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WebLinkAboutRES4438CITYOFRENTON,WASHINGTONRESOLUTIONNO.4438ARESOLUTIONOFTHECITYOFRENTON,WASHINGTON,ADOPTINGTHE2019WATERSYSTEMPLANUPDATE.WHEREAS,the2019WaterSystemPlanUpdate(“Plan”)documentsthecurrentstatusoftheCity’swatersystemandevaluatesfutureneedsofthewaterutilityandwillbeusedasaguideinmaintainingandimprovingthewatersystemintheshort-termoverthenext10years.Italsoprovidesaplanningframeworkforthe20-year,long-termplanninghorizon;andWHEREAS,theprimarypurposeofthePlanistodocumentchangestotheCity’swatersystem,identifyrequiredsystemmodifications,andappropriatelyoutlinecapitalimprovementprojectstomeetfuturewaterdemands.MaintainingacurrentPlanisrequiredtomeettheregulationsoftheWashingtonStateDepartmentofHealthassetforthintheWashingtonAdministrativeCode(WAC)246-290-100andtherequirementsoftheWashingtonStateGrowthManagementAct;andWHEREAS,thePlanwasreviewedbytheCityofRentonEnvironmentalReviewCommittee,whichissuedaDeterminationofNon-SignificanceonJune8,2020;andWHEREAS,aNoticeofEnvironmentalDeterminationwasmadepublic,andnocommentsorappealswerereceivedduringthepubliccommentandappealperiods,whichendedJune22,2020;andWHEREAS,thePlanwaspresentedtotheRentonCityCouncil,discussedatameetingoftheUtilitiesCommittee,andrecommendedforadoptionbythefullCityCouncil;and1 RESOLUTIONNO.4438Approvedastoform:ShaneMoloney,CityAttorneyRES.1870:5/17/2021WHEREAS,thePlaniscompatiblewiththeintentoftheCity’sadoptedComprehensivePlan;NOW,THEREFORE,THECITYCOUNCILOFTHECITYOFRENTON,WASHINGTON,DORESOLVEASFOLLOWS:SECTIONI.TheCityCouncilherebyadoptsthePlan,acopyofwhichisattachedheretoasExhibit“A”andincorporatedbythisreference.PASSEDBYTHECITYCOUNCILthis21stdayofJune,2021.APPROVEDBYTHEMAYORthis21stdayofJune,2021.Pavone,Mayor2 RESOLUTIONNO.4438EXHIBIT“A”2019WATERSYSTEMPLANUPDATE3 Water System Plan Update FINAL | MAY 2021 WATERSYSTEMPLANUPDATEFINALIMay2021Thisplanwaspreparedunderthedirectionofthefollowingregisteredprofessional engineers:Ronald].trka,P.E.CityofRenonCityof RentonA.Nabonnand,P.E.CarolloEngineers,Inc.OL1 CITY OF RENTON WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE A COMPREHENSIVE WATER SYSTEM PLAN MAYOR Armondo Pavone PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATOR Martin Pastucha UTILITY SYSTEMS DIVISION STAFF Ron Straka Abdoul Gafour Katie Nolan MAINTENANCE SERVICES DIVISION STAFF Michael Stenhouse George Stahl CITY COUNCIL Ruth Pérez, President Randy Corman, President Pro-tem Ed Prince, Councilmember Ryan McIrvin, Councilmember Valerie O’Halloran, Councilmember Kim-Khánh Văn, Councilmember Angelina Benedetti, Councilmember PREPARED BY City of Renton with the assistance of Carollo Engineers TABLE OF CONTENTS | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | i Contents Executive Summary ES-1 ES.1 Introduction ES-1 ES.2 Existing Water System ES-1 ES.3 Demand Development ES-7 ES.4 Water Use Efficiency and Conservation Plan ES-12 ES.4.1 WUE Objectives ES-12 ES.4.2 WUE Goals ES-12 ES.5 Policies and Criteria ES-13 ES.6 Water Supply, Water Rights, and Water Quality ES-14 ES.6.1 Water Rights ES-14 ES.6.2 Water Supply Evaluation ES-15 ES.6.3 Water Quality ES-16 ES.6.4 Wellhead Protection Program ES-16 ES.7 System Analysis ES-17 ES.7.1 Storage Analysis ES-17 ES.7.2 Distribution System Analysis ES-23 ES.7.3 Pipeline Condition Evaluation ES-24 ES.8 Operations and Maintenance ES-26 ES.9 Capital Improvement Plan ES-26 ES.10 Financial Program ES-39 Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.1 Purpose 1-1 1.2 Authorization 1-1 1.3 Objectives 1-1 1.4 Location 1-2 1.5 Ownership and Management 1-3 1.6 System History 1-3 1.7 Existing Service Area Characteristics 1-8 1.8 Service Area Agreements 1-10 1.9 Environmental Assessment 1-11 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | TABLE OF CONTENTS ii | MAY 2021 | FINAL 1.10 Approval Process 1-11 1.11 Related Plans 1-11 1.12 Acknowledgements 1-12 Chapter 2 - Existing System 2.1 System Overview 2-1 2.2 Water System Description 2-7 2.2.1 Pressure Zones 2-7 2.2.2 Source of Supply 2-9 2.2.3 Storage 2-16 2.2.4 Booster Pump Stations 2-23 2.2.5 Pressure Reducing Stations 2-30 2.2.6 Distribution System 2-39 2.2.7 Treatment 2-42 2.2.8 Telemetry and SCADA 2-43 2.3 Summary of Updates to System Since 2012 Plan 2-45 Chapter 3 - Demand Projections 3.1 Introduction and Methodology Overview 3-1 3.2 Land Use 3-1 3.3 Historical Supply and Consumption 3-2 3.3.1 Historical Water Production 3-9 3.3.2 Historical Customer Connections 3-14 3.3.3 Historical Water Consumption 3-19 3.3.4 Seasonal Variations in Water Consumption 3-30 3.3.5 Water Consumption per Connection 3-30 3.4 Demographic Trends 3-38 3.5 Water Demand Projections 3-41 3.5.1 Demand Projection Methodology 3-42 3.5.2 Demand Projection Parameters 3-42 3.5.3 ERU Projections 3-48 3.5.4 Average and Maximum Day Projections 3-48 3.5.5 Summary 3-53 TABLE OF CONTENTS | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | iii Chapter 4 - Water Use Efficiency and Conservation Plan 4.1 Planning Requirements 4-1 4.1.1 Data Collection 4-1 4.1.2 Demand Forecast 4-2 4.2 Distribution System Leakage 4-2 4.3 Metering 4-4 4.4 Conservation Planning 4-4 4.4.1 Historic Conservation Program 4-6 4.4.2 Current Conservation Program 4-9 4.4.3 Proposed Conservation Program 4-12 Chapter 5 - Policies, Criteria and Standards 5.1 Introduction 5-1 5.2 Service Area, Policies, and Standards 5-2 5.3 Summary of Policies for Water System Plan 5-2 5.3.1 Service Area 5-2 5.3.2 Water Supply Planning and Management Policies 5-6 5.3.3 Water Main Extension and Service Ownership 5-9 5.3.4 System Reliability and Emergency Management Plan 5-11 5.3.5 Fire Protection Policies 5-12 5.3.6 Financial Policies 5-13 5.3.7 Facilities Policies 5-15 5.3.8 Organizational Policies 5-20 Chapter 6 - Water Supply, Water Rights, and Water Quality 6.1 Water Supply Sources 6-1 6.1.1 Cedar Valley Aquifer 6-1 6.1.2 Springbrook Springs 6-2 6.1.3 Maplewood Production Aquifer 6-3 6.1.4 Well PW-5A 6-3 6.2 Condition of Supply Sources 6-3 6.3 Supply Management 6-4 6.4 Water Rights Analysis 6-4 6.4.1 General Conditions 6-4 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | TABLE OF CONTENTS iv | MAY 2021 | FINAL 6.4.2 Existing Water Rights 6-5 6.4.3 Forecasted Water Rights 6-5 6.5 Water Supply Interties 6-9 6.6 Water Right Self-Assessment 6-10 6.7 Water Quality Plan and Treatment 6-10 6.7.1 Raw Water Quality 6-11 6.7.2 Treatment 6-11 6.7.3 Water Quality Monitoring 6-11 6.8 State and Federal Regulatory Requirements 6-15 6.8.1 Revised Total Coliform Rule 6-15 6.8.2 Stage 1 and 2 Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts Rules 6-15 6.8.3 Groundwater Rule 6-17 6.8.4 Arsenic Rule 6-17 6.8.5 Radionuclides Rule 6-17 6.8.6 Inorganic Chemical Analysis 6-18 6.8.7 Organic Chemical Analysis 6-18 6.8.8 Lead and Copper Rule 6-18 6.8.9 Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule 6-19 6.8.10 Consumer Confidence Report Rule 6-19 6.8.11 Public Notification Rule 6-20 6.8.12 Future Regulations 6-20 6.9 Corrosion Control Program 6-20 6.9.1 Corrosion Protection: Source of Supply 6-20 6.9.2 Corrosion Protection: Distribution Mains 6-20 6.9.3 Corrosion Protection: Steel Reservoirs and CT Pipeline 6-21 6.10 Wellhead Protection Program 6-21 6.11 System Reliability 6-22 6.11.1 Reliability Efforts 6-22 6.11.2 Water Shortage Response Planning 6-22 6.12 System Wide Water Supply Planning 6-23 6.13 Operational Water Supply Planning 6-24 6.13.1 Operational Areas 6-24 6.13.2 Existing System 6-27 TABLE OF CONTENTS | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | v 6.13.3 System Recommendations 6-34 6.13.4 Regional Water Supply Issues 6-35 6.14 Recommended Water Supply Improvements 6-36 Chapter 7 - System Analysis 7.1 Introduction 7-1 7.2 Operational Areas and Distribution System Assumptions 7-1 7.3 Storage Analysis 7-7 7.3.1 Components of Storage 7-7 7.3.2 Storage Analysis by Operational Area 7-15 7.3.3 Storage Recommendations 7-19 7.4 Distribution System Analysis 7-20 7.4.1 Evaluation Criteria 7-23 7.4.2 Pressure Results 7-31 7.4.3 Velocity Results 7-37 7.4.4 Fire Flow Analysis 7-37 7.4.5 Distribution System Recommendations 7-43 7.5 Limiting Capacity Analysis 7-57 7.6 Pipeline Condition Evaluation 7-58 7.6.1 Methodology 7-58 7.6.2 Maintenance Projects 7-59 7.6.3 Remaining Useful Life Evaluation 7-63 7.7 Summary of Recommendations 7-71 Chapter 8 - Operations and Maintenance 8.1 Water System Management 8-1 8.1.1 Normal Day-to-Day Operations 8-1 8.1.2 Preventive Maintenance 8-1 8.1.3 Field Engineering 8-2 8.1.4 Water Quality Monitoring 8-2 8.1.5 Emergency Response 8-2 8.1.6 Cross Connection Control 8-2 8.1.7 Capital Improvement Planning 8-3 8.1.8 Budget Formulation 8-3 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | TABLE OF CONTENTS vi | MAY 2021 | FINAL 8.1.9 Response to Complaints 8-3 8.1.10 Public and Press Contact 8-3 8.1.11 Billing 8-4 8.2 Operator Certification 8-4 8.3 System Operation and Control 8-5 8.3.1 Identification of Major System Components 8-6 8.3.2 Routine System Operation 8-6 8.3.3 System Performance Evaluation 8-7 8.3.4 Operation during Abnormal Conditions 8-7 8.3.5 Preventive Maintenance Program 8-7 8.4 Sanitary Survey 8-9 8.5 Equipment, Supplies, and Chemical Listing 8-10 8.6 Emergency Response Program 8-10 8.6.1 Water System Personnel Emergency Call-up List 8-10 8.6.2 Notification Procedures – Water Quality Emergencies 8-10 8.6.3 Vulnerability Analysis 8-10 8.6.4 Site Security 8-11 8.7 Safety Procedures 8-11 8.8 Customer Complaint Response Program 8-11 8.9 Record Keeping and Reporting 8-11 8.10 O&M Summary 8-12 Chapter 9 - CapItal Improvement Plan 9.1 Introduction 9-1 9.1.1 Capital Project Categories 9-1 9.1.2 Capital Project Types 9-2 9.2 CIP Program Overview 9-2 9.3 Cost Estimating Assumptions 9-5 9.3.1 Cost Estimate Level 9-5 9.3.2 Baseline Unit Cost 9-5 9.3.3 Construction Contingency 9-7 9.3.4 Design/Admin Costs 9-7 9.3.5 Total Capital Improvement Cost 9-8 TABLE OF CONTENTS | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | vii 9.4 CIP Development and Implementation 9-8 9.4.1 Recommended Distribution Pipeline Projects 9-9 9.4.2 Recommended Pressure Zone Projects 9-10 9.4.3 Recommended Annual Repair and Replacement Programs 9-11 9.4.4 Recommended Pump Station Projects 9-13 9.4.5 Recommended Storage Projects 9-14 9.4.6 Recommended General and on-going Projects and Programs 9-15 9.4.7 Recommended Regulatory Compliance Projects 9-17 9.4.8 Other Projects - Future Reservoirs to Increase Storage and Enhance Operational Flexibility 9-18 9.5 CIP Program Detailed Summary 9-19 Chapter 10 - Financial Program 10.1 Introduction 10-1 10.2 Historical Financial Performance 10-1 10.2.1 Rates 10-1 10.2.2 Financial Operations 10-2 10.2.3 Outstanding Debt 10-4 10.3 Methodology 10-4 10.3.1 Financial Sufficiency Tests 10-5 10.3.2 Assumptions and Inputs 10-5 10.3.3 CIP Funding Strategy Scenarios 10-6 10.4 Financial Projections 10-6 10.4.1 O&M Cost Projections 10-6 10.4.2 CIP Expenditures 10-7 10.4.3 Fund Balance and Reserves 10-7 10.5 Findings and Results 10-10 10.5.1 Projection Results without Rate Increases 10-10 10.5.2 Scenario 1- PAYGO (No Additional Debt) 10-10 10.5.3 Scenario 2 – Maximum Additional Debt 10-14 10.5.4 Scenario 3 – Moderate Additional Debt 10-18 10.6 Conclusion 10-22 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | TABLE OF CONTENTS viii | MAY 2021 | FINAL Appendices Appendix A SEPA Checklist and Determination of Non-Significance Appendix B Agency/Adjacent Purveyor Comments and Approval Appendix C Adopting Resolution and Ordinance Appendix D Current Service Area Agreements Appendix E Water Facilities Inventory Form (WFI) Appendix F System Map Appendix G Water Loss Control Action Plan (WLCAP) Appendix H Detailed Demand Projection Appendix I King County Water Reclamation Evaluation Checklist Appendix J Updates of the Wellhead Protection Program Appendix K Water Design Standards and Details Appendix L Cross Connection Control Plan Appendix M Water Rights Documents Appendix N Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Plan Appendix O Water Shortage Response Plan Appendix P Calibration Field Plans and Testing Locations Appendix Q Hydraulic Model Development and Calibration Appendix R Detailed CIP costs Appendix S CIP Prioritization Appendix T CIP Sheets Tables Table ES.1 Demand Projection Parameters ES-10 Table ES.2 WUE Mandatory Measures ES-12 Table ES.3 System-Wide Supply Comparison ES-15 Table ES.4 CIP Summary by Project Category ES-28 Table ES.5 CIP Summary by Project Priority ES-29 Table 2.1 Pressure Zones by Geographical Area 2-8 Table 2.2 Active Supply Sources 2-10 Table 2.3 All Interties of All Types 2-15 Table 2.4 Existing Storage Facilities 2-21 TABLE OF CONTENTS | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ix Table 2.5 Booster Pump Stations 2-24 Table 2.6 Pressure Reducing Stations 2-33 Table 2.7a Pipe Inventory – Length by Diameter and Age 2-39 Table 2.7b Pipe Inventory – Length by Diameter and Material 2-39 Table 3.1 2017 Monthly Water Production (CCF) by Source 3-10 Table 3.2 Historical Annual Water Production (MG) by Source 3-11 Table 3.3 Historical Well Production 3-11 Table 3.4 Historical Number of Connections 3-15 Table 3.5 2017 Connections by Pressure Zone 3-17 Table 3.6 Historical Consumption (mgd) by Customer Category 3-20 Table 3.7 Historical Distribution System Leakage 3-28 Table 3.8 Historical Consumption per Connection, gpd/Connection 3-34 Table 3.9 Historical Number of ERUs by Customer Category 3-37 Table 3.10 System-wide Population, Household, and Employment Projections 3-38 Table 3.11 Population Projections by Pressure Zone 3-38 Table 3.12 Employment Projections by Pressure Zone 3-39 Table 3.13 Household Growth Rates by Pressure Zone 3-40 Table 3.14 Employment Growth Rates by Pressure Zone 3-40 Table 3.15 Projected Number of Water Connections 3-41 Table 3.16 Demand Projection Parameters 3-44 Table 3.17 Predicted Increase in Demand from Baseline due to Climate Change 3-45 Table 3.18 Largest Consumers Projections 3-47 Table 3.19 ERU Projections - Planning Demand Projection Scenario 3-48 Table 3.20 ADD Projections by Customer Category (mgd) 3-49 Table 3.21 MDD Projections by Customer Category (mgd) 3-50 Table 3.22 ADD Projections by Pressure Zone (mgd) 3-50 Table 3.23 MDD Projections by Pressure Zone (mgd) 3-51 Table 4.1 Categories of Data Collection 4-2 Table 4.2 Distribution System Leakage 4-3 Table 4.3 2017 Connections by Customer Category 4-4 Table 4.4 Renton Historical, Current, and Proposed Water Conservation Measures 4-8 Table 4.5 WUE Mandatory Measures 4-10 Table 4.6 2018 Customer Class Rates 4-11 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | TABLE OF CONTENTS x | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 4.7 Saving Water Partnership Conservation Measures and Strategies 4-13 Table 6.1 Wells Transmissivity and Specific Yield Summary 6-2 Table 6.2 Water Rights Status 6-7 Table 6.3 Maximum Flow Rates Status - Interties 6-9 Table 6.4 Source Treatment 6-13 Table 6.5 Existing and Future Requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act 6-16 Table 6.6 System-wide Supply Comparison 6-23 Table 6.7 Operational Areas and Pressure Zones 6-24 Table 6.8 Valley 196 Operational Area Source Capacities 6-27 Table 6.9 Valley 196 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis 6-28 Table 6.10 West Hill 495 Operational Area Source Capacities 6-28 Table 6.11 West Hill 495 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis 6-29 Table 6.12 Highlands 435 Operational Area Source Capacities 6-29 Table 6.13 Highlands 435 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis 6-30 Table 6.14 Highlands 565 Operational Area Source Capacities 6-30 Table 6.15 Highlands 565 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis 6-31 Table 6.16 Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area Source Capacities 6-31 Table 6.17 Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis 6-32 Table 6.18 Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area Source Capacities 6-32 Table 6.19 Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis 6-33 Table 6.20 Talbot Hill 350 Operational Area Source Capacities 6-33 Table 6.21 Talbot Hill 350 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis 6-34 Table 7.1 Operational Areas and Pressure Zones 7-7 Table 7.2 Operational Storage Volumes 7-8 Table 7.3 Diurnal Summer Demand by Pressure Zone 7-9 Table 7.4 Equalizing Storage Volumes 7-10 Table 7.5 Standby Storage Volumes 7-11 Table 7.6 Required Maximum Fire Flow 7-11 Table 7.7 Nested Standby Storage and Fire-Suppression Storage 7-11 Table 7.8 Reservoir Dead Storage 7-12 Table 7.9 Valley Storage Analysis 7-15 Table 7.10 West Hill 495 Storage Analysis 7-16 Table 7.11 Highlands 445 Storage Analysis 7-16 TABLE OF CONTENTS | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | xi Table 7.12 Highlands 565 Storage Analysis 7-17 Table 7.13 Rolling Hills 590 Storage Analysis 7-18 Table 7.14 Rolling Hills 490 Storage Analysis 7-18 Table 7.15 Talbot Hill 350 Storage Analysis 7-19 Table 7.16 Service Criteria for Required Fire Flow 7-23 Table 7.17 Large Fire Requirements 7-27 Table 7.18 Large Fire Results 7-38 Table 7.19 Recommended Piping Projects for Fire Flow Deficiencies 7-47 Table 7.20 Limiting Capacity Calculations 7-57 Table 7.21 Calculated Capacity in ERUs for Each Water System Component 7-58 Table 7.22 Maintenance-Identified Condition Projects 7-59 Table 7.23 Useful Life Assumptions by Pipe Material 7-63 Table 7.24 Pipe Length by Decade Installed and Material Type 7-65 Table 7.25 Summary of Recommended Improvement Projects 7-73 Table 8.1 Staff Certification 8-5 Table 8.2 Sanitary Survey Summary – Completed and On-going Actions 8-9 Table 8.3 Sanitary Survey Summary – Recommended Actions in 2017 Survey 8-9 Table 9.1 CIP Summary by Project Category 9-3 Table 9.2 CIP Summary by Project Priority 9-4 Table 9.3 Pipeline Unit Costs 9-6 Table 9.4 Pump Station Generator Unit Cost 9-6 Table 9.5 Reservoir Unit Costs 9-7 Table 9.6 Valve Costs 9-7 Table 9.7 Overall Prioritization Criteria 9-8 Table 9.8 Distribution Pipelines Projects Summary 9-10 Table 9.9 Pressure Zone Recommendations 9-10 Table 9.10 Remaining Useful Life Repair and Replacement Summary 9-12 Table 9.11 Pump Station Recommendations 9-13 Table 9.12 Storage Recommendations 9-14 Table 9.13 Recommended General Projects Summary 9-15 Table 9.14 Recommended Regulatory Compliance Projects Summary 9-17 Table 9.15 CIP Recommended Projects 9-29 Table 10.1 CY 2019 and CY 2020 Monthly Base Service Charges 10-2 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | TABLE OF CONTENTS xii | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 10.2 CY 2019 and CY 2020 Commodity Rates 10-2 Table 10.3 Summary of Historical Revenues 10-3 Table 10.4 Summary of Historical Expenditures 10-3 Table 10.5 O&M Cost Projections 10-8 Table 10.6 Short-Term CIP Expenditures (Escalated) 10-9 Table 10.7 Scenario 1 (PAYGO) Revenue Requirement, Cash Flow, and Fund Balances 10-13 Table 10.8 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Projected Debt Issuances 10-14 Table 10.9 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Capital Funding Summary 10-15 Table 10.10 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Revenue Requirement, Cash Flow, and Fund Balances 10-17 Table 10.11 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Projected Debt Issuances 10-18 Table 10.12 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Capital Funding Summary 10-19 Table 10.13 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Revenue Requirement, Cash Flow, and Fund Balances 10-21 Figures Figure ES.1 Service Area ES-2 Figure ES.2 Water Facility Locations ES-3 Figure ES.3 Hydraulic Profile Schematic ES-5 Figure ES.4 Demand Projection Methodology ES-9 Figure ES.5 Projected Water Demands ES-11 Figure ES.6 Recommended Improvement / Capacity Projects ES-19 Figure ES.7 Recommended Pipeline Condition Projects ES-21 Figure ES.8 Pipes Reaching End of Useful Life ES-25 Figure ES.9 CIP Summary by Project Category ES-28 Figure ES.10 CIP Summary by Project Priority ES-29 Figure ES.11 Recommended Specific CIP Projects ES-31 Figure ES.12 CIP Specific Project Priority ES-33 Figure ES.13 P-01: Dead-end 3,000-gpm Fire Flow Program ES-35 Figure ES.14 P-03: Remaining Useful Life ES-37 Figure ES.15 Capital Funding Comparison ES-40 Figure ES.16 Comparison of Outstanding Debt After CY 2029 ES-41 Figure ES.17 Estimated Single Family Residential Bill Comparison ES-41 TABLE OF CONTENTS | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | xiii Figure 1.1 Adjacent Purveyors 1-4 Figure 1.2 Drinking Water Utility Organization 1-5 Figure 1.3 Service Area 1-7 Figure 1.4 Revised Service Area Boundary with Soos Creek 1-9 Figure 1.5 Revised Service Area Boundary with CRWSD 1-10 Figure 2.1 Water Facility Locations 2-3 Figure 2.2 Hydraulic Profile Schematic 2-5 Figure 3.1 Zoning 3-3 Figure 3.2 Existing Land Use 3-5 Figure 3.3 Future Land Use Based on Zoning 3-7 Figure 3.4 Average Water Production by Source (2008-2017) 3-12 Figure 3.5 Historical Average and Maximum Day Water Production (2008-2017) 3-13 Figure 3.6 Historical Connections Trend by Customer Category (2008-2017) 3-16 Figure 3.7 Percent of Connections by Customer Category (2008-2017) 3-19 Figure 3.8 Percent of Consumption by Customer Category (2008-2017) 3-20 Figure 3.9 Historical Consumption Trend by Customer Category (2008-2017) 3-21 Figure 3.10 Historical Consumption by Largest Consumers (2008-2017) 3-23 Figure 3.11 Largest Water Consumers 3-25 Figure 3.12 Historical Distribution System Leakage Trend (2008-2017) 3-29 Figure 3.13 Average Seasonal Consumption and Precipitation (2008-2017) 3-31 Figure 3.14 Average Seasonal Consumption per Customer Category (2015-2017) 3-32 Figure 3.15 Average Seasonal Consumption per Connection (2015-2017) 3-33 Figure 3.16 Historical ERU Value Trend (2008-2017) 3-36 Figure 3.17 Demand Projection Methodology 3-43 Figure 3.18 Projected Water Demands 3-52 Figure 4.1 DSL 3-Year Rolling Average 4-4 Figure 4.2 2017 Water Use by Customer Category 4-5 Figure 4.3 2017 Monthly Water Production 4-5 Figure 4.4 Average Annual Consumption per Single-Family Connection 4-7 Figure 4.5 Total Consumption (1988 – 2017) 4-7 Figure 4.6 Annual Consumption per Connection (1988 – 2017) 4-8 Figure 6.1 Operational Areas 6-25 Figure 7.1 Water Facility Locations (System Analysis) 7-3 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | TABLE OF CONTENTS xiv | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 7.2 Hydraulic Profile (System Analysis) 7-5 Figure 7.3 Illustration of Storage Components 7-8 Figure 7.4 Highest Elevation Customers 7-13 Figure 7.5 Fire Flow Requirements 7-25 Figure 7.6 Large Fire Requirements 7-29 Figure 7.7 Maximum Pressure under ADD Condition in Planning Year 2020 without Improvements 7-33 Figure 7.8 Minimum Pressures under PHD Condition in Planning Year 2039 without Improvements 7-35 Figure 7.9 Maximum Velocity in Planning Year 2039 without Improvements 7-37 Figure 7.10 Large Fire Locations Below Minimum Required Residual Pressure (less than 20 psi) during 2039 MDD and Fire Flow without Improvements 7-39 Figure 7.11 Areas Below Minimum Required Residual Pressure (less than 20 psi) during 2039 MDD and Fire Flow without Improvements 7-41 Figure 7.12 Low Pressure Recommended Improvements 7-45 Figure 7.13 Recommended Pipeline Improvement Projects 7-49 Figure 7.14 Dead-end Pipes in Non-Single Family Areas 7-53 Figure 7.15 Dead-end Pipes in Single Family Areas 7-55 Figure 7.16 Maintenance-Identified Condition Projects 7-61 Figure 7.17 Pipes Reaching End of Useful Life 7-67 Figure 7.18 Pipeline Identified in Remaining Useful Life Analysis 7-69 Figure 7.19 Recommended Improvement/Capacity Projects 7-79 Figure 7.20 Recommended Pipeline Condition Projects 7-81 Figure 7.21 Mitigated Deficiencies with Recommended Improvements 7-83 Figure 9.1 CIP Summary by Project Category 9-4 Figure 9.2 CIP Summary by Project Priority 9-5 Figure 9.3 Recommended Specific CIP Projects 9-21 Figure 9.4 CIP Specific Project Priority 9-23 Figure 9.5 P-01: Dead-end 3,000 gpm Fire Flow Program 9-25 Figure 9.6 P-03: Remaining Useful Life 9-27 Figure 10.1 Historical Revenues vs Expenses 10-4 Figure 10.2 Ten-Year Financial Forecast Without Rate Increases or Additional Debt Issuances 10-10 Figure 10.3 Scenario 1 (PAYGO) Capital Funding Sources 10-11 TABLE OF CONTENTS | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | xv Figure 10.4 Scenario 1 (PAYGO) Rate Increases 10-11 Figure 10.5 Scenario 1 (PAYGO) Financial Projection 10-12 Figure 10.6 Scenario 1 (PAYGO) Estimated Single Family Residential (SFR) Monthly Bills 10-14 Figure 10.7 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Capital Funding Sources 10-15 Figure 10.8 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Rate Increases 10-16 Figure 10.9 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Financial Projection 10-16 Figure 10.10 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Estimated SFR Monthly Bills 10-18 Figure 10.11 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Capital Funding Sources 10-19 Figure 10.12 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Rate Increases 10-20 Figure 10.13 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Financial Projection 10-20 Figure 10.14 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Estimated SFR Monthly Bills 10-22 Figure 10.15 Capital Funding Comparison 10-22 Figure 10.16 Comparison of Outstanding Debt After CY 2029 10-23 Figure 10.17 Estimated SFR Bill Comparison 10-23 ABBREVIATIONS | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | xvii Abbreviations AC asbestos cement ac-ft acre-feet ac-ft/yr acre-feet per year ADD average day demand AMI Advanced Metering Infrastructure AMP Asset Management Program APA aquifer protection area AWWA American Water Works Association bgs below ground surface BPS booster pump station Carollo Carollo Engineers, Inc. CCC Cross Connection Control CCF hundred cubic feet CCR Consumer Confidence Report CCTF Corrosion Control Treatment Facility CCTV closed-circuit television CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CEMP Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan cf cubic feet CI cast iron CIP Capital Improvement Plan City City of Renton COP copper Council Renton City Council CPI-U Consumer Price Index CRWSD Cedar River Water and Sewer District CT concentration times / contact time CWA Cascade Water Alliance CY calendar year D Distribution pipeline D/DBPR Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts Rules DBCP dibromochloropropane DI ductile iron DNS determination of non-significance DOE Washington State Department of Ecology DOH Washington State Department of Health DSCR debt service coverage ratio DSL distribution system leakage CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | ABBREVIATIONS xviii | MAY 2021 | FINAL DU dwelling unit EDB ethylene dibromide ENR Engineering News Report EPS extended period simulation ERU Equivalent Residential Unit FAZ forecast analysis zone FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency fps feet per second FSS Fire-suppression storage ft /foot/feet ft/day feet per day FTE full-time employee G General GAC granular activated carbon gal gallon gal/ERU gallons per Equivalent Residential Unit GI galvanized iron GIS geographic information system gpd gallons per day gpd/ERU gallons per day per Equivalent Residential Unit gpd/ft gallons per day per foot gpm gallons per minute GMA Growth Management Act GS galvanized steel H2S Hydrogen sulfide HDPE high-density polyethylene HGL hydraulic grade line HMI human machine interface hp horsepower I-405 Interstate 405 ISO Insurance Services Organization kPa kilopascal kW kilowatt LCR Lead and Copper Rule LF linear feet MaP Maximum Performance MCL maximum contaminant level MDD maximum day demand MG million gallons mg/L milligrams per liter ABBREVIATIONS | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | xix mg-min/L milligram-minutes per liter mgd million gallons per day mgd/ft million gallons per day per foot MHz megahertz MTU master telemetry unit MWL Municipal Water Law O&M operations and maintenance OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration P Annual Program PAA potential annexation areas PACP Pipeline Assessment and Certification Program PAYGO Pay-As-You-Go PCB polychlorinated biphenyl PFAS per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances PHD peak hour demand Plan Water System Plan PLC programmable logic controller psi pounds per square inch PSRC Puget Sound Regional Council PRV pressure-reducing valve PVC polyvinyl chloride PWTF Public Works Trust Fund PZ Pressure Zone Qa system-wide annual withdrawal Qi instantaneous flow R Regulatory R&R repair and replacement RCW Revised Codes of Washington Renton RFA Renton Regional Fire Authority ROW Right-of-way RPBA reduced pressure backflow assembly RSA retail service area RTCR Revised Total Coliform Rule RTU remote telemetry unit RUL remaining useful life RWSA retail water service area SAM-GAP Strategic Asset Management Gap SCADA Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition SDWA Safe Drinking Water Act sec second CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | ABBREVIATIONS xx | MAY 2021 | FINAL SEPA State Environmental Policy Act SFR single family residential Skyway Skyway Water and Sewer District SOC synthetic organic chemical Soos Creek Soos Creek Water and Sewer District SPU Seattle Public Utilities SRSS Seattle Regional Supply System SS Standby Storage SSA Sole Source Aquifer SSTL stainless steel ST Storage State State of Washington STL steel SWP Saving Water Partnership TDH total dynamic head UCMR3 Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule 3 UCMR4 Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule 4 UD utility district USEPA United States Environmental Protection Agency VOC volatile organic chemical WA-167 Washington highway 167 WAC State of Washington Administrative Code Water Utility City of Renton Water Utility WDM Water Distribution Manager WDS Water Distribution Specialist WFI Water Facilities Inventory WHPP Wellhead Protection Program WISHA Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act of 1973 WLCAP Water Loss Control Action Plan WM Water Main Replacement Annual Program WTP Water Treatment Plant WTPO Water Treatment Plant Operator WUE Water Use Efficiency yr year EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-1 ES EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES.1 Introduction This Water System Plan (Plan) updates the City of Renton’s (City) 2012 Water System Plan. It was developed collaboratively by City staff, Carollo Engineers, Inc. (Carollo), and Pacific Groundwater Group. This Plan documents the current status of the water system and evaluates future needs of the water utility. The data used for this Plan was current as of December 2017. The Plan was developed between 2018 and 2020 for approval in 2021. This Plan will be used as a guide in maintaining and improving the water system in the short-term over the next 10 years and also provides a planning framework for the 20-year, long-term planning horizon. The purpose of this Plan is to document changes to the City’s water system, identify required system modifications, and appropriately outline capital improvement projects to meet future water demands. Maintaining a current Plan is required to meet the regulations of the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and the requirements of the Washington State Growth Management Act. This Plan complies with the requirements of DOH as set forth in the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-290-100, Water System Plan. This Plan contains timeframes, which are the intended framework for future funding decisions and within which future actions and decisions are intended to occur. However, these timeframes are estimates, and depending on factors involved in the processing of applications and project work, and availability of funding, the timing may change. The framework presented in this Plan does not represent actual commitments by the City. Key points of the Plan including analysis results and recommendations are emphasized below, with more detail provided in the chapters. ES.2 Existing Water System The City owns and operates a multi-source municipal water system, which includes supply, treatment, storage, and distribution of potable water to residential, commercial, industrial, and wholesale customers. Service is provided to an area of approximately 17.25 square miles with 17,830 retail customers (service connections) and one wholesale customer, Skyway Water and Sewer District (Skyway), via a single metered connection. The City’s service area boundaries are shown on Figure ES.1. The retail service area (RSA) is the area that the City has a duty to serve within the 20-year planning horizon of this Plan. Figure ES.2 presents the water facility locations. Water supply sources include five production wells (Downtown Wellfield) and one artesian spring (Springbrook Springs) that are used for primary supply. There are also three production wells (Maplewood Wellfield) that provide an alternate source of supply. East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson Dr S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E SunsetBlvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SECedar River Trail SE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Vall e y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd §¨¦5 ?æ ?Å ?ç Lake Boren LakeKathleen LakeDesire Spring Lake Angle Lake Lake Youngs Shady Lake PantherLake LakeMacDonald LakeWashington Last Revised: February 09, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig1.3_ServiceArea.mxd O 0 10.5 Miles Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton Figure ES.1 Service Area WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | CITY OF RENTON Legend City Limits Service Area Urban Growth Boundary Skyway Wholesale Area Future Service Area Waterbody Retail Service Area !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWSW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands1.5 & 2.0MG 435Reservoirs Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 09, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig2.1_WaterSystemLocation_V2.mxd WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | CITY OF RENTON Figure ES.2 Water Facility Locations O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 435 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 320 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches or smaller 8 to 14 inches 16 inches and larger City Limits Retail Service Area 600' 550' 500 450' 400' 350' 300' 250' SPRINGBROOK NORTH TALBOT SPRINGS RESERVOIR 200' 150' 100' 50' O' 1,050 GPM OF= 199.7' BOEING PLANT EASTIWEST METER MAX FLOW= 1,950 GPM EACH ll. WEST HILL RESERVOIR OF= 498.6' 498.6' SPU STA 38 MAX FLOW 700 GPM ll. 370' PRV 52 HIGHLANDS HIGHLANDS 435 435 RESERVOIR RESERVOIR OF= 440.3' OF= 439.8' RENTON/SEATTLE INTERTIE MAX FLOW 1,950 GPM ll. EMERGEMCY INTERTIE TO COAL CREEK UD 1,250 GPM ll. EMERGENCY INTERTIE TO W□ 90 1,250 GPM WELL HIGHLANDS 565 RESERVOIR OF= 569.1' 218' PRV48 PRV40 HAZEN RES��tOIR 593·6' OF= 569.3' 293' FRED NELSON BPS 925 GPM SPU TIFFANY PARK STA BPS 39 1,050 GPM MAPLEWOOD CLEARWELL OF= 79.3' 475' ROLLING HILLS 590 RESERVOIR OF= 593.6' 494.5' ROLLING HILLS 490 RESERVOIR OF= 494.5' ROLLING HILLS BPS 5,000 GPM 392' WELL WELL WELL WELL WELL WELL RW-1 RW-2 RW-3 PW-8 PW-9 EW-3 2,200 2,200 2,200 3,500 1,200 1,500 GPM GPM GPM GPM GPM GPM '-------------<11-------....L.--...Jl'----+----'l'-� 5A WELL WELL WELL PW-11 PW-12 PW-17 2,500 1,500 1,500 GPM GPM GPM Legend ■VALLEY OPERATIONAL AREA ■WEST HILL 495 OPERATIONAL AREA ■HIGHLANDS 435 / KENNYDALE OPERATIONAL AREA ■HIGHLANDS 565 OPERATIONAL AREA ■ROLLING HILLS 490 OPERATIONAL AREA SOUTH TALBOT BPS 4,300 GPM HOUSER WAY BPS 4,800 GPM ■ROLLING HILLS 590 OPERATIONAL AREA ■TALBOT 350 OPERATIONAL AREA ■OTHER SYSTEMS Last Revised: December 6, 2017 pw:JJcarollo/Documents/Client/WA/Renton/10899AOO/Task 200/HydraulicProfilel.dwg 700 GPM � � 1,250 GPM RESERVOIR VOLUME INSIDE TANK OVERFLOW (OF) ABOVE TANK GROUNDWATER WELL BOOSTER PUMPING � STATION £. INTERTIE 500 GPM ---£-PRESSURE REDUCING VALVE � HIGH PRESSURE ZONE HIGH: HIGHEST ELEVATION ZONE SERVED IN ZONE LOW: LOWEST ELEVATION SERVED IN ZONE LOW HGL: HYDRAULIC GRADE LINE FOR ZONE SOUTH TALBOT RESERVOIR OF= 353.6' 395' 98' EXECUTIVE SUMMARY I WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE I CITY OF RENTON SPU STA37 MAX FLOW 'l!i.. 320 GPM 370' 600' 550' 500 450' 400' 350' 300' 300' 300' 250' 200' 150' 100' 50' O' Figure ES.3 Hydraulic Profile Schematic EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-7 Mt. Olivet Booster Pump Station Rolling Hills 590 Reservoir The geography of the City requires the water system to have 16 distinct pressure zones (PZs). Figure ES.3 is a hydraulic profile of the system and shows how water moves from one zone to another. The zones are hydraulically interrelated by booster pump stations (BPSs) and pressure reducing valves (PRVs) that are located throughout the City. The Downtown Wells and Springbrook Springs supply water to the lowest pressure zone (Valley 196 PZ) and then the water is pumped up to the surrounding hills (West Hill, Highlands, Renton Hill, Talbot Hill, and Rolling Hills PZs). Water from the Maplewood Wells is pumped from a post-treatment clearwell into the Highlands and Rolling Hills PZs. Two pump stations, one pressure reducing station, and one metered connection can supply water to the Rolling Hills and Talbot Hill PZs from interties with the Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) Cedar River and Bow Lake transmission pipelines. Interties with the SPU Bow Lake transmission pipeline can also supply water to the Earlington 370 and Valley 196 PZs. Currently, there are 10 reservoirs in the system, strategically located to provide adequate equalizing and fire flow reserves for all pressure zones. PRVs are used to supply lower pressure zones from higher pressure zones that contain water storage reservoirs. ES.3 Demand Development Projecting future water demand is a key part of the water system planning process. Demand projections are used to identify the system improvements required for supply, pumping, storage, and piping infrastructure. Three future water demand scenarios (Low, Medium, and High) were projected for the City using the following information: • Historical production and consumption trends from 2008 to 2017. • Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) demographic projections. • Future predictions of the impacts placed on demands by factors such as water use efficiency (WUE), climate change, and the expected future consumption of the City’s largest water consumers. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-8 | MAY 2021 | FINAL The Medium scenario's predictions most closely resemble the City’s future demands, while the Low and High demand projection scenarios provide a range that the City’s future water demands are expected to fall within. The High and Medium scenarios were used in the Chapter 6 supply analysis, which describes when the City must supplement its own supply with wholesale water purchased from SPU. The Medium scenario was used for the Chapter 7 system analysis, which determines future pumping, storage, and distribution system requirements. Between 2008 and 2017, the City’s average day demand (ADD) was approximately 7 million gallons per day (mgd). During that time, historical maximum day demands (MDD) were approximately 13 mgd. The City’s typical Single-Family household consumes 159 gallons per day (gpd). For demographic trends, PSRC predicts approximately 1 percent annual growth in the number of City households and 1.9 percent annual growth in the number of employees over the 20-year planning period. The same projections for each pressure zone were used to also predict the number of future water connections in the system. For this analysis, water demand projections were developed in the following steps: 1. Increase historical water connection numbers for each pressure zone by the zone-specific residential and non-residential growth rates from the demographic analysis. 2. Convert connection projections into equivalent residential unit (ERU) projections using the historical ERUs per connection. 3. Convert ERU projections to ADD projections using demand projection parameters derived from historical data of the City's starting ERU value, distribution system leakage (DSL), Other Authorized Use, climate change impact, and Largest Consumer demand. City staff established unique demand projection parameters for Low, Medium, and High demand scenarios. 4. Apply the MDD to ADD peaking factor to convert ADD to MDD. Again, each demand scenario has a unique peaking factor selected by City staff. Figure ES.4 also summarizes these steps. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-9 Figure ES.4 Demand Projection Methodology CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-10 | MAY 2021 | FINAL To project the City's future ADD and MDD, several parameters were used: • ERU value. • DSL. • Other authorized use. • Climate change scenario. • Largest Consumer demand. • MDD to ADD peaking factor. For each of the above parameters, the City used historical data to establish Low, Medium, and High values, which were used to develop each of the demand projection scenarios. This information, with the exception of Largest Consumer demands, is summarized in Table ES.1. The Largest Consumer demands that were incorporated into the demand projections are summarized in Table 3.16 of the Plan. The City’s WUE program will also affect future demands. The City’s three measurable WUE goals that were incorporated into the demand projections are presented in the following section, ES.4.2. Table ES.1 Demand Projection Parameters Demand Projection Scenario Low Medium High Value Notes Value Notes Value Notes ERU Value (gpd/ERU) 153 Historical Minimum 160 WUE Goal 173 Historical Max Distribution System Leakage (Percent of Production) 10% WUE Goal 12.5% Historical Average 12.5% Historical Average Other Authorized Use (Percent of Production) 1.3% Historical Average 1.8% Historical Maximum 2.0% Climate Change Scenario None Warm Warmest MDD/ADD Peaking Factor 1.7 Historical Minimum 1.8 Historical Average 2.0 WUE Goal To calculate the ADD projections for each customer category, the ERU projections were multiplied by the ERU values in gpd/ERU unique to each demand projection scenario and customer category. To establish total ADD projections, non-revenue water consumption, including Other Authorized Use and DSL, was added using Low, Medium, and High assumptions. Finally, for each demand projection scenario, MDD projections were established by multiplying ADD projections by the appropriate MDD to ADD peaking factor. Figure ES.5 shows a chart of the system-wide demand projections. Detailed projections can be found in Chapter 3 and Appendix H. The following summarizes the medium scenario projections. The City's ADD is projected to increase from 7.7 mgd in 2019 to 8.9 mgd in 2029 to 9.8 mgd by 2039. By 2039, the MDD is projected to increase to 17.7 mgd. The analysis forecasts water system demands will increase 1.2 percent annually, which equates to a 27-percent increase over the next 20 years. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-11 Figure ES.5 Projected Water Demands CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-12 | MAY 2021 | FINAL ES.4 Water Use Efficiency and Conservation Plan In 2003, the Washington State Legislature passed the Municipal Water Law (MWL) to address the increasing demand on Washington’s water resources. As part of this law, the state implemented the WUE Rule, which requires all municipal water suppliers to use water more efficiently in exchange for guaranteed, flexible water rights to help meet future demands. The City started a WUE program in 2007 to emphasize the importance of measuring water use and evaluating the rule's effectiveness. The intent was to minimize water withdrawals and use by implementing water-saving activities and adopting applicable policies, resolutions, ordinances, or bylaws. While Table ES.2 summarizes the mandatory WUE measures, the City conducts many other conservation efforts as listed in Chapter 4. Table ES.2 WUE Mandatory Measures Must implement the following WUE measures: Status Install production (source) meters Implemented Install consumption (service) meters Implemented Perform meter calibration Implemented / ongoing Implement a WLCAP to control leakage if exceeds 10% Implemented / ongoing Educate customers about water efficiency at least once per year Implemented /ongoing Must evaluate or implement these WUE measures: Evaluate rates that encourage water demand efficiency Implemented Evaluate reclamation Implemented Note: Abbreviation: WLCAP – Water Loss Control Action Plan. The City’s current conservation program was developed through a public process to support the City’s WUE goals. The original objectives and goals are being carried forward to this Plan with the goal of encouraging residents to actively and instinctively conserve water. ES.4.1 WUE Objectives As part of the initial WUE compliance, the City reviewed its water system and water usage and developed four objectives for its WUE plan: 1. Identify and reduce sources of DSL. 2. Ensure efficient water supply for continued growth in the service area. 3. Reduce peak day and peak season demands. 