including the popular installation of Erasmus the rooftop dragon and contracting for the  creation of the Renton Loop for installation in 2020.  • Acquired and updated technology to maximize efficiency, accessibility to, and maintenance of the City’s art  collection through Collector’s System inventory software.   Supported efforts to bring art into the neighborhoods and parks with the installation of utility box wraps in Sunset  and downtown, a mini mural project on the street signs along Burnett Linear Park, and collaboration with the  South Renton and Benson Hill neighborhoods on community art projects, including the launch of the popular  hydrant art program.  • Collaboration with regional partners to promote and preserve culture in the vibrant communities south of Seattle.  • Participation and membership in the South King County Cultural Coalition and King County Local Arts Agency  meetings to encourage sharing and the promotion of best practices in building leaders and resources in and for the  arts.  • Loan of City‐owned art for an exhibit at the Tacoma Museum of Art celebrating Northwest Public Art of the 1930s.   • Supported Renton’s arts institutions with $13,150 distributed to local nonprofits offering public programming and  instruction in the arts.   • Supported a diversity of cultural arts programming throughout Renton with more than $24,567 distributed to local  organizations offering free, or reduced price programming to the public.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 47Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development • Supported Renton artists and arts organizations to create public art and provided opportunities for the community  to participate in the creation of art including the 800 foot community‐inspired fence project on Sunset Boulevard,  utility box wraps designed by local students, and the community‐painted mural on Carco Theatre.   Created three additional utility box wraps in the Sunset/Highlands community, including one by RHA adjacent to  the Kirkland Avenue Townhomes affordable rental housing project.    Housing Programs   Secured $100,000 grant from the Department of Commerce to complete a Housing Action Plan. Currently working  to create the five‐year plan focused on residential density and development.   Worked to build and implement Rental Registration Program, adopted in 2019; hired two program staff; created  registration process and outreach materials; currently working to build tracking and enforcement system for full  2021 operations.   Creation of a housing landing page (rentonwa.gov/housing) and three ancillary housing websites  (rentonwa.gov/rentalregistration; rentonwa.gov/hap; rentonwa.gov/renter) for housing programs and resources.    2021/2022 Goals    Continue to foster redevelopment efforts at the 200 Mill property as a downtown catalyst project.   Complete the construction of phase one of the Civic Core Streetscape.   Complete the installation of the Downtown Wayfinding plan per the Civic Core Plan by December 2020.   Design and engineer phase two of the Civic Core Streetscape.   Continue to work with public works projects and help execute effective business outreach and problem solving  during the intersection projects at Wells and Williams.    Attract new businesses and new development to Renton to increase employment opportunities, sales, and  property tax revenue, and continue to promote Renton as a top location for investment.    Continue to foster redevelopment efforts in the South Lake Washington area, including working with the property  owners and other City departments in this emerging district. Work to stimulate additional development adjacent  to The Landing.    Continue to support progress at Southport, moving forward on redevelopment of portions of Puget Sound Energy  property, assisting with hotel and tenant recruitment.   Utilize existing incentives to continue to foster a diverse array of increased affordable and market‐rate housing  opportunities in Renton.  Work with Microsoft, Challenge Seattle, the Housing Development Consortium, King  County, and others to increase the amount of public and private funds available to support low‐ and moderate‐ income housing in Renton.   Participate in the interdepartmental team to help complete the Rainier/Grady Junction Subarea Plan and promote  quality mixed‐use and commercial redevelopment in the area with property owners and potential developers.   Continue to facilitate the Sunset Area Transformation Resource Council and work with partner organizations to  implement as much of the Sunset Area Transformation Plan as possible.     Participate in the Renton Innovation Zone Partnership (RIZP) with other organizations to continue to address the  RIZP Implementation Plan to enhance educational opportunities and support for students at Highlands Elementary  School and all three elementary schools in the Skyway/West Hill community.   Work with DevCo to implement the Solera Master Plan for the mixed‐use redevelopment project at the Greater Hi‐ Lands Shopping Center, including both affordable and market‐rate rental housing and for‐sale townhomes.   Coordinate CED’s nine‐member AmeriCorps VISTA project with four volunteers at the City (three in CED and one in  Community Services), plus one volunteer each at RHA, Neighborhood House, the Renton School District,  Communities in Schools of Renton – Tukwila, and the St. Vincent de Paul Society (Centro Rendu).     Partner with the Renton Innovation Zone, HUD Region X, and other organizations to develop and implement a HUD  EnVision Center in the Skyway/West Hill community.  The Center would focus on four pillars: economic  empowerment, educational advancement, health and wellness, and character and leadership.        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 48Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Arts & Culture  • Support the City’s arts and culture programming as ambassadors and information providers (sending out regular e‐ newsletters and growing the audience on social media channels through regular posts and engagement with the  community).   • Motivate and ignite creativity and encourage artistic production through social media, using Facebook and other  relevant platforms and presenting art opportunities throughout the year, establishing the Arts Commission as the  go‐to for art‐related activities in Renton.   • Bringing people together and inspiring civic pride and neighborhood identity through art by continuing to  collaborate with the Neighborhood program and neighborhood associations in the installation of art at a local  level.  • Expand and grow the City’s public art programs with diverse artists participating (facilitating storefront art walks  and rotational window displays to celebrate and provide opportunities for local artists).   • Provide quarterly educational workshops to featuring topics such as grant writing for artists, how to curate an  exhibit/solo show, resources for filming in Renton.   • Connect the dots between local artists and art organizations through the creation of an inventory of the groups  and organizations providing art classes and instruction; performances and exhibits and when/where they meet in  order to best serve the community as an art resource.     Continue to collaborate with Economic Development Division and the Downtown Partnership to revitalize  Downtown Renton.   Advocate for and support art and placemaking projects in Downtown Renton, Sunset Area, and Benson Hill.  Housing Programs  • Continue to work with the City interdepartmental team to implement as much of the Sunset Area Community  Revitalization Plan as possible.  Work with the Renton Housing Authority (RHA) to promote redevelopment of the  balance of the former Sunset Terrace public housing property.  • Work with RHA, Neighborhood House, HealthPoint, Valley Cities, and the St. Vincent de Paul Society (Centro  Rendu) to help launch and operate the Sunset Neighborhood Center at the former Renton Highlands Library.  • Work with developers to support the successful construction of market‐rate and affordable housing projects in the  Sunset Area, including RHA’s 60‐unit Sunset Oaks affordable rental housing project, Homestead Community Land  Trust’s 12‐unit Willowcrest Townhomes affordable homeownership project, and iCap Equity’s 108‐unit Sunset  Terrace Apartments market‐rate rental apartments.  • Assist RHA with efforts to design and secure financing for the Sunset Gardens project, a proposed affordable  elderly/veterans project with approximately 75 rental housing units at their current headquarters site in the  Sunset Area.  Current plans include the affordable housing, plus structured parking, new RHA office space, and  space for ancillary supportive services for seniors.  • Work with the South King Housing & Homelessness Partners (SKHHP) to establish a housing capital fund to  leverage additional resources to support more affordable housing projects in South King County (SKC) and help  implement the SKHHP work plan to preserve the existing affordable housing stock and increase the available  options for Renton and other SKC residents to access affordable housing. Adopt the Housing Action Plan and begin  implementation of five‐year actions.   • Fully implement and enforce the Rental Registration Program; hire Code Compliance officer to assist with  enforcement and tracking.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 49Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Economic Development 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 336,767 512,612 479,854 539,995 651,299 656,176 680,195 21.5% 3.7% Part‐Time Salaries 27,650012,1910000N/AN/A Overtime 4701090000N/AN/A Personnel Benefits 129,915 217,048 189,634 229,964 289,041 260,463 275,778 13.3% 5.9% Supplies 4,979 5,950 21,304 5,950 62,450 9,450 9,450 58.8% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 332,771 627,543 360,384 627,543 2,140,989 708,043 708,043 12.8% 0.0% Capital Outlay 926 15,000 194,508 15,000 1,070,404 15,000 15,000 0.0% 0.0% Transfer Out 0 0 0 0 2,576,659 0 0 N/A N/A Total 833,055 1,378,153 1,257,984 1,418,452 6,790,842 1,649,132 1,688,466 16.3% 2.4% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Economic Development 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 4.005.006.005.006.006.006.0020.0%0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.790.000.340.000.000.000.00N/AN/A Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 33,051$         ‐$                14,261$         ‐$                ‐$                ‐$                ‐$                N/A N/A 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 50Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Planning Division    Mission   Direct Renton’s growth based on community values, promoting a high quality of life for residents and prosperity for  businesses through sound planning, zoning, and development, while ensuring predictability for customers.    2019/2020 Accomplishments  Long Range Planning   Worked with the Planning Commission, who held 30 meetings, including 13 public hearings, to review and make  recommendations regarding development regulations, policies, and goals of the City.   Adopted policies and regulations for 26 docket items, including streamlining permitting for Accessory Dwelling Units,  improved standards for Street Trees, and ensuring quality Mixed Use projects in the Commercial Arterial Zone.    Adopted four Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map Amendments and Concurrent Rezones.   Submitted a winning grant application to the Department of Commerce to develop the City’s first Housing Action  Plan.   Worked with the City Center Community Plan Advisory Board to implement priority actions of the City Center  Community Plan.    Worked with the Benson Hill Community Plan Advisory Board to establish goals, implementation actions, and work  program items for the Benson Hill Community Plan Advisory Board.   Worked to establish Base Plans so that residents can utilize pre‐approved and designed plans for Accessory Dwelling  Units at no or little cost.   Processed three annexations adding approximately 41.5 acres of land and welcoming approximately 79 new  residents to the City.   Provided ongoing oversight and support to the Planning Commission, City Center Community Plan Advisory Board,  and Benson Hill Community Plan Advisory Board.   Staffed the Interjurisdictional Team (IJT) to the Growth Management Planning Council as work to update the  Countywide Planning Policies and the Land Capacity Analysis was being conducted.  Current Planning   Met established timeline performance measures for:  pre‐application requests, new commercial and single family  building permit reviews, administrative land use decisions, and land use decisions requiring Hearing Examiner review  and public hearings.     Maintained our excellent reputation for expedited land use permit review, one of the fastest jurisdictions in King  County.    Continued to engage the community on large development projects such as Solara, assisted living facilities including  Merrill Gardens, Weatherly Inn, and Chateau Velley, Chick‐fil‐A, Top Golf, Family First Community Center, Stoneway  Redevelopment (Cedar River Apartments), Allura at Tiffany Park, and Quendall Terminals.     Conducted 73 development pre‐application meetings with applicants.   Staffed 15 land use public hearings for large development projects.    Processed 135 SEPA (environmental review) and Land Use Permits, including Planned Urban Developments for  Willowcrest Townhomes and the Canopy residential subdivision; conducted Site Plan Review for  Weatherly Inn,  Walker Auto Dealership, King County Parks Maintenance Shops, Top Golf, Family First Community Center, CITC  Headquarters, Penney Lofts, Kiddie Research Daycare, 4th Dimension Mixed Use, La Fortuna, Logan Place, and Solera  (redevelopment of the Greater Hi‐Lands Shopping Center); Subdivisions for units lot townhomes including Sapphire  on Talbot, Jefferson Highlands, and Emerald Highlands, and various applications for single family subdivisions, non‐ profit organizations, religious institutions, and  wireless communication permits throughout the City.   Continued to provide excellent customer service at the Planning Customer Service Counter, assisting an average of  318 customers per month.   2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 51Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development  Assisted in the coordination and advancement of affordable housing through bonus density review and working  closely with the Renton Housing Authority, Habitat for Humanity, and Low Income Housing Institute on advancing  development projects in Renton.    Continued advancing permit review and submittal from in‐person to electronic submittal options and online  payments.   Adapted quickly to remote permit intake, project review, public hearings, and customer service to ensure all our  services were maintained and provided to the public during the COVID‐19 Pandemic Governor’s Stay Home, Stay  Healthy Order and Safe Start Order.   Drafted and adopted an emergency ordinance to extend the period of validity of permits for an additional six months  due to supply chain delays and restrictions on construction sites.     Drafted and adopted an emergency ordinance to allow businesses to temporarily expand into portions of the right‐ of‐way and parking areas to comply with the Governor’s Safe Start order, and to allow for the display of certain  temporary signs through the remainder of 2020.  Property/Technical Services   Provided development reviews and achieved excellent customer service within established timelines.   Updated the City’s GIS Land Info data source and continue to add requested information for the staff and public.   Continued to improve function, process, and training associated with EnerGov permit tracking software and newer  applications for our department and others within the City.   Updated the City’s addressing database and provided accurate addressing data in support of the LUCA 2020 Census.  Added 17,000 addresses for apartments and condominium communities, which will provide a more complete  account for future communications.   