4. Maintain the historically low levels of customer water usage. ES.4.2 WUE Goals The City has defined the following measurable goals: 1. Reduce DSL to 10 percent or less by 2022. 2. Limit the MDD to ADD peaking factor to less than 2.0. 3. Maintain an ERU value under 160 gpd/ERU. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-13 As part of the Saving Water Partnership (SWP), the City also supports the regional 2019-2028 WUE goal to keep the total average annual retail water use of SWP members under 110 mgd through 2028 despite forecasted population growth by reducing per capita water use. Based on the number of the City’s connections, the WUE Rule requires the City to also evaluate or implement at least nine measures of its choice that support the proposed goals, in addition to the mandatory measures described above. The selected measures, described below, are conducted either by the City or by the SWP, on behalf of the City: • Water Bill Consumption History. • School Outreach. • Utility Bill Inserts. • Natural Yard Care Workshops. • Advertising and Public Outreach. • City Demonstration Garden. • Indoor Water Conservation Giveaways. • Hose Gaskets. • Water Conservation Education Web Page. The City’s conservation strategy has been to focus on the residential consumer, for both indoor and outdoor consumption, a strategy that has proved successful by continued savings. Most recently, emphasis has been on reducing summer peak usage, which is now a WUE goal. To lower peak consumption, the City has instituted a third billing tier and has increased irrigation rates. ES.5 Policies and Criteria The City’s Plan is based upon the following mission statement for all City utilities: “The City strives to protect the environment and empowers its citizens to be engaged in sustainability programs. The City manages its water system in a manner that ensures public health and safety, meets all regulatory requirements, and protects environmental resources.” (Source: Renton Results – A Community Accountability Program) The City is committed to providing customers high-quality drinking water that is reliable, affordable, and meets strict safety standards. We strive to serve as responsible community stewards by upholding the City’s 2021-2026 Business Plan mission to provide a safe, healthy, and vibrant community by maintaining clean and sustainable drinking water services. The Plan includes policies, effective practices, and goals over time to improve the operation and management of the City’s water supply sources and water system toward sustainability, at a pace consistent with the current and future needs of the community. These goals have been applied to the planning process of the Water System Plan Update and will continued to be implemented in current and future programs and capital projects identified in the Plan. The policies, design criteria, and standards used in the Plan are based on laws and policies that originate from the following sources, listed in descending order, from those with the broadest authority to those with the narrowest: • Federal Regulations - Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-14 | MAY 2021 | FINAL • State Regulations - Department of Health and Department of Ecology (DOE). • King County Regulations. • City of Renton Ordinances - City Council. • City of Renton Administrative Policies - Mayor. • City of Renton Comprehensive Plan. • Department Policies - Public Works Department. • Water System Plan Utility Policies - Utility Systems Division/ Water Utility Staff. Law is set by the federal government through federal regulations, by the State of Washington (State) in the form of statutes: Revised Codes of Washington (RCW) and WAC, by King County in the form of policies, and by Renton City Council in the form of ordinances and resolutions. City policies are established in order to provide a vision or mission of the Water Utility and to provide a framework for the planning, design, operation, management, and maintenance of the water system. City policies cannot be less stringent or in conflict with adopted laws. The City manages its water utility and water system in accordance with established federal and state regulations for public water systems. City policies and standards provide a consistent framework for the planning, design, construction, maintenance, operation, and service of the City’s water system and water supply sources. The City has additional land use, development, and finance policies that specify additional requirements for new development or redevelopment projects that require water service for domestic, fire protection, and other uses. The City’s policies are grouped into the following major categories: • Service Area. • Water Supply Planning and Management. • Water Main Extension and Service Ownership. • System Reliability and Emergency Management Plan. • Fire Protection. • Financial. • Facilities. • Organization. ES.6 Water Supply, Water Rights, and Water Quality To meet water demands, the City has developed its own independent water supply sources as well as designed interties with adjacent purveyors to purchase wholesale water. The City’s wells are generally in very good condition. The City has capital improvement and maintenance programs to upgrade and maintain its sources in good condition and to comply with water quality criteria. ES.6.1 Water Rights Independent water sources allow the City to maintain greater control over the management and costs of its water supply. Consistent with DOE's requirements for water rights, all of the City’s water rights specify an instantaneous flow (Qi) and a maximum system-wide annual withdrawal (Qa). With its independent sources of supply, the City strives to protect public health, ensure adequate water supply to meet the requirements of its customers, and support the economic prosperity of the City. However, concern that growing water demands in the future EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-15 may exceed the City’s available water right withdrawals must be taken into consideration for system planning. ES.6.2 Water Supply Evaluation The City’s supplies and pump stations were evaluated to ensure adequate capacity is available to serve future demands. For the evaluation, the City’s water distribution system was divided such that the 16 pressure zones were condensed into 7 different operational areas, as shown on Figure ES.3. The City’s criteria is to provide sufficient reliable sources / pumps that can provide the MDD for each operational area with the largest pump or source out of service. The analysis found that each of the operational areas had sufficient source / pumping capacity to meet the projected demands through 2039. The City has sufficient supply to serve its customers with solely its own supplies, with the exception of the West Hill 495 Operational Area. The City needs to rely on its interties with SPU in the West Hill 495 Operational area to provide the MDD demands in the planning period. The City has more than sufficient supplies to meet the system-wide MDD through 2039, as shown in Table ES.4. The City-owned supplies are sufficient to meet the system-wide MDD through 2029, with a small amount of SPU supply required by 2039. Table ES.3 System-Wide Supply Comparison 2019 2029 2039 TOTAL MDD (gpm) 9,646 11,125 12,306 Source Well Status Qi (gpm) Springbrook Springs Active 1,050 1,050 1,050 Downtown Wellfield Well RW-1 Active 2,200 2,200 2,200 Downtown Wellfield Well RW-2 Active 2,200 2,200 2,200 Downtown Wellfield Well RW-3 Active 2,200 2,200 2,200 Downtown Wellfield Well PW-8 Active 3,500 3,500 3,500 Downtown Wellfield(1) Well PW-9 Active 1,200 1,200 1,200 Well PW-5A Well PW-5A Backup NA NA NA Maplewood Wellfield Well PW-11 Active 2,500 2,500 2,500 Maplewood Wellfield Well PW-12 Active 500 500 500 Maplewood Wellfield Well PW-17 Active 0 0 0 Downtown Wellfield Well EW-3R Emergency NA NA NA City Supply Total 15,350 15,350 15,350 SPU Supply Interties Total Active 7,195 7,195 7,195 Total Reliable Capacity 22,545 22,545 22,545 Largest Pump/Supply Capacity Well PW-8 3,500 3,500 3,500 Total Reliable Capacity with Largest Pump/Supply Capacity offline 19,045 19,045 19,045 SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) 9,399 7,920 6,739 Note: (1) Reliable pump capacity for Well PW-9 is only 1,200 gpm. Abbreviation: gpm – gallons per minute. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-16 | MAY 2021 | FINAL The City will pursue several different approaches to supplement its peak demand requirements (20-year and longer planning period). This includes expanded conservation efforts and strategies, additional storage, the purchase of wholesale water from SPU, perfecting additional Qi water rights (Maplewood Wells), and the possible use of other technologies such as reclaimed water and aquifer recharge. The City actively participates with other water systems on regional planning, supply, and operating issues. For example, the City is a member of the East King County Regional Water Association and the Water Conservation Coalition of Puget Sound. Another example is the City’s participation in the recent Puget Sound Regional Water Supply Outlook Study, which assessed the supply sources of the Central Puget Sound Region, explored ways that systems can support each other, and evaluated regional supply options to meet future needs. Under the City’s new contract with SPU, the City will be participating in the Seattle Regional Supply System (SRSS) via its attendance and participation at SRSS Operating Board meetings. ES.6.3 Water Quality The City is defined as a Group A Community Public Water System. The City must comply with the drinking water standards of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and DOH standards under WAC 246-290. The City’s water quality is in compliance with all state and federal water quality and reporting requirements. All applicable drinking water quality regulations are described in detail in the Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Plan included as Appendix N. The City maintains water quality within its system through the following approaches: 1. Routine system flushing within its distribution system in order to maintain satisfactory water quality. 2. A main replacement program to eliminate dead end mains and replace aging cast iron, asbestos cement, and steel pipes. 3. In-line chlorine and fluoride analyzers at all sources for continuous monitoring. 4. In-line pH meters at all sources in order to better manage pH and as a result reduce corrosion within the distribution system. 5. Cross-connection prevention. It is recommended that the City take the following actions as part of its water quality programs: • The City should continue to track proposed new water quality regulations being considered by the USEPA and DOH in order to plan for any impacts on its water system. • The City should continue to implement its corrosion control treatment to minimize corrosion within the distribution system and private plumbing. The City prepares an annual Water Quality Report (CCR) that documents regulated contaminants detected during monitoring to ensure consumers know what’s in their drinking water. The City’s Water Quality Monitoring Reports are electronically available at: https://rentonwa.gov/city_hall/public_works/utility_systems/water_quality_report ES.6.4 Wellhead Protection Program The 1986 amendments to the federal SDWA mandated that every state develop a wellhead protection program (WHPP) to protect groundwaters that serve as drinking water sources for public water supplies. In 1994 DOH adopted WAC 246-290, which directed Group A public water systems using wells or springs to implement wellhead protection measures. The City prepared its EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-17 WHPP, which was approved by DOH in 1999. Updates to the City’s WHPP were completed under this Plan and the changes to the WHPP are included as Appendix J. Compliance with WHPP requirements is part of a broader City effort referred to as the “Aquifer Protection Program.” The Aquifer Protection Program was established in 1988 when the Council designated Aquifer Protection Areas (APAs) with the intent of safeguarding the City’s supply sources. The APAs that were initially delineated in 1988 were redefined during this WHPP update to be consistent with the capture zones, which were delineated using the City’s Groundwater Model. As part of its Aquifer Protection Program, the City has enacted aquifer protection regulations within the APAs to protect the aquifers used as potable water supply sources from contamination by hazardous materials. The regulations include restrictions on hazardous material quantities, storage, and handling; land use restrictions; facility operating standards; construction activity standards; fill quality standards; and other measures intended to prevent contamination. Other components of the Aquifer Protection Program include public education, aquifer water quality and level monitoring, coordination with emergency responders, and coordination with surrounding land use authorities on groundwater protection issues. ES.7 System Analysis The system analysis identified potential future system deficiencies in the City’s water distribution and based on the analysis results, Carollo recommended improvements to the system. Carollo evaluated the capacity of the pipelines using the City’s updated and calibrated hydraulic model. Evaluations of the remaining assets were conducted in Microsoft Excel. The system analysis yielded a number of recommended improvements for the pump stations, reservoirs, pipelines, and pressure zones, which are summarized in Figures ES.6 and ES.7. ES.7.1 Storage Analysis The City’s reservoir storage requirements depend on the water system’s configuration, seasonal and daily variation in water-use patterns, and the reliability of various water system components. Water storage volumes are comprised of five components: • Operational storage. • Equalizing storage. • Standby storage. • Fire-suppression storage. • Dead storage. The operational areas were evaluated as separate systems to ensure that each has the required usable operational, equalizing, fire, and standby storage volume. Details are summarized in Chapter 7. Storage deficits were identified in the following operational areas: the Valley, Highlands 565, West Hill 495, and Rolling Hills 590. The identified storage deficits can be mitigated by constructing additional storage or making changes to the operational strategy. In some cases, small improvements to the existing infrastructure, such as adding backup power to provide reliability, can better alleviate the storage deficiencies than adding storage. All recommended projects are summarized below. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-18 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Valley Storage Recommendation Although the Valley has sufficient storage at 20 pounds per square inch (psi), the area is deficient for all planning years in supplying operational and equalizing volumes at 30 psi to the customers located at the highest elevations within the operational area. The City is connecting high-elevation residents within the Valley 196 PZ to higher pressure infrastructure. These improvements will then provide adequate operating pressures and fire flow pressures to these high-elevation residents. Highlands 565 Storage Recommendation The Highlands 565 Operational Area does not have sufficient storage for all planning years. However, excess storage located in the adjacent Highlands 445 Operational Area is sufficient to offset deficiencies in the Highlands 565 Operational Area. A backup power generator is recommended at the Monroe Avenue BPS to allow storage to be provided from the Highlands 445 PZ to the Highlands 565 PZ, which will also improve pumping capacity in the long term. The City is already planning to add a generator at the Monroe BPS as part of constructing a new 6.3-million gallon (MG) reservoir in the Highlands 445 PZ. West Hill 495 Storage Recommendation The West Hill 495 Operational Area does not have sufficient storage through 2039. However, excess storage located in the Valley Operational Area is sufficient to offset deficiencies in the West Hill 495. The Valley Operational Area has 1.04 MG of excess storage available by 2039, which can be reliably pumped to the West Hill 495 Operational Area via the new West Hill BPS. The City is currently planning on expanding capacity of the West Hill PS and adding a generator at the West Hill BPS as part of the West Hill BPS Improvement Project. Additionally, the City currently operates the tank with a 16 foot (ft) operational band, which equates to a 0.22-MG operational storage volume. It is recommended that the City update operational strategy and reduce the operational band thus decreasing the operational volume and mitigating deficiencies. Last Revised: February 09, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-18_Rec_Imp_Projects.mxd WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | CITY OF RENTON Figure ES.6 Recommended Improvement/Capacity Projects !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir UUT UUT UUT XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d SE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç PS-02 PS-03 * Projects D-01, D-03, and D-08 are also identified as part of the condition assessment project. This map only includes the portion related to Fire Flow. Total CIP projects are larger than shown when combined with condition projects D-07 D-05 D-11 D - 0 8 *D-07D-12D-13D-01*D-14D-08*D-02D-06 D-15 D - 0 9 D-10D - 0 3 *D-04PZ-01PZ-02ST-01 ST-03 PS-01/ST-01 LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger XÚ Recommended Improvements Pump Station Projects Highlands 445 Pressure Zone Projects Distribution System Improvement Projects Storage ProjectsUUT City Limits Last Revised: February 09, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-19_rec_Pipe_Condition_Projects.mxd EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure ES.7 Recommended Pipeline Condition Projects Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç D-21 D-16 D-17 D-18D-03D-20 D-08 D-22 D-19 !5 LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Specific Condition Projects Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( Highlands 445 Pipeline Condition Projects Past RUL RUL in 0 - 10 years RUL in 10 - 20 years Water Main Maintenance-Identified Pipeline Projects Annual Condition Projects City Limits EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-23 Rolling Hills 590 Recommendation The Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area does not have sufficient storage for all planning years, being deficient by 0.95 MG by 2039. The City has a few options to mitigate this deficiency: • Add backup power to the Maplewood BPS to increase pumping capacity from the Rolling Hills 490 PZ to the Rolling Hills 590 PZ, and add auto-start, auto-transfer, and backup power to the Rolling Hills BPS so that three pumps can be operated at the same time. • Construct a new 1.5-MG standpipe for the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area, replacing the existing 0.3-MG elevated tank. ES.7.2 Distribution System Analysis The calibrated InfoWater model of the City’s distribution system was used to analyze the system for future planning years, and projected system demands were added for the 2019, 2029, and 2039 planning years. The hydraulic model was used to evaluate typical system conditions during diurnal operations and fire flow availability. Then, the model was updated and calibrated for both extended period simulation with temporary pressure loggers and steady state with hydrant flow tests. Key parameters evaluated with the model were for the system pressure criteria during normal operations and fire flow testing of the system. During normal operations, the minimum pressure as set by the DOH during MDD and PHD was 30 psi at the service meter. The City’s goal is to provide a maximum of 110 psi at the service meter. Improvements include actions such as pipe upsizing, main looping, and modifying pressure zone boundaries. Each of the recommended improvements requires a further site-specific and project-level engineering analysis before implementation. Recommendations are summarized below by type of improvement. Projects to Address Low Peak-Hour Pressure Some low-pressure nodes (below 30 psi) exist adjacent to the Springbrook transmission line. The City has been working to remove connections to this line and relocate them onto an adjacent higher-pressure line. Projects to Address Excessive Velocity One 8-inch line located at the Maple Valley Highway on-ramp to Interstate 405 was found to exceed maximum velocity in the distribution system. This section of pipe is surrounded by 12-inch pipes and is recommended to also be upsized to 12-inch. Project D-13 will upsize 70 ft of 8-inch pipe to 12-inch pipe. Improvements to Address Fire Flow in Non-Dead-End Areas Deficiencies identified during the system analysis require improvements to address fire flow deficiencies. The projects include upsizing 4-inch and 6-inch pipes and changing hydrant lateral connections. Detailed information on each recommended pipe improvement can be found in Chapter 7, where individual projects may be referenced based on Project Identification. Once implemented, these projects will eliminate the identified deficiencies. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-24 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Dead-end Pipes in Non-Single Family Areas The City has multiple older 4-inch, 6-inch, or 8-inch dead-end pipes in non-single family areas that do not have the capacity to provide the City’s fire flow requirements of 3,000 gpm. It is recommended that the City evaluate each case individually to determine how fire flows can be provided to each customer. In some cases, a customer may be protected by multiple hydrants on different water mains. As long as the total fire flow from the multiple hydrants meets the fire flow requirement, no improvements are necessary in these cases. In other cases where only one water main serves the customer, looping may be required or the dead-end main may need to be upsized to 12-inch to meet the fire flow requirements. Dead-End Pipes in Single Family Areas The City also has multiple older 4-inch and 6-inch dead-end pipes in single family areas that do not have the capacity to provide the City’s fire flow requirements of 1,000 gpm. It is recommended that the City evaluate each case individually to determine how fire flows can best be provided to each customer. The City has been programmatically moving hydrants from the dead-end to the closest main with 1,000 gpm. It is recommended that the City continue with this approach. ES.7.3 Pipeline Condition Evaluation The pipe condition evaluation incorporates two types of data: remaining useful life (RUL) and maintenance-identified projects. The RUL analysis examined the pipe’s material, installation year, and material’s useful life to determine the year in which each pipe would reach its RUL. The pipes identified in this analysis serve as a starting point for the pipeline condition evaluation. Additional pipeline condition projects have been identified by the City’s Maintenance Department based on field observation and excessive maintenance. These projects, in addition to the RUL analysis projects, make up the pipeline condition evaluation. The length of time that a pipe is anticipated to remain functional is called useful life. Useful life depends largely on the pipe material but can also depend on soil conditions, water constituents, and methods of installation. When a pipe is in service beyond its useful life, the increasing costs of maintenance associated with a failing pipe typically warrant replacement. Figure ES.8 shows the total length of pipe reaching the end of its assumed useful life for each year for the next 100 years, starting in 2019. All pipes that have already exceeded their useful life are shown in the year 2019. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-25 Figure ES.8 Pipes Reaching End of Useful Life CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-26 | MAY 2021 | FINAL ES.8 Operations and Maintenance The Water Maintenance Services Division maintains and operates the City’s public water infrastructure. Normal, day-to-day operational monitoring including daily water quality checks ensure the integrity of the drinking water provided to customers. Other operations and maintenance (O&M) responsibilities and tasks include: • Preventive Maintenance. • Water Quality Monitoring. • Emergency Response. • Cross Connection Control. • Capital Improvement Planning. • O&M Budget Formulation. • Response to Complaints. Chapter 8 also reviews the water system’s routine operation practices conducted by staff, performance evaluation, operations under abnormal conditions, and preventative maintenance program that manages the condition and operations of all the Water Utility’s major assets. ES.9 Capital Improvement Plan The various projects recommended in the Plan were summarized in a comprehensive Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). With this CIP, the City will have a guideline to plan and budget for the water system over the next 20 years, as well as the recommended timing and cost estimates for each identified project. Project phasing is described as either short term (0 to 10 years, which corresponds to 2020-2029) or long term (10 to 20 years, which corresponds to 2030-2039). The Plan’s capital projects are categorized by the following infrastructure: • Distribution pipeline (D). • Pressure Zone (PZ). • Storage Facilities (ST). • Annual Repair and Replacement (R&R) Programs (P). • Pump Station (PS). • General and On-Going Capital Projects and Programs (G). • Regulatory Compliance Programs (R). As part of the planning and development of the capital improvement plan, the water utility will continue to consider programs and projects to support the City’s business plan, vision and mission for economic growth, social equity, and environmental sustainability goals. The water utility will continue to implement capital improvement projects in a transparent manner, informed by system and community needs and the financial, environmental, and social costs and benefits, to provide long-term community value. The City’s Water Main Replacement Annual Program (WM) consist of the replacement of aging and undersized water mains throughout the water distribution and transmission system. The prioritization and selection of pipes are based on several factors including degree of fire flow deficiencies identified from the hydraulic model, frequency of leaks and breaks, remaining useful life of the pipes, and coordination with other City capital projects. This program reduces the likelihood of system failures, unplanned service interruptions, and claims for damages against EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-27 the City. The following project categories identified in this Plan will be ultimately included in the City’s WM Program: • Distribution Pipeline Projects (D), which consist of sited specific projects to help mitigate deficiencies identified in Chapter 7, and sited maintenance main projects. • Annual R&R Programs (P), which included non-sited pipelines. The City will prioritize every year based on the City’s priorities and opportunities such as major roadways improvements and redevelopment areas. Storage projects include construction of the new Kennydale and Highlands 445 reservoirs, and the recommendation of replacing the Rolling Hills 590 and Mt. Olivet reservoirs and a new Blackriver reservoir in the Valley 196 PZ. Pump station projects include improvements at the West Hill BPS, South Talbot BPS, Monroe BPS, and Mt. Olivet BPS. Meanwhile, general projects (G) include studies and seismic-related projects for the distribution system, and on-going capital projects and programs, such as security improvements, or PRV rehabilitation. Finally, regulatory (R) projects represent general water quality compliance projects, water system plan updates, and the water conservation program. Tables ES.4 and ES.5 summarize the CIP projects by project category and priority, respectively. Figures ES.9 and ES.10 summarize the percent of each project identified by project category and project phasing, respectively. Specific project details are provided at the end of the chapter in Chapter 9. When considering CIP costs by project category as shown in Table ES.5 and Figure ES.9, the majority of CIP costs (47.3 percent) are accrued from programmatic projects. Distribution pipeline projects and general projects comprise the other high-cost categories and account for 17.3 percent and 10.4 percent of the CIP, respectively. When considering CIP costs by priority as shown in Table ES.6 and Figure ES.10, approximately 63 percent of the CIP costs are annual programs. The total water CIP cost over the next 20 years is approximately $124 million, which equates to approximately $6 million per year for the planning period. Of the total cost, approximately $28 million is budgeted for the short term, approximately $18 million is budgeted for the long term, and approximately $79 million is budgeted for the annual category. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-28 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table ES.4 CIP Summary by Project Category Project Category Annual Cost Total Cost Percentage Distribution (D) $ 1,075,550 $ 21,511,000 17.3% Pressure Zone (PZ) $ 21,250 $ 425,000 0.3% Annual R&R Programs (P) $ 2,937,600 $ 58,752,000 47.3% Pump Station (PS) $ 225,250 $ 4,505,000 3.6% Storage (ST) $ 869,750 $ 17,395,000 14.0% General (G) $ 645,000 $ 12,900,000 10.4% Regulatory (R) $ 440,000 $ 8,800,000 7.1% Total Cost $ 6,214,400 $ 124,288,000 100% Figure ES.9 CIP Summary by Project Category EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-29 Table ES.5 CIP Summary by Project Priority Project Priority Total Cost Percentage 0-10 years $ 27,658,000 22.3% 10-20 years $ 18,033,000 14.5% Annual $ 78,597,000 63.2% Total Cost $ 124,288,000 100% Figure ES.10 CIP Summary by Project Priority Figure ES.11 illustrates the locations of the specific projects identified, while Figure ES.12 illustrates these projects phased between short and long terms. Distribution system improvements highlighted on Figure ES.11 includes both fire flow and velocity recommendations. Figure ES.13 and Figure ES.14 illustrate the location of projects included in the programmatic CIP, which are not included in any of the specific projects. Figure ES.13 presents City’s recommended program P-01, while Figure ES.14 presents City’s recommended program P-03. Last Revised: February 15, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig9_3_CIPSpecific.mxd Figure ES.11 Recommended Specific CIP Projects !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 UUT XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç PS-02 PS-03 * Projects D-01, D-03, and D-08 were identified as part of both the system analysis and the recommendations made by City staff for maintenance projects. ST-01 ST-01 !5 D-07 D-05 D-11 D - 0 8 *D-07D-12D-15D-01*D-14D-08*D-02D-06 D-13 D - 0 9 D-10D - 0 3 *D-04PZ-01PZ-02ST-01 ST-02 PS-01 D-21 D-16 D-17 D-18 D-03 D-20 D-08 D-22 D-19 LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger XÚ Recommended Improvements Pump Station Projects Highlands 445 Pressure Zone Projects Distribution SystemImprovement Projects Storage ProjectsUUT Maintenance-IdentifiedPipeline Projects EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Pump Station for Storage ProjectsXÚ City Limits Last Revised: February 09, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig9_4_CIPPriority.mxd WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | CITY OF RENTON Figure ES.12 CIP Specific Project Priority !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ UUT UUT East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç PS-02 * Projects D-01, D-03, and D-08 are also identified as part of the condition assessment project. This map only includes the portion related to Fire Flow. Total CIP projects are larger than shown when combined with condition projectsGreen River TrailGreen River Trail!5 D-07 D-05 D-11 D-07D-12D-15D-01*D-14D-08*D-02D-06 D-13 D - 0 9 D-10D - 0 3 *D-04PZ-01PZ-02LT-01 ST-02 PS-01 D-16 D-17 D-18 D-03 D-20 D-21 D-08 D-22 D-19 ST-01 ST-01 LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger CIP Project Priority Highlands 445 UUT Short term Storage Projects Short term Pipeline Projects Long term Pipeline Projects UUT Long term Storage Projects XÚ XÚ Short term Pump Station Projects Long term Pump Station Projects City Limits Emergency Intertie!5 !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 09, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig9-5P01DeadEnd3000FFProgram.mxd Figure ES.13 P-01: Dead-end 3,000 gpm Fire Flow Program O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Dead-End 3,000gpm Fire Flow Program Highlands 445 WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | CITY OF RENTON City Limits Last Revised: February 09, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig9_6_P03RemainingUsefulLife.mxd WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | CITY OF RENTON Figure ES.14 P-03: Remaining Useful Life !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( Highlands 445 Remaining Useful Life Program 0-10 years (High Priority) 0-10 years (Lower Priority) 10-20 years Water Main Replacement Target City Limits EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-39 ES.10 Financial Program The Water Utility’s financial status was evaluated as part of the Plan, which provides a cursory evaluation of its ability to finance the necessary capital improvements identified in the CIP. The financial sufficiency evaluation developed for this Plan aims to determine whether existing and adopted rates are sufficient to cover the capital program developed as a part of Master Plan and, if not, the level of rate increases that would be required to do so. The evaluation relies on a revenue requirements analysis, which is used to test revenue sufficiency against expected revenue needs. There are two tests used to define the annual revenues necessary to provide both sufficient (1) cash flow, and (2) debt coverage. These sufficiency tests are commonly used to determine the amount of annual revenue that must be generated from an agency’s rates: • Cash Flow Sufficiency Test defines the amount of annual revenue that a utility must generate in order to meet annual expenditure obligations. In the same lieu, the cash-flow test identifies projected cash requirements in each year. Cash requirements include O&M expenses, debt-service payments, policy-driven additions to working capital, miscellaneous capital outlays, and rate-funded capital expenditures. These expenses are compared to the total annual projected revenues, and shortfalls are used to calculate the needed rate increases. In this analysis, the cash flow test is the driver of the rate increase. • Debt-Coverage Test refers to the collection of revenues to meet all operating expenses, debt service payments, and debt service obligations, such as debt service coverage ratio (DSCR). The debt-coverage test measures an agency’s ability to meet policy-driven revenue obligations. Currently, the City holds three outstanding debt obligations and does not have any plans to issue additional debt to fund capital projects in the near future. Typical DSCRs range from 1.10x to 1.35x depending on an agency’s financial situation and the type of debt being issued. For this analysis, the debt coverage test was set to meet a 1.25x DSCR based on the City’s outstanding bond’s requirements, meaning that the City must collect sufficient revenue through user rates to meet all on-going O&M expenses, as well as 1.25 times the total debt-service requirements due each year. The debt coverage test was sufficient in this analysis. Financial projections from calendar year (CY) 2020 through CY 2029 were developed using the assumptions and inputs described in Chapter 10, as well as other inputs provided by the City or developed for the project. All three scenarios used the same assumptions for O&M costs, capital expenditures, and most offsetting revenues (all except interest earnings). The financial forecast gives the City a snapshot of its current financial status. As numerous assumptions were made for analysis, projected results can vary from the actual data depending on factors such as actual customer use, demand projection, and growth. Therefore, this high-level projection should be later compared with actuals and adjusted accordingly. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-40 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Three funding strategy scenarios were developed to evaluate the 10-year CIP’s impact on the Water Utility’s financial status. Each scenario assumes a different amount of debt to fund the CIP projects. All scenarios include the expected debt issuance with the financing assumptions mentioned above: • Scenario 1, PAYGO (No Additional Debt): This scenario assumes that all 10-year CIP projects are funded by Pay-As-You-Go (PAYGO), using revenues from user rates and available reserves. The City has indicated that this is the preferred scenario as it hopes to no longer rely on debt as a means of controlling long-term expenses. • Scenario 2, Maximized Additional Debt: This scenario maximizes the use of debt to mitigate rate increases in the short term. The first additional debt issuance would be needed in CY 2022 with debt proceeds needed every 3 years of the analysis. • Scenario 3, Moderate Additional Debt: This scenario assumes that rate increases are front loaded in the first 5 years of the analysis, then additional debt issuances are used to smooth out peaks in CIP spending. The first additional debt issuance would be required in CY 2021 and another in CY 2025. The Water Utility has indicated that Scenarios 1 or 3 are the preferred scenarios as they would decrease reliance on debt. Results for each scenario are summarized below: Figure ES.15 compares each scenario’s total capital funding sources from CY 2020 to CY 2029. As shown, Scenario 2 would require substantial use of debt to hold rate increases to 2 percent per year through CY 2025 and still implement the full 10-year CIP. Figure ES.15 Capital Funding Comparison Figure ES.16 compares the outstanding debt principal and projected interest payments that the water funds would hold after CY 2029 for each scenario. Under Scenario 2, the City would still need to pay off approximately $21.90 million in debt principal with almost $11 million in interest payments. This will lead to higher long-term costs and rate increases beyond CY 2029 as compared to what is demanded by the other scenarios. Furthermore, the City may not be able to issue debt at the frequency required for Scenario 2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | ES-41 Figure ES.16 Comparison of Outstanding Debt After CY 2029 Figure ES.17 compares estimated single family residential (SFR) bills from CY 2020 to CY 2029 under each scenario. As shown, the long-term rate outlook for each scenario has the same general magnitude with estimated single-family charges ranging from about $61 to $68 per month by CY 2029. Increasing the amount of debt issued allows rate increases to be smoothed over time for a more gradual ramp-up to the ultimate rates. Figure ES.17 Estimated Single Family Residential Bill Comparison These projections are intended to guide the financial planning of the City’s Water Utility, not to serve as the basis for any implemented rate increases. As the City works with its rate consultant to complete a comprehensive rate study, more detailed short-term projections should be developed for the rate-study period. CHAPTER 01 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 1-1 Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Purpose This Water System Plan (Plan) updates the City of Renton’s (City) 2012 Water System Plan. It was developed collaboratively by City staff, Carollo Engineers, Inc. (Carollo), and Pacific Groundwater Group. This Plan documents the current status of the water system and evaluates future needs of the water utility. The data used for this Plan was current as of December 2017. The Plan was developed between 2018 and 2020 for approval in 2019. This Plan will be used as a guide in maintaining and improving the water system in the short-term over the next ten years and also provides a planning framework for the 20-year, long-term planning horizon. The purpose of this Plan is to document changes to the City’s water system, identify required system modifications, and appropriately outline capital improvement projects to meet future water demands. Maintaining a current Plan is required to meet the regulations of the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and the requirements of the Washington State Growth Management Act. This Plan complies with the requirements of DOH as set forth in the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-290-100, Water System Plan. This Plan contains timeframes, which are the intended framework for future funding decisions and within which future actions and decisions are intended to occur. However, these timeframes are estimates, and depending on factors involved in the processing of applications and project work, and availability of funding, the timing may change. The framework presented in this Plan does not represent actual commitments by the City. 1.2 Authorization Recognizing the importance of planning, developing, and financing water system facilities to provide reliable service for the existing customers and to serve anticipated growth, the City initiated the preparation of this Plan. In October 2017, the City selected the Carollo team to assist in the preparation of the updated Plan in accordance with applicable rules and regulations governing planning for water utility systems. 1.3 Objectives This Plan has been prepared to serve as a guide for planning and designing future water system facilities and to assist the City in using its water resources in the most efficient manner possible. Identified in this Plan are system improvements intended to meet the expanding and changing needs of the City. Specific objectives of this Plan are addressed by individual chapters presented herein and include the following: • Develop a document that can be updated periodically as additional information on the water system is obtained. • Description of Existing System (Chapter 2): Document the existing water system supply, storage, and distribution facilities. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 01 1-2 | MAY 2021| FINAL • Planning Data and Water Demand Forecast (Chapter 3): Identify and estimate the effect of future land uses and population trends on the water system. Document historical water use, and project future demands based on growth projections. • Water Conservation Program (Chapter 4): Identify the role that water use efficiency will have in reducing future water requirements and how the City’s water conservation program will be implemented. • Water System Policies, Criteria, and Standards (Chapter 5): Establish clear policies and criteria relating to water service within the City’s water system. • Water Supply and Water Rights (Chapter 6): Document existing and potential future water supply and water rights and discuss existing and forthcoming regulatory requirements on the City water system. • System Analysis (Chapter 7): Update the computerized model for analysis of the system. Assess the capability of the existing water system to meet existing and projected future demands, identify water system deficiencies. • Operations Program (Chapter 8): Provide a comprehensive review of operations and maintenance of system facilities. • Capital Improvement Plan (Chapter 9): Develop a program of capital improvements, including priorities for design and construction. • Financial Program (Chapter 10): Develop a plan for financial backing of required system improvements. • Prepare an environmental checklist for city council action on the proposed water system plan. The checklist is to be reviewed by the various City departments for a threshold determination. • Prepare the Plan to comply with the requirements of the DOH. 1.4 Location The City is located within King County at the southeastern end of Lake Washington. Interstate 405 (I-405) runs through the middle of the retail service area (RSA), from its western boundary, up through its northern boundary. The Cedar River divides the City’s RSA between the north and south. The City’s water system provides service to an area of approximately 17.25 square miles that is largely coincident with the city limits. The water distribution system serves the valley floor and parts of five surrounding hills: West Hill, the Highlands, Scenic Hill (also known as Renton Hill), Talbot Hill, and Rolling Hills. The City currently serves customers within an elevation range of 11 to 476 feet. This range creates a need for at least four separate pressure zones. However, physical barriers such as hills and valleys often prevent the extension of a pressure zone from one location to another. As a result of the City’s topography and geography, the City has 16 hydraulically distinct pressure zones. The City’s RSA is bordered by nine adjacent water systems: the Skyway Water and Sewer District (Skyway), Seattle Public Utilities (SPU), the City of Tukwila, the City of Kent, the Soos Creek Water and Sewer District (Soos Creek), the Cedar River Water and Sewer District (CRWSD), King County Water District No. 90, the Coal Creek Utility District (UD), and the Wasmeta Park Water System. Figure 1.1 shows the City’s neighboring water utilities, as well as the RSA boundary. CHAPTER 01 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 1-3 1.5 Ownership and Management The City’s water system is officially designated in the DOH records as City of Renton, system identification number 71850L. It is a municipal, Class A water system. The City has a city council-mayoral form of government. Members of the council and the mayor are elected officials. The mayor is the head of the executive branch of the government and is the chief executive officer of the City government and as such has general supervision over the several departments of the City and over all its interests. Figure 1.2 shows the organization of the drinking water utility. With the exception of the billing function, the operation of the utility falls under the supervision of the administrator of the Planning/Building/Public Works Department, Mr. Martin Pastucha. Some of the City offices that provide support to the operation of the Drinking Water Utility are not shown on the organizational chart. For example, the Human Resources/Risk Management Department provides hiring, benefits, insurance, some types of training, and other support to the utility; the Information Services Division provides computer, networking and telecommunications support; and the City Attorney’s Office provides legal support. Budgets are formulated by the departments and are presented by the mayor to the city council for approval. Expenditures for items in a council-approved budget are approved by the administrator, the mayor, or the council depending upon the amount of expenditure. The main point of contact for the water system is as follows: Name: George Stahl – Water Maintenance Manager Phone: (425) 430-7400 Email: Gstahl@rentonwa.gov Address: 3555 NE 2nd Street Renton, WA 98056 1.6 System History The City’s municipal water service system was established in 1901. The municipality's source of water was first drawn from Renton Springs which was the primary source for this growing coal mine community but was eventually abandoned. A new source facility was constructed in 1924 at Springbrook Springs at the south end of the City. This artesian spring has since undergone several renovations and reconstruction phases while still providing water by gravity feed. From the early 1940's to the 1990’s, other groundwater sources were developed to augment capacity and to provide water supply reliability. These sources include six “Downtown” wells (RW-1, RW-2, RW-3, PW-8, PW-9, EW-3R) in the shallow Cedar River Delta Aquifer, three “Maplewood” wells (PW-11, PW-12, PW-17) in the deep Maplewood Aquifer, and one emergency well (PW-5A) in the Kennydale area. In 2011, the City signed a 60-year water supply contract with SPU for the purchase of additional supply to meet the City’s future growth demand and for peak demand periods. A detailed history of the City’s system is well documented in Chapter 2 of this Plan and in the previous water system plans prepared for the City by CH2M Hill in 1965, by RH2 Engineering in 1983, 1990, and 1998, by RW Beck in 2006, and by Carollo in 2012. The previous water system plans are available from the City upon request. East Valley RdRainier Ave NOakesdale Ave SWBenson Dr S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E SunsetBlvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SECedar River Trail SE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Vall e y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd §¨¦5 ?æ ?Å ?ç City of Kent City of Renton Soos Creek Water and Sewer District KC Water District #90 City of Tukwila Cedar River Water and Sewer District Coal Creek Utility District Skyway Waterand Sewer District Seattle Public Utilities Wasmeta Park Water System Lake Boren LakeKathleen LakeDesire Spring Lake Angle Lake Lake Youngs Shady Lake PantherLake LakeMacDonald LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig1.1_AdjacentPurveyors.mxd O 0 10.5 Miles Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton Figure 1.1 Adjacent Purveyors CHAPTER 01 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Legend Adjacent Purveyors Seattle Public Utilities KC Water District #90 City Limits Retail Service Area Waterbody Cedar River Water and Sewer District City of Kent City of Tukwila Coal Creek Utility District Skyway Water and Sewer District Soos Creek Water and Sewer District Wasmeta Park Water System Accounting Assistant IV Utility Billing Renton Citizens Armondo Pavone Mayor Ed VanValey Chief Administrative Officer City Council Utilities Committee City Council Finance Committee Martin Pastucha Administrator Public Works Ron Straka, PE Director Utility Systems Division Abdoul Gafour Manager Water Utility Engineering Michael Stenhouse Director Maintenance Services Division George Stahl Manager Water Maintenance CIP Project Manager (3 FTE) Cross Connection Control Manager Public Education Manager Water Quality Manager Operator Water Quality / Treatment Plant (3 FTE) Water Utility Technician Water Utility Maintenance SCADA Technician Water Maintenance Services Lead Pump Station Mechanic Craig Pray Supervisor Utility Maintenance Gregg Seegmiller Supervisor Water Maintenance Services Lead Maintenance Services Worker (2 FTE) Maintenance Services Worker (11 FTE) Utility Locator Water Meter Reader (3 FTE) Charles Vincent Administrator Community and Economic Development Jennifer Henning Director Development Services & Planning Division Brianne Bannwarth Manager Development Engineering Project Manager Plan Review (2 FTE) Construction Inspector Development Services (5 FTE) Services Representative Development Services Craig Burnell Building Official Plumbing Inspector Building Jan Hawn Administrator Finance & Information Technology Kari Roller Director Fiscal Services Terry Weishaupt Utility Accounts Supervisor Utility Billing Accounting Assistant III (2 FTE) Utility Billing Figure 1.2 Drinking Water Utility Organization CHAPTER 01 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Last Revised: March 2, 2020 \\Carollo\Documents\Client\WA\Renton\10899A00\Deliverables\Ch. 1\Fig2.1_WaterFacilityLocation.pdf City Council GIS Specialist East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson Dr S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E SunsetBlvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SECedar River Trail SE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Vall e y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd §¨¦5 ?æ ?Å ?ç Lake Boren LakeKathleen LakeDesire Spring Lake Angle Lake Lake Youngs Shady Lake PantherLake LakeMacDonald LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig1.3_ServiceArea.mxd O 0 10.5 Miles Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton Figure 1.3 Service Area CHAPTER 01 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Legend City Limits Service Area Potential Annexation Areas Skyway Wholesale Area Future Service Area Waterbody Retail Service Area CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 01 1-8 | MAY 2021| FINAL 1.7 Existing Service Area Characteristics The City’s service area boundaries are shown on Figure 1.3. The RSA is the area that the City has a duty to serve within the 20-year planning horizon of this Plan. The future service area is currently served by SPU but will likely be served by the City in the future. This area was originally defined in the Skyway Coordinated Water System Plan and is also described in service area agreement between the City and Skyway. The area would only become part of the water service area upon annexation into the City. The City’s service area includes the RSA, the future service area, and the portion of Skyway that is supplied by Renton wholesale water. The City’s RSA boundary and future service area were initially defined by the East King County Coordinated Water System Plan (Agreement CAG-075-89) and its update (CAG-97-100) and by the Skyway Coordinated Water System Plan (CAG-076-89). These boundaries were further refined by agreements with the adjacent water purveyors: Skyway (CAG-03-197), Soos Creek (CAG-91-083 and CAG-97-164), and CRWSD (CAG-99-014). It is unlikely that the City’s RSA will change very much in the future because of the geography of the surrounding areas and the fact that all of the surrounding areas are currently served by other water purveyors. However, the City is considering small revisions to the boundary lines with both Soos Creek and CRWSD to better align with service in developments to City customers. These changes will be coordinated, reviewed, and mutually agreed upon with the adjacent purveyor in the future. Figures 1.4 and 1.5 illustrate these two areas. CHAPTER 01 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 1-9 Figure 1.4 Revised Service Area Boundary with Soos Creek CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 01 1-10 | MAY 2021| FINAL Figure 1.5 Revised Service Area Boundary with CRWSD 1.8 Service Area Agreements Copies of current service area agreements are included in Appendix D. The following is a list of the service area agreements that the City has with adjacent purveyors: • CAG-03-197 – Agreement between the City of Renton and the Skyway Water and Sewer District for the Establishment of Water and Sewer Service Boundaries, December 31, 2003. • CAG-11-093 – Partial Requirements Contract for the Supply of Water to City of Renton, March 18, 2011. • City of Seattle Ordinance 119202, October 22, 1998: - Interlocal Agreement between the City of Seattle and the City of Renton for use of certain Renton right-of-way by Seattle and use of certain Seattle owned property by Renton, November 9, 1998. - Water Purveyor Contract between the City of Seattle and the City of Renton for the Sale of Wholesale Water by Seattle to Renton, November 1, 1998. - Lease Agreement No. 327-815 (18-23-5 SE) between the City of Seattle and the City of Renton, November 9, 1998. - Agreement for the Transfer of Water Service and Provision of Primary Fire Service between the City of Seattle and the City of Renton, November 9, 1998. • City of Renton Ordinance 1544, Granting Franchise to City of Seattle for 36-inch supply line in 132nd Avenue SE, May 1, 1956. CHAPTER 01 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 1-11 • CAG-02-123 – Agreement for the Sale of Water in an Emergency by the City of Renton to the City of Renton, November 30, 2002. • CAG-99-014 – Agreement between the City of Renton and the CRWSD for the Establishment of Service Boundaries, February 8, 1999. • CAG-97-100 – Agreement for Establishing Utility Service Boundaries as Identified by the East King County Coordinated Water System Plan, June 12, 1997. • CAG-075-89 – Agreement for Establishing Utility Service Boundaries as Identified by the East King County Coordinated Water System Plan, October 18, 1989. • CAG-076-89 – Agreement for Establishing Water Service Boundaries as Identified by the Skyway Coordinated Water System Plan, October 18, 1989. • CAG-97-164 – City of Renton and Soos Creek Water and Sewer District Interlocal Agreement for the Establishment of Service Boundaries, October 10, 1997. • CAG-91-083 – City of Renton and Soos Creek Water and Sewer District Agreement for the Transfer of Facilities and for the Establishment of Service Boundaries, August 6, 1991. • CAG-93-097 – City of Renton and Bryn Mawr – Lakeridge Water and Sewer District Contract for Water Supply and Joint Storage and Transmission, January 1, 1993 (now part of Skyway Water and Sewer District). • CAG-95-034 – Agreement for the Emergency Sale of Water between the City of Renton and the City of Tukwila, March 21, 1995. • CAG-95-071 – Agreement for the Emergency Sale of Water between the City of Renton and the City of Kent, May 17, 1995. 1.9 Environmental Assessment A State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Checklist and determination of non-significance (DNS) has been prepared for this Plan. The City anticipates this Plan does not have probable significant adverse impacts on the environment in accordance with the DNS under WAC 197-11-340(2). Many of the projects proposed within the Plan will require subsequent project specific environmental review and SEPA checklists as part of their preliminary and final design process. The SEPA Checklist and DNS are included in Appendix A. 1.10 Approval Process This Plan is required to meet state, county, and local requirements. It complies with the requirements of the DOH as set forth in WAC 246-290-100. The City will submit this Plan to the DOH, the Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE), King County, adjacent utilities, and local governments as part of the Agency Review process. See Appendix B for the Comment Letters. The Adopting Resolution will be included in Appendix C, upon Plan approval by the city council. 1.11 Related Plans The following plans are related to the City’s Water System Plan: • City of Renton Water System Plan (2012). • City of Renton Long-Range Wastewater Management Plan (2010). • City of Renton Comprehensive Plan (2015). • City of Renton Water Use Efficiency Plan (2008). CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 01 1-12 | MAY 2021| FINAL • King County Comprehensive Plan (2017). • East King County Coordinated Water System Plan (1996). • Skyway Coordinated Water System Plan (1989). • Skyway Water and Sewer District Comprehensive Plan (2013). • SPU Water Shortage Contingency Plan (2019). • SPU Water System Plan (2019). The City is not aware of any inconsistencies between this Plan and the plans listed above. 1.12 Acknowledgements Carollo and Pacific Groundwater Group, wish to acknowledge and thank the following individuals for their efforts and assistance in completing this Plan: • Martin Pastucha, Public Works Administrator. • Gregg Zimmerman, former Public Works Administrator • Ron Straka, Utility Systems Director. • Abdoul Gafour, Water Utility Engineering Manager. • George Stahl, Water Maintenance Manager. • Craig Pray, Water Utility Maintenance Supervisor. • Katie Nolan, Water Utility Engineer. • Mike Mitchell, Water Utility Engineer. • Lauren Imhoff, Water Utility Program Specialist. • Emina Sulych, GIS Specialist. • Mick Holte, Cross-Connection Specialist. • Greg Durbin, Water Quality Treatment Plan Operator. • Lys Hornsby, former Utility Systems Director. • Andrew Weygandt, former Water Utility Engineer. • J.D. Wilson, former Water Utility/GIS Engineer. CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-1 Chapter 2 EXISTING SYSTEM 2.1 System Overview The City of Renton (City) owns and operates a multi-source municipal water system, which includes supply, treatment, storage, and distribution of potable water to residential, commercial, industrial, and wholesale customers. Service is provided to an area of approximately 17.25 square miles with 17,830 retail customers (service connections) and one wholesale customer, Skyway Water and Sewer District, via a single metered connection. The City’s Water Facilities Inventory (WFI) is located in Appendix E. Figure 2.1 presents the water facility locations. Water supply sources include five production wells (RW-1, RW-2, RW-3, PW-8, and PW-9) and one artesian spring (Springbrook Springs) that are used for primary supply. Springbrook Springs is located at the south end of the service area. The wells are located in Liberty Park and Cedar River Park, and pump from a relatively shallow aquifer (Cedar Valley Aquifer). One emergency well (EW-3R) pumps from the same aquifer but is only available as a backup source of supply. These six wells are referred to as the “Downtown Wells”. There are also three production wells (PW-11, PW-12, and PW-17) located east of the downtown area at the Maplewood Golf Course that provide an alternate source of supply in the event of the contamination of the Downtown Wells. A secondary purpose of the Maplewood Wellfield is to provide additional instantaneous flow (Qi) during high demand periods. The permits for the Maplewood Wells set the system-wide annual withdrawal (Qa) to no more than the existing certificated Qa of 14,809.5 acre-feet (i.e., the Maplewood annual water rights are non-additive). The Maplewood wells pump from a deep aquifer (Maplewood Aquifer). A single emergency well (PW-5A) is located at the north end of the service area. Well 4 is currently inactive, as is Well PW-5A which is only used as backup due to water quality issues. These sources authorize total primary water right allocations in the amount of 1,670 gallons per minute (gpm) and 2,593.5 acre-feet per year (ac-ft/yr), which is being exercised through the use of supplemental sources. The City is a wholesale customer of Seattle Public Utilities (SPU). The City has seven metered interties with the SPU transmission mains, which are available to serve wholesale water to the City’s distribution system. The City also has two metered interties with SPU to serve water directly to the Renton Boeing Plant. The City currently only buys wholesale water from SPU to sell to Boeing, but the City has a long-term supply contract for backup supply and future water demands. The City has three emergency supply interties with neighboring water systems. All of the water the City produces comes from a well or spring. Because of this supply configuration, the City’s water system is maintenance-intensive, with facilities for pumping, water quality control, and emergency power generation. Areas within the City’s Retail Service Area (RSA) may have similar elevations but cannot be served as part of the same pressure zone due to the geography. For instance, the pressure zones CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-2 | MAY 2021| FINAL in the Highlands area have not been extended across Maple Valley into the Renton Scenic Hill or Talbot Hill areas, even though the elevations served on these two hills are similar. The Cedar River Valley provides a physical barrier that has precluded joining hydraulically similar pressure zones. As a result of these physical barriers and the elevation range served, 16 pressure zones are necessary to serve the City’s customers within acceptable pressure ranges. Figure 2.1 illustrates how water moves horizontally through the distribution system. Figure 2.2 is a hydraulic profile of the system and shows how water moves vertically from one pressure zone to another. All of the pressure zones are hydraulically interrelated with the lowest pressure zone located in the valley floor. It is desirable to have two or more connections (or supply points) within each pressure zone to allow water to move upward to a higher-pressure zone or downward to a lower pressure zone. This maximizes system reliability by providing multiple routes to move water between pressure zones. Pumping between pressure zones is accomplished by 12 booster pump stations (BPS) that are located throughout the City. The Downtown Wells and Springbrook Springs supply water to the lowest pressure zone (Valley 196 Pressure Zone [PZ]) and then the water is pumped up to the West Hill, Highlands, Renton Hill, Talbot Hill, and Rolling Hills PZs. Water from the Maplewood Wells is pumped from a post-treatment clearwell into the Highlands and Rolling Hills PZs. Water from Well PW-5A is also pumped into the Highlands 435 PZ. Two pump stations, one pressure reducing station, and one metered connection can supply water to the Rolling Hills and Talbot Hill PZs from interties with the SPU Cedar River and Bow Lake transmission pipelines. Interties with the SPU Bow Lake transmission pipeline can also supply water to the Earlington 370 and Valley 196 PZs. Currently there are 10 reservoirs in the system, strategically located to provide adequate equalizing and fire flow reserves for all pressure zones. Pressure Reducing Valves (PRVs) are used to supply lower pressure zones from higher pressure zones that contain water storage reservoirs. !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWSW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands1.5 & 2.0MG 435Reservoirs Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig2.1_WaterSystemLocation_V2.mxd CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 2.1 Water Facility Locations O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 435 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 320 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches or smaller 8 to 14 inches 16 inches and larger City Limits Retail Service Area 600' 550' 500 450' 400' 350' 300' 250' SPRINGBROOK NORTH TALBOT SPRINGS RESERVOIR 200' 150' 100' 50' O' 1,050 GPM OF= 199.7' BOEING PLANT EASTIWEST METER MAX FLOW= 1,950 GPM EACH ll. WEST HILL RESERVOIROF= 498.6' 498.6' SPU STA 38 MAX FLOW 700 GPM ll. 370' PRV 52 HIGHLANDS HIGHLANDS 435 435 RESERVOIR RESERVOIR OF= 440.3' OF= 439.8' RENTON/SEATTLE INTERTIE MAX FLOW 1,950 GPM TO SPU ll. EMERGEMCY INTERTIE TO COAL CREEK UD 1,250 GPM ll. EMERGENCY INTERTIE TO W□ 90 1,250 GPM WELL HIGHLANDS 565 RESERVOIROF= 569.1' 218' HAZEN RES��tOIR 593·6' OF= 569.3' SPU TIFFANY PARK STA BPS 39 1,050 GPM MAPLEWOOD CLEARWELL OF= 79.3' WELL WELL WELL WELL WELL WELL RW-1 RW-2 RW-3 PW-8 PW-9 EW-3R 2,200 2,200 2,200 3,500 1,200 1,500 GPM GPM GPM GPM GPM GPM '-------------<11-------....L.--...Jl'----+----'l'-� 5A WELL WELL WELL PW-11 PW-12 PW-17 2,500 1,500 1,500 GPM GPM GPM Legend ■VALLEY OPERATIONAL AREA ■WEST HILL 495 OPERATIONAL AREA ■HIGHLANDS 435 / KENNYDALE OPERATIONAL AREA ■HIGHLANDS 565 OPERATIONAL AREA ■ROLLING HILLS 490 OPERATIONAL AREA SOUTH TALBOT BPS 4,300 GPM HOUSER WAY BPS 4,800 GPM ■ROLLING HILLS 590 OPERATIONAL AREA ■TALBOT 350 OPERATIONAL AREA ■OTHER SYSTEMS Last Revised: December 6, 2017 pw:JJcarollo/Documents/Client/WA/Renton/10899A00/Task 200/HydraulicProfilel.dwg 700 GPM � � 1,250 GPM RESERVOIR VOLUME INSIDE TANK OVERFLOW (OF) ABOVE TANK GROUNDWATER WELL BOOSTER PUMPING � STATION £. INTERTIE I WTP I ---£- � HIGH ZONE LOW ROLLING HILLS 590 RESERVOIR OF= 593.6' 494.5' ROLLING HILLS 490 RESERVOIR OF= 494.5' ROLLING HILLS BPS 5,000 GPM 392' 500 GPM WATER TREATMENT PLANT PRESSURE REDUCING VALVE PRESSURE ZONE HIGH: HIGHEST ELEVATION SERVED IN ZONE LOW: LOWEST ELEVATION SERVED IN ZONE HGL: HYDRAULIC GRADE LINE FOR ZONE SOUTH TALBOT RESERVOIR OF= 353.6' 395' 98' CHAPTER 02 I WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE I CITY OF RENTON 315' SPU STA 37 MAX FLOW 'l!i.. 320 GPM 370' 600' 550' 500 450' 400' 350' 300' 300' 300' 250' 200' 150' 100' 50' O' Figure 2.2 Hydraulic Profile Schematic CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-7 2.2 Water System Description Several changes to the City’s water system have occurred since the completion of the 2012 Water System Plan Update. A description of each facility and any major changes are summarized in the following sections. 2.2.1 Pressure Zones As described above, the geography of the City requires the water system to have 16 distinct pressure zones. The hydraulic profile shown in Figure 2.2 shows how the pressure zones are interrelated and demonstrates how water can move through the system between pressure zones. All pressure zones are served directly or indirectly from the City’s active wells and Springbrook Springs. The Downtown Wells (RW-1, RW-2, RW-3, PW-8, and PW-9) and Springbrook Springs directly supply the Valley 196 PZ. The Maplewood Wells (PW-11, PW-12, and PW-17) supply the Highlands 565 PZ and Rolling Hills 590 PZ. Although the system has 16 distinct pressure zones, not all of the pressure zones have separate storage or supply facilities. Some pressure zones are supplied exclusively by pressure reducing stations from an upper pressure zone. It is impractical to plan facilities and improvements for all of these pressure zones individually; therefore, the water system has been divided into seven operating areas. Each operating area is either a single pressure zone or a combination of pressure zones with similar operating characteristics. For instance, a lower pressure zone that is supplied exclusively by PRVs from an upper pressure zone would be combined with the upper pressure zone to form an operating area. For the majority of this Plan, the pressure zones are organized into the seven operating areas as indicated in Table 2.1. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-8 | MAY 2021| FINAL Table 2.1 Pressure Zones by Geographical Area Pressure Zone Area Served Operating Area HGL (ft) Maximum Elevation Within PZ (ft) Minimum Elevation Within PZ (ft) Minimum Served Static Pressure (psi) Maximum Served Static Pressure (psi) KD218 Kennydale Highlands 435 218 33 20 80 86 KD320 Kennydale Highlands 435 320 222 11 42 134 HLD435 Highlands Highlands 435 439 367 45 31 170 HLD565 Highlands Highlands 565 569 473 293 42 119 ETH300 East Talbot Hill Rolling Hills 490 300 215 118 37 79 WTH300 West Talbot Hill Talbot Hill 350 300 208 52 40 107 TH270 Talbot Hill Talbot Hill 350 270 130 105 61 71 TH350 Talbot Hill Talbot Hill 350 354 254 49 47 132 SH370 Scenic Hill Rolling Hills 490 370 257 105 49 115 RH395 Rolling Hills Rolling Hills 590 395 315 225 35 74 RH590 Rolling Hills Rolling Hills 590 594 476 227 51 159 RH490 Rolling Hills Rolling Hills 490 495 392 50 44 192 VLY196 Valley Floor Valley 200 129 16 29 79 EARL370 Earlington West Hill 495 370 261 91 47 121 WH300 West Hill West Hill 495 300 179 45 52 110 WH495 West Hill West Hill 495 499 393 90 45 177 Note: Abbreviations: HGL – hydraulic grade line; ft – feet; psi - pounds per square inch. CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-9 2.2.2 Source of Supply The City produces water from production wells and an artesian spring. Each of the supply sources is described in the sections below. Table 2.2 lists the active supply sources and the rated capacity of each. The table does not include inactive sources or interties. All of the City's interties, regular and emergency supply, are summarized in Table 2.3. 2.2.2.1 Springbrook Springs (Department of Health [DOH] Source S05) Located at the south end of the City, Springbrook Springs is an artesian spring that supplies approximately 15 to 20 percent of the City’s drinking water. Springbrook Springs was first used in 1909. The infiltration galleries were upgraded and a sanitary seal was added to each in 1976 (project number W-0422). Chlorination was added in 1976 (W-0423). The chlorination building is located approximately 300 yards from the infiltration galleries and is adjacent to the transmission main. Fluoridation was added in 1986 (W-0851) via an addition to the chlorination building. Corrosion control treatment was added in 1999 (W-2238) and a sodium hydroxide storage building was constructed as part of this project. The City has ownership of a significant amount of property that forms a watershed directly surrounding Springbrook Springs. A chain link fence was erected around the property to restrict activities and access to the watershed. The last segment of chain link fence was installed in 2002 (W-2980). Springbrook Springs provides direct service to the Valley 196 PZ. In 2010, a motorized valve was added to the treatment facility to stop the flow of water when the chlorine residual drops below a safe level. The power source is a 20-kilowatt (kW) generator (propane fuel source). The generator is auto-start and the transfer from commercial power to electric generator power is automatic. Currently, flow control is via a manually set gate valve (throttling valve). In 2013, a chlorine line was added at Springbrook Springs to provide primary disinfection. The dosing pipeline was installed adjacent to the Transmission Main and taps into the existing main at a manhole (new chlorine injection point). The manhole is about 770 ft upstream of the chlorination building and 1,195 ft upstream of the connection point for first service. This manhole serves as the chlorine injection point such that the minimum required chlorine contact time is achieved before the supply enters the distribution system (W-3648). Concentration of free chlorine times Contact Time (CT) of 11 milligram-minutes per liter (mg-min/L) is achieved for the Springbrook Spring’s supply. A chlorine analyzer was installed as part of Project W-3648, which provides continuous chlorine concentration monitoring. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-10 | MAY 2021| FINAL Table 2.2 Active Supply Sources Name WFI Source Number Water Right Status Aquifer Water Right Qi (gpm) Maximum Pumping Capacity (gpm) Maximum Physical Capacity with Installed Equipment Standby Power (gpm) (mgd) Springbrook S05 Certificate N/A 1,050 N/A 1,050 1.51 Auto Start / Auto Transfer Well RW-1 S10 Certificate Cedar Valley 2,200 2,200 2,200 3.17 Auto Start /Auto Transfer Well RW-2 S10 Certificate Cedar Valley 2,200 2,200 2,200 3.17 Auto Start /Auto Transfer Well RW-3 S10 Certificate Cedar Valley 2,200 2,200 2,200 3.17 Auto Start / Auto Transfer Well PW-8 S20 Certificate Cedar Valley 3,500 3,500 3,500 5.04 Trailer-in / Manual Well PW-9 S20 Certificate Cedar Valley 1,300 1,200 1,200 1.73 Trailer-in / Manual Well PW-11 S13 Permit Maplewood 2,500 2,500 3,000 4.32 None Well PW-12(1) S13 Permit Maplewood 1,600 1,500 Trailer-in / Manual Well PW-17(1) S13 Permit Maplewood 1,500 1,500 Trailer-in / Manual Well EW-3R(2) S16 None Cedar Valley 1,500 1,600 1,500 2.16 Trailer-in / Manual Notes: (1) Standby power can serve either PW-12 or PW-17, not both. (2) Emergency use only, when RW-1, RW-2, RW-3, PW-8, or PW-9 is out of service. Abbreviation: mgd - million gallons per day. CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-11 2.2.2.2 Wells 1, 2, and 3 (DOH Source S10 – Wellfield) Wells PW-1 and PW-2 were originally drilled in 1942 in Liberty Park adjacent to Houser Way North and the Cedar River. The wells were replaced by Wells RW-1 (DOH Source S01) and RW-2 (DOH Source S02) in 1988 (W-0880). Well PW-3 was originally drilled in 1959 and the wellhead constructed in 1962 (W-0119) in Liberty Park near the intersection of Houser Way North and Bronson Way North. Well RW-3 (DOH Source S03) replaced Well PW-3 (W-0880) but was co-located in the wellhouse with RW-1 and RW-2. Project W-0880 also included both chlorination and fluoridation. Corrosion control treatment was added in 1999 (W-2238). A manual transfer switch with Kirk-Key safety system was added in 1999 to allow the wellhouse to be powered by a City-owned portable generator (W-2784). In 2007, an emergency electrical power generation facility was constructed at the Mt. Olivet Reservoir site to provide backup power for the Mt. Olivet BPS and Wells RW-1, RW-2, and RW-3 (W-3239). A power transmission line was installed from the new power facility to an automatic transfer switch located at the transformer adjacent to the wellhouse. The portable generator and manual transfer switch configuration remains as a secondary backup. The automatic transfer switch, which was originally installed in 1988 (W-0880), was rebuilt in 2010. Primary disinfection was added to the three wells in 2003 using a loop of large diameter pipe (CT Pipe 1) in Liberty Park. The chlorine contact pipeline provides 4-log inactivation of viruses prior to discharge into the distribution system (W-2893). The three sources share a common tap for source water samples, which are collected after treatment but before entry into the distribution system. A continuous chlorine concentration monitoring and control system was installed and integrated with the City’s existing telemetry system as part of Project W-2893. Each well is individually metered and is controlled by the water level elevation in the North Talbot Reservoir. Additionally, in 2010 the backpressure control valves were converted to flow control valves to prevent the flow rate from exceeding the water right Qi. The meters are located inside the wellhouse. The roof of the wellhouse was replaced in 2016.The wells pump into the Valley 196 PZ. 2.2.2.3 Wells 8 and 9 (DOH Source S20 – Wellfield) Well PW-8 (DOH Source S07) was initially drilled in 1968 and the wellhead constructed in 1969 (W-0310). Project W-0310 also included chlorination. Well PW-9 (DOH Source S09) was drilled in 1984 (W-0665) and the wellhead constructed in 1985 (W-0718). Project W-0718 included adding chlorination and stubbing out a 3.5-inch electrical conduit from the main panel to the west side of the building for a future emergency power feed (refer to WTR-13-0035, Emergency Power System Study 1989). The wellhouses are located in Cedar River Park adjacent to Interstate 405. Fluoridation was added in 1986 (W-0851). Corrosion control treatment was added in 1999 (W 2238). The electrical system for Well PW-8 was rehabilitated in 1990 (W-1020). The rehabilitation project included adding an automatic transfer switch and stubbing out a 4-inch electrical conduit from the main panel to the west side of the building for a future emergency power feed (refer to WTR-13-0035, Emergency Power System Study, 1989). Primary disinfection was added in 2013 (W-3582). The project included combining and routing the Well PW-8 discharge line and Well PW-9 discharge line through a loop of large diameter pipe in Cedar River Park to provide 4-log inactivation of viruses prior to discharge into the distribution system. The two sources share a common tap for source water samples, which are collected CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-12 | MAY 2021| FINAL after treatment but before entry into the distribution system. A chlorine analyzer was installed as part of Project W-3582 to provide continuous chlorine concentration monitoring. Both wells are individually metered and controlled by the water level elevation in the North Talbot Reservoir. Each meter is located in a vault adjacent to the wellhouse. The wells pump water to the Valley 196 PZ. 2.2.2.4 Emergency Well 3R (DOH Source S16) Emergency Well EW-3R was drilled in 1999 (W-2315) and the wellhead constructed in 2003 (W-2915). This well replaced EW-3, which was located at the original Well PW-3 wellhouse in Liberty Park near the intersection of Houser Way North and Bronson Way North. Project W-2315 included chlorination, fluoridation, and treatment for corrosion control. The project also included switchgear and a receptacle to feed power from a portable generator set. Primary disinfection was added to the emergency well in 2013 using a loop of large diameter pipe (CT Pipe 2) installed at the north end of Liberty Park (W-3582). The chlorine contact pipeline provides 4-log inactivation of viruses prior to discharge into the distribution system. This is a metered source and is controlled by the water level elevation in the North Talbot Reservoir. The meter is located inside the wellhouse. The well pumps into the Valley 196 PZ. Well EW-3R 2.2.2.5 Well 5 (DOH Source S04) Well PW-5A was drilled in 1988 (CAG-070-86) and the wellhead constructed in 1991 (W-0888). Well PW-5A is currently inactive due to water quality issues. The wellhouse is located on the northwest corner of Jones Avenue NE and NE 24th Street. Well PW-5A replaced Well PW-5 CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-13 (formerly Kennydale Well No. 1), which had severe sanding problems and could not be successfully redeveloped. The original Well PW-5 was drilled in 1953. Project W-0888 included both chlorination and fluoridation as well as the addition of a switchgear and a receptacle to feed power from a portable generator set. Treatment for corrosion control is not necessary, as the pH of the raw water is about 8.0. This source can be used for emergency supply but has taste and odor problems. The raw water, similar to the Maplewood Wellfield, contains hydrogen sulfide, iron, manganese, and ammonia. At some time in the future, additional treatment will be added to address these problems. This is a metered source which is controlled by the water level elevation in the Highlands 435 Reservoirs. The meter is located in a vault, which is approximately 45 ft to the east of the wellhouse. The well pumps into the Highlands 435 PZ. 2.2.2.6 Wells 11, 12, and 17 (DOH Source S13 – Wellfield) Located at the Maplewood Golf Course on Maple Valley Highway, the Maplewood Wellfield consists of three wells: PW-11 (DOH Source S11), PW-12 (DOH Source S15), and PW-17 (DOH Source S12). Wells PW-11 and PW-17 were drilled in 1989 (CAG-88-030) and the wellheads constructed in 1991 (W-0850 and W-1027). Well PW-12 was drilled in 1994 (WTR-13-042) and the wellhead constructed in 1998 (W-2279). Treatment for these wells is provided at the Maplewood Treatment and BPS Facility, which was constructed in 1995 (W-1052). The raw water contains hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, manganese, and a small amount of iron. The original strategy for treating the water was to remove hydrogen sulfide using aeration and to keep the manganese in solution using ortho-polyphosphate (sequestering) as well as chlorinating and fluoridating the water. Treatment for corrosion control is not necessary, as the pH of the raw water is about 8.0. The presence of ammonia was discovered after the plant went online. The sequestering did not work and the water utility received numerous complaints regarding staining, taste, and odor. The method used for secondary disinfection was changed from chlorination to chloramination, which limited the areas in which the water could be used in the distribution system due to problems with mixing the Maplewood water with the chlorine-treated water from the other sources. In January 2002, the City shut the wellfield down and began design and construction efforts to replace the treatment method. A treatment pilot plant study was conducted in June and July of 2001. The resulting design consisted of: 1. Converting hydrogen sulfide to sulfate by adding oxygen from air and reacting on granular activated carbon (GAC) filters. 2. Removing manganese with green sand filters. 3. Converting ammonia to nitrogen gas by adding chlorine and reacting in a contact basin. Construction (W-2953) of a new treatment building began in October 2003 and the treatment plant was put into operation in September 2006. The project included changing the method of chlorination from chlorine gas to sodium hypochlorite liquid. Fluoridation is accomplished by using the existing plant. The project also included a manual switchgear with Kirk-Key safety system to allow powering one 1,500-gpm production well, one 1,550-gpm low-lift pump, and one 1,550-gpm high-lift pump and associated treatment equipment with a City-owned portable generator. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-14 | MAY 2021| FINAL In 2015, equipment access improvements were made to the Maplewood Water Treatment Plant including installation of access platforms around the GAC contactors and green sand filter vessels. Ventilation improvements were also made to the facility (W-3610). Each well is individually metered. The meters are located in the new treatment building. Flow from each well is kept below the proposed Qi water right by using flow control valves. The wells are controlled by either the elevation in the Highlands 565 Reservoir or the Rolling Hills 590 and 490 Reservoirs (see discussion of Rolling Hills BPS – in particular the back-pressure sustaining valves regulating the flow between the 490 and 590 PZs). The treated water is pumped to the clearwell located at the existing Maplewood Treatment and BPS facility. After at least 3 to 4 hours of contact time, the water is pumped to either the Highlands 565 PZ or the Rolling Hills 590 PZ. 2.2.2.7 Well 4 (DOH Source S06) Well 4 was drilled in 1942 for the Northwest Water Company. The well was removed in 1962. The City has an active water right of 170-gpm for the well (GWC 884-D). Well 4 is currently inactive, as is Well PW-5A which is only used as backup due to water quality issues. 2.2.2.8 Seattle Interties (DOH Source S08) Currently there are 10 interties with SPU. Two of the interties are used to supply water to the Boeing Renton Plant via two 10-inch mains. Prior to 2001, Seattle sold this water directly to Boeing. In 2001, in accordance with a revised franchise agreement between Seattle and Renton, the metering points for the two 10-inch service lines were moved closer to the SPU Cedar River Pipelines (W-2890), and the City began purchasing the water wholesale from Seattle and selling to Boeing. One of the ten interties was originally constructed as a retail supply point for Seattle to provide water to the Longacres Racetrack site. In 1994, the connection was upgraded (W-2071) and is currently used as a backup fire flow supply for the Boeing Longacres site. This is an 8-inch connection to the 60-inch SPU Bow Lake transmission main at PRV Station 24. This intertie was modified in 2010 (W-3553) with a flow control valve so that it can be used to provide wholesale water to the City’s system in the future. Bow Lake intertie is available for summer peaking. Six other interties are currently available for summer peaking supply. These are SPU Station Nos. 33, 34, 36, 37, 38, and 39 and are further described in Table 2.3. Project W-3553 involved upgrading SPU stations 34 and 39 with flow meters and pressure gauges, as well as the Bow Lake Intertie. The remaining intertie is configured for supplying water to the SPU Mercer Island Pipeline. 2.2.2.9 Emergency Supply Sources The City maintains several emergency supply sources: one emergency well, EW-3R, and three emergency interties (PRV #23, PRV #25, and Dimmit BPS). Copies of all of the City's intertie and emergency supply agreements are included in Appendix D. CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-15 Table 2.3 All Interties of All Types Name Meter Size (inches) Location Other System Flow Direction Maximum Flow Rate (gpm) PZ Served Type of Service Supply/Emergency Supply Interties with SPU PRV 28 SPU Sta. #33 6 Shattuck Ave S & S 23rd St Seattle To Renton 700 TH350, WTH300 Summer Peaking Supply Fred Nelson SPU Sta. #34 8 Benson Rd S & S 26th St Fred Nelson BPS Seattle To Renton 925 RH590 Summer Peaking Supply SPU Sta. #36 6 Jones Ave S & S 7th St Seattle To Renton 700 RH490 Summer Peaking Supply PRV 6 SPU Sta. #37 3 / 5 Beacon Way, near Renton Ave S Seattle To Renton 320 SH370 Currently closed and out of service PRV 35 SPU Sta. #38 6 S 134th St & Thomas Ave S Seattle To Renton 700 EARL370 Summer Peaking Supply Tiffany Park SPU Sta. #39 10 / 8 Kirkland Ave SE & SE 158th St, Tiffany BPS Seattle Two-way 1,050 RH590 Summer Peaking Supply PRV 24 Bow Lake Pipeline(1) 8 1901 Oakesdale Ave SW (1,250 ft south) Seattle To Renton 2,800 VLY196 Summer Peaking Supply Renton / Seattle 10 Union Ave SE & SE 2nd Pl Seattle To Seattle 1,950 From HLD565 Supply to SPU Mercer Island Pipeline Boeing Plant Meter - East 10 Logan Ave S & S 2nd St Seattle To Boeing Plant 1,950 From SPU Supply to Boeing Boeing Plant Meter - West 10 Logan Ave S & S 2nd St Seattle To Boeing Plant 1,950 From SPU Supply to Boeing Intertie with Skyway Water & Sewer District Skyway Wholesale 10 80th Ave S & S 116th St Skyway To Skyway 1,950 From WH495 Supply to Skyway Emergency Interties PRV 53 Coal Creek UD 8 2610 Lynnwood Ave NE Coal Creek UD To Coal Creek UD 1,250 From HLD565 Emergency PRV 25 Kent 10 SE 43rd St & Lind Ave SW Kent Two-way 1,950 VLY196 Emergency PRV 23 Tukwila 8 17300 West Valley Hwy S Tukwila Two-way 1,250 VLY196 Emergency Dimmitt BPS(2) 6 12603 82nd Ave S Skyway Two-way 1,600 WH495 Emergency WD 90(3) None Union Ave NE & NE 4th St WD 90 To WD 90 1,250 HLD565 Emergency Notes: (1) Currently used to provide backup fire flow to the Boeing Longacres site and as source of supply to Renton. Historically it was used for domestic, irrigation and fire flow supply for the Longacres Racetrack site. Connection transitions from 8-inch to 10-inch to 12-inch. (2) The Dimmitt BPS is owned and operated by Skyway Water and Sewer District. There is a physical limit of 1,600 gpm because of limited size of the metered connection to the zone. Connection transitions from 6-inch to 8-inch to 12-inch. (3) Not set up with permanent connection; shop would have to manually connect valves to use. No meter present. Abbreviation: UD – Utility District. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-16 | MAY 2021| FINAL 2.2.3 Storage Water storage within the distribution system provides for operational, equalizing, firefighting, and standby storage volumes. Storage is provided by reservoirs, standpipes, and elevated tanks located within the distribution system. The City currently maintains and operates ten reservoirs and one operational storage/equalizing/detention clearwell at the Maplewood Treatment and BPS Facility. This section provides a description of the function and condition of each of these facilities. Table 2.4 lists all of the City’s existing storage facilities and summarizes the physical characteristics. The recommended sizing and location of future storage facilities are presented in Chapter 9 - Capital Improvement Plan. 2.2.3.1 Maplewood Clearwell Located at the Maplewood Treatment and BPS facility, this clearwell was constructed in 1995 (W-1052). The treated water from the Maplewood Treatment and BPS facility is pumped to the clearwell. After at least three to four hours of contact time, the water is pumped to either the Highlands 565 PZ or the Rolling Hills 590 PZ. Additional details can be found under Section 2.2.2.6. 2.2.3.2 North Talbot Reservoir (Valley 196 PZ) Located at Talbot Hill Park near the intersection of Talbot Road S and S 19th Street, this 5-million gallon (MG), cast-in-place, reinforced concrete underground reservoir was constructed in 1976 (W-0419). The reservoir replaced two uncovered 0.5-MG reservoirs that occupied the same site. In 1989, CH2M Hill visually inspected the reservoir. Leaching of the concrete was observed, but the joint sealant was in generally good condition. Following the inspection, CH2M Hill recommended that the access ladder and overflow pipe supports be replaced with stainless steel. They also recommended that the City install galvanic cathodic protection anodes to protect metal associated with the intake piping, wash-down piping, and other metals submerged in the reservoir. The interior was visually inspected again in 2010 by Water Utility staff who noted that all steel and iron surfaces were badly corroded and need to be replaced or recoated (WTR-27-0419). Because of the corrosion, the inlet/outlet pipes and 2.5-inch wash down pipes are no longer usable. The floor slab appeared to be in good shape with no exposed rebar and minor pitting near the columns. The columns appeared to be in fair condition with some areas of exposed aggregate and rust staining. The origin of the rust staining was not determined. The roof to column connections appeared to be in good condition. The exterior of the reservoir roof is a tennis court. It has been noted that several depressions exist on the roof and retain rain water during storm events. In 2017, the reservoir was drained and inspected. A leak test was performed and noted that even with missing joint material the reservoir does not leak. Likely this is due to the rubber joint material installed. 2.2.3.3 Mt. Olivet Reservoir (Valley 196 PZ) Located near the intersection of NE 3rd Street and Bronson Way NE, this 3-MG aboveground cylindrical steel reservoir was constructed in 1954 (W-1141). CH2M Hill has periodically inspected CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-17 it over the years (1969, 1977, 1982, 1985, 1989, and 1997). In 1971, an impressed-current cathodic protection system was installed (W-0371). The exterior was recoated in 1978 (W-0476). The interior was recoated in 1991 (W-1035). The exterior was recoated and the cathodic protection system replaced in 1999 (W-2787). The exterior was recoated again in 2008 (W-3449) because of the failure of the 1999 coating. The interior was inspected most recently in 2009. The steel stringers between the roof beams are corroded badly and need to be replaced. Norton Corrosion Limited inspected the reservoir’s cathodic protection system in 2017 (WTR-13-0123). They reported that the reservoir had adequate protection based on their testing results. One issue with this tank site is the aerial high voltage lines close to the steel tank. Based on the observations made during the 2009 inspection, the City performed a preliminary design (WTR-13-0104, Water Distribution Storage Planning Study) of replacing the existing reservoir with a 7-MG reservoir. The estimated cost of replacing the reservoir is $8.25 million. 2.2.3.4 Highlands 435 Reservoir – 1.5-MG (Highlands 435 PZ) Located at the Highlands Reservoir site east of the intersection of NE 12th Street and Monroe Avenue NE, this 1.5-MG reservoir was originally constructed as an uncovered reservoir during World War II (circa 1942). The reservoir was concrete-lined, rectangular in shape, partially in-ground and partially aboveground with bermed excavated material. In 1966, the reservoir was covered (W-0098). In 1986, the beams for the cover were sand blasted and painted. In 1987, the roof beams were inspected for cracks; none were found (W-0909). In 2000, CH2M Hill inspected the reservoir for leaks and a preliminary design was conducted to increase the inflow and outflow piping (WTR-13-0072). The inspection was prompted by a concern that the two Highlands 435 Reservoirs had been damaged in the 1995 Robinson Point Earthquake (5.0 magnitude) as evidenced by wet ground around the chlorination building (further examination discovered the problem was a leaking service line). Because of the concern that these reservoirs will suffer major damage in a large earthquake, the City plans to replace both reservoirs. In 2009, the City performed a preliminary design (WTR-13-0104, Water Distribution Storage Planning Study), which estimated the cost of replacing both reservoirs at $21.3 million for one 15-MG, two-compartment reservoir built in two phases. The reservoir replacement project is currently in final design review (W-3888). 2.2.3.5 Highlands 435 Reservoir – 2-MG (Highlands 435 PZ) Also located at the Highlands reservoir site, this covered, concrete lined, partially in-ground, partially aboveground reservoir was constructed in 1960 (W-0024). In 1986, the beams for the cover were sand blasted and painted. In 1987, the roof beams were inspected for cracks; some were found at the column locations (W-0909). In 1992, reinforcing collars were installed at the roof beam-column intersections and various cracks and joints in the concrete liner were sealed (W-1081). See discussion above for the 2000 inspection and reservoir replacement. There is a project under construction (WTR-27-03888, Replace Highlands Reservoirs and Mains) to replace the two reservoirs in Highlands 435 (Sections 2.2.3.4 and 2.2.3.5) with a 6.4-MG concrete partially buried reservoir. The tank will include a partition dividing it in half, so that it can be cleaned / maintained one half at a time and include replacement of mains along NE 12th from the reservoir site to Edmonds Ave NE and along Monroe Ave next to the site. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-18 | MAY 2021| FINAL 2.2.3.6 Highlands 565 Reservoir - 0.75-MG (Highlands 565 PZ) Also located at the Highlands reservoir site, this 0.75-MG elevated steel tank was constructed in 1960 (W-0018). CH2M Hill has periodically inspected it over the years (1969, 1973, 1977, 1985 1989, 1998, and 2009). In 1971, an impressed-current cathodic protection system was installed (W-0371). The exterior was recoated in 1978 (W-0476). In 1996, Chicago Bridge & Iron inspected the reservoir. Based on the inspection, the interior and exterior of the reservoir were recoated, the impressed-current cathodic protection system was replaced, and additional railing and a safety climb rail were added in 1997 (W-2210 and W-2303). During the 2001 Nisqually earthquake (6.8 magnitude), the cross bracing of the tower structure was plastically deformed. In 2003, the bracing was repaired and the tank structure seismically rehabilitated (W-3005). The rehabilitation consisted of installing friction dampeners on the cross bracing and flexible connections where the water mains interface with the tank. In 2009, a two-way flow meter was added to the single inlet / outlet pipe that connects the reservoir to the distribution system (W-3214). In 2010, LiquiVision Technology performed a dive inspection of the interior surfaces (WTR-13-0112). The interior protective coating appeared to be in good condition at that time. Norton Corrosion Limited inspected the reservoir’s cathodic protection system in 2017 (WTR-13-0123). They reported that the reservoir had adequate protection based on their testing results. 2.2.3.7 Hazen 565 Reservoir (Highlands 565 PZ) Located north of the Hazen High School campus with address 4901 NE Sunset Boulevard, this 4.2-MG steel standpipe was constructed in 2009 (W-3214). It has flow meters on both the inlet and outlet pipes that connects the reservoir to the distribution system. 2.2.3.8 Rolling Hills 590 Reservoir (Rolling Hills 590 PZ) Located at the Rolling Hills reservoir site near the intersection of Puget Drive SE and Edmonds Avenue SE, this 0.3-MG elevated steel tank was constructed in 1970 (W-0323). The exterior was recoated in 1980 (W-0524). Project W-3005 (see Section 2.2.3.5) also included repairing the Rolling Hills 590 Reservoir. The rehabilitation consisted of installing friction dampeners on the cross bracing and flexible connections where the water mains interface with the reservoir. In addition, both the interior and exterior were recoated and an impressed-current cathodic protection system was installed in 2003. Norton Corrosion Limited inspected the reservoir’s cathodic protection system in 2017 (WTR-13-0123). They reported that the reservoir had adequate protection based on their testing results. Replacement of this reservoir is included in the City’s long-term water CIP (Chapter 9). CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-19 Rolling Hills 590 Reservoir 2.2.3.9 Rolling Hills 490 Reservoir (Rolling Hills 490 PZ) Also located at the Rolling Hills reservoir site, this 3-MG aboveground steel reservoir was constructed in 2001 (W-2230). 2.2.3.10 West Hill Reservoir (West Hill 495 PZ) Located adjacent to Dimmitt Middle School near the intersection of 82nd Avenue S and S 126th Place, this 1.3-MG steel standpipe was constructed in 1985 (W-0489). Both the interior and exterior of the reservoir were recoated in 2010 (W-3488). Additionally, two concentric rings of handrail on the top of the standpipe were constructed and an impressed-current cathodic protection system was added as part of Project W-3488. Norton Corrosion Limited inspected the reservoir’s cathodic protection system in 2017 (WTR-13-0123). They reported that the reservoir had adequate protection based on their testing results. 2.2.3.11 South Talbot Reservoir (Talbot Hill 350 PZ) Located on Mill Avenue SE south of Carr Road, this 1.5-MG aboveground steel reservoir was constructed in 1990 (W-0722). CH2M Hill inspected the reservoir in 1998 (WTR-13-0063) and its interior and exterior protective coatings were founded to be in good and very good condition, respectively. In 2008, the exterior was recoated due to pitting that appeared to be from rocks CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-20 | MAY 2021| FINAL being thrown at the reservoir (W-3449). Water Utility staff performed an inspection of the interior of the reservoir in 2015. The interior protective coating appeared to be in generally good condition, with the exception of rust staining at the locations were the roof beams connect to the walls. The access ladder was also severely corroded at that time. South Talbot Reservoir CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-21 Table 2.4 Existing Storage Facilities Reservoir Name PZ Served Gross Volume (gallons) Year Constructed Base Elevation (ft) Overflow Elevation (ft) Height (ft) Diameter (ft) Type Highest Service Elevation (ft) 40 psi HGL (ft) 30 psi HGL (ft) 20 psi HGL (ft) Reservoir Volume w/40 psi (gallons) Reservoir Volume w/30 psi (gallons) Reservoir Volume w/20 psi (gallons) North Talbot Reservoir VLY 196 5,078,381 1976 173.2 199.7 26.5 N/A variable 129 221 198 175 0 268,292 4,695,107 Mt. Olivet Reservoir VLY 196 2,814,553 1954 146.9 184.1 37.2 113.5 cylindrical 129 221 198 175 0 0 673,555 Highlands 435 - 1.5-MG Reservoir HLD 435 1,555,223 1942 425.6 440.3 14.7 N/A variable 367 459 436 413 0 421,074 1,555,223 Highlands 435 - 2.0-MG Reservoir HLD 435 1,947,664 1960 425.3 439.8 14.5 N/A variable 367 459 436 413 0 467,439 1,947,664 Highlands 565 - 0.75-MG Reservoir HLD 565 747,985 1960 534.1 569.1 35.0 N/A variable 473 565 542 519 78,645 572,315 747,985 Hazen Reservoir HLD 565 4,203,521 2009 457.5 569.3 111.8 80 cylindrical 473 565 542 519 146,634 1,015,162 1,883,689 Rolling Hills 590 Reservoir RH 590 300,000 1970 565.5 593.6 28.1 N/A variable 476 568 545 522 269,305 300,000 300,000 Rolling Hills 490 Reservoir RH 490 3,036,535 2001 458.0 494.5 36.5 119 cylindrical 392 485 462 438 822,776 2,744,528 43,036,535 West Hill Reservoir WH 495 1,394,155 1985 395.6 498.6 103.0 48 cylindrical 393 485 462 439 178,398 491,068 803,737 South Talbot Reservoir TH 350 1,586,190 1990 326.6 353.6 27.0 100 cylindrical 254 346 323 300 421,809 1,586,190 1,586,190 Maplewood Clearwell MWD 79 212,846 1992 68.7 79.3 10.6 66 cylindrical N/A N/A N/A N/A 212,846 212,846 212,846 CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-23 2.2.4 Booster Pump Stations The City maintains and operates 12 pump stations that provide regular and emergency supply from lower pressure zones to the higher pressure zones. The Windsor Hills BPS, which had been a backup to the Mt. Olivet and Houser Way BPS, was taken out of service in 2010. A description of each of the facilities is included in the following sections. Table 2.5 provides a summary of each BPS with the rated capacity of each pump. 2.2.4.1 Mt. Olivet Booster Pump Station Located adjacent to the Mt. Olivet Reservoir, the Mt. Olivet BPS pumps from the Valley 196 PZ to the Highlands 435 PZ. The BPS was constructed in 1967 (W-0262). In 1989, one booster pump was added and the electrical, heating, and ventilation systems were rehabilitated (W-0931). In 2007, an emergency electrical power generation facility was constructed at the Mt. Olivet reservoir site to provide backup power for the Mt. Olivet BPS and Wells RW-1, RW-2, and RW-3 (W-3239). This BPS now has emergency backup electrical power with auto-start of the generator and auto-transfer from commercial to backup power. Flow from the station is measured by one meter located in a vault outside the station. The pumps are controlled by the water level elevation in the Highlands 435 Reservoirs. Mt. Olivet Booster Pump Station 2.2.4.2 Houser Way Booster Pump Station Located on the northwest corner of the intersection of Houser Way N and N Marion Street, the Houser Way BPS pumps from the Valley 196 PZ to the Highlands 435 and Kennydale 320 PZs. The BPS was constructed in 1996 (W-2089). The station has a receptacle for an emergency generator hook-up and a manual transfer switch. Meters located inside the station measure flow to the two pressure zones. The pumps are controlled by: 1. The water level elevation in the Highlands 435 PZ reservoirs. 2. The pressure in the Kennydale 320 PZ measured at the station. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-24 | MAY 2021| FINAL Table 2.5 Booster Pump Stations Name PZ Pumps From PZ Pumps To Pump Number Pump Capacity (gpm) Pump TDH (ft) Pump (hp) Total BPS Max Capacity BPS Firm Capacity (gpm) Backup Capacity (gpm) Standby Power Type (gpm) (mgd) Mt. Olivet VLY 196 HLD 435 1 2 3 1,050 1,500 1,800 300 320 360 100 150 200 4,350 6.3 2,550 4,350 Auto Start / Auto Transfer Houser Way VLY 196 VLY 196 KD 320 HLD 435 1 2 3 700 2,050 2,050 162 295 290 40 200 200 700 4,100 1.0 5.9 0 2,050 700 4,100 Trailer-in / Manual Monroe Ave HLD 435 HLD 565 1 2 1,500 1,000 80 60 75 50 2,500 3.6 1,000 0 None Highlands HLD 435 HLD 565 1 2 3 1,500 1,200 1,200 152 152 152 60 60 60 3,900 5.6 2,400 3,900 Auto Start / Auto Transfer West Hill VLY 196 WH 495 1 2 3 600 600 1,000 305 295 305 60 60 10 2,200 3.2 1,200 1,000 None None Auto Start, Diesel Direct Drive Rolling Hills(1) RH 490 RH 590 1 2 3 4 2,500 2,500 1,000 1,000 121 122 120 121 100 100 40 40 5,000 7.2 3,500 5,000 Auto Start / Auto Transfer North Talbot VLY 196 VLY 196 RH 490 TH 350 1 2 3 5 1,750 1,500 933 500 422 418 424 170 250 200 125 30 4,183 500 6.0 0.7 2,433 0 4,183 500 Auto Start / Auto Transfer Maplewood(2) MWD 79 RH 590 1 2 1,550 2,400 525 560 300 450 2,400 3.5 1,550 1,550 Trailer-in / Manual None HLD 565 4 5 2,400 1,550 560 252 450 300 2,400 3.5 1,550 1,550 None Trailer-in / Manual CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-25 Name PZ Pumps From PZ Pumps To Pump Number Pump Capacity (gpm) Pump TDH (ft) Pump (hp) Total BPS Max Capacity BPS Firm Capacity (gpm) Backup Capacity (gpm) Standby Power Type (gpm) (mgd) South Talbot(3) VLY 196 TH 350 1 2 3 4 200 600 3,500 3,500 200 200 225 225 20 50 250 250 4,300 6.2 3,500 4,300 Trailer-in / Manual Tiffany Park SPU 490 RH 590 1 2 350 700 196 168 25 40 1,050 1.5 350 0 None Fred Nelson SPU 490 RH 590 2 3 700 225 168 196 40 25 925 1.3 225 0 None Dimmitt(4) Skyway 460 WH 495 1 2 3 4 300 300 300 2,400 160 160 160 196 15 15 15 200 1,600 2.3 900 1,600 Auto Start / Auto Transfer Notes: (1) Any two pumps may be operated at one time. (2) The current maximum capacity of the wellfield is 3,000-gpm and is limited by current installed treatment. Two of the 1,550-gpm pumps or one of the 2,400-gpm pumps may be operated at one time based upon treatment limitations. (3) Only one of the 3,500-gpm fire pumps can be run at one time. Preliminary (30 percent) design in 2018 for installing emergency generator and auto transfer switches and replacing the existing fire pumps (two 3,500-gpm). Construction by ~ 2021. (4) There are two modes of moving water from Skyway to Renton: 1) Pump from Skyway 460 PZ. There is a physical limit of 1,600-gpm in this mode because of limited size of the metered connection to the pressure zone and friction losses. Pumping above 1,600-gpm causes negative pressures on the suction side of the pump. 2) Gravity feed from Skyway 550 PZ via a PRV located in the Dimmitt BPS. Abbreviations: TDH - total dynamic head; hp - horsepower. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-26 | MAY 2021| FINAL 2.2.4.3 Monroe Avenue Booster Pump Station Located on the northwest corner of the intersection of NE 4th Street and Monroe Avenue NE, the Monroe Avenue BPS pumps from the Highlands 435 PZ to the Highlands 565 PZ. An 8-inch supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) controlled transfer valve can allow flow from the Highlands 565 PZ to the Highlands 435 PZ. The valve is used in coordination with the Maplewood BPS when water is being pumped to the Highlands 565 PZ. The BPS was constructed in 1969 (W-0324). In 1991, the station’s electrical system was rehabilitated (W-1048). Flow from the station is measured by one meter located in the station. The pumps are controlled by the water level elevation in the Highlands 565 Reservoir. The pump station does not have emergency power backup capability. Installing backup power is included in the City’s short-term water CIP (Chapter 9). 2.2.4.4 Highlands Booster Pump Station Located at the Highlands Reservoir site, the Highlands BPS pumps from the Highlands 435 PZ to the Highlands 565 PZ. The BPS was constructed in 1960 (W-0018). In 1989, two pumps and motors were replaced and the third pump was rebuilt; the electrical system was also rehabilitated (W-0924). An isolation valve was installed in 1992 (W-1023). In 2003, the wooden doors on the west side of the building were replaced with metal. This station has emergency power backup with auto-start and auto-transfer (W-0815). A new 275 kW electrical generator with auto start / auto transfer was completed in 2017 (WTR-27-03759). Flow from the station is measured by one meter located in a vault outside the station. The pumps are controlled by the water level elevation in the Hazen 565 Reservoir. Replacement of this pump station is planned to occur concurrently with the Highlands 435 Reservoirs Replacement Project. Highlands Booster Pump Station CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-27 2.2.4.5 North Talbot Booster Pump Station Located near the intersection of SR 515 (Benson Road) and South 19th Street, the North Talbot BPS pumps from the Valley 196 PZ to the Rolling Hills 490 and Talbot Hill 350 PZs. It originally pumped to the Rolling Hills 590 PZ and Talbot Hill 350 PZ. The BPS was constructed in 1979 (W-0450). A manual transfer switch with Kirk-Key safety system was added in 1999 to allow the station to be powered by a City-owned portable generator (W-2784). In 2007, an emergency electrical power generation facility was constructed at the North Talbot Reservoir site to supply power to the North Talbot BPS (W-3239). The power is auto-start and auto-transfer. The portable generator and manual transfer switch configuration remains as a secondary backup. In 2001, a backpressure sustaining valve was added to the station’s primary discharge when a portion of the Rolling Hills 590 PZ was converted to the Rolling Hills 490 PZ as part of the Rolling Hills 3 MG reservoir and pump station project (W-2230). The station’s electrical, heating, and ventilation and control systems were rehabilitated in 2003 (W-2878). Flow to the two pressure zones is measured by meters located inside the station. The pumps are controlled by: 1. The water level elevation in the Rolling Hills 490 Reservoir. 2. The water level elevation in the South Talbot Reservoir. North Talbot Booster Pump Station CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-28 | MAY 2021| FINAL 2.2.4.6 Rolling Hills Booster Pump Station Located at the Rolling Hills reservoirs site, the Rolling Hills BPS pumps from the Rolling Hills 490 PZ to the Rolling Hills 590 PZ. The BPS was constructed in 2001 (W-2230). Two backpressure sustaining valves in the pump station allow water to flow from the Rolling Hills 590 PZ to the Rolling Hills 490 PZ when the Rolling Hills 590 Reservoir is near overflow. This allows the Rolling Hills 3-MG reservoir to be filled by either the Maplewood BPS or the North Talbot BPS. Two flow meters are located inside the station. One flow meter measures flow from the Rolling Hills 490 PZ to the Rolling Hills 590 PZ. Another meter measures flow from the Rolling Hills 590 PZ to the Rolling Hills 490 PZ. The pumps are controlled by the water level elevation in the Rolling Hills 590 Reservoir. This pump station is equipped with an emergency generator with auto-start and auto-transfer, but only allows two pumps to operate at the same time. It is recommended that backup power be installed such that all four pumps can be operated at the same time. This project is included in the City’s short-term water CIP (Project ST-01 in Chapter 9). 2.2.4.7 Tiffany Park Booster Pump Station Located in Tiffany Park near the intersection of Kirkland Avenue SE and SE 20th Court, the Tiffany Park BPS pumps from the SPU 66-inch Cedar River transmission main to the Rolling Hills 590 PZ. The BPS was constructed in 1962 (W-0226). The pumps were replaced in 1972 (W-0383). The entire station was rehabilitated in 1984 (W-0742) but does not have emergency power backup capability. In 2011, a flow meter was installed. The pumps are controlled by the water level elevation in the Rolling Hills 590 Reservoir. CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-29 Tiffany Park Booster Pump Station 2.2.4.8 Fred Nelson Booster Pump Station Located adjacent to the Nelsen Middle School on Benson Road S, the Fred Nelson BPS pumps from SPU 60-inch Bow Lake transmission main to the Rolling Hills 590 PZ. The BPS was constructed in 1962 (W-1125). It does not have emergency power backup capability. In 2011, a flow meter was installed. The pumps are controlled by the water level elevation in the Rolling Hills 590 Reservoir. 2.2.4.9 Maplewood Booster Pump Station Located at the Maplewood Golf Course, the Maplewood BPS pumps from the clearwell to the Highlands 565 and Rolling Hills 590 PZs. The BPS was constructed in 1995 (W-1052). The BPS roof was replaced in 2016 (W-3765). Flow to the two pressure zones is measured by meters located inside the station. The pumps are controlled by: 1. The water level elevation in the Highlands 565 Reservoir. 2. The water level elevations in both the Rolling Hills 490 and 590 Reservoirs. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-30 | MAY 2021| FINAL The Maplewood Treatment and BPS Facility is equipped with a manual transfer switch with Kirk-Key safety system that allows one production well, one booster pump, and associated treatment equipment to be powered by a City-owned portable generator (W-2953). It is recommended that auto-start and auto-transfer capability be installed at the Maplewood BPS. This project is included in the City’s short-term water CIP (Chapter 9). 2.2.4.10 South Talbot Booster Pump Station Located on SW 43rd Street just west of SR 167, the South Talbot BPS pumps from the Valley 196 PZ to the Talbot Hill 350 PZ. The BPS was constructed in 1982 (W-0600). A manual transfer switch with Kirk-Key safety system was added in 1999 to allow the station to be powered by a City-owned portable generator (W-2784). Flow from the station is measured by one meter located in the station. The domestic pumps are controlled by the water level elevation in the South Talbot Reservoir, while the fire flow pumps are controlled by the pressure of the Talbot Hill 350 PZ measured at the station. Note that only one fire pump can operate at a time. Installing emergency backup power at the South Talbot BPS is currently in preliminary design (WTR-13-0129) and is included in the City’s short-term water CIP (Chapter 9). 2.2.4.11 West Hill Booster Pump Station Located on West Perimeter Road at the Renton Municipal Airport near the control tower, the West Hill BPS pumps from the Valley 196 PZ to the West Hill 495 PZ. The BPS was constructed in 1985 (W-0715). It has one 1,000-gpm fire pump that is driven by a diesel engine with auto-start and two 600-gpm domestic pumps. Flow from the station is measured by one meter located in the station. The pumps are controlled by the water level elevation in the West Hill Reservoir. Installing emergency backup power at the West Hill BPS is currently in preliminary design (WTR-13-0129) and is included in the City’s short-term water CIP (Chapter 9). 2.2.5 Pressure Reducing Stations PRV stations are installed between pressure zones and allow water from a higher-level pressure zone to flow into a lower level pressure zone at reduced pressures. The PRVs in the pressure reducing stations hydraulically vary the flow rate through the valve to maintain a constant and preset discharge pressure up to the limit of the flow capacity of the valve. The effect of a PRV on the lower pressure zone is the same as that as a reservoir whose overflow elevation is the same as the pressure setting on the valve (hydraulic elevation). Lead PRVs are located in hydraulically remote areas from both upper and lower pressure zone reservoirs to promote good circulation in both pressure zones, thus maintaining water quality. Lag PRVs may be located hydraulically closer to storage to minimize system head losses during high flow rate conditions when the lag valves need to operate. The primary purposes of the PRVs in the City’s system are as follows: 1. To maintain pressures in the lower pressure zone during high demand periods. 2. To increase pressure and flow which would otherwise be required during an emergency such as a fire or pipeline failure. 3. To achieve optimum circulation in each pressure zone, thereby maintaining water quality. When a PRV malfunctions in an open position and allows downstream pressures to rise above the PRV setpoint, damage can occur due to over pressuring of the pressure zone. The probability CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-31 of over pressuring the lower pressure zone can be greatly reduced by placing a pressure relief valve on the discharge (pressure-reduced) side of the PRV. If a pressure sensor is also installed on the PRV discharge and the pressure reading is telemetered and alarmed at the central control center, the City will know quickly when the failure is occurring and will be able to minimize damages as a result of the PRV failure. The City’s PRV stations currently in operation are listed in Table 2.6. WTR-13-00130 (PRV Station Rehabilitation and Replacement Study) occurred in 2018. The following list provides additional information on PRV stations that are no longer in operation: • PRV Stations 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, and 33 were put on inactive status (zone valves opened; PRVs set to wide open) in 2001 as part of the reconfiguration of the Rolling Hills 490 and 590 PZs following the completion of the Rolling Hills 3-MG Reservoir and BPS project (W-2230). • PRV Station 6 is closed and out-of-service. • PRV Station 11 was removed in 1995 (W-2126). • PRV Station 15 was removed in 1992. • PRV Station 27 was removed in 1992. • PRV Station 42 was removed in 2000. Pressure Reducing Valve (PRV) 52 CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-33 Table 2.6 Pressure Reducing Stations Station Number Station Location Receiving PZ Supplying PZ Map Book Index No. Map Book Page No. Project Number Valve Size (inches) Valve Elevation (ft) Pressure Settings (psi) 1 Taylor Pl NW southeast of intersection of Taylor Pl NW and Stevens Ave NW 602 Taylor Pl NW WH 300 WH 495 E3W 73 W-0704 2 4 8 154.6 65 60 50 2 NW 4th Street & Lind Ave NW 371 Lind Ave NW WH 300 WH 495 E3W 74 W-0308 4 8 176.6 40 40 3 SW Langston Rd SW & Bagley Place SW 510 Langston Rd SW WH 300 Earl 370 F3W 75 W-0285 4 8 178.6 40 40 47 NW 3rd Street & Maple Ave NW 301 Maple Ave NW WH 300 WH 495 F3W 112 W-3123 2 8 149.5 70 50 4 Mill Ave S & S 6th Street 536 Mill Ave S SH 370 RH 490 F4W 76 W-2240 8 157.5 85 5 Cedar Ave S & S 5th Street 444 Cedar Ave S SH 370 RH 490 F4W 77 W-0410 4 191.6 70 6(1) Beacon Way S between Renton Ave S & Cedar Ave S 1318 Beacon Way S SH 370 SPU CRPL #3 490 F4W 78 W-1939 6 6 267.6 37 37 22 Renton Ave S & Beacon Way S 424 Renton Ave S SH 370 RH 490 F4W 92 W-1939 1.5 6 222.6 60 50 7 Benson Rd S & Berkshire Apt Access Rd South of 1240 Benson Rd S ETH 300 RH 490 G4W 79 W-0620 2 8 125.9 92 82 8 Eagle Ridge Dr & Berkshire Apt Access Rd North of 1600 S Eagle Ridge Dr ETH 300 RH 490 G4W 80 W-0620 3 10 220.5 48 35 9 North Talbot BPS 730 S 19th Street TH 350 RH 490 G3E 81 W-0419 3 8 165.1 76 65 12 S 23rd Street & Williams Ave S 2217 Williams Ave S TH 350 RH 490 G3E 83 W-2126 4 12 222.6 48 45 28 S 23rd Street & Shattuck Ave S 2226 Shattuck Ave S TH 350 SPU Bow Lake Pipeline 490 G3E 97 W-0709, 0708 2 8 188.1 50 45 49 S 35th Street & Wells Ave S West of 1001 S 35th Street TH 350 RH 490 H4W 114 W-3190 3 12 198.9 64 55 10 S 16th Street & Talbot Rd S East of 1605 Talbot Rd S WTH 300 TH 350 G3E 82 W-0552 2 6 112 80 73 29 S 23rd Street & Shattuck Ave S 2226 Shattuck Ave S WTH 300 TH 350 G3E 98 W-0709, 0708 2 8 187.6 41 31 13 Meadow Ave N & N 28th Street 1440 N 28th Street KD 320 HLD 435 C4W 84 W-2180 3 10 203 54 44 14 Meadow Ave N & N 32nd Street 1415 N 32nd Street KD 320 HLD 435 C4W 85 W-0456 4 12 208.6 54 37 16 NE 3rd Street & Sunset Blvd N South of 324 Sunset Blvd N KD 320 HLD 435 F4E 86 W-0395 4 12 41 122 107 26 Marina Landing Apartments 1300 N 20th Street KD 320 HLD 435 D4W 96 W-1994 2.5 10 85.8 105 95 CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-35 Station Number Station Location Receiving PZ Supplying PZ Map Book Index No. Map Book Page No. Project Number Valve Size (inches) Valve Elevation (ft) Pressure Settings (psi) 39 Inside Houser Way BPS 325 Houser Way N KD 320 HLD 435 - - W-2089 3 10 35 110 110 43 N 26th Street & Park Ave N 1405 N 26th Street KD 320 HLD 435 D4W 108 W-2820 2 8 180 65 55 52 North of West Hill BPS 615 West Perimeter Road Renton Municipal Airport KD 320 WH 495 E3W 117 W-3324 2 2 10 10 21.7 130 125 115 115 23 Tukwila Emergency Intertie 17300 West Valley Highway VLY 196 Tukwila 360 H2W 93 W-0515 1.25 8 24.6 50 45 24 Boeing Longacres Intertie PID 0886700140 VLY 196 SPU Bow Lake Pipeline 490 H2E 94 W-2071 10 10 12 120 55 25 Kent Intertie SW 43rd Street & Lind Ave SW 4208 Lind Ave SW VLY 196 Kent 240 I3W 95 W-0515 1.25 10 17.3 52 47 30 Park Ave N & N 8th Street 750 Park Ave N VLY 196 KD 320 E4W 99 W-1922 3 12 26.1 65 65 31 Garden Ave N & N 7th Street 636 Park Ave N VLY 196 KD 320 E4W 100 W-1922 3 12 25.8 66 66 32 SW Sunset Blvd & Maple Ave SW 203 SW Sunset Blvd VLY 196 WH 300 F3W 101 W-0854 2 8 68.4 50 50 36 Talbot Rd S & 177th Ave SE 17600 Talbot Rd S TH 270 TH 350 I3E 105 W-2091 3 12 98.6 75 70 37 East of N 4th Street & Houser Way N North of 353 Sunset Blvd N VLY 196 HLD 435 F4E 106 W-2089 3 12 46 58 58 40 Inside Maplewood BPS 4024 Maple Valley Highway VLY 196 RH 590 - - W-1052 12 80 40 48 NW Corner of Maplewood BPS 4024 Maple Valley Highway VLY 196 HLD 565 G6W 113 W-2953 2 2 8 8 80 47 100 41 100 34 Benson Rd S & S 26th Street SE corner of 2223 Benson Rd S RH 490 RH 590 H4W 103 W-1827 2.5 10 372.1 48 42 46 SE 8th Place Between S 7th Court & SE 8th Street South of 1801 SE 8th Place RH 490 RH 590 G4E 111 W-2981 3 12 385.2 40 35 35 Thomas Ave SW & SW Langston Rd PID 1823059026 EARL 370 SPU CRPL #2 520 F3W 104 W-1033 6 233 48 41 84th Ave S & Renton Ave S 13223 84th Ave S EARL 370 WH 495 F3W 107 W-2280 3 12 218 74 68 38(2) Inside Monroe Ave BPS Transfer Valve SE corner of 401 Monroe Ave NE HLD 435 HLD 565 - - None 8 343.6 44 Shadow Hawk Condos SE 12th Street & Kirkland Ave SE RH 395 RH 590 G5W 109 W-2900 3 12 240.5 65 55 CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-37 Station Number Station Location Receiving PZ Supplying PZ Map Book Index No. Map Book Page No. Project Number Valve Size (inches) Valve Elevation (ft) Pressure Settings (psi) 45 Shadow Hawk Condos SE 12th Street & Harrington Place SE RH 395 RH 590 G5W 110 W-2900 3 12 296 36 26 50 East of 4127 Wells Ave N KD 218 KD 320 C4W 115 W-3330 2.5 10 33.3 80 70 51 N 42nd Place & N 43rd Street KD 218 KD 320 B4W 116 W-3330 2.5 10 32 74 70 53(3) 2610 Lynwood Ave NE Coal Creek UD 440 HLD 565 - - W-3455 8 346.5 30 54(4) Perimeter Rd W, east of West Hill BPS VLY 196 KD 320 - - W-3810 2 8 21 70 65 55(5) S 23rd St and Wells Ct S TH 350 RH 490 - - W-3969 2 6 219.1 60 50 20 Grant Ave S, south of S 10th St RH 490 RH 490 G4W 90 W-1660, 0410 2.5 10 330.6 Open(6) 65 Notes: (1) PRV is closed and out of service. (2) PRV is present, but not used. (3) PRV 53 serviced by Coal Creek UD. (4) Added in January 2016. (5) Added in January 2017. (6) PRV station only activated to temporarily change pressure zone areas when reservoir is taken out of service. CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-39 2.2.6 Distribution System The City’s water pipelines are shown in plan view in Figure 2.1. Tables 2.7a and 2.7b summarize the length of mains in the water system by diameter, material, and age. Table 2.7a Pipe Inventory – Length by Diameter and Age Diameter Size 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s Total (ft) Total System Percent (%) 4-inch and less 8,287 1,372 1,535 35 11,673 5,272 17,313 8,010 5,437 4,414 7,362 2,446 73,156 4.5% 6-inch 8,689 20,755 584 164 12,537 10,049 90,223 30,585 14,408 4,609 1,003 747 194,352 11.9% 8-inch 263 7,427 0 328 5,389 5,655 54,354 91,592 120,720 119,120 116,053 30,997 551,899 33.9% 10/12-inch 0 2 0 0 9,650 16,846 72,836 102,531 177,076 141,595 122,544 33,861 676,941 41.5% 14/16-inch 0 769 0 0 0 4,283 14,354 17,409 25,305 28,436 11,957 2,507 105,020 6.4% 18/20-inch 0 0 0 0 0 2,353 1,009 599 1,303 2,094 215 93 7,667 0.5% 24-inch 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,058 11,396 5,933 1,066 57 16 20,526 1.3% Total (ft) 17,239 30,324 2,119 528 39,249 44,458 252,148 262,122 350,181 301,335 259,190 70,667 1,629,560 Total System Percent (%) 1.1% 1.9% 0.1% 0.0% 2.4% 2.7% 15.5% 16.1% 21.5% 18.5% 15.9% 4.3% 100.0% 100.0% Table 2.7b Pipe Inventory – Length by Diameter and Material Diameter Size Asbestos Cement Cast Iron Copper Ductile Iron Galvanized Iron Galvanized Steel HDPE PVC Steel Total (ft) Total System Percent (%) 4-inch and less 285 42,136 45 21,474 941 3,877 98 265 4,034 73,156 4.5% 6-inch 4,193 146,216 0 28,558 4 0 0 0 15,381 194,352 11.9% 8-inch 5,359 110,329 0 430,928 0 0 0 0 5,283 551,899 33.9% 10/12-inch 7,726 101,841 0 561,900 0 0 145 1,596 3,733 676,941 41.5% 14/16-inch 48 18,128 0 85,117 0 0 594 1,081 51 105,020 6.4% 18/20-inch 0 3,362 0 4,305 0 0 0 0 0 7,667 0.5% 24-inch 0 0 0 20,526 0 0 0 0 0 20,526 1.3% Total (ft) 17,611 422,013 45 1,152,807 945 3,877 838 2,942 28,483 1,629,560 100.0% Total System Percent (%) 1.1% 25.9% 0.0% 70.7% 0.1% 0.2% 0.1% 0.2% 1.7% 100.0% Note: Abbreviations: HDPE - high-density polyethylene; PVC - polyvinyl chloride. CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-41 The City’s system is comprised of two types of pipes: • Transmission pipelines, and • Distribution pipelines. 2.2.6.1 Transmission Mains Transmission capability for the system is primarily provided by 12-inch, 16-inch, and 24-inch diameter pipelines that convey water from the wellfields located in Liberty Park, Cedar River Park, and the Maplewood Golf Course to various points within the service area. Transmission mains generally convey water between the supply sources (reservoirs or wells) to the local distribution grid and individual customers. Ideally, minimal head loss should occur in transmission pipelines during normal demand periods, allowing these mains to also convey fire demands to the distribution system and to meet other emergencies without experiencing adverse head losses. Since approximately 96 to 97percent of the system’s supply is provided from the wellfields and artesian spring, major transmission facilities are required in the Valley 196 PZ to ensure adequate water distribution throughout the service area. As shown in Figure 2.1, the transmission pipelines are located primarily along the major transportation corridors. The looped 8-inch pipelines in the well-developed residential areas of the system also provide some transmission capability: • Transmission pipelines in the Valley 196 PZ predominantly run north to south, supplying the downtown business pressure zone, the Green River Valley industrial complexes, and the BPS that serve the other areas of the system. • East-west pipelines that connect to the north-south transmission mains also provide additional transmission capacity. The pipe loops or grids formed by these connections help to increase system reliability and capacity throughout the system. • Transmission pipelines from the Maplewood Wellfield carry finished water to the Highlands and Rolling Hills PZs. Both transmission pipeline routes follow unimproved corridors and steep slopes. A high-pressure fire loop (320-ft hydraulic grade line) encompasses a high-risk area of the industrial sector near the Paccar and Boeing plants for improved fire protection. • For areas on the eastern side of the valley, the topography of the terrain dictates that the transmission corridors run in a north-south orientation within each pressure zone and in a west-east orientation between the different pressure zones. • The transmission corridor in the West Hill area runs east and west from the West Hill BPS to the reservoir and north and south on 84th Avenue S. A separate transmission route connects the reservoir with Skyway Water and Sewer District. Looped 8-inch and 6-inch distribution mains provide a large percentage of the transmission capacity in the West Hill area. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-42 | MAY 2021| FINAL Pipeline -Flex Joint Installation 2.2.6.2 Distribution Mains Unlike, transmission pipes, the distribution system functions by meeting individual demands in the immediate vicinity via branching and looping pipelines through the service area. Figure 2.1 also presents the smaller pipelines, below 12 inches in diameter, which convey water from the transmission grid to the individual service connections. The transmission and distribution system is comprised of water mains of four different materials: asbestos cement, steel, ductile iron, and cast iron. Current City policy is to replace all asbestos cement and steel water mains in the system as the budget permits, since transmission lines made of these materials are prone to leakage and failure. The City completed deployment of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) throughout the entire system in 2015 (W-3499). The AMI system enhances the City’s water conservation activities, improves leak detection capabilities, and optimizes pumping of the City’s water supply wells. 2.2.7 Treatment The City began chlorinating its drinking water in 1976. Each source treatment is currently designed with primary disinfection to provide 4-log inactivation of viruses (CT of 6 mg-min/L) and the City maintains a chlorine residual between 0.6 and 1.