Continued to provide project management and technical support for Electronic Plan Submittal for staff and  applicants. The overall project name is CED Electronic Roadmap and is a three‐year process with over 25 projects for  the realization of fully electronic permitting and review.   Completed the transition from Mybuildingpermit.com to Renton Permitting Portal to save the City $100,000 in  annual membership costs.   Supported staff and public during the transition of working remotely for online permitting and finding new ways to  meet our expectations.   Worked with various City departments to find ways to provide CED information electronically and easily for the  public and other interest groups.    Public Works Plan Review and Inspection   Completed public works plan review for construction permits associated with development projects in a timely  manner resulting in over $10 Million in permitted public civil infrastructure per budget year.     Met established timeline performance measures for:  pre‐application requests, new commercial and single family  building permit reviews, and land use reviews.   Further streamlined the Franchise Permitting Process, ensuring timely and consistent reviews and reducing review  time by 50 percent while averaging approximately 420 franchise permits per year.   Increased coordination between the City and the Franchise Permit Holds to better facilitate construction work within  the City for both public and private projects.    Ensured timely and thorough inspections of all public works and private development projects. Provided inspection‐ related documentation for the projects in compliance with grant reporting requirements resulting in over 4,400  permit inspections, 1,250 hours of Capital Improvement project inspection, and over 50 days of nighttime inspection  in 2019 alone.    Provided high quality coordination between the City and external applicants and agencies such as Washington State  Department of Transportation (WSDOT) on the Direct Connector Project as well as the ongoing I‐405 Renton to  Bellevue project.   Continued advancing permit review and submittal from in‐person to electronic submittal options and online  payments.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 52Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development  Adapted quickly to remote permit intake, review, and customer service as well as maintained permit inspections to  ensure all our services were maintained and provided to the public during the COVID‐19 Pandemic Stay Home, Stay  Healthy Order and Safe Start Order.    2021/2022 Goals  Long Range Planning   Amend City development regulations to implement the Comprehensive Plan.    Continue to refine and streamline development regulations to ensure they are easier to understand and administer.   Process annexations as residents and property owners express a desire to become a part of Renton.   Continue to implement the Sunset Area Community Investment Strategy; work with the Renton Housing Authority  to redevelop public housing projects in Sunset; collaborate with Community Services (Parks) and Public Works  (Transportation and Utilities) to further the revitalization of the Sunset Area.   Continue to provide support to the Planning Commission, City Center Community Plan Advisory Board, and Benson  Hill Community Plan Advisory Board.  Current Planning   Meet or exceed department goals for timely review of pre‐application requests, permit applications, and land use  decisions.   Provide high quality development review to reduce impacts to the community and ensure new development adds  value, quality, and character to the City.    Continue to engage the community on large‐scale development projects.   Provide excellent customer service to internal and/or external customers.  Property/Technical Services   Work on establishing a plan to maintain current and accurate survey network as we prepare for the 2022 National  Datum change.   Provide GIS mapping support to CED and other customers to present Citywide data to the public in accurate, usable,  and easy to understand methods.   Continue working with various groups to determine data that can be communicated to the public in a spatial or map  based product.   Meet or exceed department goals for timely review of development applications and customer service response.   Develop and maintain GIS databases and other data/information sources to support ongoing operations within CED  and other City departments.   Provide Project management and technical support for electronic plan submittal for City staff, applicants, and the  public by way of technical expertise, support, and training to reviewers.   Realize the CED Electronic Roadmap through the combined efforts of various departments within CED to be fully  electronic and accessible to the public.  Public Works Plan Review and Inspection   Meet or exceed departmental goals for timely review of public works plan review of construction permits, and land  use and pre‐application submittals.   Ensure timely and thorough inspections of all public works and private development projects. Provide inspection‐ related documentation for the projects in compliance with grant reporting requirements.       2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 53Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Planning 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 2,601,981 2,932,223 2,610,418 3,106,098 2,966,342 3,107,538 3,217,445 0.0% 3.5% Part‐Time Salaries 20,41004,7590000N/AN/A Overtime 40,209 42,517 38,896 42,517 9,020 42,117 42,117 ‐0.9% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 989,068 1,149,441 979,508 1,234,999 1,071,685 1,326,626 1,405,614 7.4% 6.0% Supplies 4,352 63,450 9,562 63,450 ‐15,025 13,050 13,050 ‐79.4% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 158,201 174,175 126,467 174,175 249,492 194,975 194,975 11.9% 0.0% Interfund Payments 28,895 33,284 33,284 48,789 31,724 87,979 88,715 80.3% 0.8% Total 3,843,116 4,395,090 3,802,894 4,670,028 4,370,938 4,772,285 4,961,916 2.2% 4.0% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Planning 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 29.50 31.50 30.50 31.50 30.50 30.50 30.50 ‐3.2% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.55 0.00 0.13 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 N/A N/A Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 23,019$         ‐$                5,549$           ‐$                ‐$                ‐$                ‐$                N/A N/A 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 54Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Development Services Division    Mission   Create and maintain a safe and pleasant physical environment by ensuring compliance with codes and land use regulations  and assisting the public and the development community through the regulatory process.  2019/2020 Accomplishments     Building Permit Review and Inspection   Building Inspectors have responded to an average of 80 inspection requests per day.   Inspection requests are being completed within 24 hours more than 94% of the time.    Permit staff are completing an average of 24 building permit applications for single‐family homes each month.   Permit staff are completing an average of 21 building permit applications for commercial and multi‐family projects  each month.     The Division is issuing an average of over 4,650 permits each year resulting in a total construction valuation of over  $227 million.   The City is no longer utilizing MBP (MyBuildingPermit.com) and now uses the City CSS (Citizen Self‐Service) portal to  process permits.   Number of inspections requested through our CSS Portal is currently at 64%.   Online permit applications applied for through our CSS Portal is currently at 79.50%.   Educating the public how to use the City CSS and online applications.   The Division has successfully made the transition to LaserFiche as a document storage database for all plans.   The department has completed the transition from paper to electronic plan review with all reviews being performed  on Blue Beam, while continuing to educate the public how to submit plans electronically.   The permit counter served an average of over 34 walk‐in customers at permit center each day.   The department added a Permit Services Manager position to oversee permit service counter productivity and  quality.   Staff continue to monitor the city website and update all forms and instructional materials as necessary.    Code Compliance   The team has inspected and processed average of over 600 code cases annually.   The inspectors make contact with the customer requesting assistance from code enforcement within one working  day of receiving the request 80% of the time.   The team continues to exceed department goals by achieving resolution to code compliance requests through  voluntary action more than 80% of the time. Code compliance resolution was achieved within 15 days from  complaint on average.   The City has employed Renton Responds (SeeClickFix) to enable citizens to easily report violations. Requests from  Renton Responds account for approximately 75% of complaints.   Code compliance inspectors conducted complaint based inspections from private citizen requests. All sites with  verified code compliance violations in the last year were checked at least once to verify continued compliance.  Entering 100% of cases into EnerGov database.    • Code compliance inspectors work with other city departments regarding homeless camps, illegal dumping, fire  damaged structures, and other violations that require multiple department collaboration.  Working with King  County, Department of Ecology, Burlington Northern Railroad, Washington State Department of Transportation, and  other outside agencies as needed.  • Reviewed and processed and average of 321 business license applications in 2019/2020.    Adapted quickly to remote permit intake, review, and customer service as well as maintained permit inspections to  ensure all our services were maintained and provided to the public during the COVID‐19 Pandemic Stay Home, Stay  Healthy Order and Safe Start Order.        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 55Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development 2021/2022 Goals  Building Permit Review and Inspection   Strive to meet or exceed departmental goals for timely review of building applications.   Streamline Renton’s permitting system using EnerGov and the City CSS to allow for more efficient permit processing.   These systems allow for improved online permitting, improved inspection request capability, and status inquiry for  customers.   Continue to work on reducing the number of permit types for more efficient process.   Work with IT to upgrade the City CSS portal to allow the public to submit applications for single family and limited  commercial projects.    Continue to refine and update forms and instructional materials for website.   Continue using LaserFiche for a central document database.   Encourage additional education, trainings, and certifications of permit technicians, plan reviewers, building  inspectors, and code compliance inspectors.     Continue to streamline building permit application, plan submittal, and screening process for over the counter  permits.     Code Compliance  • Strive to meet or exceed departmental goals for timely response to customer complaints.  • Work to meet or exceed departmental goals for timely resolution of code compliance complaints and voluntary  compliance.   • As Renton Police Department has eliminated the Graffiti Abatement Coordinator position, Code Compliance will  proactively enforce the abatement of graffiti within the City of Renton.    Add a Code Compliance Inspector position to support Healthy Housing Initiative when the program is initiated.          Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Development Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,437,616 1,601,085 1,479,497 1,742,211 1,632,572 1,803,835 1,861,815 3.5% 3.2% Part‐Time Salaries 0027,3900000N/AN/A Overtime 9,874 10,000 5,090 10,000 1,144 10,000 10,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 597,525 695,449 636,862 781,939 787,067 847,185 897,424 8.3% 5.9% Supplies 7,046 12,250 6,672 12,250 7,525 12,250 12,250 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 121,117 131,426 104,374 126,353 112,912 157,018 157,018 24.3% 0.0% Interfund Payments 37,958 62,576 62,576 78,807 58,814 55,244 55,814 ‐29.9% 1.0% Total 2,211,136 2,512,785 2,322,460 2,751,559 2,600,034 2,885,532 2,994,321 4.9% 3.8% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Development Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 19.00 19.00 19.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.00 0.00 0.74 0.00 0.04 0.00 0.00 N/A N/A Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben ‐$                ‐$                30,989$         ‐$                1,528$           ‐$                ‐$                N/A N/A 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 56Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development   Community & Economic Development Position Listing         2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Administration Division M49 Community & Economic Development Admin 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to CED 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N14 Administrative Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Administration Division 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Economic Development Division M38 Economic Development Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M33 Community Development and Housing Mana 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M32 Economic Development Manager 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M27 Housing Programs Manager 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A24 Sr. Economic Development Specialist 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A20 Economic Development Specialist 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A09 Admin Secretary I 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Economic Development Division 4.00 5.00 6.00 5.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Planning Division M38 Planning Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M33 Long Range Planning Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M33 Current Planning Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M33 Property & Technical Services Manager 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M29 Property & Technical Services Manager 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A28 Senior Planner 3.50 3.50 4.50 3.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 A23 GIS Analys II 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A21 GIS Analyst I 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A21 Associate Planner 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A17 Assistant Planner 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A16 Assistant Planner 2.00 3.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A15 Planning Technician 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A09 Admin Secretary I 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M33 Development Engineering Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M30 Assistant Development Engineering Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A29 Civil Engineer III 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A26 Construction Inspection Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A26 Civil Engineer II 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A23 Engineering Specialist III 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A21 Construction Inspector 5.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 A19 Engineering Specialist II 2.00 2.