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L) throughout the distribution system. CT pipelines were installed at Springbrook Springs and in Liberty Park and Cedar River Park for the Downtown Wells. Primary disinfection at Wells PW-11, PW-12 and PW-17 occurs at the Maplewood Water Treatment Plant as a result of the treatment process to remove ammonia from the raw water. Water in the Chlorine Contact Basin and Clearwell has a contact of at least four hours before entering the distribution system. Each source is equipped with an automatic shutdown and alert notification when the chlorine residual drops below a safe level. Renton citizens voted for fluoridation in 1985. The current fluoride target dose is 0.7 mg/L, as recommended by DOH. Wells RW-1, RW-2, RW-3, and EW-3R have fluoride saturation and metering equipment located in the wellhouses. Wells PW-8 and PW-9 are served by the CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-43 Fluoridation Building, which is located next to Well PW-8. This building also serves as a storage facility for bagged sodium fluoride. Fluoridation for Wells PW-11, PW-12, and PW-17 occurs in the Maplewood BPS and Treatment Building. In 1999, the City began treating the water from the Downtown Wells and Springbrook Springs with sodium hydroxide to raise the pH of the water. The goal is to decrease the corrosivity of the water and to comply with the Lead and Copper Rule. For the Downtown Wells, sodium hydroxide is stored at the Corrosion Control Treatment Facility (CCTF) located in Cedar River Park. From this facility, diluted sodium hydroxide is fed to each of the Downtown Wells via HDPE pipes. At Springbrook Springs sodium hydroxide is fed from a storage building, which is located adjacent to the chlorination building. A corrosion inhibitor and sequestering agent (Aqua Mag®) is also used for additional corrosion control in areas of the distribution system that contain a high number of unlined cast iron water mains. In 2006, the City redesigned the treatment method at Maplewood to include the removal of manganese using greensand filters, hydrogen sulfide using GAC, and ammonia using sodium hypochlorite. Maplewood Treatment Facility 2.2.8 Telemetry and SCADA The telemetry and SCADA systems for the water system have changed over the years with the changes in technology that is available. The following is a brief description of the current system. Certain aspects of operation and capability are not discussed for security reasons. Each site (all sources, all booster pump stations, all reservoirs, all treatment facilities, Boeing Longacres Intertie, Skyway Wholesale Meter, Dimmitt BPS, Coal Creek emergency intertie) has a remote telemetry unit (RTU) that in some cases also serves as a programmable logic controller (PLC). Information about the site is forwarded from the site to the master telemetry unit (MTU) that is located at the Water System Control Room (City Shops Administration Building). The MTU CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 02 2-44 | MAY 2021| FINAL sends information and instructions back to the RTUs. Signals between the RTUs and MTU travel either by dedicated phone lines or by radio waves. At the Water System Control Room, the operations staff monitor (and control as necessary) the system using a Human Machine Interface (HMI). The HMI is a PC running software that communicates with the MTU and can display information. The HMI computer also runs an auto-dialer application (Win 911) that calls a 24-hour manned call service and/or water shop stand-by staff. There is a backup auto-dialer that is used in the event the HMI computer or MTU fails. Each RTU, the MTU, and the HMI computer have various levels of backup power and redundancy. Various analog (e.g., flow rate, water elevation), discrete (e.g., pump status), and alarm information is stored in a SQL Server database for historical and analysis purposes. By 2016, the City finished upgrading its MTU and RTUs to Emerson Control Wave Micro equipment (W-3826). All radios were changed to Viper SC 450-512-megahertz (MHz) radio units in 2015. The City also added fiber connection for North Talbot BPS, North Talbot Reservoir, North Talbot generator building, Mt. Olivet BPS, Mt. Olivet Reservoir, and Mt. Olivet generator building in 2017 (W-3885). In-line Water Quality Meters at the Maplewood WTP CHAPTER 02 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 2-45 2.3 Summary of Updates to System Since 2012 Plan The following is a list of updates and improvements completed by the City since the completion of the last Water System Plan in 2012: • Major Pipe Replacement Projects: - Sunset Lane NE Improvement Project – WTR2703875 – 2017. - Renton Hill Utility Improvements - WTR2703824 – 2019. - SE 5th St AC Main Replacement Project - WTR2703604 - 2012. - Rainier Ave S Utilities Improvements - WTR2703430 - 2013. - President Park Main Replacement Project - WTR2703638 - 2013. - NE 5th Pl Water Main Replacement - WTR2703673 - 2014. - Monterey Terrace Water Main Replacement - WTR2703674 - 2014. - SW 27th St-Strander Blvd Extension Project - WTR2703693 - 2014. - Lake Youngs Ct SE Project - WTR2704017 - 2019. - Renton Ave S Resurfacing Project - WTR2704043 - 2019. • Added primary disinfection for Springbrook Springs – WTR2703648 – 2013. • Added emergency power for CCTF building - WTR2703583 – 2013. • SPU Intertie Upgrades, Upgrade three interties with SPU for the purpose of purchasing water on a routine basis: Bow Lake Intertie, Fred Nelson BPS and Tiffany Park BPS – WTR2703553 – 2013. • Added primary disinfection for Wells EW-3R, PW-8 and PW-9 – WTR2703582 – 2014. • Added security fencing at West Hill reservoir, South Talbot reservoir, South Talbot BPS, Hazen Reservoir – WTR2703764 – 2014. • SCADA / Telemetry, Changed operating frequency of radios because old frequency was getting ‘stepped on’. Changed all radios to Viper SC 450-512 MHZ radio units with programmable frequencies and TCP / IP connectivity capabilities – WTR2703767 – 2015. • Maplewood WTP, Equipment access and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) mitigation improvements. Added access platforms around GAC contactors and greensand filter vessels; ventilation improvements – WTR2703610 – 2015. • Repaired Fluoride Building Roof – WTR2703766 – 2015. • Advanced Metering Infrastructure, Completed deployment – WTR2703499 – 2015. • Added PRV Station 54 at Renton Airport – WTR2703810 – 2016. • Replaced Maplewood BPS Roof – WTR2703765 – 2016. • Replaced Wellhouse (Wells 1-2-3) Roof – WTR2703806 – 2016. • SCADA / Telemetry, Finished upgrading MTU / RTUs to Emerson Control Wave Micro equipment – WTR2703826 – 2016. • Added fiber connectivity for North Talbot BPS, North Talbot reservoir, North Talbot generator building, Mt Olivet BPS, Mt Olivet reservoir and Mt Olivet generator building – WTR2703885 – 2017. • Added PRV Station 55 at Wells Ct S – WTR2703969 – 2017. CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-1 Chapter 3 DEMAND PROJECTIONS 3.1 Introduction and Methodology Overview Three future water demand scenarios (Low, Medium, and High) were projected for the City of Renton (City) using the following information: • Historical production and consumption trends from 2008 to 2017. • Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) demographic projections. • Future predictions of the impacts placed on demands by factors such as water use efficiency (WUE), climate change, and the expected future consumption of the City’s largest water consumers. The Medium scenario's predictions most closely resemble the City’s future demands, while the Low and High demand projection scenarios provide a range that the City’s future water demands are expected to fall within. The High and Medium scenarios were used in the Chapter 6 supply analysis, which describes when the City must supplement its own supply with wholesale water purchased from Seattle Public Utilities (SPU). The Medium scenario was used for the Chapter 7 system analysis, which determines future pumping, storage, and distribution system requirements. Between 2008 and 2017, the City’s average day demand (ADD) was approximately 7 million gallons per day (mgd). During that time, historical maximum day demands (MDD) were approximately 13 mgd. The City’s typical Single-Family household consumes 159 gallons per day (gpd). For demographic trends, PSRC predicts approximately 1 percent annual growth in the number of City households and 1.9 percent annual growth in the number of employees over the 20-year planning period. The same projections for each pressure zone (PZ) were used to also predict the number of future water connections in the system. The City’s WUE program will also affect future demands. To plan its water system, the City selected three measurable WUE goals, which were incorporated into the demand projections: 1. Limit the peaking factor to less than 2.0. 2. Reduce distribution system leakage (DSL) to 10 percent or less by 2022. 3. Maintain an equivalent residential unit (ERU) value under 160 gpd/ERU. 3.2 Land Use The City’s water service area encompasses the majority of the Renton city limits, small portions of unincorporated King County, and a few parcels within the City of Tukwila. Northwest of Interstate 405 (I-405) and west of Washington highway 167 (WA-167), the City is predominantly commercial and industrial, while the areas east of I-405 and WA-167 are less dense and more residential. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-2 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 3.1 shows the City’s zoning, which was used as the baseline for the analysis presented in this chapter. Figure 3.2 shows the City’s existing land use, while Figure 3.3 shows future land use based on zoning of the City and King County. For this Plan, the City’s zoning and land use data was compiled into 11 land-use designations as follows: • Agriculture. • Commercial. • Industrial. • Mixed Use. • Multi-Family. • Open Space. • Park. • Public/Quasi-public. • Right of Way. • Single-Family. • Vacant. The City’s Comprehensive Plan encourages high-density, mixed-use redevelopment of the City Center, South Lake Washington/Southport area, and Sunset Neighborhood. Much of the City’s vacant parcels are zoned for industrial and commercial purposes. 3.3 Historical Supply and Consumption To help Carollo Engineers, Inc. (Carollo) establish historical demand trends, the City provided historical water purchase records, the number of connections, and consumption data between 2008 and 2017. The data was then evaluated to characterize the unique water use of the City’s customers, generate several key demand parameters, and predict future water demand. East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson Dr S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E SunsetBlvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y SE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Val l e y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd §¨¦5 ?æ ?Å ?ç Lake Boren LakeYoungs PantherLake LakeWashington CA IH R-4 R-4R-4 R-4RC R-4 R-8R-4R-1 R-8 RM-F COCO CO R-4 COCO R-4 R-1 RM-F R-8CACO COCAIM CO R-1IMIMR-8ILCO R-10IL IL R-8 IM IL IL R-6 IM CA IM CAIMCA CAIMCA CA CA RC R-8 R-8R-8 R-8 R-8IH RM-F R-6RM-F R-8RM-F R-8R-6COCO R-1 IL RM-F R-6RM-F R-8 R-8 R-8 R-6 CO R-8 R-8 R-8R-8 R-8 IM COCO R-8 R-1 R-8 R-8R-8R-6 R-6 R-6 R-8COIMIMIMIMIMR-6 R-8R-8 R-8 R-8IM R-4 CA RM-F RM-F R-14RC R-4 R-8R-8R-8 R-8 R-14 CAIM CA R-14 CO CDR-14 R-14 CD CDR-14CD CDCDCD CDCDCDCD CD CD CD CD CD IMCOIMIM R-4IMCO R-8 R-4 RC RM-F R-8RM-F R-6 R-6 R-6 R-6R-6 R-6 R-8 CN CA CA R-8 R-10CAR-8 R-8 IH R-8R-8 R-8R-8 R-10 RMHR-8 R-8 R-6CORR-8 R-8 R-8 R-6R-10 CA R-8 R-8R-8 R-10R-10 R-6CACDR-8CAR-8 R-10 R-8R-6R-6 CACAR-8 R-10CACACAR-8 R-10 R-10 R-10RM-FR-8R-8R-8R-8 COCA IL R-8 R-10 CA CAR-8 CA CA R-8 CAR-8CA RM-FR-8R-8 CA CAR-10R-10 RM-F CARM-F R-10 R-8 R-10 CACARM-F R-8 R-8 CA CA CAR-8R-8 R-8 CAR-8R-8 RM-FR-8 R-8R-8 R-14 R-14 R-14R-10R-8R-8 R-10R-10R-8R-8UCR-10 UC R-10 R-8 R-10R-10 R-8 R-8R-1 R-14R-10R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8R-8 CA R-8R-8 R-8UC R-8R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 CA R-8 R-8R-8 R-8R-8R-8 R-8 UC R-8R-8UC R-8 R-8R-8 R-8CVR-8 R-8 R-8R-8UCCV R-8R-8 R-8RM-F R-8R-8RM-F R-8 IM RM-F IH R-8R-8 IM CA IH CA IL IM CA R-14 R-8 R-1 CVRM-F R-8 R-8 CV RM-F R-10RM-FR-14 R-8RM-FCVCV CVR-8R-8 R-8 CACVR-8R-10 CA CACV CA RM-FCVR-10 R-6 R-8 R-14 CVR-8 R-8 R-8 R-6R-8 R-14 R-14 CA R-6 RM-FR-6R-8 R-6 R-6R-6R-14 R-6 R-6 R-8 R-6R-14R-4 R-8 R-8 R-14 R-6R-1R-14 R-6 R-6 R-6 R-8 R-6 R-6 R-8 R-8 R-6R-8 R-6R-6 R-6 R-8 R-8R-6 R-8 R-6 R-6 R-4 R-8 R-1 R-8 R-4 RC R-6 RC R-4R-4 R-4R-8 RCR-8R-8 R-8R-8 R-6 R-8 R-8 RC R-1 R-8 R-10 CNR-8 R-8 CNR-8R-8 R-6R-8 R-1 R-8 RCR-8 RC R-6 R-8R-8 R-8 R-1 R-8RC R-8R-6 RC R-8 R-6 CA R-8 COR CA CA R-10 R-8 R-4 R-8 R-1 R-4 CA R-8 R-8 R-6 R-6 R-10 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 CA CO CO R-8 R-8 R-1 R-6 IM RC R-8 R-8 R-8 R-1 R-6 R-8 R-8 R-14 R-14 R-14 R-10 R-10 R-6 R-8 CA R-4 R-8 R-8 CA R-8 R-6 R-4 RM-F R-10 R-10 R-1 R-8 R-8 RC R-4 UC R-10 CA IH RC IL IM RC CO RC R-4 RC R-4 RM-F R-8 R-8 CA R-6 R-6 CA COR R-8 CA R-10 RM-F R-14 R-6 R-8 CA R-6 R-4 R-8 R-4 R-4 IM IH IM IH IM IM R-8 CO CO R-8 R-8R-8 R-8 R-6 R-6 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 CA CA R-8 R-10 R-10 R-10 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 RM-F R-8 R-8 R-8 R-8 R-6 R-6 R-4 R-8 CA CA CA CA CA CA CD CD CD R-14 R-8 IH R-8 CA R-8 RC R-4 R-8 R-8 R-6R-6 R-8 CA R-1 CA CA CA R-10 COR CA RM-F RM-F R-8 COR RC RC R-8 CA R-6R-6 UC UC UC CA R-8 R-8 R-8 CA R-4 R-1 UC RC R-10 R-6 CO CO R-6 CV CV CO CO CA CV R-8 R-8 R-6 R-4 R-6 R-8 R-10 CA R-8 R-6 R-10 R-6 R-6 UC R-4 R-8 R-6 R-6 R-4 IH RM-F CA CA R-14 CA R-14 R-14R-14 R-8 R-8 R-4 R-8 CA CA R-8 RM-F R-10 R-8 RM-F R-8 R-10 RM-F R-8 RM-F R-6 CA CA R-10 CA R-4 R-1 CA IL R-4 Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton O 0 0.50.25 Miles Last Revised: February 09, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig3.1_Zoning.mxd Legend City Limits Service Area Zoning Designation RC-Resource Conservation R1-Residential 1 du/ac R4-Residential 4 du/ac R6-Residential - 6 DU/AC R8-Residential 8 du/ac R10-Residential 10 du/ac R14-Residential 14 du/ac RMF-Residential Multi- Family RMH-Residential Manufactured Homes CN-Commercial Neighborhood CV-Center Village CA-Commercial Arterial UC-Urban Center CD-Center Downtown COR-Commercial Office/Residential CO-Commercial Office IL-Industrial - Light IM-Industrial - Medium IH-Industrial - Heavy Waterbody CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 3.1 Zoning East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson Dr S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E SunsetBlvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Val l e y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å LakeBoren PantherLake LakeWashington LakeWashington Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton O 0 0.50.25 Miles Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig3.1_ExistingLU.mxd Legend City Limits Service Area Agriculture Commercial Industrial Mixed Use Multi-Family Open Space Park Public/Quasi-Public Right of Way Single Family Vacant Waterbody CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 3.2 Existing Land Use East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson Dr S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E SunsetBlvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y SE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Val l e y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç SOUTH LAKEWASHINGTON/SOUTHPORT CITY CENTER SUNSET NEIGHBORHOOD Lake Boren LakeYoungsPantherLake LakeWashington Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton, Kiing County O 0 0.50.25 Miles Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackupRenton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig3.3_FutureLU.mxd Legend City Limits Service Area Future Land Use Commercial Industrial Mixed Use Multi-Family Open Space Park Public/Quasi-Public Single Family Waterbody CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 3.3 Future Land Use Based on Zoning CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-9 3.3.1 Historical Water Production The City has a variety of supply sources, including Springbrook Springs, 10 production wells, and interties with SPU. Springbrook Springs and the City's wells produce most of the water for the City's customers. Wholesale water purchased from SPU primarily serves the Boeing Renton Plant through two metered connections. The SPU water mains supplying the Boeing Plant are isolated from the rest of the City’s water system. When necessary, the City can purchase water from SPU through other interties to supplement its supply. Table 3.1 shows the City’s monthly production in 2017 by supply source, while Table 3.2 lists the historical annual production from 2008 through 2017. As shown, the annual production ranged from a low of 2,411 million gallons (MG) in 2012 to a high of 2,799 MG in 2009. Figure 3.4 shows the average production percentage by source from 2008 to 2017. As shown, the City relies on Wells RW-1, RW-2, and RW-3 for more than half of its water supply. When water demands are elevated, these wells account for 52 percent of water produced by the City. Other major sources of supply include Springbrook Springs, the Maplewood Wellfield (PW-11, PW-12, and PW-17), and Well PW-8, which accounted for 18 percent, 17 percent, and 11 percent, respectively. The remaining 2 percent consisted of water purchased from SPU for the Boeing Renton Plant. 3.3.1.1 Average Day Demand ADD is a water system’s average daily demand for a year. To calculate ADD, the total water produced by the City over a year is divided by the number of days in the year. Table 3.3 and Figure 3.5 show ADD values from 2008 through 2017, which average out to 7 mgd during that time. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-10 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 3.1 2017 Monthly Water Production (CCF) by Source Source Springbrook Springs Wells RW-1, RW-2, and RW-3 Well EW-3R(1) Well PW-5A(1) Wells PW-8 and PW-9 Wells PW-11, PW-12, and PW-17 Total January 54,000 131,000 0 0 0 51,000 236,000 February 21,000 140,000 0 0 0 48,000 209,000 March 0 186,000 0 0 3,000 53,000 242,000 April 22,000 158,000 0 0 0 51,000 231,000 May 59,000 151,000 0 0 0 62,000 272,000 June 56,000 156,000 0 0 53,000 75,000 340,000 July 59,000 118,000 0 0 168,000 93,000 438,000 August 58,000 144,000 0 0 170,000 91,000 463,000 September 62,000 64,000 0 0 142,000 78,000 346,000 October 63,000 129,000 0 0 20,000 59,000 271,000 November 57,000 128,000 0 0 4,000 51,000 240,000 December 20,000 112,000 0 0 15,000 55,000 202,000 Total 531,000 1,617,000 0 0 575,000 767,000 3,490,000 Note: (1) EW-3R and PW-5A are emergency-use wells. Abbreviation: CCF – hundred cubic feet. CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-11 Table 3.2 Historical Annual Water Production (MG) by Source Source 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Springbrook Springs 522 494 428 473 441 431 461 494 543 397 Wells RW-1, RW-2, and RW-3 1,752 1,690 1,203 1,399 1,155 1,275 1,203 1,252 1,043 1,209 Well EW-3R 13 1 0 0 1 4 1 5 7 0 Well PW-5A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Wells PW-8 and PW-9 188 165 326 55 276 225 467 331 395 431 Wells PW-11, PW-12, and PW-17 229 417 506 510 500 456 340 546 563 575 Purchase from SPU 29 32 45 66 38 33 36 41 35 42 Total 2,733 2,799 2,508 2,493 2,411 2,424 2,508 2,669 2,586 2,654 Table 3.3 Historical Well Production Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Annual Production (MG) 2,733 2,799 2,508 2,493 2,411 2,424 2,508 2,669 2,586 2,654 Average Day Demand (mgd) 7.47 7.67 6.87 6.83 6.59 6.64 6.87 7.31 7.07 7.27 Maximum Day Demand (mgd) 12.74 14.81 12.83 12.48 11.44 12.36 12.41 13.59 12.75 13.10 Date of Maximum Day Demand August 16 July 29 July 25 August 26 Sep 7 August 9 August 1 July 18 July 29 August 6 MDD/ADD Peaking Factor 1.7 1.9 1.9 1.8 1.7 1.9 1.8 1.9 1.8 1.8 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-12 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 3.4 Average Water Production by Source (2008-2017) 3.3.1.2 Maximum Day Demand Historical MDD values represent the largest amount of water produced in a single day in a given year, usually during the summer when irrigation use is highest. MDD must be established to determine system requirements for supply capacity, pump station discharge rates, and reservoir capacity. The MDD and date of occurrence for each year since 2008 are also shown in Table 3.3. As this table and Figure 3.5 show, MDD has fluctuated around 13 mgd with no definitive trend moving up or down. The historical MDD to ADD peaking factor is also a key parameter used to develop future MDD projections. The City’s average historical peaking factor is 1.8, while the MDD to ADD peaking factor fluctuated between 1.7 in 2008 and 1.9 in 2009. CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-13 Figure 3.5 Historical Average and Maximum Day Water Production (2008-2017) CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-14 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 3.3.2 Historical Customer Connections From 2008 to 2017, the total number of the City’s retail water service connections increased by 5.6 percent. By the end of 2017, the City provided water to 17,831 connections. Table 3.4 and Figure 3.6 show the historical number of connections per customer type. Table 3.5 shows the total number of connections in 2017 as distributed by pressure zone. Figure 3.7 shows the average percent of connections by customer category from 2008 through 2017. For this Plan, the City’s thirteen customer classes were consolidated into the following eight categories: • Single-Family Residential: Single-Family homes accounted for 77 percent of customer connections in 2017. From 2008 through 2017, Single-Family Residential connections increased by 801 connections, which corresponds to roughly a 0.7 percent annual growth. • Multi-Family Residential: Multi-Family housing, including Duplexes, accounted for about nine percent of customer connections in 2017. Because the City tracks the number of dwelling units per residential customer, Multi-Family Residential water consumption trends are reported per dwelling unit. Between 2009 and 2017, the number of Multi-Family Residential dwelling units served by the City increased by 330. (Note that reliable statistics for Multi-Family dwelling units were not available in 2008.) This corresponds to an annual growth rate of 0.3 percent. • Commercial: Commercial accounted for six percent of customer connections in 2017. From 2008 through 2017, Commercial connections increased by 32 connections, corresponding to a 0.3 percent annual growth. • Industrial: Industrial accounted for less than one percent of customer connections in 2017 and has not grown within the last decade. • Government: Government combines two customer classes (City and School, State, Federal). Government connections accounted for less than one percent of connections in 2017. From 2008 through 2017, Government connections grew by eight connections, or roughly 1.2 percent annually. • Irrigation: Irrigation consists of the City’s Irrigation and Irrigation from the other customer classes. Multi-Family Housing Developments, Mobile Home Parks, Schools, Commercial Complexes, and Industrial Plants often have separate connections for irrigation. Between 2008 and 2017, Irrigation connections accounted for 3.4 percent of the system and grew by 0.6 percent annually. • Other Authorized Use: Other Authorized Use combines two customer classes (Hydrants and Fire). Commercial and Multi-Family Residential customers often have separate connections for fire suppression. Revenue water is also sold to contractors and tracked by portable hydrant meters checked out to the contractor. • Largest Consumers: The City’s six Largest Consumers were evaluated separately. The City supplies wholesale water to the Skyway Water and Sewer District (Skyway) through one connection located in the West Hill 495 PZ. Wholesale water is purchased from SPU and sold to the Boeing Plant through two connections. Other large consumers include the King County South Plant, Valley Medical Center, G&K Services, and Service Linen Supply. (Note that throughout this analysis, the King County South Plant connection was subtracted out of the Industrial category and the Valley Medical Center, G&K Services, and Service Linen Supply connections were subtracted out of the commercial category). CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-15 Table 3.4 Historical Number of Connections Customer Type 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Annual Growth Rate 2008 to 2017 Single-Family Residential 13,005 13,038 13,129 13,205 13,377 13,478 13,588 13,671 13,727 13,806 0.7% Multi-Family Residential 1,539 1,541 1,539 1,537 1,537 1,534 1,539 1,543 1,535 1,534 0.0% Multi-Family Residential (Dwelling Units) 13,252 14,169 14,119 14,124 14,175 14,166 14,191 14,376 14,489 14,499 0.3% Commercial 1,025 1,026 1,020 1,022 1,035 1,035 1,037 1,038 1,061 1,057 0.3% Industrial 63 63 62 61 65 65 64 65 63 63 0.0% Government 73 81 77 79 82 83 85 84 87 81 1.2% Irrigation 573 587 579 575 587 587 589 587 594 605 0.6% Other Authorized Use (Hydrants and Fire) 601 615 629 643 675 635 617 646 689 678 1.3% Largest Consumers 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 0.0% Total 16,886 16,958 17,042 17,129 17,365 17,424 17,526 17,641 17,763 17,831 0.6% CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-16 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 3.6 Historical Connections Trend by Customer Category (2008-2017) CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-17 Table 3.5 2017 Connections by Pressure Zone Pressure Zone KD218 KD320 HLD435 HLD565 VLY196 WH300 WH495 EARL370 SH370 RH590 RH490 RH395 TH270 TH350 ETH300 WTH300 Total Single-Family Residential 113 932 2,985 5,055 1,009 177 413 272 70 1,081 531 0 1 824 4 339 13,806 Multi-Family Residential 0 108 174 483 262 24 2 23 11 109 114 45 0 155 19 5 1,534 Commercial 1 80 55 178 686 11 1 2 0 5 7 0 6 25 0 0 1,057 Industrial 0 10 0 0 53 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 63 Government 0 8 5 23 39 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 2 0 0 81 Irrigation 6 59 61 143 248 1 0 3 0 18 22 2 1 37 3 1 605 Other Authorized Use (Hydrants and Fire) 0 89 39 99 322 2 0 0 0 5 6 4 1 54 0 0 621(1) Largest Consumers 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 Total 120 3,515 4,951 9,680 5,305 537 417 369 124 2,166 2,046 248 9 2,138 300 348 17,774 Note: (1) Connections for hydrants were not available by pressure zone. Hydrant accounts not in GIS account numbers. The total number of connections for Hydrants is 57 and is not included in the totals in this table. Abbreviation: GIS – geographic information system. CHAPTER 3 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-19 Figure 3.7 Percent of Connections by Customer Category (2008-2017) 3.3.3 Historical Water Consumption Using the City’s billing records, Carollo obtained data on the annual water consumption of each customer category from 2008 to 2017. This data is shown in Table 3.6. Although Single-Family Residential customers make up 77 percent of the City’s connections, they consumed only 35 percent of total retail water sales. The Multi-Family Residential customers accounted for 23 percent of water use, meaning that a majority of the City’s water sales consisted of residential water use. Figure 3.8 shows that Commercial customers accounted for 15 percent of water sales and Industrial customers accounted for three percent. The City’s six Largest Consumers alone accounted for 10 percent of water sales. Government customers accounted for 1 percent of water sales. Although comprising only three percent of the total number of accounts, Irrigation use accounted for 12 percent of the total water used. Figure 3.9 shows how consumption for each customer category changed between 2008 and 2017. Despite adding many new residential connections, Single-Family and Multi-Family Residential consumption grew very little over this time. As indicated by their annual consumption growth rates in Figure 3.9, Commercial, Irrigation, and the Largest Consumers had the most growth. Other Authorized Use included billed consumption from Hydrant and Fire connections plus unbilled consumption that was authorized by the City (Authorized Non-Revenue Water). With the City's improved tracking of unbilled water use, Authorized Non-Revenue Water (water used by City maintenance and by Renton Regional Fire Authority [Renton RFA]) also grew significantly. Other Authorized Use increased from 0.6 percent in 2008 to a high of 1.8 percent in 2016 and averaged 1.3 percent of the City’s overall water consumption. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-20 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 3.6 Historical Consumption (mgd) by Customer Category Customer Type 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Single-Family Residential 2.15 2.25 2.07 2.04 2.07 2.10 2.08 2.19 2.11 2.19 Multi-Family Residential 1.44 1.42 1.47 1.43 1.45 1.46 1.42 1.46 1.41 1.45 Commercial 0.94 0.91 0.89 0.89 0.87 0.88 0.90 0.94 0.95 1.04 Industrial 0.19 0.17 0.15 0.17 0.18 0.15 0.16 0.16 0.14 0.12 Government 0.11 0.09 0.08 0.08 0.08 0.08 0.07 0.07 0.07 0.07 Irrigation 0.72 0.93 0.61 0.66 0.69 0.66 0.76 0.87 0.80 0.82 Largest Consumers 0.61 0.54 0.56 0.60 0.58 0.59 0.61 0.66 0.67 0.72 Other Authorized Use 0.04 0.07 0.04 0.07 0.10 0.09 0.07 0.11 0.11 0.08 Percent Other Authorized Use 0.6% 1.1% 0.7% 1.2% 1.7% 1.5% 1.2% 1.7% 1.8% 1.2% Total Consumption 6.20 6.38 5.87 5.94 6.02 6.01 6.07 6.46 6.26 6.49 Figure 3.8 Percent of Consumption by Customer Category (2008-2017) CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-21 Figure 3.9 Historical Consumption Trend by Customer Category (2008-2017) CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-22 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 3.3.3.1 Largest Consumers To more accurately predict the magnitude and location of future demands, the City’s six Largest Consumers' consumption was evaluated separately from other customer categories. Each of these customers has an annual water demand exceeding 40,000 gpd. The seventh largest consumer used less than 15,000 gpd, making the top six a natural cutoff for customers that must be evaluated in more detail. The City provides wholesale water to Skyway and sells water to Boeing’s Renton Plant, the King County South Plant, Valley Medical Center, G&K Services, and Service Linen Supply. To more precisely predict the magnitude and location of their future demands, consumption trends for these customers were evaluated individually. Figure 3.10 shows the historical consumption for these connections between 2008 and 2017. Wholesale to Skyway and consumption at the King County South Plant increased steadily. Figure 3.11 shows the locations of the City’s six Largest Consumers. CHAPTER 3 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-23 Figure 3.10 Historical Consumption by Largest Consumers (2008-2017) !P !P !P !P !P !P !PEast Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç !PBoeing G&K Services King County South Plant Skyway Service Linen Supply Valley Medical Center Lake Boren Lake Desire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig3.4_Customers.mxd CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 3.11 Largest Water Customers O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton Legend Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 435 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 Parcel Kennydale 320 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 Largest Water Customer!P City Limits CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-27 3.3.3.2 Distribution System Leakage and Non-Revenue Water DSL is water not authorized for consumption, and equals the total water produced/purchased minus the total authorized consumption. Deterioration of the City’s aging water infrastructure leads to real losses such as water main breaks, reservoir leaks or overflows, and general distribution system leakage. However, it is important to note that the DSL includes apparent losses other than leakage such as meter inaccuracy or failure, data handling errors, water theft, and untracked authorized water use. Table 3.7 lists the total water production, total authorized consumption, and DSL between 2008 and 2017. Figure 3.12 plots the DSL trends during this time. The average DSL was 12.5 percent, which is a reduction of 5.3 percent since the previous Water System Plan. The City's goal is to reduce the DSL to 10 percent or less. To this end, the City deployed an Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) system in 2011, which helps the City more accurately compare production and consumption and better detect stuck meters, meter tampering, and water theft. Authorized Non-Revenue Water that is not tracked by the City contributes to the DSL. Based on recommendations in the last Water System Plan, the City installed a meter at the Regional Firefighting Training Facility in 2018 to track the fire department's authorized water use and also installed meters at the King County South Plant in 2019 to track currently authorized, but unmetered, water use. Once metered, the authorized water consumption will be subtracted out of the DSL. In accordance with Washington State requirements for systems with DSL in excess of 10 percent, the City prepared a Water Loss Control Action Plan (WLCAP). This document is included in Appendix G. The leakage percentages in Table 3.7 may slightly differ from the ones reported to the Washington State Department of Health (DOH). The City historically reported raw meter data to DOH. With the upgrade to AMI data, the City has been resolving data issues and the updated data is shown in Table 3.7. In the future, the City will report water use data to DOH using the updated method. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-28 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 3.7 Historical Distribution System Leakage Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Total Production (mgd) 7.47 7.67 6.87 6.83 6.59 6.64 6.87 7.31 7.07 7.27 Total Authorized Consumption (mgd) 6.20 6.38 5.87 5.94 6.02 6.01 6.07 6.46 6.26 6.49 DSL (mgd) 1.27 1.29 1.00 0.89 0.57 0.63 0.80 0.85 0.81 0.78 DSL (ERUs) 7,920 8,053 6,258 5,563 3,546 3,944 5,008 5,327 5,035 4,883 DSL Percentage 17.0% 16.8% 14.6% 13.0% 8.6% 9.5% 11.7% 11.7% 11.4% 10.7% Rolling 3-Year Average DSL 17.3% 16.1% 14.8% 12.1% 10.4% 9.9% 10.9% 11.6% 11.3% CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-29 Figure 3.12 Historical Distribution System Leakage Trend (2008-2017) CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-30 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 3.3.4 Seasonal Variations in Water Consumption To better assess the City’s water use, Carollo also analyzed seasonal water use. Figure 3.13 depicts the variation in average monthly water consumption from 2008 to 2017, along with average monthly precipitation during that time. Figure 3.14 and Figure 3.15 show the variation of water use for each customer category throughout the year, which is based on average monthly water use between 2015 and 2017. While most of the City’s customers are billed monthly, some customers are billed bi-monthly. This accounts for the month-to-month fluctuations in water consumption for customer categories with fairly consistent water consumption throughout the year, such as Multi-Family Residential customers. 3.3.5 Water Consumption per Connection Table 3.8 shows annual water consumption per connection for each customer category. For forecasting and planning, individual demand is expressed as ERU. CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-31 Figure 3.13 Average Seasonal Consumption and Precipitation (2008-2017) CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-32 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 3.14 Average Seasonal Consumption per Customer Category (2015-2017) CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-33 Figure 3.15 Average Seasonal Consumption per Connection (2015-2017) CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-34 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 3.8 Historical Consumption per Connection, gpd/Connection Customer Type 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Average ERUs per Connection Single-Family Residential 165 173 158 154 155 156 153 160 154 159 159 1.0 Multi-Family Residential (Per Dwelling Unit) 109 100 104 101 102 103 100 102 97 100 102 0.6 Commercial 923 893 879 877 846 856 874 912 901 990 895 5.6 Industrial 3,065 2,742 2,459 2,833 2,813 2,344 2,540 2,500 2,258 1,935 2,549 15.9 Government 1,507 1,111 1,039 1,013 976 964 824 833 805 864 993 6.2 Irrigation 1,257 1,584 1,054 1,148 1,175 1,124 1,290 1,482 1,347 1,355 1,282 8.0 CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-35 3.3.5.1 Equivalent Residential Units An ERU is the amount of water consumed by a typical full-time Single-Family Residence. According to the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-290-010, non-residential customer water use is expressed as a multiple of Single-Family Residence ERU. To calculate ADD water use per ERU, the total annual volume of water consumed by Single-Family Residences is divided by the total number of active Single-Family Residential connections. The resulting value, also called the ERU planning value, is the average Single-Family Residence’s annual water use per connection. To determine the number of ERUs used by other customer categories, the volume of water used by those customer categories is divided by the ERU value. Table 3.8 shows each customer categories’ average daily consumption per connection between 2008 and 2017. The Single-Family Residential average consumption volume was 159 gpd during that time. As shown in Figure 3.16, the City’s ERU value generally declined over the last decade and has remained below 160 gpd since 2010. Since one of the City's WUE goals is to keep its ERU value under 160 gpd, the City has selected 160 gpd as its ERU planning value. The last column in Table 3.8 shows the average number of ERUs per connection for each customer category the City serves. This is calculated by dividing the consumption per connection by the ERU planning value. The typical Multi-Family dwelling unit consumes 0.6 ERUs, meaning that a Multi-Family household consumes 60 percent of the water of a typical Single-Family household. Non-residential connections use significantly more water than a typical Single-Family Residence, with a range of 5.6 to 16.0 ERUs. Table 3.9 lists each customer categories’ number of ERUs between 2008 and 2017. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-36 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 3.16 Historical ERU Value Trend (2008-2017) CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-37 Table 3.9 Historical Number of ERUs by Customer Category Customer Type 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Single-Family Residential 13,440 14,060 12,940 12,750 12,940 13,130 13,000 13,690 13,190 13,690 Multi-Family Residential 9,000 8,880 9,190 8,940 9,060 9,130 8,880 9,130 8,810 9,060 Commercial 5,880 5,690 5,560 5,560 5,440 5,500 5,630 5,880 5,940 6,500 Industrial 1,190 1,060 940 1,060 1,130 940 1,000 1,000 880 750 Government 690 560 500 500 500 500 440 440 440 440 Irrigation 4,500 5,810 3,810 4,130 4,310 4,130 4,750 5,440 5,000 5,130 Largest Consumers 3,810 3,380 3,500 3,750 3,630 3,690 3,810 4,130 4,190 4,500 Total 38,510 39,440 36,440 36,690 37,010 37,020 37,510 39,710 38,450 40,070 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-38 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 3.4 Demographic Trends To determine future demand for the City's retail water service area (RWSA), current and projected demographic trends were developed using data provided by the PSRC. The PSRC publishes population, household, and employee growth forecasts for jurisdictions within its regional boundary. The PSRC database contains historical and future yearly estimates of key demographic and employment values for the Puget Sound region by forecast analysis zone (FAZ). The City’s RWSA and pressure zone boundaries do not coincide with the PSRC’s FAZ boundaries. As a result, the City allocated key demographic and employment variables (households, population, and employees) to each pressure zone within its service area using GIS techniques. Table 3.10 shows the PSRC’s population, household, and employment projections. Table 3.11 shows the PSRC’s population projections by pressure zone, and Table 3.12 shows the employment projections by pressure zone. Table 3.10 System-wide Population, Household, and Employment Projections 2010 (Historical) 2017 (2016 for Employees) 2025 2030 2035 2040 Population 61,921 68,664 75,416 78,468 80,220 82,704 Households 25,732 29,151 33,092 34,386 35,302 36,568 Employees 53,786 62,116 75,349 79,520 87,238 97,002 Table 3.11 Population Projections by Pressure Zone 2010 (Historical) 2017 2025 2030 2035 2040 EARL370 837 873 909 947 975 1,002 ETH300 411 503 435 437 454 457 HLD435 11,923 12,566 14,374 15,172 15,490 16,096 HLD565 21,025 23,163 25,332 26,396 26,955 27,978 KD218 212 256 310 323 335 338 KD320 5,170 6,462 7,996 8,311 8,613 8,659 RH395 432 447 459 467 481 479 RH490 3,473 3,933 3,880 4,027 4,137 4,342 RH590 4,656 4,892 4,936 5,142 5,235 5,460 SH370 225 234 272 293 305 331 TH270 2 2 3 3 3 3 TH350 3,923 4,221 4,194 4,224 4,296 4,412 VLY196 6,409 7,716 8,864 9,073 9,239 9,365 WH300 1,214 1,274 1,306 1,376 1,409 1,407 WH495 1,023 1,099 1,114 1,170 1,175 1,203 WTH300 986 1,023 1,032 1,107 1,118 1,172 CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-39 Table 3.12 Employment Projections by Pressure Zone 2010 (Historical) 2016 2025 2030 2035 2040 EARL370 42 40 93 101 128 130 ETH300 0 0 0 0 0 0 HLD435 911 978 1,230 1,572 1,734 1,874 HLD565 3,969 4,810 5,624 5,870 6,196 8,113 KD218 0 0 0 0 0 0 KD320 12,670 14,985 21,474 24,022 29,104 32,142 RH395 0 0 0 0 0 0 RH490 95 172 221 227 239 249 RH590 357 429 452 472 519 580 SH370 0 0 0 0 0 0 TH270 8 9 24 28 34 40 TH350 4,064 4,580 4,785 4,982 5,351 5,650 VLY196 31,412 35,829 41,136 41,920 43,585 47,750 WH300 242 269 272 273 283 412 WH495 15 17 38 53 65 62 WTH300 0 0 0 0 0 0 Using PSRC’s household and employment projections for each pressure zone, annual growth rates were calculated to forecast future City water connections for each customer category. Household growth rates were used to project Single-Family Residential and Multi-Family Residential connections. Employment growth rates were also used to forecast connections for all Non-Residential customer categories (Commercial, Industrial, Government, and Irrigation). Table 3.13 and Table 3.14 show annual growth rates for each pressure zone. Note, the City assumed that negative growth will not occur, so growth rates were set to the minimum value between the calculated value and zero. PSRC predicts the greatest residential growth rates in the Renton Highlands zones, as shown in Table 3.13, while the Valley 196 PZ and Kennydale 320 PZ will experience the highest commercial growth in terms of the number of employees added, as illustrated in Table 3.14. The PSRC also predicts the number of households within the City’s RWSA to grow by one percent annually between 2017 and 2040. This projection is higher than the 0.7 percent annual growth rate for Single-Family Residential connections experienced in the City between 2008 and 2017 (Figure 3.6). Furthermore, the PSRC predicts that employment within the City’s RWSA will experience an annual growth rate of 1.9 percent from 2017 to 2040. This projection more than doubles the annual growth rates of Commercial and Industrial that the City experienced between 2008 and 2017. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-40 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 3.13 Household Growth Rates by Pressure Zone Pressure Zone 2010 - 2017 2017 - 2025 2025 - 2030 2030 - 2035 2035 - 2040 2017 - 2040 EARL370 1.1% 0.4% 0.4% 0.6% 0.6% 0.5% ETH300 3.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.7% 0.0% 0.0% HLD435 0.6% 2.8% 1.2% 0.6% 0.9% 1.6% HLD565 1.5% 1.7% 1.0% 0.5% 1.0% 1.1% KD218 3.3% 2.8% 0.7% 0.5% 0.1% 1.3% KD320 3.7% 2.8% 0.5% 0.7% 0.1% 1.2% RH395 0.7% 1.1% 0.1% 0.5% 0.1% 0.5% RH490 2.9% 0.0% 0.6% 0.5% 0.8% 0.2% RH590 1.3% 0.3% 0.8% 0.4% 0.9% 0.6% SH370 0.6% 1.8% 1.0% 0.6% 1.5% 1.3% TH270 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% TH350 1.4% 0.1% 0.1% 0.4% 0.4% 0.2% VLY196 2.9% 1.8% 0.3% 0.5% 0.2% 0.9% WH300 1.1% 0.5% 0.8% 0.4% 1.0% 0.6% WH495 1.4% 0.6% 1.0% 0.3% 0.9% 0.7% WTH300 1.1% 0.4% 1.5% 0.4% 1.3% 0.8% System-wide 1.8% 1.6% 0.8% 0.5% 0.7% 1.0% Table 3.14 Employment Growth Rates by Pressure Zone Pressure Zone 2010 - 2016 2016 - 2025 2025 - 2030 2030 - 2035 2035 - 2040 2017 - 2040 EARL370 0.0% 9.9% 1.7% 4.9% 0.3% 5.1% ETH300 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% HLD435 1.2% 2.6% 5.0% 2.0% 1.6% 2.7% HLD565 3.3% 1.8% 0.9% 1.1% 5.5% 2.2% KD218 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% KD320 2.8% 4.1% 2.3% 3.9% 2.0% 3.2% RH395 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% RH490 10.3% 2.9% 0.5% 1.0% 0.8% 1.6% RH590 3.1% 0.6% 0.9% 1.9% 2.2% 1.3% SH370 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% TH270 2.7% 11.7% 3.1% 4.0% 3.3% 6.5% TH350 2.0% 0.5% 0.8% 1.4% 1.1% 0.9% VLY196 2.2% 1.5% 0.4% 0.8% 1.8% 1.2% WH300 1.8% 0.1% 0.1% 0.7% 7.8% 1.8% WH495 1.5% 9.5% 6.9% 4.2% 0.0% 5.6% WTH300 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% System-wide 2.4% 2.2% 1.1% 1.9% 2.1% 1.9% CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-41 Water connections were projected by raising the City’s existing number of water connections in each pressure zone by the growth rates in Table 3.13 and Table 3.14. Table 3.15 shows the number of connection projections for the planning years, which will be then used to estimate the City’s future water demand. Table 3.15 Projected Number of Water Connections Customer Type 2017 2029 2039 Single-Family Residential 13,806 16,335 17,460 Multi-Family Residential (Dwelling Units) 14,499 17,545 18,589 Commercial 1,057 1,283 1,528 Industrial 63 77 90 Government 81 98 120 Irrigation 605 745 901 Largest Consumers 7 7 7 System-wide 30,796 36,090 38,694 3.5 Water Demand Projections Projecting future water demand is a key part of the water system planning process. Demand projections are used to identify the system improvements required for supply, pumping, storage, and piping infrastructure. This section summarizes the ADD and MDD projections Carollo developed for the City's water system using historical water demand trends and the future demographic growth assumptions developed in Section 3.4. Demand projections are presented for three demand scenarios (Low, Medium, High) that represent a range in potential future demands. Low, Medium, and High water demand projection scenarios were developed by adjusting various demand projection parameters: • The Low scenario assumes aggressive WUE, which represents the lowest future demands the City expects to experience. • The Medium scenario is a planning case predicted to most closely match the City’s future demands. • The High scenario assumes no intentional WUE, which represents the highest demands the City could experience. Both Medium and High scenarios were used in the Chapter 6 supply analysis, which will help the City to decide when to acquire new water rights and develop new supply sources. The Medium scenario was used for the Chapter 7 system analysis, which identifies deficiencies in future pumping, storage, and the distribution system analyses, as well as size potential improvements to achieve the City’s established capacity criteria. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-42 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 3.5.1 Demand Projection Methodology For this analysis, water demand projections were developed in the following steps: 1. Increase historical water connection numbers for each pressure zone and customer type (as shown in Tables 3.4 and 3.5) by the zone-specific residential and non-residential growth rates from the demographic analysis (as shown in Tables 3.13 and 3.14). Table 3.15 shows the resulting connection projections. 2. Convert connection projections into ERU projections using the historical ERUs per connection (as shown in Table 3.8). 3. Convert ERU projections to ADD projections using demand projection parameters derived from historical data of the City's starting ERU value, DSL/Non-Revenue Water, Other Authorized Use, climate change impact, and Largest Consumer demand. City staff established unique demand projection parameters for Low, Medium, and High demand scenarios. 4. Apply the MDD to ADD peaking factor to convert ADD to MDD. Again, each demand scenario has a unique peaking factor selected by City staff. Figure 3.17 also summarizes these steps. 3.5.2 Demand Projection Parameters To project the City's future ADD and MDD, several parameters were used: • ERU value. • ERU value annual reduction. • DSL/Non-Revenue Water. • Other authorized use. • Climate change scenario. • Largest Consumer demand. • MDD to ADD peaking factor. For each of the above parameters, the City used historical data to establish Low, Medium, and High values, which were used to develop each of the demand projection scenarios. This information is summarized in Table 3.16 and discussed in further detail in the following subsections. CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-43 Figure 3.17 Demand Projection Methodology CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-44 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 3.16 Demand Projection Parameters Demand Projection Scenario Low Medium High Value Notes Value Notes Value Notes ERU Value (gpd/ERU) 153 Historical Minimum 160 WUE Goal 173 Historical Max DSL/Non-Revenue Water (Percent of Production) 10% WUE Goal 12.5% Historical Average 12.5% Historical Average Other Authorized Use (Percent of Production) 1.3% Historical Average 1.8% Historical Maximum 2.0% Climate Change Scenario None Warm Warmest MDD/ADD Peaking Factor 1.7 Historical Minimum 1.8 Historical Average 2.0 WUE Goal 3.5.2.1 ERU Value The City selected a unique ERU value for each demand projection scenario. As mentioned before, the ERU value represents the consumption of a typical Single-Family household in gpd and is used to convert the number of ERU projected to ADD projections. For the Low scenario, the City selected an ERU value of 153 gpd/ERU, which is the lowest value experienced between 2008 and 2017. An ERU value of 160 gpd/ERU was selected for the Medium scenario, which corresponds to the City’s WUE goal, while the High scenario used an ERU value of 173 gpd/ERU, corresponding to the highest ERU value the City experienced between 2008 and 2017. 3.5.2.2 Distribution System Leakage The City’s goal is to reduce its DSL and Non-Revenue Water to 10 percent or less, which is reflected in the Low scenario. The Medium and High scenarios conservatively assume the City will not able to meet its goal and DSL and Non-Revenue Water will remain at 12.5 percent, the average value between 2008 and 2017. 3.5.2.3 Other Authorized Use (Hydrants and Fire) Other Authorized Use is a small percentage of the City’s water production. The historical average value of 1.3 percent was selected for the Low scenario. As the City improves its tracking of authorized use to lower DSL, it expects that Other Authorized Use may increase. Therefore, the historical maximum of 1.8 percent was selected for the Medium scenario, while the High scenario used 2 percent. CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-45 3.5.2.4 Impact of Climate Change on Demand Projections According to climate change models, the Pacific Northwest will, in general, experience warmer, wetter winters and hotter, drier summers. To estimate climate change's impact on the City’s water demands, Carollo examined results from the Water Supply Forum’s 2009 Regional Water Supply Outlook, which forecasted demands for the Puget Sound Region under three general circulation models (climate change models) developed by the University of Washington. For the purpose of this Plan, these models were nicknamed Warm, Warmer, and Warmest: • The Warm model predicted a small increase in temperature and a small decrease in annual precipitation. • Compared to the Warm model, the Warmer model predicted a medium increase in temperature and a small increase in annual precipitation. • The Warmest model predicted the highest increase in temperature and also the highest increase in precipitation. Using each model’s climate predictions, water demands for the Puget Sound Region were projected and compared to a baseline demand projection scenario that assumed no change in temperature or precipitation. Table 3.17 shows the difference in demand for each climate change scenario compared to the baseline. The Warm and Warmest models were applied to the Medium and High demand projection scenarios, respectively. According to the Warm model, an approximately 2 percent increase in demands is predicted by 2040. The Warmest model, on the other hand, predicts a roughly 5 percent increase in demands by 2040. The Low scenario assumes no impact from climate change. Table 3.17 Predicted Increase in Demand from Baseline due to Climate Change Climate Change Scenario 2005 2010 2020 2030 2040 Baseline 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% Warm 0.0% 0.2% 0.8% 1.4% 2.1% Warmer 0.0% 0.1% 0.5% 1.4% 3.1% Warmest 0.0% 0.4% 1.4% 2.9% 4.9% 3.5.2.5 MDD to ADD Peaking Factor The City’s WUE goal is to maintain a peaking factor of less than 2.0, which is higher than historical trends show. This peaking factor was applied to the High scenario. The City anticipates that increased WUE and conservation measures may reduce annual water consumption, thereby increasing the peaking factor. The historical average peaking factor of 1.8 was used for the Medium scenario, and the historical minimum peaking factor of 1.7 was used for the Low scenario. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-46 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 3.5.2.6 Largest Consumer Demand Using analyses of the City’s historical consumption, Carollo developed individual demand projections for the City’s six Largest Consumers, as shown in Table 3.18. Each of the Largest Consumers was assigned a starting demand (the demand for 2017 in the projections) and an annual growth rate dependent on the demand scenario (Low, Medium, High). Details for each of the Largest Consumers are provided below. Over the last decade, the annual consumption of Boeing, Valley Medical Center, G&K Services, and Service Linen Supply remained fairly constant. Therefore, no growth is projected for these customers. For all demand scenarios, the starting demand for Boeing, G&K Services, and Service Linen Supply was set to their annual average demand from 2008 to 2017. For Valley Medical Center, the Low scenario’s starting demand was set to the historical average, while the Medium and High scenarios’ starting demands were set to their maximum demand from 2008 to 2017. Conversely, water consumption at King County’s South Plant fluctuated over the last decade, with consumption increasing consistently from 2015 to 2017. According to plant staff, more water was used during that time because the water reuse facility was offline for repairs and upgrades. Now that the reuse facility’s upgrade is complete, the plant’s water use is predicted to drop closer to figures in 2015. As such, no growth is projected for King County’s South Plant. Nonetheless, to reflect King County’s South Plant’s varying water consumption, the Low scenario was assigned a starting demand close to 2015 levels, the Medium scenario was assigned a starting demand equal to the average annual demand from 2008 to 2017, and the High scenario was assigned a starting demand equal to the maximum demand experienced from 2008 to 2017. Since 2012, water sales to Skyway have increased steadily at a rate of eight percent annually. However, Skyway's most recent Comprehensive Water System Plan (2013) estimated an annual increase of 1.2 percent for the number of ERUs served by the City. Therefore, this range of growth is reflected in the annual growth rates set for each demand projection scenario. The Low scenario has a starting demand equal to Skyway’s historical average from 2008 to 2017 and a growth rate of 1.2 percent. The Medium and High scenarios have starting demands set to 202,000 gpd, representing Skyway’s maximum water purchase in 2017. The High scenario has an annual growth rate of 8 percent, while the Medium scenario has an annual growth rate of 5 percent, which is a midpoint between Skyway’s historical growth rates and growth rates predicted for the future. The City and Skyway will likely negotiate a new contract in the near future, which will include a cap on water sales (the existing agreement with Skyway can be found in Appendix D). The volume of this cap, however, is not known at the time of this Plan. For planning purposes, a cap of 300,000 gpd was set for all three demand projection scenarios. CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-47 Table 3.18 Largest Consumers Projections Demand Projection Scenario Low Medium High Starting Demand (gpd) Annual Growth Rate Cap (gpd) Starting Demand (gpd) Annual Growth Rate Cap (gpd) Starting Demand (gpd) Annual Growth Rate Cap (gpd) King County South Plant 170,000 0.0% None 185,000 0.0% None 218,000 0.0% None Skyway Wholesale 157,000 1.2% 300,000 202,000 5.0% 300,000 202,000 8.0% 300,000 Boeing 92,000 0.0% None 92,000 0.0% None 92,000 0.0% None Valley Medical Center 71,000 0.0% None 100,000 0.0% None 100,000 0.0% None G&K Services 55,000 0.0% None 55,000 0.0% None 55,000 0.0% None Service Linen Supply 60,000 0.0% None 60,000 0.0% None 60,000 0.0% None CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-48 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 3.5.3 ERU Projections When converting projected number of accounts to ADD, the first step is to convert these number of accounts into a number of ERUs. To calculate the projected number of ERUs for the RWSA, the projected number of accounts shown in Table 3.15 were multiplied by the number of ERU per account shown in Table 3.8. Table 3.19 shows the ERU projections for each demand projection scenario. These ERU projections include ERUs that correspond to non-revenue water (DSL and Other Authorized Use), which were calculated by dividing the ADD projections of DSL and Other Authorized Use by the ERU values in gpd/ERU shown in Table 3.16. Section 3.5.4 below describes how ADD projections for DSL and Other Authorized Use were calculated. The number of ERUs served by the City is projected to increase from approximately 48,000 in 2019 to nearly 61,000 by 2039, an increase of 27 percent. Table 3.19 ERU Projections - Planning Demand Projection Scenario Demand Projection Scenario Low Medium High Customer Category 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 Single-Family Residential 14,125 16,171 17,286 14,125 16,171 17,286 14,125 16,171 17,286 Multi-Family Residential 9,921 11,229 11,897 9,921 11,229 11,897 9,921 11,229 11,897 Commercial 6,150 7,167 8,533 6,150 7,167 8,533 6,150 7,167 8,533 Industrial 1,060 1,227 1,430 1,060 1,227 1,430 1,060 1,227 1,430 Government 522 610 742 522 610 742 522 610 742 Irrigation 5,035 5,964 7,219 5,035 5,964 7,219 5,035 5,964 7,219 Largest Consumers(1) 3,979 4,112 4,262 4,467 4,950 4,950 4,397 4,769 4,769 DSL & Other Authorized Use 5,184 5,906 6,528 6,900 7,954 8,800 7,013 8,093 9,027 Total 45,970 52,390 57,900 48,180 55,270 60,860 48,220 55,230 60,900 Note: (1) ERU values were not used to develop the projections for the large consumers. The ERU values for the Largest Consumers shown in this table were calculated by dividing the projected ADD by the ADD ERU value. Since the ADD ERU value is higher for the High Scenario than the Medium Scenario, the ERU values for the Largest Consumers in this table are shown as lower for the High Scenario than the Medium Scenario. 3.5.4 Average and Maximum Day Projections To calculate the ADD projections for each customer category, the ERU projections were multiplied by the ERU values in gpd/ERU unique to each demand projection scenario and customer category, as shown in Table 3.16. To establish total ADD projections, non-revenue water consumption, including Other Authorized Use and DSL, was added using Low, Medium, and High assumptions. Finally, for each demand projection scenario, MDD projections were established by multiplying ADD projections by the appropriate MDD to ADD peaking factor. CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-49 Table 3.20 shows ADD projections for Low, Medium, and High demand scenarios for each customer category, while Table 3.22 shows the same projections by pressure zone. Figure 3.18 shows a chart of the system-wide demand projections. The City's ADD is projected to be between 7.0 and 8.4 mgd in 2019, for the Low and High scenarios respectively. By 2039, ADD is estimated to be between 8.9 mgd and 10.8 mgd, for the Low and High scenarios respectively. The Medium scenario predicts 9.8 mgd. In 2039, MDD is estimated to be between 15.1 mgd and 21.5 mgd, for the Low and High scenarios respectively, as shown in Table 3.21. The Medium scenario predicts 17.7 mgd. Additionally, the Medium scenario predicts a 1.2 percent annual increase in water system demands, which equates to a 27 percent increase over the 20-year planning period. These demands are the basis for the water resource evaluation of Chapter 6 and the water system evaluation of Chapter 7. Table 3.23 shows these MDD projections by pressure zone. Appendix H shows detailed demand projections by year. Table 3.20 ADD Projections by Customer Category (mgd) Demand Projection Scenario Low Projected ADD (mgd) Medium Projected ADD (mgd) High Projected ADD (mgd) Customer Category 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 Single-Family Residential 2.2 2.5 2.6 2.3 2.6 2.8 2.5 2.8 3.1 Multi-Family Residential 1.5 1.7 1.8 1.6 1.8 1.9 1.7 2.0 2.1 Commercial 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.1 1.3 1.5 Industrial 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 Government 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Irrigation 0.8 0.9 1.1 0.8 1.0 1.2 0.9 1.1 1.3 Largest Consumers 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 DSL & Other Authorized Use 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.6 Total 7.0 8.0 8.9 7.7 8.9 9.8 8.4 9.7 10.8 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-50 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 3.21 MDD Projections by Customer Category (mgd) Demand Projection Scenario Low Projected MDD (mgd) Medium Projected MDD (mgd) High Projected MDD (mgd) Customer Category 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 Single-Family Residential 3.7 4.2 4.5 4.1 4.7 5.1 4.9 5.7 6.2 Multi-Family Residential 2.6 2.9 3.1 2.9 3.3 3.5 3.5 3.9 4.2 Commercial 1.6 1.9 2.2 1.8 2.1 2.5 2.1 2.5 3.0 Industrial 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 Government 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 Irrigation 1.3 1.6 1.9 1.5 1.7 2.1 1.8 2.1 2.6 Largest Consumers 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.7 DSL & Other Authorized Use 1.4 1.5 1.7 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.4 2.8 3.1 Total 12.0 13.6 15.1 13.9 16.0 17.7 16.8 19.3 21.5 Table 3.22 ADD Projections by Pressure Zone (mgd) Pressure Zone Low Projected ADD (mgd) Medium Projected ADD (mgd) High Projected ADD (mgd) 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 EARL370 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 ETH300 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 HLD435 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.1 1.4 1.5 HLD565 1.8 2.0 2.3 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.1 2.4 2.8 KD218 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 KD320 0.6 0.8 0.9 0.7 0.9 1.0 0.8 1.0 1.1 RH395 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 RH490 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.4 RH590 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 SH370 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 TH270 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 TH350 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 VLY196 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.3 2.6 2.8 2.5 2.8 3.1 WH300 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 WH495 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 WTH300 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Total 7.0 8.0 8.9 7.7 8.9 9.8 8.3 9.7 10.8 CHAPTER 03 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-51 Table 3.23 MDD Projections by Pressure Zone (mgd) Pressure Zone Low Projected MDD (mgd) Medium Projected MDD (mgd) High Projected MDD (mgd) 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 EARL370 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 ETH300 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 HLD435 1.5 1.9 2.1 1.7 2.2 2.5 2.1 2.7 3.0 HLD565 3.0 3.4 3.9 3.4 3.9 4.5 4.1 4.8 5.5 KD218 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 KD320 1.1 1.4 1.6 1.3 1.6 1.8 1.5 1.9 2.3 RH395 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 RH490 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 RH590 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 SH370 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 TH270 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.1 TH350 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.1 VLY196 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.2 4.6 5.0 5.1 5.6 6.1 WH300 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 WH495 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.9 0.9 WTH300 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 Total 12.0 13.6 15.1 13.9 16.0 17.7 16.7 19.3 21.5 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 03 3-52 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 3.18 Projected Water Demands CHAPTER 3 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 3-53 3.5.5 Summary The City’s WUE program will affect future demands. To plan its water system, the City selected three measurable WUE goals, which were incorporated into the demand projections: 1. Limit the peaking factor to less than 2.0. 2. Reduce DSL to 10 percent or less by 2022. 3. Maintain an ERU value under 160 gpd/ERU. These factors were used to develop the demand projections shown in Figure 3.17. As shown, the City's ADD is projected to be between 7.0 and 8.4 mgd in 2019, and between 8.9 mgd and 10.8 mgd by 2039. The Medium demand scenario predicts 9.8 mgd. By 2039, the City’s estimated MDD will be between 15.1 mgd and 21.5 mgd. The Medium demand scenario predicts 17.7 mgd. The Medium scenario also predicts a 1.2 percent increase in water system demands annually, which translates to a total increase in demand of 27 percent over the 20-year planning period. CHAPTER 04| WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 4-1 Chapter 4 WATER USE EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION PLAN In 2003, the Municipal Water Law (MWL), to address the increasing demand on Washington’s water resources. As part of this law, the state implemented the Water Use Efficiency (WUE) Rule, which requires all municipal water suppliers to use water more efficiently in exchange for guaranteed, flexible water rights to help meet future demands. The City of Renton (City) started a WUE program in 2007 to emphasize the importance of measuring water use and evaluating the rule's effectiveness. The intent was to minimize water withdrawals and use by implementing water-saving activities and adopting applicable policies, resolutions, ordinances, or bylaws. This chapter presents the City’s current and proposed actions to comply with conservation planning requirements and to promote using water efficiently. The chapter focuses specifically on the following four fundamental elements of the WUE program: 1. Planning requirements. 2. Distribution leakage standard. 3. Metering requirements. 4. Conservation planning and goal setting. This discussion follows the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) guidelines established in the WUE Guidebook, Third Edition (revised January 2017), which replaces the former Conservation Planning Requirements (March 1994). 4.1 Planning Requirements A municipal water system plan must include the following WUE elements: • Data collection. • Demand forecast. Both are described in greater detail below. 4.1.1 Data Collection The WUE Rule requires that all municipal water suppliers regularly collect production and consumption data. The City uses its source, intertie, purchase, and service water meters to collect system production and consumption data, which is summarized as monthly and annual totals. This planning document uses unique data, divided into the categories shown Table 4.1, to forecast future demand, describe water supply characteristics, help with decisions on water management, calculate distribution system leakage (DSL), and evaluate the WUE program. This information was ultimately compiled into the annual WUE report and submitted to the state. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 04 4-2 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 4.1 Categories of Data Collection Water Volume Entering Distribution System Water Produced (from City sources) Water Purchased (from SPU) Authorized Water Consumption - Metered Single-family Residential Multi-family Residential (including Duplexes) Industrial/Commercial/Government Irrigation Hydrants and Fire Wholesale Interties Regional Firefighting Training Center City Maintenance Use Tank/Reservoir Draining and Cleaning Authorized Water Consumption - Non-metered Firefighting King County South Plant Note: Abbreviation: SPU – Seattle Public Utilities. 4.1.2 Demand Forecast Demand forecasting estimates how much water will be needed in the future. To do this, forecasted demands were developed using demographic projections from the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC), all of which are detailed in Chapter 3 – Demand Projections. 4.2 Distribution System Leakage The WUE Rule requires the 3-year rolling average for DSL to be 10 percent or less. Table 4.2 shows annual DSL between 1988 and 2017. As the graph of the rolling 3-year average (Figure 4.1) shows, the DSL has generally been on a downward trend. However, the DSL has risen again in recent years, even though the City lowered its DSL below 10 percent in 2012 and 2013. To comply with the DSL standard, the City developed a Water Loss Control Action Plan (WLCAP) in 2008.The WLCAP was updated in 2018 and summarizes the City’s current and proposed water loss control efforts. The updated plan can be found in Appendix G. The leakage percentages in Table 4.2 may slightly differ from the ones reported to DOH. The City historically reported raw meter data to DOH. With the upgrade to AMI data, the City has been resolving data issues and the updated data is shown Table 4.2. In the future, the City will report water use data to DOH using the updated method. CHAPTER 04| WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 4-3 Table 4.2 Distribution System Leakage Year Volume (cf) Percent (%) Rolling 3-Year Average 1988 156,434,000 33.9% 1989 78,414,000 20.8% 1990 73,674,000 19.7% 24.8% 1991 72,448,000 19.7% 20.1% 1992 74,680,000 20.4% 20.0% 1993 52,878,000 16.8% 19.0% 1994 48,138,000 14.5% 17.2% 1995 45,496,000 13.7% 15.0% 1996 57,026,000 16.4% 14.9% 1997 60,243,000 17.1% 15.7% 1998 63,538,000 17.2% 16.9% 1999 62,292,000 16.6% 16.9% 2000 51,907,000 13.8% 15.9% 2001 48,188,000 13.5% 14.6% 2002 47,290,000 13.1% 13.5% 2003 45,520,000 12.1% 12.9% 2004 59,899,000 15.8% 13.7% 2005 51,673,000 14.5% 14.1% 2006 67,070,000 17.2% 15.8% 2007 71,974,000 18.2% 16.6% 2008 61,832,000 17.0% 17.4% 2009 62,870,000 16.8% 17.3% 2010 48,854,000 14.6% 16.1% 2011 43,433,000 13.0% 14.8% 2012 27,687,000 8.6% 12.1% 2013 30,793,000 9.5% 10.4% 2014 39,095,000 11.7% 9.9% 2015 41,588,000 11.7% 10.9% 2016 40,107,000 11.4% 11.6% 2017 38,119,000 10.7% 11.3% Note: Abbreviation: cf - cubic feet. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 04 4-4 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 4.1 DSL 3-Year Rolling Average 4.3 Metering As required by the MWL, all of the City’s sources of supply are metered via production meters. This includes all of the City-owned production wells, Springbrook Springs, interties with adjacent districts, and water purchased from SPU. The production meters are calibrated periodically. The City also provides service metering for all customers. The consumption meters are categorized either as large (3 inches or greater) or small (smaller than 3 inches). All large service meters are tested annually and repaired as needed. In 2012, the City implemented an Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) system, which provides more time for water maintenance staff to perform repairs on small meters as well. With these measures in place, the City is in full compliance with the WUE metering requirements. 4.4 Conservation Planning To develop a successful WUE and conservation plan, the City must understand how, where, and when water is used. This knowledge reveals where savings and efficiencies can be made. The City had a total of 17,831 connections in 2017, most of which were residential connections. Commercial and Industrial sectors make up only about 6 percent of connections, yet account for 25 percent of overall consumption. This indicates that these sectors have opportunities for additional efficiency and conservation savings. Table 4.3 2017 Connections by Customer Category Single Family Residential Multi-Family Residential Commercial Industrial Government Irrigation Large Consumers Other Authorized Use Total # of Connections 13,806 1,534 1,057 63 81 605 7 678 17,831 Percent of Total 77.4% 8.6% 5.9% 0.4% 0.5% 3.4% 0.0% 3.8% 100.0% CHAPTER 04| WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 4-5 Figure 4.3 presents monthly water production in 2017. Summer irrigation season generally begins in May and extends through September. In 2017, the peak irrigation months of July and August experienced a 55 percent increase in average daily water consumption over annual average day demand (ADD). Although this result is typical, it shows that irrigation and general outdoor summer use could also have additional efficiency and conservation savings. Figure 4.2 2017 Water Use by Customer Category Figure 4.3 2017 Monthly Water Production Note: Abbreviation: MG = Million Gallons. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 04 4-6 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 4.4.1 Historic Conservation Program The City’s water conservation program was implemented in compliance with the Water Use Efficiency Act of 1989, which requires all public water systems to have a conservation program. After initiating its leak detection and repair program in 1989, the City observed a noticeable drop in volume of DSL. Since then, the conservation program has expanded to include school outreach, a speakers’ bureau, fairs, and promotion of regional programs. In addition, a 12-month water consumption history was added to water bills in 1992 to help customers understand their usage. In 1994, the City also began implementing tiered water-pricing rates to encourage consumer conservation. Table 4.4 summarizes past and current conservation efforts. Current measures are indicated with a “C” and have been in effect for the last 6 years. Measures that will continue through the next 10 years are indicated with a “P.” 4.4.1.1 Consumption History Figure 4.4 shows average water use per connection for the Single-Family Residential customer class between 1988 and 2017. During this period, Single-Family consumption per connection decreased steadily by approximately 30 percent. However, over the most recent decade (2008 to 2017), the decrease was less dramatic, with average Single-Family usage decreasing by 7 gallons per day (gpd), a 4 percent decrease. Figure 4.5 shows that total annual consumption has increased very little since 1988. However, annual consumption per connection, shown in Figure 4.6, has decreased by 32 percent. Various events and influences affected this downturn. One significant decline in water use occurred in 1993, which was largely attributable to the drought that occurred from 1992 to 1993 and to major regional education efforts to remediate the situation. This, coupled with the 1994 change in the City’s rate structure (with inverted-rate blocks), prevented water use from returning to pre-drought levels. In 2009, the City again instituted a more aggressive inverted-rate block structure for Single-Family and Duplex customers and changed Multi-Family and Irrigation rates. Rate increases in subsequent years have continued to encourage conservation and impact consumption. Although many factors contribute to the amount of water consumed, a consistent decline in water use over time indicates that water conservation measures and education do have a long-term impact. CHAPTER 04| WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 4-7 Figure 4.4 Average Annual Consumption per Single-Family Connection Figure 4.5 Total Consumption (1988 – 2017) CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 04 4-8 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 4.6 Annual Consumption per Connection (1988 – 2017) Table 4.4 Renton Historical, Current, and Proposed Water Conservation Measures Measure Description Savings Implementation Production Metering (M) Annually calibrate meters on all sources Supply Side H C P Consumption Metering (M) All service connections are metered Supply Side H C P Pipe Leak Detection and Repair (M) Leak detection and pipe replacement Supply Side H C P WLCAP (M) Systematic pipe and valve leak check, repair and replacement to decrease DSL for WUE compliance Supply Side H C P Household Leak Detection Kits Available at City’s Utility Office and at annual Renton River Days Demand Side H C P Sprinkler Rain Gauge Small yard gauge for measuring rain and sprinkler Demand Side H C Sink Aerator Free aerator reduces flow to 1.0-gpm Demand Side H C P Water Rates (M) Increasing block rate Demand Side H C P School Outreach Classroom presentations, currently through SWP membership Demand Side H C P Utility Bill Inserts Inclusion of conservation tips in utility bill mailing Demand Side H C P CHAPTER 04| WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 4-9 Measure Description Savings Implementation Public Presentations Presentation at fairs and workshops in Renton Demand Side H C P Water Bill Consumption History History included with all customer utility bills, waterusage.rentonwa.gov Demand Side H C P Advertising Public advertising through membership in SWP Demand Side H C P Natural Yard Care Workshops Coordinate SWP gardening classes with other utility departments Demand Side H C P City Demonstration Garden Located at Renton City Hall Demand Side H C P Toilet Rebates Rebates for single-family and multi-family toilets available through SWP Demand Side C P Non-residential Appliance Rebates Rebates for toilets, urinals, dishwashers, and other technologies available through SWP Demand Side C P Sprinkler System Upgrade Rebates Irrigation timer and custom rebates available through SWP Demand Side C P Hose Gaskets Garden hose gaskets to stop leaks Demand Side H C P Web Page Indoor, outdoor tips as well as links and kids’ page Demand Side H C P Showerheads Free showerhead reduces flow to 1.5-gpm Demand Side C P Note: Abbreviations: H - historically implemented measure; C - currently implemented measure; P - implementation of measure will continue into the future; M - mandatory WUE measure; gpm - gallons per minute. 4.4.2 Current Conservation Program 4.4.2.1 Municipal Water Law The MWL governs water conservation planning. The minimum number and type of efficiency measures a conservation program must evaluate or implement is based on the system’s total number of connections. With more than 17,000 connections, the City must implement five mandatory measures and must either implement or evaluate two additional measures. These mandatory measures are detailed in Table 4.5. The City must also evaluate or implement nine measures of its own choice. These selected measures are conducted either by the City or by the Saving Water Partnership (SWP), on behalf of the City. The City’s current conservation program was developed through a public process to support the City’s WUE goals. The original objectives and goals are being carried forward to this Plan with the goal of encouraging residents to actively and instinctively conserve water. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 04 4-10 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 4.5 WUE Mandatory Measures Must implement the following WUE measures: Status Install production (source) meters Implemented Install consumption (service) meters Implemented Perform meter calibration Implemented / ongoing Implement a WLCAP to control leakage if exceeds 10% Implemented / ongoing Educate customers about water efficiency at least once per year Implemented /ongoing Must evaluate or implement these WUE measures: Evaluate rates that encourage water demand efficiency Implemented Evaluate reclamation Implemented WUE Objectives As part of the initial WUE compliance, the City reviewed its water system and water usage and developed four objectives for its WUE plan: 1. Identify and reduce sources of DSL. 2. Ensure efficient water supply for continued growth in the service area. 3. Reduce peak day and peak season demands. 4. Maintain the historically low levels of customer water usage. WUE Goals The City has defined the following measurable goals: 1. Reduce DSL to 10 percent or less by 2022. 2. Limit the maximum daily demand (MDD) to ADD peaking factor to less than 2.0. 3. Maintain an equivalent residential unit (ERU) value under 160 gpd/ERU. As part of the SWP, the City also supports the regional 2019-2028 WUE goal to keep the total average annual retail water use of SWP members under 110 million gallons per day (mgd) through 2028 despite forecasted population growth by reducing per capita water use.” 4.4.2.2 Mandatory Measures Meters To fulfill all mandatory measures related to meters, the City installed AMI for both production and consumption meters. These meters are calibrated and/or tested periodically. Appendix G presents the City’s updated WLCAP. Reclamation In response to the Washington State Department of Ecology's water resource policy initiative and the DOH's 1994 Interim Conservation Guidelines, the City thoroughly evaluated the usage potential of its reclaimed water. This study, titled “City of Renton Conceptual Reuse Plan” (COR File Code WTR-09-0009), included a pilot project and long-range plan to develop a city-wide distribution system that would use reclaimed water for various uses. CHAPTER 04| WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 4-11 Then in 1995, King County, the City, and the City of Seattle Water Department published a study titled “Water Reclamation and Reuse: A Feasibility Study for the King County Metropolitan Area.” According to this study, the cost of reclaimed water service would be higher than the marginal cost of developing new potable supplies at that time under most conditions. A successful reuse project would have to serve a reasonably large demand (at least 1 mgd) and be located adjacent to a source of secondary treated effluent. The study also noted that the King County Renton Effluent Transfer System included a 96-inch pipeline in the Duwamish Corridor with 12 taps in place for reclamation and reuse. Therefore, site-specific reuse projects along the Duwamish Corridor were suggested as the most cost-effective and promising options (detailed in a King County report titled “An Economic Analysis of the North Seattle Reclaimed Water Project”). In 2011, the King County Wastewater Treatment Division began another engineering, environmental, and economic analysis of conceptual reclaimed water strategies. The City is now working with King County to provide them appropriate information for this analysis. Appendix I includes a completed King County Water Reclamation Evaluation Checklist for this use. The checklist identifies potential reclaimed water users from the City’s largest consumers. Education The mandatory requirement for annual customer WUE education is met through the City’s annual water quality report, also known as the consumer confidence report, or CCR. This report includes annual WUE data and water conservation education advice. City customers receive a postcard in the mail which provides a link to an electronic copy of the annual report (https://rentonwa.gov/city_hall/public_works/utility_systems/water_quality_report). Customers may also contact the Water Utility and request a hardcopy of the annual reports. Other customer education measures are part of the selected measures described below. Rate Structure A balanced water-rate structure is an important way to encourage water conservation. The City introduced a two-tiered inverted block rate pricing structure for single-family homes and duplexes in 1994. Then in 2009, the City reevaluated and instituted changes to its rate structure by defining rates for more customer classes, offering a more aggressive inverted-rate block structure for Single-Family and Duplex customers, and adjusting Multi-Family and Irrigation rates. Rate increases in subsequent years have continued to encourage conservation. Table 4.6 shows the City’s 2018 rate structure. Table 4.6 2018 Customer Class Rates Rate Structure (Cost per 100 cf) Single-family / Duplex 3-tier block rate ($2.54, $3.41 and $4.30) Multi-family $3.29 Non-residential $3.48 Irrigation $5.58 Irrigation (city accounts) $3.92 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 04 4-12 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 4.4.3 Proposed Conservation Program Based on the number of the City’s connections, the WUE Rule requires the City to evaluate or implement at least nine measures of its choice that support the proposed goals, in addition to the mandatory measures described above. The nine selected measures are described below. The City’s conservation strategy has been to focus on the residential consumer, both indoor and outdoor, a strategy that has proved successful by continued savings. Most recently, emphasis has been on reducing summer peak usage, which is now a WUE goal. To lower peak consumption, the City has instituted a third tier and has increased irrigation rates. 4.4.3.1 Selected Measures 1 - Water Bill Consumption History Current customer bills provide historical data to help educate customers of their usage patterns throughout the year, particularly to see the impact of outdoor watering. With this information, they are encouraged to make informed conservation choices and to save money. 2 - School Outreach As part of the SWP, the City provides interactive educational experiences to Renton Elementary School students presented by Nature Vision. Presentations cover subjects such as Water Cycle Terrariums, Water Use Exploration, and more. The City also partners with other purveyors through the SWP to produce educational materials that explain the groundwater process and promote conservation. 3 - Utility Bill Inserts This avenue of communication is effective in delivering a focused message to customers. Once or twice per year, conservation information specifically geared toward residential customers is included with the utility bill. 4 - Natural Yard Care Workshops The City’s Water Utility department partners up with its solid waste and surface water departments to educate customers about water-efficient gardening and ways to reduce toxic chemicals in the yard and garden by hosting SWP gardening classes. 5 - Advertising and Public Outreach The City is a member of the regional SWP, the national Alliance for Water Efficiency, and the US Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense partnership. As a member, the City supports these organizations' missions to promote water efficiency and conservation through local, regional, and national advertising. 6 - City Demonstration Garden At the 200 Mill Avenue South building, the City maintains a demonstration garden that features low water and low maintenance plants. The garden presents an educational viewing of well-established plants that thrive in limited water and sloped conditions. 7 - Indoor Water Conservation Giveaways The City provides customers with free high efficiency showerheads and aerators as well as toilet leak kits. Distribution of these items also allows staff to discuss water conservation principles with residents and answer any related questions. CHAPTER 04| WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 4-13 8 - Hose Gaskets Replacement rubber hose gaskets are offered at community events such as Renton River Days, helping to reduce a source of common outdoor water waste. Although the annual savings cannot be qualified, the hose gaskets do contribute to summer peak reduction. 9 - Water Conservation Education Web Page The City’s water conservation web page provides information for indoor and outdoor savings and links to rebates and other resources. It also presents information for all age groups, including a “kids” page accessible to children and teachers. The City’s participation in the SWP offers access to a broad set of online conservation resources that are linked on the City’s web page. 4.4.3.2 Regional Conservation Participation To help achieve its stated WUE objective to “ensure efficient water supply for continued growth within its service area,” the City implemented long-range water supply planning. As part of this effort, the City evaluated alternate sources of water to meet the growing demand from the projected population growth and from development within the City's water service area. In 2010, the Water Utility evaluated alternatives for the City to obtain additional water supply from SPU and Cascade Water Alliance (CWA) and to improve water quality in Well PW-5A. The most cost-beneficial and reliable alternative was determined to be purchasing water from SPU; thus, a contract was negotiated between the City and SPU in 2011 (CAG-11-093). With this contract, the City became a part of the SWP, a consortium of water utilities with contracts with SPU. The SWP has created a collection of water conservation measures and technical assistance to City customers that took the City’s conservation program from one geared primarily toward residential customers to one that now includes owners/managers of apartments and condos as well as industrial and commercial customers. Table 4.7 presents the current SWP measures, rebates, and resources to be expected in 2019. Table 4.7 Saving Water Partnership Conservation Measures and Strategies Types of Measures Types of Strategies Residential Indoor Replace toilets, showerheads, and faucets (multi-family) Free showerhead and aerator distribution to multifamily properties Fix leaks (toilets) Multi-family and single-family toilet rebates, free dye strip distribution for leak detection Change behaviors (toilet flushes, faucet use, shower, full loads) Multi-family building owner and operator recruiting Behavior messaging Collaboration with energy utilities Program recruiting through media, direct mailing, web Promotion of Maximum Performance (MaP) toilet performance Residential Landscape Reduce peak water use Irrigation system efficiency rebates Landscape watering behaviors Gardening classes CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 04 4-14 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Types of Measures Types of Strategies Practices that affect watering (mulch, soil prep, plant selection) Promotion of free gardening advice service -The Garden Hotline at (206) 633-0224 Natural lawn and garden guides (how-to materials) Trainings for irrigation professionals Online weather data, watering index, irrigation scheduling tools Commercial Process/Domestic Upgrade equipment efficiency for cooling process, other industrial uses Rebates for projects that aim to reduce water usage during space cooling, refrigeration, and ice-making Small and large business targeting. Promotion through vendors, trade groups, and agencies. Upgrade efficiency of specific water consuming medical and lab equipment Outreach to businesses about water saving techniques and available rebates Outreach to ethnic businesses Technical assistance, assessments, workshops Commercial Landscape Improve watering efficiency Targeted outreach to large commercial customers Upgrade irrigation equipment (controllers, rain sensors, drip) Provide site-specific recommendations and technical assistance Improve scheduling and maintenance Financial incentives (custom projects and rebates) Targeted recruiting and promotion to large commercial customers Market transformation by establishing and building vendor and contractor relationships Online weather data, watering index, irrigation scheduling tools Trainings for irrigation professionals Youth Education Build conservation awareness Classroom presentations through Nature Vision, take-home materials and devices Educator resources online Support of water conservation events Overall Messaging Conservation awareness supporting recruitment of residential and commercial customers Targeted marketing Outreach at conservation events Program Evaluation Evaluate program effectiveness Annual reports Customer baseline surveys of attitudes and behaviors CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-1 Chapter 5 POLICIES, CRITERIA AND STANDARDS 5.1 Introduction The City of Renton (City) Water System Plan (Plan) is based upon the following mission statement for all City utilities, including the City water system: “The City strives to protect the environment and empowers its citizens to be engaged in sustainability programs. The City manages its water system in a manner that ensures public health and safety, meets all regulatory requirements, and protects environmental resources.” (Source: Renton Results – A Community Accountability Program) The policies, design criteria, and standards used in the Plan are based on laws and policies that originate from the following sources, listed in descending order, from those with the broadest authority to those with the narrowest: • Federal Regulations - Environmental Protection Agency. • Washington State Regulations - Department of Health and Department of Ecology. • King County Regulations. • City of Renton Ordinances - City Council. • City of Renton Administrative Policies – Mayor. • City of Renton Comprehensive Plan. • Department Policies - Public Works Department. • Water System Plan Utility Policies – Utility Systems Division/ Water Utility Staff. The City is committed to providing customers high-quality drinking water that is reliable, affordable, and meets strict safety standards. We strive to serve as responsible community stewards by upholding the City’s 2021-2026 Business Plan mission to provide a safe, healthy, and vibrant community by maintaining clean and sustainable drinking water services. The Plan includes policies, effective practices, and goals over time to improve the operation and management of the City’s water supply sources and water system toward sustainability, at a pace consistent with the current and future needs of the community. These goals have been applied to the planning process of the Water System Plan Update and will continued to be implemented in current and future programs and capital projects identified in the Plan. Law is set by the federal government through federal regulations, by the State of Washington (State) in the form of statutes: Revised Codes of Washington (RCW), Washington Administrative Code (WAC), by King County in the form of policies, and by Renton City Council (Council) in the form of ordinances and resolutions. City policies are established in order to provide a vision or mission of the Water Utility and to provide a framework for the planning, design, operation, management, and maintenance of the water system. City policies cannot be less stringent or in conflict with adopted laws. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 05 5-2 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 5.2 Service Area, Policies, and Standards The City manages its water utility and water system in accordance with established federal and state regulations for public water systems. City policies and standards set forth in this chapter provide a consistent framework for the planning, design, construction, maintenance, operation, and service of the City’s water system and water supply sources. The City has additional land use, development, and finance policies that specify additional requirements for new development or redevelopment projects that require water service for domestic, fire protection, and other uses. The City’s policies are grouped into the following major categories: • Service Area. • Water Supply Planning and Management. • Water Main Extension and Service Ownership. • System Reliability and Emergency Management Plan. • Fire Protection. • Financial. • Facilities. • Organization. 5.3 Summary of Policies for Water System Plan 5.3.1 Service Area 5.3.1.1 Mission Statement Ensure that the City’s drinking water supply is safe and sufficient and that the City’s infrastructure is adequate to meet our community’s present and future needs for water1. 5.3.1.2 Service Availability The City’s goal is to provide water service to all customers within the City’s retail service area (RSA) in a timely and reasonable manner consistent with applicable City policies, resolutions, ordinances, the Municipal Water Law, Washington State Department of Health (DOH) rules and guidelines, and applicable federal, state, and local laws and plans 2. The City shall serve an applicant for new service within its retail service area if all of the following conditions are met. 1. The service request is consistent with adopted local plans and development regulations. 2. The water system has sufficient water rights to provide service. 3. The water system has sufficient capacity to serve water in a safe and reliable manner. 4. The water system can provide service in a timely and reasonable manner. 5.3.1.3 Government Consistency Provisions of water service should be consistent with the goals, objectives, and policies of this Plan and the Renton Comprehensive Plan. This Plan will be consistent with local, county, and 1 Sources: Renton Comprehensive Plan Goal U-N, Outcome Management for Water Utility Service Delivery Plan. 2 Sources: WAC-246-290, Municipal Water Law, Renton Comprehensive Plan, Water System Plan. CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-3 state land use authorities and plans. Water service should be consistent with the growth and development concepts directed by the City’s Comprehensive Plan 3. 5.3.1.4 Existing Water Service Area and Retail Service Area The City’s RSA (Figure 1.3 in Chapter 1) encompasses the area where the City has existing distribution mains or where distribution mains can be extended in a reasonable timeframe 4. The City’s retail service area is established in accordance with the East King County Coordinated Water System Plan and the Skyway Coordinated Water System Plan. The City also has inter-local agreements with neighboring cities and water districts to address minor adjustments of service area boundaries. In general, the City’s RSA area is located within incorporated City of Renton with the exception of several very small areas within unincorporated King County. The City uses its existing service area agreements to determine areas where water service will be provided. Therefore, annexations to the City do not affect the provisions of water service. The City’s water service area encompasses the retail service area, the portion of the Skyway Water and Sewer District that is served by City of Renton water through a wholesale agreement, and the future service area described in the next section. The City’s water service area is shown in Figure 1.3 of Chapter 1. 5.3.1.5 Future Service Area The only potential changes to the City’s RSA is for a small area near the westerly City limits. This area is currently served by Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) and may be served by the City in the future upon annexation. The future annexation area to be served by the City is also described in Skyway Water & Sewer District Comprehensive Plan and in the Skyway Coordinated Water System Plan. 5.3.1.6 Potential Annexation Areas The City’s potential annexation areas (PAA) boundary extends beyond the City’s city limits and water service area boundary. Other water purveyors serve areas outside of the City’s water service area. Due in large part to the geography of the City, it is unlikely that its water service area would be extended further beyond the existing water service area. Any new areas within the City’s PAA that are annexed by the City would likely continue to be served by the other utilities currently serving them 5. 5.3.1.7 Satellite/Remote Systems The City does not allow satellite/remote systems. 5.3.1.8 Service for Annexations without Existing Municipal Water Supplies The City intends to provide water service to areas annexed to the City that do not have existing water service from other municipal water suppliers and water districts. Service extension by the City may be considered under such conditions only if the City’s costs are recovered and sufficient financial resource is available and that service to annexations will not decrease the level of service to existing customers or increase the cost of service to existing customers 6. 3 Sources: WAC-246-290, Renton Comprehensive Plan Policy U-1, Water System Plan. 4 Sources: WAC-246-290, East King County Coordinated Water System Plan, Skyway Coordinated Water System Plan, Water System Plan. 5 Source: Renton Comprehensive Plan, Water System Plan. 6 Source: Renton Comprehensive Plan Policy U-5, Water System Plan. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 05 5-4 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 5.3.1.9 Service for Annexations with Existing Municipal Water Supplies The City will not provide water service to areas annexed to the City that are already served by other existing municipal water suppliers or water districts. Areas annexed with existing municipal supply must meet the City water utility standards 7. 5.3.1.10 Service for Protection of Public Health The City will allow extension of water service without annexation to areas outside of the City limits when such areas are within the City’s water service area, or when no other reasonable service is available, and it is determined by the City and/or by DOH that a public health emergency exists or is imminent 8. 5.3.1.11 Conditions for Service to Properties with Existing Private and or Exempt Wells The City will provide water service for domestic and for fire protection to properties within the City water service area that have existing private wells and/or exempt wells subject to the following conditions: 1. All “exempt” wells and private wells on the property must be decommissioned in accordance with Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE) standards and regulations, except when such wells can be used by the City for purposes including but not limited to: water supply, water supply mitigation, resource protection, environmental monitoring, or remediation of contamination. 2. All water rights, permits, or certificates must be deeded to the City if the type of use is municipal, community, or domestic. Any associated source(s) must either be decommissioned or deeded to the City, at the discretion of the City. Water rights, permits or certificates, for which the type of use is irrigation, industrial, or agricultural may be retained if the proposed land use is consistent with the type of use listed on the water right. If the proposed land use is not consistent with the type of use listed on the water right, then the water right must be deeded to the City; and any associated source(s) must either be decommissioned or deeded to the City, at the discretion of the City. 5.3.1.12 Requests for Assumption by Water Districts or Private Water Systems The City may assume the operation of a water district or private water system at their request if the following conditions are met and subject to the approval of the Council 9: 1. The district or private system is adjacent to or within the City’s water service area. 2. The district’s or private system’s facilities meet the City’s performance criteria and engineering standards, or a plan is in place to assure that they will be brought up to Renton’s standards without adversely impacting the City’s existing customers financially or with regard to level of service. 3. The assumption of the district or private system is permitted by State law. 4. The City shall require that the district or private system to transfer the ownership of its water supply sources and associated water rights to the City. Water rights must be 7 Source: Water System Plan. 8 Source: RCW, Water System Plan. 9 Source: RCW, WAC, Water System Plan. CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-5 successfully transferred to the City and approved for municipal water use by the DOE prior to commitment from the City for water service. 5.3.1.13 City Initiated Assumption of Water Districts or Private Water Systems The City will seek to assume the operation of a water district when the Council determines that the assumption is in the best interest of the City and the assumption is consistent with the City’s Comprehensive Plan. The City will follow State laws and guidelines in assuming portions of adjacent water systems as a result of annexations 10. 5.3.1.14 Wholesaling Water The City will continue to provide wholesale water to Skyway Water and Sewer District through a single metered connection in accordance to the current wholesale water supply agreement between the City and the District. The City is not planning to provide additional water to the District above the quantity identified in the existing wholesale agreement. The City has no plans to sell water wholesale on a long-term basis to any other purveyor. Sales of water for short term basis will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Current service agreements are included in Appendix D. 5.3.1.15 Wheeling Water The City does not currently wheel water. Water chemistry compatibility and its effects on water quality, including aesthetics such as taste and odor would be a primary consideration. The City will evaluate any request for wheeling water on a case by case basis. 5.3.1.16 Water Service to Properties in King County and within Renton Retail Service Area As a result of numerous annexations to the City up to 2018, there is one developed area that is within the City’s RSA and within unincorporated King County, which could be served by the City. The City currently serves three areas outside of its RSA: Skyway area, Cedar Rim Apartments in Newcastle, and the commercial area in Tukwila near 17900 West Valley Hwy. For these areas the City has adequate existing infrastructure and is providing water service to all existing residences within this area known as the Sierra Heights Division 3 and 4 and the Western Hills subdivisions. For any new development or redevelopment projects within the above unincorporated King County and within the City’s RSA, the City intends to provide “timely and reasonable water service” consistent with State Law RCW 19.27.097. For all new development and redevelopment projects and building permit applications requiring a “King County Certificate of Water Availability”, the City typically processes and issues the requests for water availability within one week of our receipt of the applicants’ written requests. Developers’ extensions of water mains will be required to provide water service for domestic and for fire protection to all new development and redevelopment projects. The City typically reviews the civil plans for water main extensions within 3 weeks of our receipt of the plans and the plans are approved as soon as our review comments have been addressed. The City also coordinates with King County to assure that all county road permits are obtained and that all fees are paid to the county for plan review and for inspection of the roadway restoration related to the construction of the water lines within the county roads. 10 Source: RCW, WAC, Council Discretion, Renton Comprehensive. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 05 5-6 | MAY 2021 | FINAL The City charges a higher water commodity rate to customers that are outside of the City limits and within the City’s RSA, at 1.5 times the inside City Limit water rate 11. The higher rate is necessary for the City to recover additional costs incurred for obtaining King County right-of-way permits for the installation, maintenance, repair of water mains, water service lines, hydrants and related appurtenances within the county roads. The City must also relocate its water mains at its own cost, when directed by King County under franchise agreement to accommodate future County roadway improvement work and the roadway overlay program. 5.3.2 Water Supply Planning and Management Policies 5.3.2.1 Water Supply Planning It is the City’s goal to have system-wide reliable supply sources, treatment, pumping and storage facilities to meet the current and projected maximum daily demand (MDD) – with the largest source out of service 12. The City will work cooperatively with adjacent purveyors to assure reliable water supply at the lowest environmental and economic cost. The City will pursue additional and/or new water supply and use water conservation, water use efficiency (WUE) measures and water reuse programs to ensure adequate water supply needs to meet the essential needs of the community and water demand created by growth targets established through the Growth Management Act (GMA) planning process. Adequate supply is enough water to meet normal peak day demands of the City’s customers. Peak day demand includes the effects of drought and curtailment. As time passes, normal demand is expected to decrease on a per household basis for two reasons. First, average household size is expected to decline, reducing the number of water users per house. Second, continued efforts to use water wisely by all customers will reduce demand. The City intends to take a cautious approach toward demand reductions that result from behavioral changes, which will not be considered permanent. Alternately, structural improvements (e.g., low-flush toilets, low-flow shower heads, or other water-saving devices) will be considered permanent reductions in demand. The City supports efficient use of water. The City supports eliminating the “waste” of water 13. The City has adopted rates to achieve these objectives. The quantity of water at the source shall: (1) be adequate to meet the maximum projected water demand of the RSA as shown by calculations based on the extreme drought of record; (2) provide a reasonable surplus for anticipated growth; (3) be adequate to compensate for all losses such as silting, evaporation, seepage, etc.; and (4) be adequate to provide ample water for other legal users of the source14. 5.3.2.2 Regional Water Supply Planning The City will participate in regional water supply management and planning activities. The City will monitor legislative, regulatory, litigation, and planning activities that may impact or influence the adequacy or reliability of supply 15. 11 Source: City Ordinance 4461, Renton Municipal Code 8-4-32(A). 12 Source: WAC 246-290-222, Renton Comprehensive Plan Goal U-C and Policy U-11. 13 Sources: City Ordinance 1437, Renton Municipal Code 8-4-23, Renton Comprehensive Plan Policies U-6 and U-8. 14 Sources: WAC 246-290-420, WAC 246-290-200, RCW 19.27.097, RCW 58.17.110, Renton Comprehensive Plan Policies U-9 and U-10, Water System Plan. 15 Source: Council and Administration Discretion. CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-7 5.3.2.3 Water Supply and Resources Management The City will practice and support water resource management that achieves a maximum net benefit for all citizens and promotes enhancement of the natural environment 16. The City operates and monitors its water supply sources to ensure compliance with all conditions and withdrawal quantities limits for total annual withdrawal quantity and for instantaneous withdrawal quantity, established under State issued water rights certificates and permits17. The City will continue to monitor the pumping of its wells to allow aquifer recovery and to avoid impacts to in-stream flows for the Cedar River. The City has installed flow control/throttling valves and flow metering equipment on its well pumps to monitor instantaneous pumping rates and total pumping rates. The controls are set up so that the well pumps cannot exceed their individual and total instantaneous flow rates established under the water rights certificates and permits issued by the DOE. If the demand calls for additional water, the controls are set up so that the City will receive additional water through the intertie with SPU’s 60-inch Bow Lake pipeline, and if needed through two other interties with SPU at Tiffany Park and Fred Nelson pump stations 18. 5.3.2.4 Reclaimed Water Use The City will support the regional supplier’s study of reclaimed water use opportunities and will work with King County Department of Natural Resources to identify potential reclaimed water users and demand. Any reclaimed water to be used as a source of supply should only be provided through regional water suppliers. The City has identified several potential users of reclaimed water for landscape irrigation uses, including the Boeing Longacres facilities 19. 5.3.2.5 Conservation and Water Use Efficiency The City will actively continue to promote voluntary conservation and the wise use of water and implement a water conservation program and measures consistent with the requirements of the DOH. The City will cooperate with SPU to regional conservation goals 20. The City has implemented a water rate structures promoting conservation such as, residential inverted block rate and higher commodity rate for commercial and multifamily irrigation. In 2015, the City completed the deployment of an Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) system, which enhances the City’s water conservation activities and optimizes the pumping of its water supply wells 21. The City has adopted the following WUE goals: • Reduce distribution system leakage to 10 percent or less by 2022. • Limit the MDD to average day demand (ADD) peaking factor to less than 2.0. • Maintain an equivalent residential unit (ERU) value under 160 gallons per day (gpd) per ERU. 16 Source: Renton Comprehensive Plan Policy U-16. 17 Source: Renton Comprehensive Plan Policy U-11. 18 Source: Municipal Water Law, Water System Plan, Water Rights Certificates and Permits. 19 Source: Municipal Water Law, Water System Plan. 20 Source: Renton Comprehensive Plan Policy U-17. 21 Source: WAC 246-290, Water System Plan, WUE Goals. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 05 5-8 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 5.3.2.6 Water Shortage Response Plan The City maintains and updates a local response plan in case of a water supply shortage caused by a drought or supply interruption. The City will implement necessary water conservation measures to avoid curtailment in all but the most exceptional circumstances. The Mayor and/or Council are empowered to declare an emergency and to carry out the necessary actions to ensure compliance with the Water Shortage Response Plan 22. 5.3.2.7 Emergency Interties The City has emergency interties with adjacent water systems for short-term emergency uses. The City will evaluate requests for emergency interties on a case by case basis and shall support emergency interties with adjacent systems if they benefit both providers and if they don’t compromise the City’s ability to serve its existing customers or its future supply needs. 5.3.2.8 Water Quality The City shall operate and manage the system to provide water quality that meets or exceeds all health requirements. The City will take steps to meet or exceed all water quality laws and standards. The City will take all reasonable measures to ensure that water reaching the point of delivery, the customer’s meter, meets all water quality standards. The City shall continue to maintain and upgrade its system to provide the best water quality and service 23. The City shall submit Monthly Water Quality Reports to DOH. 5.3.2.9 Cross Connection Control The City shall administer a cross connection control program that protects the City’s public water supply and users of the public water supply from backflow contamination in accordance with State law and to the DOH regulations and guidelines. The City has an established cross connection control program and related ordinances and procedures to implement the program. The City shall submit an Annual Summary Report to the DOH 24. 5.3.2.10 Wellhead Protection Program In conjunction with Plan development, the City updated its Wellhead Protection Plan that will be reviewed by the DOH along with this Plan. Updates of the plan are described in Appendix J of this Plan. The Wellhead Protection Plan will be reviewed and updated, if necessary, in conjunction with the Plan update. 5.3.2.11 Aquifer Protection Program In 1998, the City established an Aquifer Protection Program and adopted ordinances, policies, standards, and regulations for existing and new development within the City’s aquifer protection areas (APAs) to protect the aquifers from potential contamination by hazardous materials 25. The City shall continue to provide outreach and training to facilities within the APAs. The City is in the process of updating the program: 1) update APA zones to reflect our capture zone delineations, 2) will be performing site surveys at facilities within the APA zones that store/use hazardous materials, 3) provide outreach and training for aquifer protection.” 22 Source: WAC 246-290, Water System Plan. 23 Sources: USEPA, Safe Drinking Water Act, Council Discretion, WAC 246-290-310, WAC 246-290-135. Renton Comprehensive Plan Policy U-13. 24 Sources: WAC-246-290-490, Water System Plan. 25 Sources: Renton Comprehensive Plan Policy U-18, City Ordinances 4851, 4992, 5478. CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-9 5.3.3 Water Main Extension and Service Ownership 5.3.3.1 Orderly Extension of Utilities All utilities within the City will be extended in an orderly manner, in and along routes which comply with the City’s Comprehensive Plan and Water System Plan. All City utilities will be extended and installed in a manner as to best serve the citizens of Renton 26. 5.3.3.2 Extension across Full Frontage of Properties All water main extensions shall extend to and across the full width of the property served with water. No property shall be served with City water unless the main is extended to the extreme boundary limit of the property line extending the full length of the front footage of the property. Provisions shall be made wherever appropriate in any project for looping all dead end or temporary dead end mains. Provisions for stubs shall be made to serve adjacent properties 27. 5.3.3.3 Sizing of Water Mains All water mains shall be sized based on fire flow requirements, and densities/land uses anticipated in the City’s Comprehensive Plan and Water System Plan. A hydraulic analysis is required to confirm adequate system design. The analysis shall be used to verify flow demands and pressure availability for the proposed project. The analysis shall demonstrate the effect the proposed project will have on the existing distribution system. The hydraulic analysis shall include, as a minimum, the following: 1. Under peak hour demands (excluding fire demands), the water distribution system shall maintain pressures above 30 pounds per square inch (psi) at the service meters. 2. Under maximum day demand plus fire demands, the water system shall maintain pressures above 20 psi at the service meters. 3. Velocity in any water main shall not exceed 8 feet per second (fps) under any condition. 4. Water system layout shall be designed to minimize dead ends. Looping water lines is a standard practice to eliminate dead ends. 5. The minimum size of water mains with fire hydrants in a residential area shall be 8-inch diameter. Short segments of smaller mains may be allowed for water quality reasons provided that fire flow requirement can be met through other larger mains. 6. The minimum sizing for water mains with fire hydrants in the City’s Central Business District, Urban Center, Commercial and Industrial Corridors, and Sunset Reinvestment Strategy Area shall be 12-inch diameter or larger depending on fire flow demands 28. 5.3.3.4 Requirements for Looping of Water Mains When the required fire flow for a development is over 2,500 gallons per minute (gpm), the fire hydrants shall be served by a water main that loops around the building (or complex of buildings) and reconnects back into a distribution supply main. All fire hydrants shall be served by a municipal or quasi-municipal water system, or as otherwise approved by the Renton Regional Fire Authority (RFA)29. 26 Source: City of Renton Resolution 2164, Renton Comprehensive Plan, Water System Plan. 27 Sources: City Ordinances 3541, 2849, Renton Development Regulations 4-6-010, Water System Plan. 28 Sources: Renton Development Regulations, Water System Plan, DOH Water System Design Manual. 29 Sources: City Ordinance 4007, Renton Development Regulations, Water System Plan. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 05 5-10 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 5.3.3.5 Design of Water Main Extension All water main extensions must be designed by a professional engineer, registered with the State, and shall conform to the latest City design criteria, development regulations, other City adopted standards, and sound engineering practices. Plans must be submitted to the City for review and approval prior to the issuance of utility construction permits. Plan review fees shall be paid to the City at the time of the submittal of the plans. All water mains shall be sized based on fire flow requirements, densities/land uses anticipated in the City’s Comprehensive Plan and Water System Plan 30. 5.3.3.6 Construction of Water Main Extension All extensions of City water mains and related appurtenances must be constructed by a licensed and bonded contractor, or by City forces, and shall conform to the latest City construction and development regulations and standards and other City adopted standards and approved project civil plans. The applicant/owner/developer/contractor must pay all permits fees and related charges, obtain the required permits, and construct the new water mains, at its own costs 31. 5.3.3.7 Oversizing of Water Main Extension The City reserves the right, upon the approval of the Council, to participate in the installation of any oversized water line extensions or additional water or extra improvements related to such installations. In general, subject to Council’s approval, the City may pay for the difference in material costs between the required main sized and the larger main size32. 5.3.3.8 Water Main Extension - Exception The City may defer compliance with Renton water utility standards in the case of temporary or emergency water service. All temporary and emergency waivers must be approved by the Public Works Administrator 33. 5.3.3.9 Water Service and Water Meter Ownership/Responsibility The City shall own and maintain the service line from the main line to the meter, the meter and setter, and the meter box. The property owners shall own and maintain the private water service line and other facilities such as pressure-reducing valves, backflow prevention assemblies, etc. beyond the City’s water meter. For fire sprinkler systems, the City’s ownership will end at the connection point or connecting valve to the water main. The City shall own the detector meter on the backflow prevention assembly 34. 5.3.3.10 Requirement for Water Meters Any person desiring to have premises connected to the City water system shall make application for water meters and pay all required fees. All fire sprinkler systems connected to the City water system shall have meters or detector-meters and shall have required backflow prevention assemblies. New water meters, additional water meters, larger water meters, landscape 30 Sources: Renton Comprehensive Plan, Water System Plan, City Development Regulations. 31 Sources: Renton Comprehensive Plan, Water System Plan, City Development Regulations. 32 Sources: City Ordinance 2434, Renton Comprehensive Plan, Water System Plan, Development Regulations. 33 Source: Water System Plan. 34 Sources: City Development Regulations, Water System Plan, Water Standard Details. CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-11 irrigation meters, fire protection meters and detector meters, will trigger water system development charges 35. 5.3.3.11 Water Main Extension by Developers All water main extensions including fire hydrants, valves, water services stubs, meters, and related appurtenances, with the exception of private fire sprinkler lines and systems, shall be conveyed, at no cost, to the City for ownership, maintenance and operations, after the City’s acceptance of the water main extensions. As-built plans, easements and bill of sales shall be provided to the City for the conveyance of the water mains, hydrants, water meters, and related appurtenances. 5.3.3.12 Latecomer Agreements The City has discretionary power to grant latecomer’s agreements to owners and developers for pro rata portion of the original costs of water main extensions. The authority to approve a latecomer’s agreement is vested in the Council. The latecomer’s agreement can be granted for a period up to but not exceeding 15 years and no term extension will be granted 36. 5.3.4 System Reliability and Emergency Management Plan 5.3.4.1 Service Reliability The City has built in redundancies in the operation and in the construction of capital improvements of its water system, including reservoirs, pumps, pressure reducing stations, and transmission and distribution mains, to maintain service reliability. The City has water system interties with SPU and emergency interties with neighboring water purveyors to provide water service during emergencies. All new water facilities added to the system that require electrical power shall be provided with backup emergency electrical power with automatic start and automatic transfer to and from commercial power. The power source may be an electrical generator or storage batteries. Existing facilities requiring electrical power that do not have on-site emergency electrical power with auto-start / auto transfer shall have such capabilities added as part of the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) within the next 10 years. Emergency backup power for sources and booster pump stations (BPSs) shall be capable of operating at full load without being refueled for at least 36 hours. Battery backup power for Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Remote Telemetry Units (RTUs) and Master Telemetry Units (MTUs) shall be capable of providing power for at least 8 hours of continuous operation without needing a recharge or replacement. Wells and BPSs that do not have emergency power with automatic start and automatic transfer to and from commercial power are not considered reliable, because they cannot be relied upon to provide water during a fire. If at some time in the future installed storage is adequate to meet fire flow demands, then this policy could change. Each BPS shall be equipped with redundant, reliable pumps so as to meet the MDD with only reliable pumps and the largest pump serving the pressure zone out of service 37. 35 Sources: Municipal Water Law, City Ordinances, City Development Regulations, Water System Plan. 36 Sources: City Ordinance 4443, Renton Municipal Code 9-5. 37 Sources: WAC 246-290-420, DOH Water System Design Manual, Council Discretion, Water System Plan. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 05 5-12 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 5.3.4.2 Emergency Preparedness The City has an adopted Comprehensive Emergency Management and Hazard Mitigation Plan developed in accordance with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) standards, to address issues related to continuity of water service, long-term system recovery and to ensure the orderly and full restoration of the water system after an emergency. The City is continually updating its Water System Emergency Response Plan as part of its operations program, and as new facilities are brought into operation. 5.3.4.3 Vulnerability Assessment The City has completed a Security Vulnerability Assessment of its water system in compliance with the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness Act of 2002 as directed by United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The City has phased in the design and construction of the recommended security upgrades as part of the CIP 38. 5.3.4.4 Multiple Sources of Supply The City will develop supplies that, when combined, meet the DOH demand criteria. The City will maintain and execute data collection strategies and record keeping procedures that quantify the average day and peak day demands of each customer class. The City will develop reliable supplies that meet the anticipated MDD (based on customer demand patterns, weather, and growth) with the largest of the supply sources not included 39. 5.3.5 Fire Protection Policies 5.3.5.1 Fire Protection Responsibility The City shall continue to maintain and upgrade its water system infrastructure to deliver adequate water for fire protection to all residential, commercial, industrial customers, schools and other public facilities served with City water 40. The City shall continue to perform routine maintenance on all of its fire hydrants and valves to keep them in working order. The City shall continue to replace its old and undersized water mains with adequate size mains to provide the required level of fire protection. 5.3.5.2 Fire Flow Requirements for New Construction New development, redevelopment, subdivisions, and tenant improvements projects within the City will be required to provide the minimum fire flow requirements as established by Renton RFA. It is the developer’s responsibility to install, at its own cost, all water system facilities including off-site and on-site main line extensions and upgrades to meet the required fire flow demand and applicable City’s development regulations and standards. If the off-site improvements result in regional benefit, the developer may request the City to cost participate in the construction of the improvements. If the off-site improvements benefit other adjacent properties, the developer may request a latecomer agreement to recoup equitable costs from future development of properties within the latecomer boundary which can benefit from the improvements. 38 Source: WAC 246-290-221, -222, -230 & -235, DOH Water System Design Manual. 39 Source: RCW 90.54.180, 90.42.005, WAC 246-290-420, Comprehensive Plan Policy U-11, Water System Plan. 40 Source: Renton Comprehensive Plan Policy U-12. CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-13 5.3.5.3 Fire Flow Requirements for Existing Construction Existing structures are not required to upgrade the City’s water system infrastructure to meet current fire flow and development standards. Redevelopment of existing structures, including remodeling, expansions, additions, change of occupancy and use can trigger the requirements for upgrades to the water system. The City is not obligated to upgrade existing system to meet current codes. As part of its CIP the City continues to systematically replace its old and undersized water mains to bring them to current standards with a goal to provide a minimum fire flow of 1,000 gpm (at 20 psi residual pressure), and to install fire hydrants at 500 feet spacing, throughout the distribution system. 5.3.5.4 Fire Flow Quantity The minimum fire flow requirements for one- and two-family dwellings having a fire flow calculation area that does not exceed 3,600 square-feet shall be 1,000 gpm for 1 hour at 20 psi residual pressure. Fire flow requirements for one- and two-family dwellings larger than 3,600 square-feet shall be at least 1,500 gpm for 2 hours and shall be determined by the Renton RFA 41. The baseline fire flow requirement for multi-family, commercial, and industrial buildings is 3,000 gpm for 3 hours. Fire flow quantities and fire flow durations above this baseline shall be determined by the Renton RFA. 5.3.5.5 Fire Flow Storage The City’s fire flow storage policies are described in the Facilities Policies Section 5.3.7. 5.3.5.6 Fire Hydrants All fire hydrants shall be equipped with Storz adapters on the pumper ports. All fire hydrant feed lines shall be equipped with gate valves (foot valves). The minimum size of feed lines to fire hydrants shall be 6-inch diameter. Fire hydrant lines over 50 feet long shall be 8-inch diameter. 5.3.6 Financial Policies 5.3.6.1 Fiscal Stewardship The Water Utility will follow financial policies and criteria adopted by the Council. Water Utility funds and resources shall be managed in accordance with applicable laws, standards, City financial and fiscal practices and policies. The financial criteria include rate stabilization, establishment of fund balance and operating reserves, maintaining the desired debt service coverage. 5.3.6.2 Enterprise Fund – Self-Sufficient Funding The Water Utility shall be operated as a self-supporting enterprise fund. Revenues to the Water Utility primarily come from customer charges from water sales, system development charges, plan review and inspection fees. Detailed information on the City’s financial program are presented in Chapter 10 42. 41 Sources: Renton Municipal Code 4-5-070(C), International Fire Code Appendix B. 42 Source: Council Discretion, Water System Plan. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 05 5-14 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 5.3.6.3 Rate Stabilization The City’s financial goal is to minimize and stabilize the long-term, life-cycle cost of service. Rates and additional charges shall be cost-based to recover current, historical, and future costs associated with the City’s water system and services 43. 5.3.6.4 Operating Reserve An operating reserve provides a liquidity cushion. It protects the financial viability of the utilities from the risk of short-term variation in revenues and expenses – primarily caused by seasonable fluctuations in billing, unanticipated operating expenses or lower than expected revenue collections. Target funding levels are generally expressed in number of days’ operating and maintenance (O&M) with the minimum requirement varying with the expected risk of unanticipated needs or revenue volatility. Industry practice ranges from 30 days to 120 days of O&M. The City’s goal (used in the financial analysis – see Chapter 10) is to stabilize the Water Utility funds and maintain an operating reservoir of 24 percent annual operating expenses for operation of the water system for 90 days. This is also consistent with the City’s latest rate study. 5.3.6.5 Debt Service The City’s goal is to maintain a desired reserve for debt service coverage of 1.25 times the annual financial obligations 44. 