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A18 Dev Services Representative 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A13 Engineering Specialit I 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Planning Division 29.50 31.50 30.50 31.50 30.50 30.50 30.50 Building Division A09 Administrative Secretary I 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A22 Lead Code Compliance Inspector 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A19 Code Compliance Inspector 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 M33 Building Official 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M28 Permit Services Manager 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M22 Permit Center Supervisor 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A23 Building Plan Reviewer 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A21 Building Inspector/Electrical 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A21 Building Inspector/Combination 4.00 5.00 5.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 A21 Building Inspector/Combination ‐ LT 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A13 Permit Services Specialist 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 A10 Permit Technician 5.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Building Division 19.00 19.00 19.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 Total Community & Economic Development 54.50 57.50 57.50 58.50 58.50 58.50 58.50 Grade Title 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 57Budget by Department - Community and Economic Development Community Services   ADMINISTRATOR Kelly Beymer  (115 FTEs) Facilities Jeff Minisci 35 FTEs Leased City  Properties Capital Investment  Properties Facilities  Maintenance  Services Golf Course Vacant 12 FTEs Golf Course  Maintenance Professional Services Capital Investment  Projects Human Services Guy Williams 4.50 FTEs Housing Repair  Assistance Program Community  Development Block  Grant (CDBG) Human Services  Advisory Committee Museum Elizabeth Stewart 1FTE Renton Historical  Society Board Parks & Trails Cailín Hunsaker 34.85 FTEs Parks Maintenance Volunteer Program Farmers Market Parks Planning &  Natural Resources Leslie Betlach 6.40 FTEs Urban Forestry and  Natural Resources Planning, Acquisition,  and Development Capital Investment  Projects Recreation &  Neighborhoods Maryjane Van Cleave 19.25 FTEs Recreation Services Renton Community  Center Renton Senior  Activity Center Senior Advisory  Board Neighborhood  Program Special Events  Committee Renton Sister Cities  Association  Administrative  Support 1 FTE Parks Commission 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 58Budget by Department - Community Services Community Services  Mission  Promote and support a more livable Renton community by providing recreation, museum, human services programs,  neighborhood and special events opportunities, golf course and modern parks and facilities, and undisturbed natural  areas.    Core Businesses and Services    Facilities  The Facilities Division develops and maintains City buildings and manages the delivery of building‐related services to the  public and the City workforce in a safe, customer‐focused manner.    Parks and Golf Course  The Parks and Golf Course Division provides a safe, clean, attractive, accessible, and well‐maintained environment for the  public’s enjoyment of active and passive recreational opportunities along with natural resource and wildlife preservation  and stewardship.    Parks Planning and Natural Resources  The Parks Planning and Natural Resources Division provides a comprehensive and interrelated system of parks, recreation,  open spaces, and trails that respond to locally based needs, values, and conditions; provide an appealing and harmonious  environment and protect the integrity and quality of the surrounding natural systems; and create a sustainable and  exemplary urban forest.    Recreation & Neighborhoods  The Recreation & Neighborhoods Division promotes and supports a more livable community by providing opportunities for  the public to participate in diverse recreational, cultural, athletic, and aquatic programs and activities. In addition, the  Recreation & Neighborhoods Division provides leadership, guidance, and resources which connect and engage residents,  neighborhoods, businesses, and the City through diverse opportunities for partnerships, volunteers, special events, sister  cities, farmers markets, and neighborhood programs.    Human Services  The Human Services Division, in partnership with the community, helps provide services, resources, and opportunities so  that residents have food, clothing, and shelter, are healthy and safe, and develop to their fullest capacity.    Renton History Museum  The Renton History Museum is the City’s only organization dedicated to the preservation, documentation, and education  about the City’s heritage. With the support of the Renton Historical Society, the Museum cares for a collection of over  90,000 objects and 14,000 historic photos. The Museum also provides changing and permanent exhibits, programs,  publications, and classroom outreach about local history.         2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Operating Budget Summary 23,110,919 23,712,402 24,220,344 24,866,443 23,285,489 27,080,597 27,765,179 8.9% 2.5% CIP Budget Summary 8,240,294 8,520,357 15,034,794 5,521,680 33,099,360 3,838,533 2,528,162 ‐30.5%‐34.1% Position Summary 93.50 96.00 99.50 97.00 116.50 115.00 115.00 18.6% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 59Budget by Department - Community Services List of Community Services Renton Results Decision Packages:     2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Package # Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100020.0024 Serving vulnerable/low income 4.50          1,316,559          20,000                4.50              1,342,967          20,000                 100020.0025 CDBG ‐            63,133                63,133                 ‐                 63,133                63,133                 200020.0011 Volunteer Program 1.00          133,972              ‐                           1.00              137,011              ‐                            300020.0143 Museum 1.00          289,701              ‐                           1.00              297,273              ‐                            300020.0144 Administration/Com Svcs 2.00          592,057              ‐                           2.00              606,402              ‐                            300020.0145 Aquatics 1.40          963,276             367,936             1.40              975,821             407,636              300020.0146 Leased Facilities 1.50          849,878             535,565             1.50              860,534             790,321              300020.0147 Cultural & Community Engagement 3.90          926,740             48,367                3.90              950,556             210,176              300020.0148 Parks and Trails Program 32.60        6,428,197          10,000                32.60            6,615,715          10,000                 300020.0149 Education and Recreational Activities 7.15          1,877,391          425,161             7.15              1,918,397          469,305              300020.0150 Senior Activity Center 4.90          1,067,944          128,000             4.90              1,078,775          128,000              300020.0151 Farmers Market 1.25          183,264             9,955                  1.25              188,695             34,404                 300020.0152 Recreational Facilities 1.90          1,589,398          153,271             1.90              1,641,680          376,678              500020.0024 Golf Course 12.00        2,566,000          2,833,175          12.00            2,638,766          2,912,455           500020.0025 Parks Planning, Urban Forestry and Na Res 6.40          2,064,918          241,357             6.40              2,092,249          249,680              600020.0049 Custodial Services 22.50        2,450,152          2,385,869          22.50            2,566,751          2,568,494           600020.0050 Facilities Technical Maintenance 11.00        3,718,018          3,606,861          11.00            3,790,456          3,610,976           Total Operating 115.00     27,080,597       10,828,650       115.00          27,765,179       11,851,258        360020.0050 CIP ‐ General Gov't ‐            1,716,048          1,616,000          ‐                 1,299,646          1,462,840           560020.0013 Golf Course MM ‐            68,100                68,100                ‐                 72,200                72,200                 660020.0010 CIP General Gov't ‐            1,738,386          1,086,185          ‐                 1,156,316          1,000,000           760020.0004 Parks Impact Mitigation Fund ‐            316,000             ‐                            ‐                 ‐                           ‐                            Total CIP ‐            3,838,533          2,770,285          ‐                 2,528,162          2,535,040           Total 115.00     30,919,130$     13,598,935$     115.00          30,293,341$     14,386,298$      2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 60Budget by Department - Community Services Community Services Performance Measures:        Highlight of Budget Changes:   Regular and Part‐Time Salaries include the following changes effective 2020, made after the 2019/2020 budget  was adopted:  o Removed 1 FTE CS Deputy Administrator   o Added 1 FTE Golf Pro Shop Assistant  o Added 1 FTE Golf Course Maintenance Worker  o Added 1 FTE Golf Course Apprentice  o Added 6 FTEs Facilities Custodians  o Added 6 FTEs Parks Maintenance Assistant  o Added 2 FTEs Parks Maintenance Worker  o Removed 8 PERS eligible positions from Parks and Trails  o Reduced overall Part‐Time budget for the Golf Course  o Reduced overall Part‐Time budget for Facilities   Transfers Out includes the following change:  o The Golf Course has reduced its operating transfer out to its capital investment project fund for the next  budget cycle in accordance with its projected expenditures.  o The Custodian assigned to the Golf Course is no longer charging salary directly to the 404 fund and is being  paid for through interfund transfers.   Capital Improvement Projects includes the following changes:  o Priority on Capital Projects have shifted to focus on Bond Funded projects reducing overall spending.  o Excess fund balance in the capital fund has been shifted out to help offset COVID19 costs reducing overall  spending and resources.  o Urban Forestry budget has been moved into the 001 operating fund.   Debt Service includes the following changes:  o Interfund loan was fully paid off in 2020.    City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results Value of volunteer service  $        1,179,835  $        1,267,820 $1,480,792 $1,586,000 $1,268,800 Per capita spending for human services.  $       5.54    $                  5.60 5.67$                  5.67$                  5.67$                   Daily Attendance at Senior Center 401 394 400 no data no data Maintain or increase the number of  officially recognized neighborhoods/  associations participating in the  program. 74 74 90 no data no data Protection of open  space/acquisition Overall customer satisfaction rating is  good to excellent In cleanliness and  appearance of Parks & Trail System 84% N/A 88% N/A 64% Safeguard public interests and  assets Average number of days to complete  Cityworks service requests that are  assigned to the Parks Maintenance team  via ‘Renton Responds. new 2020 new 2020 new 2020 new 2020 new 2020 Representative  Government Partnership with community  organizations to leverage  resources Internal  Support Encourage and foster a strong  sense of community Livable Community Utilities and  Environment 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 61Budget by Department - Community Services                     Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Community Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Administration 510,454 528,906 594,844 753,194 520,919 592,057 606,402 ‐21.4% 2.4% Facilities 6,233,520 6,450,456 6,376,296 6,591,217 6,092,647 7,018,047 7,217,741 6.5% 2.8% Parks & Trails 5,026,203 5,414,681 5,249,860 5,841,621 5,103,016 6,783,681 6,980,785 16.1% 2.9% Recreation & Neigh 6,280,121 6,239,574 6,432,140 6,434,094 4,879,722 6,394,894 6,534,037 ‐0.6% 2.2% Human Services/CDBG 1,421,280 1,363,310 1,478,729 1,399,246 1,644,515 1,418,644 1,447,001 1.4% 2.0% Museum 245,590 252,298 253,008 265,248 225,195 289,701 297,273 9.2% 2.6% Golf Course 2,279,597 2,261,417 2,321,138 2,353,168 2,404,682 2,566,000 2,638,766 9.0% 2.8% Parks Plan and Nat Res 1,114,153 1,201,760 1,514,329 1,228,657 2,414,791 2,017,574 2,043,175 64.2% 1.3% Operating Total 23,110,919 23,712,402 24,220,344 24,866,443 23,285,489 27,080,597 27,765,179 8.9% 2.5% CIP 8,240,294 8,520,357 15,034,794 5,521,680 33,099,360 3,838,533 2,528,162 ‐30.5%‐34.1% Total 31,351,213 32,232,759 39,255,138 30,388,123 56,384,848 30,919,130 30,293,341 1.7%‐2.0% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Community Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 6,881,152 7,808,526 7,438,556 8,330,438 8,554,056 9,335,039 9,642,488 12.1% 3.3% Part‐Time Salaries 1,791,614 1,713,254 1,831,182 1,700,894 349,403 1,249,472 1,234,472 ‐26.5%‐1.2% Overtime 97,026 31,596 130,230 31,596 21,496 31,596 31,596 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 3,374,833 3,941,575 3,642,573 4,210,377 4,048,537 5,081,348 5,363,398 20.7% 5.6% Supplies 1,288,202 1,225,551 1,335,565 1,165,851 1,194,782 1,108,907 1,108,907 ‐4.9% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 5,325,552 4,948,365 5,647,910 4,938,318 5,443,330 5,439,130 5,436,580 10.1% 0.0% Intergovernmental Services15,67711,050012,050000‐100.0% N/A Capital Outlay 797 20,000 25,041 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 0.0% 0.0% Debt Service 175,000 175,000 175,000 175,000 175,000 0 0 ‐100.0% N/A Interfund Payments 3,971,629 3,765,485 3,781,018 4,205,919 3,399,885 4,747,005 4,855,538 12.9% 2.3% Transfer Out 189,440 72,000 213,269 76,000 79,000 68,100 72,200 ‐10.4% 6.0% Operating Total 23,110,919 23,712,402 24,220,344 24,866,443 23,285,489 27,080,597 27,765,179 8.9% 2.5% CIP 8,240,294 8,520,357 15,034,794 5,521,680 33,099,360 3,838,533 2,528,162 ‐30.5%‐34.1% Total 31,351,213 32,232,759 39,255,138 30,388,123 56,384,848 30,919,130 30,293,341 1.7%‐2.0% Staffing Levels by Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 ‐33.3% 0.0% Facilities 25.25 28.75 29.00 28.75 35.00 35.00 35.00 21.7% 0.0% Parks & Trails 27.00 27.00 26.85 27.00 34.85 34.85 34.85 29.1% 0.0% Recreation & Neigh 19.17 19.17 19.75 19.17 19.75 19.25 19.25 0.4% 0.0% Human Services/CDBG 4.33 4.33 4.50 4.33 4.50 4.50 4.50 3.9% 0.0% Museum 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% 0.0% Golf Course 9.75 9.75 9.00 9.75 12.00 12.00 12.00 23.1% 0.0% Parks Plan and Nat Res 5.004.007.404.007.406.406.4060.0%0.0% Total FTE 93.50 96.00 99.50 97.00 116.50 115.00 115.00 18.6% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 51.91 48.36 53.12 48.06 10.63 37.03 36.67 ‐23.0%‐1.0% Temp/Intermit Salaries and Ben 2,159,458$   2,011,750$   2,209,602$   1,999,390$   442,277$       1,540,483$   1,525,483$    ‐23.0%‐1.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 62Budget by Department - Community Services Administration Division    Mission  Provide leadership, guidance, and resources to allow the various divisions within the Department to perform their  respective functions in accordance with the City Business Plan, Administration and Council policy directives, and the  general needs of the populations they serve.     2019/2020 Accomplishments   Reviewed Capital Projects to meet community needs and budget opportunities.   Continued to address level of service through 2019 – 2020 budget.   Held management team retreat on continued leadership development in 2019.   Offered  intra‐departmental  staff  training  to  use  new  City  website  and  SharePoint  management  for   increased workflow efficiency, relevancy, and branding.   Ongoing, continue to build stronger intra‐departmental partnerships to ensure and improve efficiency,  collaboration and responsible use of time, funds, and resources.   Completed development and implementation of the Community Services Marketing Plan.   Began to review and update annual divisional customer satisfaction surveys.   Completed design of Family First Community Center to construct in 2021.   Coordinated spring and fall employee recognition events in 2019.   Completion of major capital projects, including Phase 2 Construction of Sunset Neighborhood Park,  Fire Station 15, and City Hall elevator replacement project.   Began implementation of Council approved funding ($14.5 million) to address Parks maintenance  projects backlog.   Continued to identify alternate funding opportunities through grants, partnerships, and sponsors.   Established COVID‐19 plan to reopen City Hall.      2021/2022 Goals   Complete  construction of the Family First Community Center.   Identify and construct a more permanent Human Service provider facility to include feeding  program, severe weather shelter, and hygiene unit.   Complete identified Bond projects.   Complete division revision to surveys supporting Renton Results.   Continue to provide opportunities of engagement with all types of the City’s diverse communities.   Continue to work through the ‘new normal’ to provide innovative, creative, efficient processes,  programs, and events.   Update all division work manuals.   Provide staff training opportunities.   Continue to identify alternative funding opportunities through grants, partnerships, and sponsors.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 63Budget by Department - Community Services       Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Administration Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 231,081 246,565 247,246 405,873 271,065 272,232 277,407 ‐32.9% 1.9% Personnel Benefits 90,575 96,657 91,931 152,511 102,926 105,974 110,992 ‐30.5% 4.7% Supplies 4,575 42,744 6,531 42,744 22,744 7,200 7,200 ‐83.2% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 13,063 0 70,106 0 315 35,544 35,544 100.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 166,576 142,940 142,940 152,066 123,869 171,107 175,259 12.5% 2.4% Transfer Out 4,584036,0900000N/AN/A Operating Total 510,454 528,906 594,844 753,194 520,919 592,057 606,402 ‐21.4% 2.4% CIP 8,220,118 8,520,357 14,927,611 5,449,680 33,027,360 3,770,433 2,455,962 ‐30.8%‐34.9% Total 8,730,572 9,049,263 15,522,455 6,202,874 33,548,279 4,362,490 3,062,364 ‐29.7%‐29.8% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Administration Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 ‐33.3% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 64Budget by Department - Community Services Facilities Division    Mission  Develop and maintain City buildings and manage the delivery of building‐related services to the public and the City  workforce in a safe, customer‐focused manner.    2019/2020 Accomplishments   Implemented  a  building component  replacement  plan  that provides  a  plan,  schedule, and  cost  of replacing all  major building components over the next six years.   Developed and implemented an energy plan and programs that would reduce the City’s energy costs.   Improved energy efficiency through hiring an Energy Services Company (ESCO) to provide an energy audit and  implement energy and water efficiency projects.   Completed construction of Fire Station 15.   Developed and implemented a preventative maintenance plan and program for all major City buildings that  includes major building equipment and systems.   Completed Elevator Modernization of City Hall.   Designed and replaced City Hall Main Air Handling Unit.    2021/2022 Goals   Develop  and  implement  a  business  plan  with  performance  measures  for  Facilities  that  increases  business  performance by improving customer‐focus, delivery of services, operations, and functionality (space).   Plan, develop, and implement a customer engagement process and program to increase customer knowledge of  and satisfaction with Facilities services.   Develop and implement Service Level Agreements (SLA) for all major buildings.   Develop and implement a staff position progression/succession plan.   Develop and implement workplace guidelines and standards handbook that incorporates best practices, space  designs, technology solutions, and process improvement.   Develop and implement mobility and technology initiatives to increase operational efficiency, reduce travel time,  and increase workforce capacity.   Implement citywide Lease Review procedures.   Implement consistent standards for Cell Tower Leases.   Replace City Hall fire pump, boilers, generators, IT server room.   Replace Renton Community Center chiller and audio/video equipment.   Replace all lighting in the downtown parking garage with LED lighting.              2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 65Budget by Department - Community Services   Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Facilities Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,556,423 2,088,634 1,805,012 2,224,944 2,163,341 2,544,309 2,646,400 14.4% 4.0% Part‐Time Salaries 283,86385,996190,10788,636000‐100.0% N/A Overtime 43,934 10,000 75,625 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 807,431 1,153,007 956,131 1,230,466 1,170,030 1,493,481 1,589,711 21.4% 6.4% Supplies 504,928 409,908 546,814 330,908 341,608 309,508 309,508 ‐6.5% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 2,676,708 2,459,865 2,542,077 2,452,368 2,162,402 2,528,086 2,528,086 3.1% 0.0% Intergovernmental Services3,054000000N/AN/A Capital Outlay 0010,9010000N/AN/A Debt Service 175,000 175,000 175,000 175,000 175,000 0 0 ‐100.0% N/A Interfund Payments 75,179 68,046 69,409 78,894 70,266 132,663 134,036 68.2% 1.0% Transfer Out 107,00005,2200000N/AN/A Total 6,233,520 6,450,456 6,376,296 6,591,217 6,092,647 7,018,047 7,217,741 6.5% 2.8% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Facilities 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Facilities 24.25 27.25 27.50 27.25 33.50 33.50 33.50 22.9% 0.0% Leased City Properties 1.00 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 25.25 28.75 29.00 28.75 35.00 35.00 35.00 21.7% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 8.492.255.832.310.000.000.00‐100.0% N/A Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 353,186$       93,481$         242,347$       96,121$         ‐$                ‐$                ‐$                 ‐100.0% N/A 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 66Budget by Department - Community Services Parks and Trails Division    Mission  We enhance the quality of life in the City of Renton by providing exceptional park environments, opportunities to build  community through volunteering, and access to healthy food choices.    2019/2020 Accomplishments   Provided training and opportunities for staff to stay current with certifications and licensing.   Led interdepartmental efforts to patrol, post, and clear encampment sites on City‐owned properties.   Continued interdepartmental efforts to maintain irrigation networks at planting strips in the City.   Provided interdepartmental support for City‐hosted events such as Arbor Day/Earth Day, July 4 Celebration, and  Renton River Days (2019).   Implemented Cityworks software to manage Parks maintenance activities.   Implemented CERVIS software for City‐sponsored volunteer activities with five departments.   Updated informational signage at Coulon Park and along the Cedar River Trail.   Collaborated with King County and partner agencies to create a new brand for the Eastside Rail Corridor.   Collaborated with King County Parks to construct the Lake to Sound Trail, Segment A.   Partnered with United Way and Renton School District to facilitate sites and recreation programs for the Summer  Lunch Program.   Installed a TRACK Trail at Cedar River Trail Park.   Oversaw gardening activities at the Downtown and North Highlands Community Gardens.   Performed two farm visits to ensure farm integrity.   Increased use of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program/Fresh Bucks at the Renton Farmers Market.      2021/2022 Goals   Achieve at least an 80% good to excellent rating through customer satisfaction surveys for cleanliness and  appearance in developed Parks and Trails.   Provide training and opportunities for staff to stay current with certifications and licensing.   Lead interdepartmental efforts to patrol, post, and clear encampment sites on City‐owned properties.   Provide interdepartmental support for City‐hosted events such as Arbor Day/Earth Day, July 4 Celebration, and  Renton River Days.   Incorporate ‘Business Intelligence’ with Cityworks work management software.   Update informational signage at Coulon Park and along the Cedar River Trail.   Collaborate with King County and partner agencies to create a wayfinding plan for the Eastrail.   Install a FitLot outdoor fitness area as part of Renton’s ‘Age‐Friendly City’ designation.    Complete repairs to the Cedar River embankment that is next to the Cedar River Trail.   Incorporate ‘Business Intelligence’ with CERVIS software for City‐sponsored volunteer activities.   Partner with United Way and Renton School District to facilitate the Summer Lunch Program.   Install one (1) new TRACK Trail in the Renton Parks system.   Implement a ‘Renton Outdoors’ recreation program to highlight City parks.   Participate in one new regional/national park promotion, such as BioBlitz (National Recreation and Park  Association) or National Trails Day (American Hiking Society).   Increase participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program/Fresh Bucks at the Renton Farmers  Market.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 67Budget by Department - Community Services     Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Park & Trails 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,890,393 2,005,374 1,952,063 2,091,039 2,118,492 2,585,707 2,677,435 23.7% 3.5% Part‐Time Salaries 229,756 318,232 267,154 318,232 5,201 45,023 45,023 ‐85.9% 0.0% Overtime 19,997 13,076 20,019 13,076 12,076 13,076 13,076 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 832,703 879,418 868,706 924,668 878,418 1,415,797 1,494,835 53.1% 5.6% Supplies 178,726 238,874 202,526 238,874 200,434 238,874 238,874 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 747,898 742,709 701,965 742,709 697,451 742,709 742,709 0.0% 0.0% Intergovernmental Services1,17050050000‐100.0% N/A Interfund Payments 1,125,559 1,216,948 1,237,428 1,512,973 1,190,944 1,742,495 1,768,833 15.2% 1.5% Total 5,026,203 5,414,681 5,249,860 5,841,621 5,103,016 6,783,681 6,980,785 16.1% 2.9% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Park & Trails 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 27.00 27.00 26.85 27.00 34.85 34.85 34.85 29.1% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 6.79 8.79 7.82 8.79 0.15 2.22 2.22 ‐74.7% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 282,303$       365,702$       325,448$       365,702$       6,421$           92,493$         92,493$         ‐74.7% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 68Budget by Department - Community Services Golf Course Division – Maplewood Golf Course    Mission  Provide a safe, clean, attractive, accessible, and well‐maintained environment for the public’s enjoyment of active and  passive recreational opportunities along with natural resource and wildlife preservation and stewardship.    2019 / 2020 Accomplishments   Re‐Carpeted Club House.   Replaced overhead netting west of Driving rage and #18 vertical netting (collapsed due to heavy snowfall in  February).   Rebuilt #3 championship tee box (enlarged, regraded, trimmed trees for increase light and air flow).   Removed diseased tree and widened #16 fairway (green now visible from tee box).   Added new set of tees (Yellow – Junior/Family).   Added new security cameras in Pro‐Shop.   Replaced “static” signage behind Pro‐Shop counter with two 65” Digital Signage Displays (improved rate and  marketing information).   Added 86” Digital Signage Display in Clubhouse Lobby (increased GC and restaurant marketing).   Continued use/leverage of Text Marketing Database (over 1,900 members).   Replaced hitting stall heaters in lower level of Driving Range (15) and added individual timers.   Maintained facility during COVID‐19 shut‐down (41 days).   Established appropriate sanitizing procedures for facility for re‐opening.   Prepared Pro‐Shop, Driving Range, and Golf Course for re‐opening under guidelines provided by Governor Inslee:  o Prepared walk‐up window with Plexiglas shield for initial opening (no Pro‐Shop access).  o Installed tempered glass shield on Pro‐Shop counter and had walls erected in Pro‐Shop Lobby to limit  access in expanded phase of opening.   Altered operational procedures to coincide with phased re‐opening approaches (twosomes to foursomes, single  riders to shared carts, etc.)    2021 / 2022 Goals   Fire protection re‐piping: replace exposed sprinkler pipe in the lower level driving range hitting stalls.   Replace driving range lighting with new LED fixtures.   Rebuild/rewire upper level driving range hitting stall heaters.   Fire protection re‐piping: replace exposed sprinkler pipe in the cart barn storage.   Renovate tee boxes (#3, #6, #7, #12, #18).   Secure golf course with additional fencing and gates.   Continue to build marketing programs in conjunction with Concessionaire.   Achieve a minimum 85% good to excellent rating for Golf Course conditions, value of Driving Range, and level of  service in the Pro‐Shop.   Provide timely updates to website and lobby signage to include activities, projects, events, and promotions.   Provide multiple Junior Golf Camps throughout each year.   Establish Junior Academy Program.   Conduct annual Open House each year.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 69Budget by Department - Community Services Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Golf Course 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 758,166 786,088 795,381 812,300 853,470 943,357 972,233 16.1% 3.1% Part‐Time Salaries 256,411 255,500 281,044 255,500 174,468 174,468 174,468 ‐31.7% 0.0% Overtime 13,813 1,020 5,192 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 419,223 434,559 419,370 455,421 483,234 554,247 583,745 21.7% 5.3% Supplies 365,163 302,200 346,608 321,500 321,500 321,500 321,500 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 142,079 121,050 132,271 121,050 133,050 133,050 133,050 9.9% 0.0% Intergovernmental Services11,28511,000012,000000‐100.0% N/A Capital Outlay 797 20,000 14,140 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 242,660 258,000 251,690 278,377 341,940 350,258 360,550 25.8% 2.9% Transfer Out 70,000 72,000 75,443 76,000 76,000 68,100 72,200 ‐10.4% 6.0% Operating Total 2,279,597 2,261,417 2,321,138 2,353,168 2,404,682 2,566,000 2,638,766 9.0% 2.8% CIP 20,176 0 107,184 72,000 72,000 68,100 72,200 ‐5.4% 6.0% Total 2,299,773 2,261,417 2,428,322 2,425,168 2,476,682 2,634,100 2,710,966 8.6% 2.9% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Golf Course 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Administration 2.75 2.75 2.00 2.75 2.00 2.00 2.00 ‐27.3% 0.0% Maintenance 4.004.004.004.005.005.005.0025.0%0.0% Pro‐Shop/Driving Range 3.003.003.003.005.005.005.0066.7%0.0% Total FTE 9.75 9.75 9.00 9.75 12.00 12.00 12.00 23.1% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 7.567.518.287.515.565.565.56‐25.9% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 314,533$       312,500$       344,450$       312,500$       231,468$       231,468$       231,468$       ‐25.9% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 70Budget by Department - Community Services Parks Planning and Natural Resources Division    Mission  Provides a comprehensive and interrelated system of parks, recreation, open spaces, and trails that respond to locally  based needs, values, and conditions, provide an appealing and harmonious environment, protect the integrity and quality  of the surrounding natural systems, and create a sustainable and exemplary urban forest.    2019/2020 Accomplishments   Accepted the 12th Tree City USA certification and the 10th Growth Award (Sterling Award recognizing Renton for  10 consecutive growth awards and being a leader in community forestry).   Completed and incorporated the 2019 Forestry Canopy Cover Assessment into management planning.   Adopted the Parks, Recreation and Natural Areas Plan; plan certified with the State Recreation and Conservation  Office (RCO).   Adopted the Trails and Bicycle Master Plan with the Transportation Division; plan certified with the State RCO.   Completed citywide update to the tree inventory database.    Completed Phase II Sunset Neighborhood Park. Administered $4.8 million in federal, state, and local grants.    Acquired May Creek Corridor parcel; recommended for $305,000 King County Conservation Futures grant award.   Secured $605,000 State Legislative Direct Appropriation Grant for Coulon Playground Replacement.    Applied to WA RCO for a $500,000 Land and Water Conservation Fund grant for Coulon Park Trestle Bridge project.   Completed structural assessment and repair work at the Cedar River Trail Trestle Bridge.   Completed Coulon Park structural repairs at eight locations.   Replaced aging play equipment at Teasdale, Tiffany, and Cedar River Trail Parks.   Completed 30% design for four Bond Projects (Coulon North Waterwalk Phase 1, Coulon Trestle Bridge  Replacement, Philip Arnold Park, and Kiwanis Park).   Initiated play equipment replacements at Coulon Park and Liberty Park.   Completed feasibility study for future Ron Regis Park restroom facility and maintenance shed.    Completed over 1,000 work orders, inspected 3,700 trees, trimmed 700 trees, and planted 200 trees.   Adopted Forestry Ordinance in coordination with the Community and Economic Department.   Coordinated with WSDOT on the Renton to Bellevue Project, Seattle Public Utilities Broodstock Collection Facility,  King County Parks Soos Creek Trail, and Boeing Company Sam Chastain Trail Easement.   Staffed and trained three new managers and two new capital project coordinators.  2021/2022 Goals   Renew 10‐year Urban Forest Management Plan, including annual tree planting initiative and tree risk  management program.   Apply for Tree City USA Certification and Growth Award; apply for the Society of Municipal Arborists accreditation.   Complete design and construction documents, secure permits, bid, and construct planned improvements for four  Bond Projects (Coulon North Waterwalk Phase 1, Coulon Trestle Bridge, Philip Arnold Park, and Kiwanis Park).   Replace play equipment at Liberty, Coulon, Cascade, Kennydale Beach, Maplewood, and Glencoe Parks.   Commence parks, trails, and natural areas monument, directional and informational sign program.   Complete structural reviews for Coulon Park and system‐wide park bridges.   Complete interim repairs to Coulon Rose Wall as identified in 2020 structural assessment.   Renovate Teasdale Park and Senior Activity Center Bocce Ball courts for improved safety.   Continue to explore options for creating an in‐house forestry crew.   Initiate conversation on citywide approach to ADA transition planning.   Formalize grant agreement with King County for May Creek acquisition and State RCO for Coulon Trestle Bridge  replacement; administer grant funding.   Continue Inter‐agency coordination with WSDOT on Renton to Bellevue Project, Seattle Public Utilities Broodstock  Collection Facility, King County Parks Soos Creek Trail, and the Boeing Company Sam Chastain Trail easement.    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 71Budget by Department - Community Services     Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Parks Planning and Natural Resources 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 482,234 473,954 516,855 488,527 838,638 739,360 753,922 51.3% 2.0% Personnel Benefits 155,415 147,991 163,295 154,488 318,778 236,487 245,711 53.1% 3.9% Supplies 1,190 4,827 3,428 4,827 4,827 4,827 4,827 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 392,031 535,463 789,900 535,463 1,207,061 960,463 960,463 79.4% 0.0% Capital Outlay 0000000N/AN/A Interfund Payments 83,023 39,525 39,525 45,352 45,488 76,437 78,252 68.5% 2.4% Total 1,114,153 1,201,760 1,514,329 1,228,657 2,414,791 2,017,574 2,043,175 64.2% 1.3% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Parks Planning and Natural Resources 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 5.00 4.00 7.40 4.00 7.40 6.40 6.40 60.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 72Budget by Department - Community Services Recreation and Neighborhoods Division    Mission  To create an active, vibrant, and connected community through quality programming, grants, and services that are  responsive to a diverse community and sustained by leveraging City resources and innovation.      2019/2020 Accomplishments   • Completed the replacement, configuration, and public launch of the recreation software Perfect Mind. The prior  recreation software had been in place for 20 years.   • Completed the first ever Recreation and Neighborhoods Strategic Plan, which includes updating the City’s Cost‐ Recovery policy, a full market analysis of City‐offered recreation programming, and use of recreation facilities to  increase equitable distribution of services that utilize City subsidies and resources.  • Improved customer service and access to information by creating two more “full service counters” at the  Highlands Neighborhood Center and the Renton Senior Activity Center to mirror the full service capabilities that  had only been available at the Renton Community Center.   • Increased community engagement in the Benson‐Cascade planning area by dedicating an America Corp Vista  employee for 15 months, to create community conversations and experiences that build relationships between  residents and the City, such as the completion of the “Benson Mural.”   • Executed Grants: STREAM – King County Best Starts for Kids three‐year cycle has been completed, and extended by  King County for an additional year. Executed two King County Veterans Human Services Levy Grants and obtained  a third to assist towards the citywide senior initiative “Age‐Friendly Renton,” an AARP and World Health  Organization designation.   2021/2022 Goals    Leveraging technology, the division will continue to assess business processes that should move to fully automated  and executable online experiences for customers, utilizing Perfect Mind recreation software.  For the 2021/2022  budget cycle we will be:  o Converting the boat launch permitting to an online process.  o Creating an online and mobile check‐in and out process for patrons and recreation building usage.  o Utilizing Energov to create online application and communication portals for Neighborhood Program Grants  and Special Event Permit applications.    Finalize and implement our Age‐Friendly Renton action plan, focusing on up to eight of the domains, along with  other City departments and divisions, and community partners.    Equity and inclusivity goals:  o Expand the Neighborhood Program’s grant opportunities by removing the barrier of homeownership as a  requirement. The expansion would open the grant opportunities to all Renton residents, not just  homeowners, making the program more inclusive and equitable to access, allowing everyone to apply for  funds to assist in beautifying and connecting neighbors.   o Create a formal field allocation process for sport field and gymnasium access with Renton residency as a  priority, equity of gender access, and opportunity for emerging sports and organizations who serve vulnerable  populations to have access.    Update the recreation programming fee schedule based on the recommendations, and market analysis conducted  through the completed Cost Recovery Policy update and council adoption.    Execute the following grants:  o AARP FitLot Senior Programming Grant, with the installation of the FitLot outdoor exercise equipment AARP is  also providing grant funding to provide instructor lead exercise programming to activate it. This grant will  allow the programming to be offered to adults, 18 + for free.  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 73Budget by Department - Community Services o King County Best Starts for Kids, STREAM Team, out‐of‐school program. Execute a 4th year of the program at  the recommendation and request of King County due to the performance and success of the program, and  serving over 100 youth on a daily basis.       Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Recreation & Neighborhoods 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,501,513 1,709,932 1,630,126 1,792,923 1,754,303 1,715,702 1,764,969 ‐4.3% 2.9% Part‐Time Salaries 1,003,062 1,037,705 1,077,479 1,022,705 165,234 1,014,160 999,160 ‐0.8%‐1.5% Overtime 19,023 7,500 28,069 7,500 ‐1,600 7,500 7,500 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 860,222 997,642 929,719 1,047,481 816,323 1,028,641 1,077,430 ‐1.8% 4.7% Supplies 219,270 211,348 215,629 211,348 288,019 211,348 211,348 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 588,817 454,335 633,488 451,785 406,708 404,335 401,785 ‐10.5%‐0.6% Intergovernmental Services 168000000N/AN/A Interfund Payments 2,080,190 1,821,113 1,821,113 1,900,351 1,447,735 2,013,208 2,071,844 5.9% 2.9% Transfer Out 7,856 0 96,517 0 3,000 0 0 N/A N/A Total 6,280,121 6,239,574 6,432,140 6,434,094 4,879,722 6,394,894 6,534,037 ‐0.6% 2.2% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Recreation & Neighborhoods 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Recreation Services 19.17 19.17 19.75 19.17 19.75 19.25 19.25 0.4% 0.0% Total FTE 19.17 19.17 19.75 19.17 19.75 19.25 19.25 0.4% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 28.53 29.36 30.73 29.00 4.78 28.80 28.44 ‐0.7%‐1.3% Temp/Intermit Salaries and Ben 1,186,683$   1,221,571$   1,278,406$   1,206,571$   198,847$       1,198,026$   1,183,026$    ‐0.7%‐1.3% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 74Budget by Department - Community Services Human Services Division    Mission  Provide information and referrals to resources and services through community partnerships that promote safety, health,  and security and are inclusive, integrated, and respectful of cultural and linguistic differences; that foster equity and dignity  as well as social, emotional support for vulnerable and marginalized residents in the City of Renton.     2019/2020 Accomplishments   Successfully started the monthly Homelessness Community Resource Event with community partners to provide  resources and medical services at a one‐stop location to those experiencing homelessness.    Over 95% of agencies funded by our RFP process correctly completed and submitted their invoices and service  reports by due date (with the exception of COVID‐19 related issues).     Collaborated successfully with other King County cities on aligning and improving common Human Services  processes and products (application forms, performance reports, contracts, and monitoring visits).    After implementation of the new Housing Repair Assistance Program client database software, we made necessary  changes to focus on customer service and include client feedback.    Completed multiple manufactured home siding replacement program projects with Habitat for Humanity.   Established additional community partners, like Rotary and Club 21, on the repair or replacement of appliances for  low‐income residents.   Application review and technical assistance provided to multiple agencies via Zoom meetings with those  requesting in‐depth assistance with their funding applications.    Renton specific eligibility reviews completed on over 100 applications for funding, while financial reviews were  completed on 97 City of Renton specific applications for funding.   Completed administrators’ review on over 200 applications as part of the work needed for South King County  funding cycle.   Meeting federal guidelines on spending of 2019 CDBG funds and paperwork/reports submitted for reimbursement,  including HRAP’s completion of the CDBG contract with King County using HUD dollars.    Partnership with Rod Kirkwood to provide 100+ low‐income Renton homeowners with a new installed home  appliance. Approximately $55K spent over the past two years.    Coordinated with community organizations and others that serve the homeless on the One Night Count,  including Coordinated Entry, Renton Ecumenical Association of Churches, and ARISE rotating shelter.    2021/2022 Goals     Establish and complete a succession plan with staff to determine needs and future direction.    Create additional funding streams to support the Human Services Strategic Plan of developing an enhanced  homeless shelter and supporting the annual agency funding cycle.    Work in conjunction with the Community and Economic Development department to enhance the human services  element of the comprehensive plan.    Continue to work with IT on tweaking a new database for the Housing Repair Program.    Ensure that 90% of all 2021‐2022 contracts are completed and signed with DocuSign by April 10, 2021.    Establish a working timeline with the Community and Economic Development department to use Community  Development Block Grants to fund economic development projects for façade improvements.    Create a new bi‐annual survey of contracted agencies for the regional funding application in 2022.   Start a demonstration project with Habitat for Humanity and King County Housing Authority to rehabilitate the  siding on manufactured homes owned by low‐income older adults.    Continue to host and expand the Community Homeless Resource Events with community partners.       2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 75Budget by Department - Community Services                                               Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Human Services/CDBG 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 369,514 403,413 397,067 417,415 455,926 435,085 448,708 4.2% 3.1% Personnel Benefits 177,361 200,645 180,870 212,354 247,474 211,052 223,892 ‐0.6% 6.1% Supplies 14,350 15,650 14,029 15,650 15,650 15,650 15,650 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 764,955 634,943 778,103 634,943 836,343 634,943 634,943 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 95,101 108,659 108,659 118,884 89,123 121,913 123,807 2.5% 1.6% Total 1,421,280 1,363,310 1,478,729 1,399,246 1,644,515 1,418,644 1,447,001 1.4% 2.0% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Human Services/CDBG 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Human Services 3.83 3.83 4.00 3.83 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.4% 0.0% CDBG 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 4.33 4.33 4.50 4.33 4.50 4.50 4.50 3.9% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 76Budget by Department - Community Services Renton History Museum    Mission   The Renton History Museum is the City’s only organization dedicated to the preservation, documentation, and education  about the City’s heritage in ways that are accessible to diverse people of all ages. With the support of the Renton Historical  Society, the Museum cares for a collection of over 10,000 objects, 15,000 archival documents, and over 19,000 historic  photos. The Museum also provides changing, traveling, and permanent exhibits, classroom curricula, programs, publications,  and research assistance for those interested in local history. Staff at the Museum also serve as resources for historic  preservation and interpretation projects in Renton.   2019/2020 Accomplishments   Researched, wrote, and designed a series of exhibits for the Low Income Housing Institute, installed at June  Leonard Place on Whitworth Avenue in downtown Renton.    Organized and mounted seven temporary exhibits on topics ranging from Dungeons & Dragons players to the  centennial of women’s suffrage to glamourous fashions from our collection.   Developed and implemented a calendar of 34 programs in 2019, including our first Pride event and programs  associated with the Dungeons & Dragons exhibit for neurodiverse visitors.   Provided the Museum Manager as a Special Commissioner to the King County Landmarks Board to further historic  preservation work in Renton.   Replaced exterior signage—banners, letters, door canopy, and monumental sign—to create a more welcoming  exterior.   Upgraded offsite storage furniture to improve collections care.   Conducted and transcribed 20 oral histories with diverse narrators that included founding members of Renton’s  chapter of the National Organization of Women, restaurant and café owners, and Japanese and Japanese  Americans living in Renton.   Provided four internship opportunities that included two M.A. thesis projects exhibits with UW Museology  students.   Applied for and received grants from 4Culture, the Washington State Historical Society “Votes for Women”  program, Tulalip Tribal Foundation, King County Council, and CARES Act Paycheck Protection Program.   Partnered with Sunset Transformation Group and the Division of Community and Economic Development, Low  Income Housing Institute, King County Library System (KCLS), Renton Downtown Partnership, the Renton  Municipal Arts Commission, South King County Cultural Coalition, Cultural Access Washington, Washington  Museum Association, Kent Valley Artists Group, and the American Association for State and Local History.   Expanded membership benefits for higher level members, adding a fifth newsletter.   Expanded our social media presence to include Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.   Conducted a survey of volunteers on reopening after COVID‐19.    2021/2022 Goals   Conduct an IMLS CARES‐funded initiative with the UW Museology Program to plan to expand and improve  Museum’s online offerings based on community needs and interests.   Create and implement online exhibit components for future exhibits.   Host Facing the Inferno, a major traveling exhibit on wildfire and climate change.   Develop a values statement to guide the Museum’s work with external partners.   Revise the Museum’s Photo Reproduction Policy.   Re‐carpet north gallery with the assistance of the Facilities Division.   Obtain new track lighting system for galleries with the assistance of the Facilities Division.   2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 77Budget by Department - Community Services      Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Museum 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 91,826 94,566 94,806 97,417 98,821 99,287 101,413 1.9% 2.1% Part‐Time Salaries 18,521 15,821 15,398 15,821 4,500 15,821 15,821 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 31,902 31,657 32,551 32,988 31,354 35,669 37,082 8.1% 4.0% Interfund Payments 103,340 110,254 110,254 119,022 90,520 138,924 142,957 16.7% 2.9% Total 245,590 252,298 253,008 265,248 225,195 289,701 297,273 9.2% 2.6% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Museum 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.55 0.44 0.46 0.44 0.13 0.44 0.44 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 22,752$         18,496$         18,952$         18,496$         5,541$           18,496$         18,496$         0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 78Budget by Department - Community Services   Community Services Position Listing (1 of 2) 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Grade Title Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Administration Division M49 Community Services Administrator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M45 Community Services Deputy Administrator 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 N14 Administrative Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Administration Division 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Facilities Division     Facilities M38 Facilities Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M28 Facilities Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A28 Capital Project Coordinator 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A25 Facilities Coordinator 0.00 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 A21 Custodial Maintenance Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A21 Facilities Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A19 HVAC Systems Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A19 Electrical Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A15 Facilities Technician II 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A13 Facilities Technician I 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A11 Lead Maintenance Custodian 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A09 Administrative Secretary I 1.00 1.50 1.00 1.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 A07 Maintenance Custodian 3.25 3.25 4.00 3.25 4.00 4.00 4.00 A01 Custodian 7.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 Total Facilities 24.25 27.25 27.50 27.25 33.50 33.50 33.50     Leased City Properties A25 Facilities Coordinator 0.00 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 A13 Facilities Technician I 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Leased City Properties 1.00 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 Total Facilities Division 25.25 28.75 29.00 28.75 35.00 35.00 35.00 Parks & Trails Division     Parks M38 Parks and Trails Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M28 Parks Maintenance Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A21 Park Maintenance Supervisor 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A16 Lead Park Maintenance Worker 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 A12 Park Maintenance Worker III 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 A09 Administrative Secretary I 1.00 1.00 0.60 1.00 0.60 0.60 0.60 A08 Park Maintenance Worker II 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 A04 Park Maintenance Worker I 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 A03 Parks Maintenance Assistant 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 A18 Recreation Program Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A16 Program Assistant 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.00 0.25 0.25 0.25 A18 Farmers Market Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Parks & Trails Division 27.00 27.00 26.85 27.00 34.85 34.85 34.85 Golf Course Division      Golf Course Administration M29 Golf Course Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A09 Golf Course Operations Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A07 Maintenance Custodian 0.75 0.75 0.00 0.75 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Golf Administration 2.75 2.75 2.00 2.75 2.00 2.00 2.00     Golf Course Maintenance M22 Golf Course Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A16 Lead Golf Course Maintenance Worker 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A15 Grounds Equipment Mechanic 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A04 Golf Course Maintenance Worker I 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A12 Golf Course Maintenance Worker III 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Golf Maintenance 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 5.00 5.00 5.00     Pro‐Shop/Driving Range M22 Golf Professional 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 M25 Golf Professional 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N11 Assistant Golf Professional 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A03 Golf Course Apprentice 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A04 Pro Shop Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Total Pro‐Shop/Driving Range 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Total Golf Course Division 9.75 9.75 9.00 9.75 12.00 12.00 12.00 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 79Budget by Department - Community Services       Community Services Position Listing (2 of 2) 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Grade Title Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Parks Planning and Natural Resources Division M38 Parks Planning & Natural Resources Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M32 Urban Forestry and Natural Resources Mgr 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M32 Parks Planning Manager 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M32 Capital Projects Manager 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A09 Administrative Secretary I 0.00 0.00 0.40 0.00 0.40 0.40 0.40 A28 Capital Project Coordinator 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A28 Capital Project Coordinator LT 1.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 Total Parks Planning and Natural Resources Division 5.00 4.00 7.40 4.00 7.40 6.40 6.40 Recreation & Neighborhoods Division     Recreation Services M38 Recreation and Neighborhood Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M29 Recreation and Neighborhoods Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 M23 Recreation Supervisor 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 A18 Recreation Program Coordinator 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 A09 Administrative Secretary I 0.34 0.34 1.00 0.34 1.00 1.00 1.00 A16 Program Assistant 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 A14 Recreation Systems Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A11 Recreation Specialist 1.00 1.00 1.25 1.00 1.25 0.75 0.75 A07 Recreation Assistant 3.00 3.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 A09 Recreation Assistant 0.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 M22 Community Relation & Events Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A25 Neighborhood Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A09 Administrative Secretary I 0.33 0.33 0.00 0.33 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Recreation & Neighborhoods Division 19.17 19.17 19.75 19.17 19.75 19.25 19.25 Human Services Division     Human Services M29 Human Services Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A20 Housing Repair Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A20 Human Services Coordinator 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 A09 Administrative Secretary I 0.33 0.33 0.50 0.33 0.50 0.50 0.50 A13 Facilities Technician  I 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Human Services 3.83 3.83 4.00 3.83 4.00 4.00 4.00     Community Development Block Grants (CDBG)        A20 Human Services Coordinator 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Total CDBG 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Total Human Services Division 4.33 4.33 4.50 4.33 4.50 4.50 4.50 Museum Division M22 Museum Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Museum Division 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Department Regular Staffing 93.50 96.00 99.50 97.00 116.50 115.00 115.00 Total Community Services Department 93.50 96.00 99.50 97.00 116.50 115.00 115.00 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 80Budget by Department - Community Services ADMINISTRATOR Ellen Bradley‐Mak 13 FTEs EMPLOYEE RELATIONS Kim Gilman 4 FTEs Recruitment and Selection  Classification and  Compensation  Investigations and  Compliance Employee/Labor Relations Unemployment BENEFITS Wendy Rittereiser 4 FTEs Personnel Benefits Retiree Benefits Wellness Program FMLA Workers' Compensation  Claims RISK MANAGEMENT Kelsey Ternes 2 FTEs Property and Casualty  Programs Subrogation Claims Workplace Health and  Safety  ADA Facilities Compliance Administrative Support 3 FTE Employee Training and  Development  Human Resources and Risk Management  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 81Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Human Resources and Risk Management      Mission  The Human Resources and Risk Management (HRRM) Department works in partnership with Administrators and their teams,  with individual employees and groups, and with employee representatives and the community to provide programs and  services that create a positive, inclusive, and productive work environment that empowers all employees to serve the needs  of our residents.    Description  The department provides a comprehensive array of programs, including Recruitment and Selection, Classification and  Compensation, Employee/Labor Relations, Employee Training and Development, Property/Liability, Workplace Health and  Safety, and Employee Benefits.  Services are provided primarily to internal customers (i.e., all city departments).  For a more  detailed description, see our program descriptions.    Additionally, in response to the COVID‐19 pandemic, HRRM is developing programs and procedures to support staff in  continuing operations, maintaining a safe working environment, and implementing budget mitigation strategies.           List of HR&RM Renton Results Decision Packages:        HR&RM Performance Measures:    2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Operating Budget Summary 15,947,023 18,336,117 15,975,510 19,407,795 23,108,294 18,877,237 20,133,146 ‐2.7% 6.7% Position Summary 12.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 0.0% 0.0% 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Package # Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 600014.0041 HR/RM Administration 7.70          1,654,688          ‐                           7.70              1,701,170          ‐                            600014.0042 Risk Management 2.75          3,279,123          3,511,775          2.75              3,304,171          3,539,243           600014.0043 Benefits 2.55          13,943,427       15,143,476       2.55              15,127,804       16,236,884        Total 13.00        18,877,237$     18,655,251$     13.00            20,133,146$     19,776,127$      City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results Highly qualified, healthy, well  trained, and productive  workforce Number of training courses provided by  HR/RM 9101298 Percentage of new hires or promotions  retained past their probationary period.  89% 94% 92% 94% 93% Functional work environment Number of business days to recruit and  fill non‐civil service positions 71 47 45 67 55 Complete a safety inspection of each  City‐owned facility annually 89% 45% 73% 100% 87% Maintain or reduce the annual number  of Workers Compensation Claims 98 72 36 55 42 Safeguard public interests and  assets Internal Support 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 82Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Highlight of Budget Changes:   Regular Salaries increased by $60,742 in 2021 due to reclassification of various positions after the 2019/2020  budget was adopted.   Personnel Benefits increased by $1.2M in 2022 due to projected increases in overall medical/dental claims and  premiums.   Other Services and Charges increased by $24,958 and $36,419 in 2021 and 2022 respectively, mostly due to  increase in Broker Fees.   Interfund Payments increased by $35,648 in 2021 due to increased payments for IT, Facilities, and Indirect costs.   Transfer Out decreased by $900K in 2021 due to transferring all of the remaining portion of the Annexation Sales  Tax Reserve to the General Fund in 2020.           Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Human Resources and Risk Management 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Fund/Dept Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Employee Relations 1,268,733 1,506,283 1,438,605 1,626,606 1,530,267 1,656,832 1,703,366 1.9% 2.8% Benefits 11,635,221 12,629,200 11,330,595 13,551,677 13,748,148 13,943,516 15,127,856 2.9% 8.5% Risk Management 3,043,070 4,200,634 3,206,310 4,229,512 7,829,878 3,276,889 3,301,923 ‐22.5% 0.8% Total 15,947,023 18,336,117 15,975,510 19,407,795 23,108,294 18,877,237 20,133,146 ‐2.7% 6.7% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Human Resources and Risk Management 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,120,729 1,224,515 1,245,981 1,316,256 1,391,527 1,376,998 1,420,825 4.6% 3.2% Part‐Time Salaries 17,794 25,102 22,244 25,102 3,102 25,102 25,102 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 12,033,510 13,295,379 11,361,071 14,247,630 14,463,630 14,499,564 15,665,062 1.8% 8.0% Supplies 32,795 36,284 30,295 36,284 20,328 36,284 36,284 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 2,395,386 2,537,029 2,080,992 2,548,199 2,431,663 2,573,157 2,609,576 1.0% 1.4% Intergovernmental Services3,4893,73103,840000‐100.0% N/A Interfund Payments 334,204 314,077 325,577 330,484 298,043 366,132 376,297 10.8% 2.8% Transfer Out 9,117 900,000 909,352 900,000 4,500,000 0 0 ‐100.0% N/A Total 15,947,023 18,336,117 15,975,510 19,407,795 23,108,294 18,877,237 20,133,146 ‐2.7% 6.7% Staffing Levels by Division ‐ Human Resources and Risk Management 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Employee Relations 7.008.008.008.008.007.707.70‐3.8% 0.0% Benefits 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 2.55 2.55 45.7% 0.0% Risk Management 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 2.75 2.75 ‐15.4% 0.0% Total FTE 12.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.50 0.60 0.61 0.60 0.07 0.60 0.60 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 20,612$         25,102$         25,398$         25,102$         3,102$           25,102$         25,102$         0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 83Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Employee Relations Division    Mission  Provide a broad range of candidate and employee services in a timely, responsive, and reliable manner to attract and retain  an effective and inclusive workforce necessary to provide services to our community members.      2019/2020 Accomplishments    Implemented action steps that were laid out in the 2017 HR Inclusion Tactical Plan, and made progress towards  hiring a more diverse workforce in terms of gender and racial ethnicity.       Reviewed and revised personnel policies and job descriptions, as well as created new policies to adapt to changing  times.     Provided Success Signals trainings to teams citywide to enhance communication skills.   Developed a Supported Employment Program and made our first hire in August 2019.   Completed a Market Study of benchmarked Non‐Represented wages and benefits in 2020.     Implemented new technologies to streamline HR operations and enhance the onboarding experience. Also  implemented a new Performance Evaluation System.    2021/2022 Goals    Negotiate Successor Union Contracts with all three bargaining groups.     Continue to revise and create personnel policies, procedures, and job descriptions to address and adapt to the  changing needs of our workforce.     Based on budget resources, revisit the findings of the Market Study of Non‐Represented Positions.     Explore and implement an electronic system for personnel files, eliminating the need for paper files.     Continue to implement strategies as laid out in the 2020 HR Inclusion Tactical Plan and measure progress.      Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Employee Relations Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 643,292 701,459 724,523 764,403 812,505 779,787 800,597 2.0% 2.7% Part‐Time Salaries 17,794 25,102 13,450 25,102 3,102 25,102 25,102 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 249,343 294,219 286,552 337,557 337,557 336,496 355,611 ‐0.3% 5.7% Supplies 18,809 21,828 17,099 21,828 8,828 21,828 21,828 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 98,677 207,663 120,116 207,663 130,663 207,663 207,663 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 239,611 256,013 267,513 270,054 237,613 285,956 292,566 5.9% 2.3% Total 1,268,733 1,506,283 1,438,605 1,626,606 1,530,267 1,656,832 1,703,366 1.9% 2.8% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Employee Relations Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 7.008.008.008.008.007.707.70‐3.8% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.50 0.60 0.37 0.60 0.07 0.60 0.60 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Pay & Ben 20,612$         25,102$         15,503$         25,102$         3,102$           25,102$         25,102$         0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 84Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Benefits Division  Mission  Provide a comprehensive, cost effective employee benefit package and wellness program that serves to attract and retain a  qualified staff and promote a healthy, productive workforce. Encourage full and appropriate utilization of benefits through  employee outreach and training. Manage the programs and ensure efficient, consistent, and accountable service by City  staff and vendors, and compliance with all applicable laws and policies.     2019/2020 Accomplishments   Conducted an RFP and replaced the City’s long‐time broker for the health insurance plans.  Completed onboarding  with the new broker, including updates with the Renton Employee Health Plan Board (REHP).    Hired a new Senior Benefits Analyst to replace a retiring employee.  Completed onboarding and a review and  update of procedures.   Reviewed and updated the City’s leave policies, replacing seven policies with one new comprehensive policy;  conducted training for supervisors, and provided information to employees.    Implemented the State’s new Paid Family Leave program, including updating the City’s leave policies, working with  payroll to make necessary updates, and providing training for supervisors and employees.   Developed retirement planning workshops for LEOFF and PERS, and conducted nine workshops, with 107 total  participants attending.     Completed an audit of benefits enrollment and files, and addressed any discrepancies or missing documents.   Based on COVID‐19: Amended benefit plans to cover testing and treatment at no cost without prior approval;  updated eligibility rules during COVID‐related leave; implemented a one‐month health plan rate holiday as a cost  saving measure; and implemented a voluntary separation incentive program.      2021/2022 Goals   Conduct a compliance audit of the self‐funded insurance plans with the new broker, taking any corrective action  that is necessary.   Update and communicate procedures to support the return to work, including accommodating high‐risk workers,  and those requiring leave for illness or childcare.   Review City policies related to benefits and update as needed.        Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Benefits Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 192,252 196,736 206,137 204,849 212,196 301,131 308,058 47.0% 2.3% Personnel Benefits 10,902,387 11,891,949 10,584,216 12,792,669 13,008,669 13,047,361 14,184,800 2.0% 8.7% Supplies 13,663 7,500 13,196 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,500 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 428,836 471,220 468,982 482,390 459,354 507,348 543,767 5.2% 7.2% Intergovernmental Services 3,489 3,731 0 3,840 0 0 0 ‐100.0% N/A Interfund Payments 94,593 58,064 58,064 60,430 60,430 80,176 83,731 32.7% 4.4% Transfer Out 0000000N/AN/A Total 11,635,221 12,629,200 11,330,595 13,551,677 13,748,148 13,943,516 15,127,856 2.9% 8.5% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Benefits Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 2.55 2.55 45.7% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 85Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Risk Management Division    Mission  Provide a safe environment for our employees and community members, minimize the City’s risk of unexpected financial  losses, and protect the City’s assets by identifying, analyzing, and implementing loss prevention and safety programs and  developing effective channels of communication through excellent customer service.        2019/2020 Accomplishments   Collected funds owed to the City from responsible third parties for damage to city property.   Utilized the City’s property and liability insurance broker, Alliant Insurance Services, to improve property and liability  self‐insurance programs when financially advantageous to the City.   Reviewed and updated safety and risk management‐related policies and procedures.     2021/2022 Goals   Provide safety and risk management support to City of Renton departments to proactively identify, assess, mitigate  risks, and ultimately save the City from human and monetary assets losses.   Protect the City from catastrophic losses through the purchasing and managing of excess insurance through the  City’s property and liability insurance broker, Alliant.   Continue collecting funds owed to the City from responsible third parties for damage to city property.   Review and update safety and risk management‐related policies and procedures.     Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Risk Management Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 285,185 326,321 315,321 347,005 366,827 296,080 312,171 ‐14.7% 5.4% Personnel Benefits 881,780 1,109,211 490,302 1,117,405 1,117,405 1,115,707 1,124,651 ‐0.2% 0.8% Supplies 323 6,956 0 6,956 4,000 6,956 6,956 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 1,867,872 1,858,146 1,491,894 1,858,146 1,841,646 1,858,146 1,858,146 0.0% 0.0% Transfer Out 7,910 900,000 900,000 900,000 4,500,000 0 0 ‐100.0% N/A Total 3,043,070 4,200,634 3,206,310 4,229,512 7,829,878 3,276,889 3,301,923 ‐22.5% 0.8% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Risk Management Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Total FTE 3.253.253.253.253.252.752.75‐15.4% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 86Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management   Human Resources and Risk Management Position Listing 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted Employee Relations M49 Human Resources/Risk Management Administrator 0.500.500.500.500.500.500.50 M36 HR Labor Relations & Compensation Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M25 Senior Employee Relations Analyst 0.000.003.000.003.003.003.00 M25 Senior Benefits Analyst 0.000.000.500.000.500.200.20 M22 Senior Human Resources Analyst 2.502.500.002.500.000.000.00 M20 Human Resources Analyst 1.001.000.001.000.000.000.00 N16 Administrative Assistant to Human Resources 0.000.000.000.001.001.001.00 N14 Administrative Assistant 1.001.001.001.000.000.000.00 N13 Human Resources Specialist 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N11 Human Resources Assistant 1.001.001.001.000.000.000.00 N01 Office Specialist 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total Employee Relations 7.008.008.008.008.007.707.70 Benefits M49 Human Resources/Risk Management Administrator 0.250.250.250.250.250.250.25 M30 Human Resources Benefits Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M25 Senior Benefits Analyst 0.000.000.500.000.501.301.30 M22 Senior Human Resources Analyst 0.500.500.000.500.000.000.00 Total Benefits 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 2.55 2.55 Risk Management M49 Human Resources/Risk Management Administrator 0.250.250.250.250.250.250.25 M30 Risk Manager 1.001.001.001.001.001.001.00 M25 Senior Benefits Analyst 0.000.001.000.001.000.500.50 M23 Risk Management Analyst 0.000.000.000.000.001.001.00 M20 Human Resources Analyst 1.001.000.001.000.000.000.00 M20 Risk Management Analyst 1.001.001.001.001.000.000.00 Total Risk Management 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 2.75 2.75 Total Human Resources and Risk Management 12.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 13.00 Grade Title 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 87Budget by Department - Human Resources and Risk Management Other City Services    Mission  Provide for miscellaneous payments that benefit all City departments.   Overview of Other City Services  The Finance Division manages this accounting department.  The primary activity is to receive revenue and to make property  and liability payments to the insurance fund, interfund payments, intergovernmental payments, limited general obligations  debt payments, and employee termination payments.      List of Other City Services Renton Results Decision Packages:       Highlight of Budget Changes:   Shifted $2.3M in reserves to Other City Services.    Reclassified $89K from Intergovernmental Services to Other Services and Charges due to the State Auditor’s Office  removing the Intergovernmental classification from the BARS manual.   Debt Service decreased by $2.8M in 2022 due to the 2010 GO DT Parking Refunding Bond being paid off in 2021.   Transfer Out increased by $8.4M in 2021 due to the change in how property taxes and B&O taxes are recorded.   These taxes are now directed to the General Fund and transferred out to other funds.  2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Operating Budget Summary 9,760,840 13,005,849 37,172,488 12,662,115 35,568,953 23,591,412 17,973,516 86.3%‐23.8% CIP Budget Summary 142,975 128,576 128,576 113,808 113,808 436,987 500,634 284.0% 14.6% 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Package #DescriptionFTETot Exp $Tot Rev $FTETot Exp $Tot Rev $ 600004.0104 General Government Debt ‐            7,153,019          551,618             ‐                 4,341,920          545,244              600005.0036 Other City Svc ‐ Employee Separation Pay ‐            782,516             ‐                            ‐                 782,516             ‐                            600005.0037 LEOFF 1 Medical Obligation ‐            2,624,684          ‐                            ‐                 2,624,684          ‐                            600005.0038 Association Dues and Contracted Services ‐            186,070             ‐                            ‐                 183,948             ‐                            700005.0016 Indirect Cost Transfer Multi Depts ‐            ‐                           3,830,617          ‐                 ‐                           3,951,261           900005.0015 General Governmental Fund Revenues ‐            2,211,723          83,974,659       ‐                 2,211,723          90,515,484        900005.0016 Non‐GG Fund Revenues ‐            ‐                           372,500             ‐                 ‐                           372,500              900005.0017 General Governmental Fund Transfers ‐            4,520,375          3,480,375          ‐                 2,763,100          1,723,100           900005.0018 REET 1 Fund ‐            2,865,000          2,250,000          ‐                 2,315,000          2,300,000           900005.0019 REET 2 Fund ‐            3,248,025          2,250,000          ‐                 2,750,625          2,300,000           Total Operating ‐            23,591,412       96,709,769       ‐                 17,973,516       101,707,589      760009.0005 Fire Impact Mitigation Fund ‐            436,987             99,000                ‐                 500,634             99,000                 Total CIP ‐            436,987             99,000                ‐                 500,634             99,000                 Total ‐            24,028,399$     96,808,769$     ‐                 18,474,150$     101,806,589$    2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 88Budget by Department - Other City Services   Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Other City Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Other City Services 4,064,656 6,212,181 30,357,614 5,863,679 28,406,567 16,438,393 13,631,596 180.3%‐17.1% Ltd Tax General Obligation Bond 5,696,184 6,793,668 6,814,874 6,798,436 7,162,386 7,153,019 4,341,920 5.2%‐39.3% Operating Total 9,760,840 13,005,849 37,172,488 12,662,115 35,568,953 23,591,412 17,973,516 86.3%‐23.8% CIP 142,975 128,576 128,576 113,808 113,808 436,987 500,634 284.0% 14.6% Total 9,903,815 13,134,425 37,301,064 12,775,923 35,682,761 24,028,399 18,474,150 88.1%‐23.1% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Other City Services 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 180,895 369,364 182,442 369,364 369,364 369,364 369,364 0.0% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 2,637,545 3,030,336 2,639,295 3,037,836 2,037,836 3,037,836 3,037,836 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 49,066 82,845 176,710 80,481 169,651 2,383,738 2,381,374 2861.9%‐0.1% Intergovernmental Services112,63886,806089,170000‐100.0% N/A Debt Service 5,696,184 6,793,668 6,814,874 6,798,436 7,162,386 7,153,019 4,341,920 5.2%‐39.3% Interfund Payments 26,513 15,830 15,830 18,828 18,828 14,055 14,297 ‐25.4% 1.7% Transfer Out 1,058,000 2,627,000 27,343,337 2,268,000 25,810,888 10,633,400 7,828,725 368.8%‐26.4% Operating Total 9,760,840 13,005,849 37,172,488 12,662,115 35,568,953 23,591,412 17,973,516 86.3%‐23.8% CIP 142,975 128,576 128,576 113,808 113,808 436,987 500,634 284.0% 14.6% Total 9,903,815 13,134,425 37,301,064 12,775,923 35,682,761 24,028,399 18,474,150 88.1%‐23.1% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 89Budget by Department - Other City Services . Police Chief Ed VanValey 163.4 FTEs Deputy Chief Jon Schuldt 54 FTEs Patrol Services 17 FTEs Animal Control Parking  Enforcement Traffic Special Operations 20 FTEs Directed  Enforcement Team Special  Enforcement Team Graffiti Abatement  Coordinator Administrative  Services 15 FTEs Training School Resource  Officers Community  Programs Electronic Home  Detention Professional  Standards Volunteer Program Deputy Chief  Kevin Keyes 107.4 FTEs Patrol Operations 66 FTEs Patrol Officers Investigations 24 FTEs Detectives Evidence  Technicians Domestic Violence  Victim Advocate Crime Analyst Staff Services 17.4 FTEs Front Counter Records Administrative  Support 1 FTE Chaplains Police  2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 90Budget by Department - Police Police     Mission  Working together to provide professional and unbiased law enforcement services to our community.        Description  The department assumes a leadership role in the community in addressing crime and safety‐related concerns.  This role  involves implementing proactive and reactive measures to reduce both the fear of crime and actual crime in our community.        List of Police Renton Results Decision Packages:        2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Operating Budget Summary 39,735,236 41,868,922 43,145,496 42,849,585 43,435,597 42,530,483 43,642,136 ‐0.7% 2.6% Position Summary 161.90 163.40 163.40 163.40 163.40 163.40 163.40 0.0% 0.0% 2021 Adopted 2022 Adopted Package # Description FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ FTE Tot Exp $Tot Rev $ 100008.0111 Auxiliary Services ‐ Jail ‐            4,306,301          ‐                            ‐                 4,306,301          ‐                            100008.0112 Patrol Operations 67.00        12,958,172       ‐                           67.00            13,392,798       ‐                            100008.0113 Staff Services 17.40        2,158,266          ‐                           17.40            2,267,688          ‐                            100008.0114 Police Administration 4.00          7,864,729          ‐                           4.00              7,976,891          ‐                            100008.0115 Investigations 24.00        4,184,172          ‐                           24.00            4,326,131          ‐                            100008.0116 Administrative Services 13.00        2,631,945          225,000             13.00            2,688,719          225,000              100008.0117 Patrol Services 16.00        4,175,438          2,042,326          16.00            4,276,359          2,042,326           100008.0118 Special Operations 20.00        3,724,857          ‐                           20.00            3,869,265          ‐                            100008.0119 Electronic Home Detention Program 2.00          526,603             251,941             2.00              537,983             365,045              Total 163.40     42,530,483$     2,519,267$       163.40          43,642,136$     2,632,371$        2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 91Budget by Department - Police Police Performance Measures:          Highlight of Budget Changes:   Overtime increased by $600k in 2021 to more accurately reflect actual costs.   Intergovernmental Services shifted to Other Services and Charges due to a change in accounting guidance.   Interfund Payments increased by $80k in 2021 due to Citywide increases to Information Systems costs.   Personnel Benefits increased by $730k due to projected increases in medical/dental, FMLA implementation, and  COLA increases.   Regular Salaries increased by $482k due to cost of living adjustments and scheduled increases.      City Service Area City Service Area Strategies Performance Measures 2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results 2019 Results Average response time (in minutes) to  Priority I calls.4.52 4.43 4.61 4.66 4.06 Average response time (in minutes) to  Priority II calls.8.13 7.62 7.35 6.90 6.59 Average response time (in minutes) to  Priority III calls.11.75 11.62 10.94 10.73 10.01 Average response time (in minutes) to  Priority IV calls.23.94 26.08 23.54 23.82 21.99 Residents report feeling somewhat or  very safe during the day in their  neighborhood.  92%*‐‐‐92%*‐‐‐next survey  2021 Residents report feeling somewhat or  very safe during the night in their  neighborhood.  60%*‐‐‐67%*‐‐‐next survey  2021 Community report feeling somewhat or  very safe during the day in the  downtown area. 80%*‐‐‐86%*‐‐‐next survey  2021 Community report feeling somewhat or  very safe during the night in the  downtown area. 33%*‐‐‐42%*‐‐‐next survey  2021 Annual percent of successful resolution  or clearance of assigned cases 83% 88% 106% 68% 82% Number of Cases processed by staff 15,517 16,665 16,367 16,179 14,643 Number of warrants processed by staff 2,161 1,575 1,526 1,687 1,695 Number of Citations processed by staff 11,766 11,462 11,438 11,047 8,629 Number of Public Records Requests  processed by staff 2,359 1,630 2,686 2,855 3,596 * Residential Surveys are conducted every three‐four years Timely responsiveness and  “Projection of effort” when  the community cannot help  itself Encourage the community to  comply with local, state and  federal laws Safety and  Health Encouragement of a self  reliant community through  programs and education 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 92Budget by Department - Police     Expenditure Budget by Division ‐ Police 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Administration 13,526,062 14,960,113 14,491,723 14,334,987 13,841,725 12,174,530 12,286,692 ‐15.1% 0.9% Patrol Operations 11,484,596 11,225,287 12,153,539 12,007,857 11,928,609 12,847,927 13,277,670 7.0% 3.3% Special Operations 3,683,084 3,579,522 3,947,058 3,797,211 5,039,188 3,835,102 3,984,393 1.0% 3.9% Patrol Services 3,025,296 3,657,418 3,774,605 3,974,971 3,817,101 4,175,438 4,276,359 5.0% 2.4% Investigations 3,426,069 3,513,361 3,883,265 3,696,034 3,864,854 4,180,672 4,322,631 13.1% 3.4% Administrative Services 2,792,712 2,978,017 3,053,793 2,969,335 2,924,260 3,158,548 3,226,702 6.4% 2.2% Staff Services 1,797,417 1,955,203 1,841,513 2,069,189 2,019,860 2,158,266 2,267,688 4.3% 5.1% Total 39,735,236 41,868,922 43,145,496 42,849,585 43,435,597 42,530,483 43,642,136 ‐0.7% 2.6% Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Police 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 15,356,266 16,651,437 16,557,638 17,488,015 17,429,333 17,970,465 18,548,230 2.8% 3.2% Part‐Time Salaries 6,334 8,000 14,709 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 0.0% 0.0% Overtime 2,071,469 681,397 2,074,037 681,797 1,227,147 1,281,397 1,281,797 87.9% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 5,874,124 6,381,420 6,347,900 6,764,878 6,577,923 7,494,646 7,988,673 10.8% 6.6% Supplies 506,213 588,000 612,118 539,541 1,135,352 539,541 539,541 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 1,904,834 1,825,061 10,949,559 1,824,661 11,565,543 9,223,625 9,223,225 405.5% 0.0% Intergovernmental Services8,751,2929,194,02209,610,287000‐100.0% N/A Capital Outlay 33,897010,5690000N/AN/A Interfund Payments 4,020,750 4,949,585 4,956,999 5,932,406 4,646,155 6,012,809 6,052,670 1.4% 0.7% Transfer Out 960,058 1,590,000 1,617,467 0 9,030 0 0 N/A N/A Total 39,485,236 41,868,922 43,140,996 42,849,585 42,598,484 42,530,483 43,642,136 ‐0.7% 2.6% Staffing Levels by Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Administration 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 0.0% 0.0% Patrol Operations 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 0.0% 0.0% Special Operations 22.00 22.00 22.00 22.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 ‐9.1% 0.0% Patrol Services 14.50 15.00 15.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 0.0% 0.0% Investigations 22.00 22.00 22.00 22.00 24.00 24.00 24.00 9.1% 0.0% Admin Services 16.00 16.00 16.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 0.0% 0.0% Staff Services 16.40 17.40 17.40 17.40 17.40 17.40 17.40 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 161.90 163.40 163.40 163.40 163.40 163.40 163.40 0.0% 0.0% Intermittent FTE 0.18 0.23 0.39 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.0% 0.0% Temp/Intermit Salaries and Ben 7,331$           9,400$           16,212$         9,400$           9,400$           9,400$           9,400$           0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 93Budget by Department - Police Administration Division    Mission  Provide leadership and guidance that allows the divisions within the Department to perform their respective functions in  accordance with our vision, mission, and goals, and to meet the needs of the public we serve while maintaining fiscally  responsible practices.    2019/2020 Accomplishments   Successfully transitioned leadership, continuing the momentum and success of the Department as a regional leader.   Strengthened outreach efforts through personal interaction and social media, reinforcing our commitment to the  community.   Planned for the future succession of the Department by providing growth opportunities for current leaders and  identifying and developing future leaders through mentorship and training.    2021/2022 Goals    Continue to meet the needs of the public we serve while maintaining fiscally responsible practices.   Increase engagement and outreach with the goal of interacting with a broader spectrum of the community.   Evaluate Department effectiveness through polling of populous to be more efficient at serving their needs and  building confidence in our organization.                Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Administration Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 569,456 599,608 606,436 617,632 639,924 627,255 639,703 1.6% 2.0% Overtime 423000000N/AN/A Personnel Benefits 171,643 168,144 182,339 176,063 176,063 195,467 205,122 11.0% 4.9% Supplies 4,113 4,390 2,369 4,390 4,390 4,390 4,390 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 50,853 40,400 8,707,942 40,400 9,668,887 7,438,964 7,438,964 18313.3% 0.0% Intergovernmental Services 8,742,894 9,194,022 0 9,610,287 0 0 0 ‐100.0% N/A Capital Outlay 21,85703,6430000N/AN/A Interfund Payments 3,004,765 3,363,549 3,371,528 3,886,215 3,343,431 3,908,454 3,998,513 0.6% 2.3% Transfer Out 960,058 1,590,000 1,617,467 0 9,030 0 0 N/A N/A Total 13,526,062 14,960,113 14,491,723 14,334,987 13,841,725 12,174,530 12,286,692 ‐15.1% 0.9% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Administration Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Commissioned 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.0% 0.0% Non‐Commissioned 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 94Budget by Department - Police Patrol Operations Division    Mission  The Patrol Operations Division is a 66‐member team responsible for the safety and security of Renton residents, businesses,  and visitors.  Through 24‐hours‐a‐day, 7‐days‐a‐week coverage, officers respond to all 911 calls for service within the city,  proactively patrol problem areas, and work with the community to improve relationships, resolve issues, and educate the  public.      2019/2020 Accomplishments    Implemented a drone program to enhance officer safety and increase Patrol efficiency.     Enhanced less lethal munitions options by integrating 40 MM rifles in patrol, with a majority of the division now  equipped with this equipment.   Equipped uniformed personnel with additional safety equipment/active shooter kits (ballistic helmet and plate  carrier) for response to high‐risk emergencies.     Built relationships with the community through increased use of social media.   Implemented quarterly training for Patrol that focuses on tactics and building cohesive response squads.  This  project is ongoing and was unfortunately put on hold due to COVID‐19 protocols.    2021/2022 Goals   Develop and participate in inclusive engagement opportunities to open lines of communication to better  understand the needs of our community members.    Build trust with the community through transparency and accountability.    Hold offenders within our community accountable for their criminal activity to ensure the public’s ability to feel  safe in our city.    Lower our annual average response time to priority calls.   Re‐institute quarterly training for Patrol that is focused on tactics and building a cohesive response to public need.    Find creative and innovative ways to remain fiscally responsible without jeopardizing the services we provide to  the community.        Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Patrol Operations Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 7,109,753 7,251,860 7,386,303 7,635,160 7,776,270 7,593,649 7,841,392 ‐0.5% 3.3% Overtime 967,307 304,300 896,103 304,300 533,673 550,473 550,473 80.9% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 2,583,845 2,562,514 2,730,862 2,721,639 2,721,639 3,074,128 3,298,430 13.0% 7.3% Supplies 70,422 72,459 87,046 23,000 23,000 23,000 23,000 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 24,571 35,845 54,915 35,845 21,500 35,845 35,845 0.0% 0.0% Interfund Payments 728,697 998,309 998,309 1,287,913 852,527 1,570,832 1,528,530 22.0%‐2.7% Total 11,484,596 11,225,287 12,153,539 12,007,857 11,928,609 12,847,927 13,277,670 7.0% 3.3% Staffing Levels (Full‐Time Equivalent Employees ‐ FTE) ‐ Patrol Operations Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Orig Bdgt Authorized Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Commissioned 66.00 66.00 66.00 66.00 66.00 66.00 66.00 0.0% 0.0% Non‐Commissioned 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% 0.0% Total FTE 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 0.0% 0.0% 2021/2022 Adopted Budget City of Renton, Washington 3 - 95Budget by Department - Police Special Operations Division Goals    Mission  The Special Operations Division is comprised of two units that work independently to proactively address quality of life  issues within the City.  The Special Enforcement Team (SET) is a plain clothes unit that specializes in long term  investigations, targeting/arresting repeat criminal offenders involved in various crimes.  The Directed Enforcement Team  (DET) is the uniformed unit within the Division.  DET works in conjunction with citizens, businesses, and other department  work groups to proactively address issues that negatively impact the community.  DET primarily specializes in short term  investigations, utilizing community outreach and proactive methods to address criminal activity and promote safety.     2019/2020 Accomplishments   Successfully investigated and participated in a regional effort to reduce criminal activity associated with the sexual  exploitation of minors, which resulted in numerous arrests and asset forfeiture.    Successfully investigated a large‐scale promotion of prostitution case covering three counties (King, Pierce, and  Snohomish), which has now been taken up by federal prosecutors.   Successfully targeted numerous repeat offenders in an effort to reduce crime, with the assistance of crime analysis  information.   Successfully participated in numerous community outreach and engagement events.    2021/2022 Goals    Continue working with community groups and other City departments to address quality of life issues regarding the  homeless population and nuisance abatement.   Increase investigation of sexual predators who target minors.   Reduce the impact of drugs in our community by targeting all levels of drug use and distribution.   Continue targeting prolific criminal offenders using long term and covert investigation methods.    Continue participation in community engagement and outreach events.    Expenditure Budget by Category ‐ Special Operations Division 2018 2019 2019 2020 2020 2021 2022 Change Change Actual Orig Bdgt Actual Orig Bdgt Estimate Adopted Adopted 2020‐2021 2021‐2022 Regular Salaries 1,967,367 2,331,653 2,213,146 2,427,995 2,261,551 2,431,609 2,505,418 0.1% 3.0% Part‐Time Salaries 6,334 8,000 14,709 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 0.0% 0.0% Overtime 295,468 76,830 331,499 76,830 202,224 207,124 207,124 169.6% 0.0% Personnel Benefits 742,845 924,163 844,283 975,798 909,130 1,044,792 1,109,000 7.1% 6.1% Supplies 56,317 40,500 127,641 40,500 751,602 40,500 40,500 0.0% 0.0% Other Services and Charges 184,006 50,900 261,943 50,900 47,650 50,900 50,900 0.0% 0.0% Ca