5.3.6.6 Bonds vs. Cash Expenditures • All non-CIP shall be paid for by rates. • All system reinvestment, maintenance, replacement and rehabilitation projects shall be paid for by rates. • CIP projects for new infrastructure to accommodate growth or to increase system capacity can be paid for using bonds 45. 5.3.6.7 Comprehensive Planning Comprehensive plans for water systems should be updated every 10 years, using a 20-year or greater planning horizon, as required by State law and financial policies shall be reviewed and updated as needed. The City has a 6-year CIP which is updated with each biennial budget cycle. 5.3.6.8 Equitable Rates The City’s rates and charges shall be equitable to recover costs from customers commensurate with the benefits they receive and to provide an adequate and stable source of funds to cover the current and future cash needs of the City Water Utility. Rates shall be developed using the cash basis to determine the total revenue requirements of the Water Utility. Rates should be calculated for the service area as a whole46. 5.3.6.9 Outside-City Rates For customers residing outside the city limits, water rates are 1.5 times the residential city rates47. 43 Source: Council Discretion. 44 Source: Council Discretion. 45 Source: Council Discretion. 46 Source: Council Discretion, Water System Plan. 47 Sources: Council Discretion, City Ordinance 4461, Renton Municipal code 8-4-32(A). CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-15 5.3.6.10 Discounted Rates The City shall provide a senior and/or disabled citizen discount on City water rates 48. 5.3.6.11 Other Fees and Charges Owners of properties that have not been assessed or charged an equitable share of the cost of the City’s water system shall pay, prior to connection to the system, one or more of five charges: 1. System development charge. 2. Special assessment charge. 3. Latecomer's fees. 4. Inspection/approval fees. 5. Water meter installation fees 49. 5.3.6.12 Ancillary Charges Customers should be charged for supplemental, special purpose services through separate ancillary charges based on the cost to provide the service. Ancillary charges create more equitable fees and increase operating efficiency for services to customers. Revenue from ancillary charges should be used to offset operations and maintenance costs 50. 5.3.6.13 Inflation Rate The inflation rate should be based on information provided by the Finance Department. 5.3.7 Facilities Policies 5.3.7.1 System Pressure The existing facilities will be operated and new facilities constructed to ensure compliance with DOH and Insurance Services Organization (ISO) criteria for maximum and minimum pressure. The City will provide the minimum water pressure requirement established by DOH at 30 psi at the service meter during MDD and during peak hour demand conditions, not including a fire or emergency. The City’s goal is to provide a minimum of 40 psi at the highest domestic water plumbing fixture or at the highest fire sprinkler head, except during emergency conditions. The City’s goal is also to provide a maximum of 110 psi at the service meter to prevent over pressurization of water uses fixtures and appliances. Current building codes require the installation of individual pressure reducing valves (PRVs) by property owners beyond the water meter where system pressures exceed 80 psi. During a failure of any part of the system, the maximum pressure shall not exceed the normal pressure rating of the pipe, generally 150 psi 51. 48 Sources: Council Discretion, Renton Municipal Code 8-4-31(C). 49 Source: City Development Regulations. 50 Sources: Council Discretion, Water System Plan. 51 Source: WAC 246-290-230, Insurance Services Organization (ISO), Council Discretion, Water System Plan. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 05 5-16 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 5.3.7.2 Velocity The existing facilities will be operated and new facilities constructed to minimize damage from excessive pipeline velocities. When adding to the distribution system or replacing components of the distribution system, water mains shall be sized such that: • Under normal conditions, the velocity of water in a transmission main shall be less than 4 fps during demand periods. • Under emergency conditions, such as a fire, the velocity of water in a transmission main shall be less than 8 fps. Fire flow planning and modeling will use a de-rating procedure that limits fire flow velocities to 8 fps 52. 5.3.7.3 Storage The existing storage facilities will be operated and new storage facilities constructed to comply with DOH criteria and good engineering practice. Storage within the distribution system must be of sufficient capacity to supplement transmission supply when peaking demands are greater than the source pumping capacity (equalizing storage) and still maintain sufficient storage for a fire or other emergency condition. Equalizing, fire suppression, and stand-by storage are provided in addition to operational storage. Location of storage facilities should be in areas where they will satisfy the following requirements: • Minimize fluctuations in system pressure during normal demands. • Maximize use of the storage facilities during fires and peak demands. • Improve the reliability of the supply for the water system 53. Equalizing Storage The bottom of the equalizing storage component must be located at an elevation which produces no less than 30 psi at all service connections throughout the pressure zone under peak hour demand conditions, assuming all sources are in service. Equalizing storage requirements shall be determined using the following equation: ES = 150 min x (PHD – MDD) Where ES is equalizing storage volume. PHD is peak hour demand and is calculated based on maximum day diurnal curves developed for each operational area, and MDD is maximum day demand. The analysis shall compare the cost of designing and constructing storage versus the cost of purchasing wholesale water from SPU, including the cost of upgrading and / or adding intertie connections to the SPU transmission mains. Fire Suppression Storage For fire flow supplied via gravity storage, the bottom of the fire suppression storage component shall be located at an elevation which produces no less than 20 psi at ground level at all points in 52 Source: DOH Water System Design Manual, Renton RFA, ISO, Council Discretion, Water System Plan. 53 Source: WAC 246-290-235, Council Discretion, Water System Plan, Renton RFA. CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-17 the zone under peak hour demand condition, assuming the largest source or booster pump to the zone is out of service. The fire suppression storage criteria available from the ISO were considered in the study. The quantity of fire flow storage provided will approach these requirements as closely as possible, considering economic factors and other design criteria. Sufficient storage for a fire condition is the product of the fire protection water demand and the required duration as determined by Renton RFA. Standby Storage The stand-by storage component or the fire suppression storage component, whichever volume is smaller, can be excluded from the zone’s total storage requirement (also known as “nested” storage) provided that the elevation of the bottom of effective storage is no less than that elevation which produces 20 psi at the meter at all points in the zone under peak hour demand conditions, assuming the largest source or booster pump to the zone is out of service. The calculation of the standby storage volume requirements shall use the following equation: SS = 200 gallons/ERU Where SS is standby storage volume ERU is the number of equivalent residential units in the zone 5.3.7.4 Pipelines and Water Services New water transmission and distribution pipelines and facilities shall be designed and constructed to comply with DOH criteria, American Water Works Association (AWWA) standards, the City’s latest design criteria, and good engineering practice. Where possible, transmission and distribution mains shall be looped to increase reliability and decrease head losses. The preferred pipe material for distribution mains is ductile iron. In residential areas, the grid of distribution mains shall consist of ductile iron mains at least 8 inches in diameter. In commercial, industrial, Central Business District, and other areas with high fire flow demand, the grid of the distribution system shall consist of 12-inch or larger ductile iron mains. All 6-inch and smaller dead-end mains shall terminate with a blow-off assembly. All 8-inch and larger mains shall terminate with a fire hydrant. Distribution system design assumes that only adequately sized service lines will be used. All residential service lines will be copper and 1-inch or larger in diameter. The meter shall be minimum 3/4-inch by 5/8-inch with adapters to fit a 1-inch meter setter. In all other cases, the service line from the main line to the meter shall be the same size as the meter. All water service lines shall conform to the plumbing code. Connections to the system shall comply with the City’s cross connection control standards (Appendix L). In general, the standard protection for commercial and industrial connections is the use of reduced pressure backflow assemblies (RPBAs). CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 05 5-18 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Valve installations shall meet the following criteria: • Zone valves shall be located at all pressure zone interfaces to allow future pressure zone re-alignment without the need for additional pipe construction. • Isolation valves shall be located wherever necessary to allow individual pipelines to be shut down for repair or installing services. Four valves shall be provided per cross, and three valves per tee. • Isolation valves should be spaced along water mains at intervals not to exceed 400 feet. • Air/vacuum release valves shall be placed at all high points or “crowns” in all pipelines. • Individual PRVs are recommended where the service connection pressure exceeds 80 psi, in accordance with the UPC. Individual PRVs must be installed on the customer’s property downstream of the water meter and the customer is responsible for the proper operation and maintenance of the PRV. The PRVs protect customers from high pressures in the case of failure of a pressure-reducing station. • Check valves are recommended for all service lines in the City. Check valves prevent hot water tanks from emptying into the transmission main when the main is empty and prevent contamination of the system mains due to possible cross connections in the customer’s service. Meter setters equipped with check valves are required by the City on all new customer service lines. 5.3.7.5 Booster Pump Stations The existing booster facilities will be operated and new booster facilities constructed to comply with DOH criteria and good engineering practice. All existing and future booster stations should be modified/constructed to comply with the following minimum standards: • All structures should be non-combustible, where practical. • All buildings should have adequate heating, cooling, ventilation, insulation, lighting, and workspaces necessary for on-site operation and repair. • Underground vaults should be avoided where possible due to the increased potential of flooding, electrocution, and other hazards. • Sites should be fenced to reduce vandalism and City liability where appropriate. • Each station shall be equipped with a flow meter and all necessary instrumentation to assist personnel in operating and troubleshooting the facility. Emergency power capability (auto-start/auto-transfer) shall be provided to each BPS. Booster stations should be placed wherever necessary to fulfill the following criteria: • Provide supply redundancy to a pressure zone. • Improve the hydraulic characteristics of a pressure zone. • Reduce the cost of water supply. • Improve water quality (i.e., increase circulation)54. 5.3.7.6 Pressure Reducing Stations The existing PRV facilities will be operated and new PRV facilities constructed to comply with DOH criteria and good engineering practices. 54 Source: WAC 246-290-200, DOH Water System Design Manual, Water System Plan. CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-19 All PRVs should be placed in vaults that are large enough to provide ample work space for field inspection and repair of the valves. Vaults should be tall enough to allow operating personnel to stand erect. Vaults should drain to daylight or be equipped with sump pumps to prevent vault flooding. Each PRV station shall have a larger main (lead) PRV for fire flow demand and a smaller (lag) PRV for anticipated domestic demand. The smaller (lag) PRV shall have a meter connected to the telemetry/SCADA system. Pressure-relief valves should be provided on the low-pressure side of the PRV to prevent system over-pressuring in case of a valve failure. High-pressure alarms should be transmitted to the central control cabinet to alert operating personnel of the PRV failure. When pressure at the service line connection point is such that the plumbing code dictates that water service requires a PRV (e.g., 80 psi) the customer is required to install, own, operate and maintain the PRV. The PRV shall be installed on the customer side of the water service 55. 5.3.7.7 SCADA Telemetry System The control and alarm system will be maintained and updated as necessary to optimize all policy goals. Controls must be capable of optimizing the operation of the water system’s components in response to reservoir levels, system pressures, abnormal system conditions, electrical power rate structure, and water costs 56. 5.3.7.8 Construction Standards All new water system infrastructure shall be designed and constructed to comply with DOH criteria, AWWA standards, the City’s latest design criteria, and good engineering practice. 5.3.7.9 Standard Useful Life for Design • Distribution system pipes – 80 years. • Electrical equipment – 10 to 20 years (varies by type). • Mechanical equipment – 10 to 20 years (varies by type). • Structures – building shell – 50 years. • Structures – water storage – 50 years. • SCADA hardware and software – 10 years (technical obsolescence). • Human Machine Interface (HMI) hardware and software - 5 years (physical limit / technical obsolescence). 5.3.7.10 Facilities Maintenance All City water facilities and related equipment will be maintained so that they perform at the level of service necessary to meet all operational policies and service delivery goals. Equipment breakdown are given highest maintenance priority and repairs should be made as soon as possible to restore the established level of service and for continuity of operation. Equipment should be scheduled to be replaced or upgraded before they become obsolete or when spare parts are no longer available. Worn parts should be repaired, replaced, or rebuilt before they represent a high failure probability. A preventive maintenance schedule shall be 55 Source: WAC 246-290-200, DOH Water System Design Manual, Water System Plan. 56 Source: DOH, Water System Plan. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 05 5-20 | MAY 2021 | FINAL established for all facilities, equipment, and processes. Spare parts shall be stocked for all equipment items whose failure will impact the ability to meet other policy standards. All maintenance personnel shall be trained in the procedures and techniques necessary to efficiently perform their job descriptions. The City ensures that Water Maintenance staff obtained the required State water works certifications by WAC 246-292, such as for Water Distribution Managers and/or Water Treatment Operators, to maintain and operate the City’s water system. Maintenance shall be performed by the water maintenance staff and supervised by the Field Superintendent. Written records and reports will be maintained on each facility and item of equipment showing operation and maintenance history 57. 5.3.7.11 Joint Use Facilities The City will participate in regional projects to the extent that the level of service is not compromised or the cost of service inequitable. All joint-use facilities must comply with City policy and design standards. Joint-use facilities which supply a portion of the City that cannot be supplied from other sources in the event the joint-use facility is out of service will be maintained by the City. Joint-use facilities will be pursued only in those areas that improve reliability or operating costs 58. 5.3.8 Organizational Policies 5.3.8.1 Structure The Water Utility will be structured to provide the best level of service at the least cost. Utility staff level is established by the Council based on financial resources and desired level of service to be provided by the City. The Water Utility shall be part of the following divisions: • Public Works /Utility Systems/ Water Utility Engineering for the planning, management, design, and construction of the City water system and the development and updates of policies and design standards. • Public Works Maintenance Services/ Water Maintenance for the operation and maintenance of the City water system. • Community and Economic Development/Plan Review and Permitting for the review, permitting, and inspection of developers’ extensions of City water system. • Finance & Information Technology/Fiscal Services for financial and utility billing services, cost accounting, and fund activity reporting. 5.3.8.2 Project Review Procedures The City submits projects for new sources, water treatment facilities, booster pump stations, reservoirs, and the recoating of the interior of existing reservoirs to DOH for review and approval as per WAC 246-290-110, -120 and -130. City staff reviews and approves projects for water main replacements and water main extensions including related fittings, blocking valves, air and vacuum valves, pressure regulating and relief valves, fire hydrants, service connections and meters, and cross connection control devices. City 57 Source: Water System Plan. 58 Source: DOH, Council Discretion, Water System Plan. CHAPTER 05 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 5-21 staff reviews and approves projects for the maintenance and repair of water treatment facilities, booster pump stations, and reservoirs (except for the recoating of the interior of reservoirs). City staff reviews and approves projects for the installation, maintenance, and repair of control, telemetry, and SCADA systems of the drinking water system. The Water Utility Engineering Manager reviews project plans for compliance with DOH and City design and construction standards including compatibility with the objectives of the Plan. The Water Utility Engineering Manager consults with Renton RFA staff and the Water Maintenance Managers as part of the review. The review addresses separation from sanitary sewers, other non-potable conveyance systems, and sources of contamination; service pressures; fire flow volumes, velocities, and pressures; cross connection control; thrust block and anchoring requirements; corrosion control and protection; air and vacuum control; meter and service line sizes; PRV requirements; operations and maintenance considerations (blocking valves, blow-offs, etc.); construction considerations (cleaning with polypigging, pressure testing, chlorination, flushing, and bacterial testing); etc. Some reviews include hydraulic modeling by the Water Utility staff. The City requires that the plans include applicable standard details and that the plan notes repeat key provisions of the City specifications for the construction and testing of water distribution system mains and appurtenances. Plans must be signed and stamped by a Washington State licensed professional engineer. The Water Utility Engineering Manager indicates his approval of the plans by signing and dating the construction drawing originals within a City approval block 59. 5.3.8.3 Requirements for Outside Parties The policies pertaining to water distribution system facilities and financing are listed above and are applicable to both City CIP projects and private developer projects. Normally during the planning phase of a Developer-project, a pre-application conference is held with the Developer’s engineer. Members of the Water Utility engineering staff, Renton RFA staff, and Development Services staff participate in the meeting. Based upon the preliminary information about the proposed project the City staff reviews with the Developer’s engineer anticipated requirements for the project: main sizes and main extents, fire flow, looping, pressure control and pressure issues, construction practices, etc. The City’s design standards and policies regarding water main extensions by developers and related requirements are described in Appendix K of this Plan 60. Fire flow requirements are determined by Renton RFA. The City Water Utility first determines sufficient water rights are available. Then, the City Water Utility will determine the available fire flow using its computer simulated hydraulic model of the City water distribution system. The minimum allowable system pressure during fire flow analysis is 20 psi at the fire location and 30 psi throughout the rest of the distribution system. New developments or redevelopment of existing sites are required to meet the minimum City fire flow requirements. The Developer is responsible for the design and installation of all necessary water main improvements to provide the required fire flow including off-site and on-site water mains. The change of use of existing buildings or areas may also require the installation of the water main improvements. 59 Source: DOH, Water System Plan. 60 Source: DOH, Water System Plan. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-1 Chapter 6 WATER SUPPLY, WATER RIGHTS, AND WATER QUALITY To meet water demands, the City of Renton (City) has developed its own independent water supply sources as well as designed interties with adjacent purveyors to purchase wholesale water. This chapter describes the City’s sources of supply, including the condition and capacity of its sources; the water rights associated with its sources; and the water quality requirements for its sources. This chapter also provides a summary of the City’s Wellhead Protection Program (WHPP). The City will maintain its capability to supply a growing population and control water rates by: 1. Placing additional emphasis on water conservation via customer education, incentive programs, and rates that encourage conservation. 2. Protecting the water quality of existing sources from adverse development impacts in the capture zones. 3. Continuing “beneficial use” of its well supply and protecting the legal integrity of the existing water rights. 4. Negotiating with adjacent utilities for emergency supply. 5. Participating in regional water supply organizations. Water quality policies and programs to protect existing groundwater supply sources are among the City’s highest priorities. To ensure public health protection, the City has established a monitoring program that covers operational parameters, regulatory requirements, and aquifer management. 6.1 Water Supply Sources The City’s normal supply is derived from four water sources: the Downtown Wellfield, Springbrook Springs, the Maplewood Wellfield, and Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) supply interties. The City also has an emergency backup well (Well EW-3R), a backup well (Well PW-5A), and emergency supply interties with adjacent purveyors. These supply sources are described in the sections below and are shown on the water system map included in Appendix F, System Maps. The SPU source of supply is described under Section 6.5 - Interties. 6.1.1 Cedar Valley Aquifer The primary source of the City’s municipal water supply is the Downtown Wellfield, which draws water from the deltaic portion of the Cedar Valley Aquifer (also referred to as the deltaic aquifer). The Cedar Valley Aquifer has been designated a Sole Source Aquifer (SSA) by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) since 1988. The aquifer boundaries correspond to the aerial extent of the post-Vashon alluvium of the lower Cedar River Valley. In the vicinity of the wellfield constructed in downtown Renton, the aquifer consists of coarse-grained sediments deposited at the mouth of the prehistoric Cedar River during the last CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-2 | MAY 2021 | FINAL glacial period. The average water table is approximately 23 feet below ground surface (bgs) and the average aquifer thickness is roughly 70 feet in the vicinity of the wellfield. This shallow aquifer is highly susceptible to contamination since there is no confining layer between the land surface and the water table to retard the downward migration of hazardous chemical spills or other releases of contaminants. 6.1.1.1 Aquifer Characteristics Soils overlying the aquifer are silt, sand, and gravel while the aquifer itself is comprised of coarser, very permeable sandy gravel. Aquifer transmissivity is estimated to range from about 1 to 2.3 million gallons per day per foot (mgd/ft). The transmissivity and specific yield of the City’s wells located in that Cedar Valley Aquifer are summarized in Table 6.1. Table 6.1 Wells Transmissivity and Specific Yield Summary Well Name Transmissivity (mgd/ft) Specific Yield (cf/cf) RW-1, RW-2, RW-3 1.00 0.025 PW-8 1.30 0.030 PW-9 2.30 0.020 Notes: (1) Source: Analysis Report for the City of Renton Cedar River Valley Aquifer Test, RH2 Engineering, 1987. Abbreviation: cf - cubic feet. The hydraulic conductivity is on the order of 2,500 feet per day (ft/day) assuming an average transmissivity for all the Cedar Valley Aquifer wells of 1.3 mgd/ft. Recharge is local, both from direct precipitation and subflow. The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) contamination susceptibility rating of wells located in the Cedar Valley Aquifer is moderate to high. 6.1.1.2 Downtown Wells The City operates six production wells (RW 1, RW 2, RW 3, PW 8, PW 9, and EW-3R) in the Cedar Valley Aquifer. Wells RW-1, RW-2, and RW-3 each have a pumping capacity of 2,200 gallons per minute (gpm) and are screened at depths ranging from 50 to 105 feet bgs. Well EW-3R may be used in case of an emergency. Its capacity is 1,600 gpm and it is screened from 40 to 70 feet bgs. Wells PW-8 and PW-9 have pumping capacities of 3,500 and 1,200 gpm, respectively. The wells are screened at depths ranging from 50 to 105 feet bgs. Further detail is available in Chapter 2 – Existing System. 6.1.2 Springbrook Springs Approximately 15 percent of City’s current water supply comes from Springbrook Springs, located at the southern city limits. A water-bearing sand and gravel layer enclosed in a thick sequence of glacial till intercepts the surface of the hillside at Springbrook Springs. Two infiltration galleries collect and channel water into the transmission pipeline. Flow measured at the Springbrook treatment building varies over the year with the highest flow rates occurring during the summer months. The City is able to maintain a maximum flow of 1,050 gpm into the distribution system via a throttling valve. Section 6.4 of this chapter describes recommendations and potential changes to the operation of the throttling valve to allow higher flow from Springbrook Springs. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-3 The capture area has been estimated by combining the surface area draining to Springbrook Springs with the estimated groundwater recharge area. The latter is based on well driller reports for wells in the vicinity of the spring. The DOH contamination susceptibility rating of Springbrook Springs is moderate to high. 6.1.3 Maplewood Production Aquifer The Maplewood Production Aquifer is located east of the downtown area under the Maplewood Golf Course. It serves as a redundant source of supply for the vulnerable Cedar Valley Aquifer. 6.1.3.1 Aquifer Characteristics This aquifer is believed to extend northward into hydrostratigraphically correlated zones beneath the North Uplands. It ranges from 70 to 120 feet thick and is encountered from approximately 135 to 345 feet below the golf course. The Maplewood Production Aquifer is confined with evidence of some leakage. Gradients are predominantly upward. Estimated transmissivities range from 49,000 to 76,000 gallons per day per foot (gpd/ft) with corresponding hydraulic conductivity ranging from 94 to 128 ft/day. Recharge is believed to occur predominantly from the North Uplands while discharge occurs in the Cedar Valley via upward flow to the alluvial aquifer east of the bedrock narrows. Other recharge and discharge points may exist. The DOH contamination susceptibility rating of the Maplewood Aquifer is low. 6.1.3.2 Maplewood Wells The City has three Maplewood Wells (PW-11, PW-12, and PW-17), which have pumping capacities of 2,500 gpm, 1,600 gpm, and 1,500 gpm, respectively. These wells are screened at depths ranging from 284 to 344 feet bgs. The City has a permit for a water right at this location for a new Well 10. The City has no current plan to develop this well. 6.1.4 Well PW-5A Well PW-5A is located near the northern city limits east of Lake Washington. This backup well has a pumping capacity of 1,500 gpm and is completed in a sand and gravel aquifer zone approximately 280 to 390 feet bgs (about -42 to -152 feet mean sea level). The aquifer zone is overlain by stratified glacial deposits of fine to coarse sand and gravel layered with silt and clay. The capture zone for Well PW-5A is not known, but there are some indications that the well may be withdrawing from the Maplewood Aquifer. The DOH contamination susceptibility rating of Well PW-5A is low. 6.2 Condition of Supply Sources The City’s wells are generally in very good condition. The City has capital improvement and maintenance programs to upgrade and maintain its sources in good condition and to comply with water quality criteria. Chapter 8 – Operation and Maintenance summarizes City maintenance activities. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-4 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 6.3 Supply Management The City manages each water supply source within the limitations of the instantaneous water right quantity (Qi) and annual water right quantity (Qa) established by the Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE). In general, the City’s sources are equipped with capacity to deliver the full certificated City water rights (or in the case of the Maplewood Wells – the permitted Qi flows) to the distribution system. Without obtaining authorization from DOE to use the Maplewood Wells to provide additional instantaneous flow as originally intended, not all of this installed capacity can be utilized. For the current planning period, the City plans to use the Maplewood Wells as alternate sources only and to revisit the terms of these water right authorizations during the next planning period. The combined withdrawals from the Cedar Valley Aquifer sources and the Maplewood Aquifer sources will not exceed the total certificated Qi of 11,400 gpm for the Downtown Wells and total certificated Qa of 14,809 acre-feet per year (ac-ft/yr) for all sources. Springbrook Springs will be used at its full available supply during the planning period. At present, Well PW-5A is only used for backup supply because of the water quality issues mentioned in Chapter 2 of this Plan. During the current planning period the City anticipates that on infrequent occasions the demand will exceed the Qi water rights of the Cedar Valley sources and Springbrook Springs. During these periods the City plans to meet the demand by purchasing wholesale water from SPU. 6.4 Water Rights Analysis 6.4.1 General Conditions The State Water Code, as outlined in Title 90 of the Revised Codes of Washington (RCW), states that all surface and ground waters of the state are the property of the public. It is, therefore, the policy of the state to promote the use of the public waters in a fashion that provides the maximum benefit arising from both diversionary uses of the state's public water and the retention of waters within the streams and lakes in sufficient quantity and quality to protect in-stream and natural values and rights. (90.03.005 RCW): The state takes responsibility for determining who, among the various competing basin stakeholders, is allowed to use, divert, or consume the water. When an application to obtain water rights is submitted to the DOE, the date of receipt of this application establishes the priority of the water right. Prior to the development of a source of supply, a permit is issued by DOE to construct, develop, and test the supply source. A water right may then be issued following a thorough review process, a determination of the amount of supply that is put to beneficial use, and the impacts on the various other basin stakeholders. This water right establishes the priority use of the water and becomes an appurtenance to the property. The City has developed independent water sources in order to maintain greater control over the management and costs of its water supply. Through the development of independent sources of supply, the City strives to protect public health, ensure adequate water supply to meet the requirements of its customers, and support the economic prosperity of the City. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-5 Consistent with DOE's procedures for issuing water rights, all of the City’s water rights specify a Qi and a maximum Qa. Copies of the City's water rights certificates and permits are in Appendix M. 6.4.2 Existing Water Rights The City has 13 water right certificates and 4 permits. A summary of the City’s existing water rights for municipal supply is presented in Table 6.2. The total instantaneous flow rate from the certificated rights is 15,152 gpm. Certificated additive (primary) annual water rights are 14,809.5 ac-ft/yr. Certificated non-additive (previously termed supplemental) annual water rights are 7,539 ac-ft/yr. Well 4 is currently inactive, as is Well PW-5A which is only used as backup due to water quality issues. These sources authorize total primary water right allocations in the amount of 1,670 gpm and 2,593.5 ac-ft/yr, which is being exercised through the use of supplemental sources. The City’s water rights authorize total primary allocations in the amount of 15,152 gpm and 14,809.5 ac-ft/yr. The water right for Well EW-3R (GWC 5836-A) was transferred to the new wells RW-3, RW-1, and RW-2. However, in accordance with the water right certificate, Well EW-3R continues to be maintained should it be needed to intercept contaminants that could affect the other wells. Well EW-3R can also be used as an emergency supply after notifying DOE, in the event that the City’s other sources fail. In 2011, the City requested an additional development extension of the Maplewood Wellfield and was granted until September 30, 2021 to finalize the rights and file the Proof of Appropriation forms. The City continues to operate the sources consistent with the past arrangement with DOE to not exceed the total Qi and Qa authorized by the Cedar Valley sources; however, the final disposition of these permits has not been resolved. 6.4.3 Forecasted Water Rights The City does not anticipate applying for any new water rights or changes to its existing water rights. In 1997, the City applied for a change of place for several of its water rights, but since then it has withdrawn those applications. The City’s forecasted water rights are the same as its existing water rights. Springbrook Springs have both a surface water certificate and groundwater certificate, which, if added together would put the withdrawal amount to 2,082 gpm. The City currently has a throttling valve and is maintaining the flow at the Qi value of 1,050 gpm (groundwater certificate value). The City has the ability to increase the withdrawal amount with the infrastructure currently in place, and will, on an as needed basis, withdraw up to the combined value of 2,082 gpm. The City plans to use the Maplewood wells as alternate sources only and to revisit the terms of these water right authorizations perfecting water right certificates during the next planning period. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-7 Table 6.2 Water Rights Status Permit Certificate or Claim No. Tracking # Name of Rightholder or Claimant Priority Date Source Name / No. Primary or Supplemental Existing Water Rights Qi (gpm) QaA (ac-ft/yr) QaNA (ac-ft/yr) SWC 463 S1-*02983C City of Renton May 17, 1930 Springbrook Creek Primary 1,032 1,650 G1-20605C G1-20605C City of Renton May 3,1973 Infiltration Gallery (Springbrook Springs) Primary 1,050 1,680 GWC 886-D G1-*00816S City of Renton Jan 1, 1944 RW-1 Primary 1,040 1,676 GWC 5838-A G1-*08042C City of Renton Apr 14, 1966 RW-1 Supplemental 960 1,536 GWC 887-D G1-*00817S City of Renton Jan 1, 1944 RW-2 Primary 1,040 838 GWC 5835-A G1-*08040C City of Renton Apr 14, 1966 RW-3 Supplemental 1,600 2,560 GWC 5836-A G1-*08041C City of Renton Apr 14, 1966 RW-1, 2, 3 Supplemental 1,960 3,136 GWC 6775-A G1-*09349C City of Renton Apr 1, 1968 PW-8 Primary 3,000 4,532 307 GWC 6776-A G1-*09985C City of Renton Jan 21, 1969 PW-8 Primary 500 800 G1-24191C G1-24191C City of Renton Oct 18, 1982 PW-9 Primary 1,300 1,040 GWC 3591-A G1-*03040C City of Renton Feb 18, 1953 PW-5A Primary 1,300 2,000 GWC 5834-A G1-*08039C City of Renton Apr 14,1966 PW-5A Primary 200 320 GWC 884-D G1-*00814S City of Renton Nov 1, 1942 Well 4 Primary 170 273.5 G1-24781-P G1-24781P City of Renton Jan 2, 1986 PW-11 Supplemental 1,600 1,792 G1-25396-P G1-25396P City of Renton Feb 13, 1989 PW-11 Supplemental 900 1,008 G1-24782-P G1-24782P City of Renton Jan 2, 1986 PW-12 Supplemental 1,600 1,792 G1-25397-P G1-25397P City of Renton Feb 23, 1989 PW-17 Supplemental 1,500 1,680 Total 20,752 14,809.5 13,811 Total Certificated 15,152 14,809.5 7,539 Certificated Currently Online 12,450 10,566 7,539 CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-9 6.5 Water Supply Interties In the coming years, as the limits of water rights are encountered, the City plans to purchase more water from SPU to meet its needs. The City and SPU have a wholesale supply contract (renewed in 2011), which provides an additional supply source for the City through 2062. The City has nine metered interties with the SPU transmission mains (including the two Boeing Plant meters), which are available to serve wholesale water to the City. The City’s interties are summarized in Table 6.3 and described in detail in Chapter 2 as part of the supply sources. Most interties receive summer peaking supply, with the greatest supply from pressure-reducing valve (PRV) 24 / SPU Bow Lake Pipeline Sta. #196. The City plans to meet its water demand needs that cannot be met by way of its own sources of supply and/or via storage by purchasing water from SPU. Table 6.3 Maximum Flow Rates Status - Interties Intertie Name / Identifier Name of Purveyor Providing Water Maximum Intertie Flow Type of Service Maximum Instantaneous Flow Rate (gpm) Maximum Annual Volume (ac-ft/yr) Tiffany Park / SPU Sta. #39 SPU 1,050 1,694 Summer Peaking Fred Nelson / SPU Sta. #34 SPU 925 1,492 Summer Peaking PRV 24 / SPU Bow Lake Pipeline Sta. #196 SPU 2,800 4,516 Summer Peaking PRV 28 / SPU Sta. #33 SPU 700 1,129 Supply/Summer Peaking PRV 35 / SPU Sta. #38 SPU 700 1,129 Supply/Summer Peaking PRV 6 / SPU Sta. #37 SPU 320 516 Summer Peaking SPU Sta. #36 SPU 700 1,129 Summer Peaking Boeing Plant Feed – East SPU Sta. #179 SPU 1,950 3,145 Boeing Boeing Plant Feed – West SPU Sta. #180 SPU 1,950 3,145 Boeing PRV 23 Tukwila City of Tukwila 1,250 2,016 Emergency PRV 25 Kent City of Kent 1,950 3,145 Emergency Dimmitt BPS (operated by Skyway) Skyway 1,600 4,516 Emergency Total 15,895 27,572 Note: Abbreviation: BPS: booster pump station; Skyway – Skyway Water and Sewer District. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-10 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 6.6 Water Right Self-Assessment A water right self-assessment was made based on all water right permits, claims, and certificates. The self-assessment compares the current and 20-year projected water demand to determine the adequacy of the City’s water rights. The self-assessment also considers Table 6.4. The City currently has sufficient water rights. If the City does not pursue additional treatment for Well PW-5A, does not redevelop Well 4, and does not expand capacity of the Springbrook Springs water right, the available annual water right will be 10,566 ac-ft (equivalent to 9.43-mgd average day demand [ADD]), and the City could face a source capacity issue that would result in exceeding this usable annual water. The City plans to address the forecast difference between Qa water rights and annual demand by purchasing water from SPU. To address the forecast difference between Qi water rights and demand, the City plans to construct additional storage and purchase water from SPU. Additionally, the City will further evaluate the timing of capital improvements to address the water quality problems of Well PW-5A. The details of the supply and pumping analysis are presented in Section 6.13. 6.7 Water Quality Plan and Treatment The City is defined as a Group A Community Public Water System. The City must comply with the drinking water standards of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and DOH standards under Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-290. The City’s water quality is in compliance with all state and federal water quality and reporting requirements. The City maintains water quality within its system through the following approaches: 1. Routine system flushing within its distribution system in order to maintain satisfactory water quality. 2. A main replacement program to eliminate dead end mains and replace aging cast iron, asbestos cement, and steel pipes. 3. In-line chlorine and fluoride analyzers at all sources for continuous monitoring. 4. Installation of pH meters at all sources in order to better manage pH and as a result reduce corrosion within the distribution system. 5. Cross-connection prevention. It is recommended that the City take the following actions as part of its water quality planning programs: • The City should continue to track proposed new water quality rules and regulations being considered by the USEPA and DOH in order to plan for any impacts on its water system. • The City should continue to implement its corrosion control treatment improvements as necessary to reduce levels of corrosion within the distribution system and private plumbing. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-11 6.7.1 Raw Water Quality A review of the City's raw water quality testing records indicates that overall source water quality is excellent with only minor aesthetic problems caused by ammonia, iron, manganese, and hydrogen sulfide at Maplewood and corrosivity concerns at Springbrook Springs and Downtown. Even though the aesthetic components do not affect public health, the City provides treatment to improve aesthetic quality in terms of odor and discoloration. Corrosion treatment reduces health risks associated with potential leaching of lead and copper from piping, but also improves aesthetics as well. 6.7.2 Treatment The City’s water treatment is described in detail in Chapter 2 as part of the supply sources. Table 6.4 summarizes the current source treatment goals and effectiveness. The City upgraded the treatment systems at both Springbrook Springs in 2013 and the Downtown Wells in 2010 to modernize the disinfection systems and add sodium hydroxide for pH adjustment to reduce the corrosivity of the water. Water treatment improvements at the Maplewood Wells were completed in 2006 to remove hydrogen sulfide, manganese, and ammonia. The Maplewood Treatment Plant is currently able to deliver up to 3,000 gpm to the distribution system, with provisions to allow additional filters that would increase the capacity to 5,500 gpm. For regular use of Well PW-5A, treatment for ammonia, iron, manganese, and hydrogen sulfide is required. There is no plan to provide additional treatment for Well PW-5A within the next 20 years. Adding treatment to Well PW-5A will be examined during the next planning period. 6.7.3 Water Quality Monitoring The City has implemented a comprehensive and proactive water quality monitoring program. It includes monitoring for operations, regulatory monitoring to meet the requirements of the federal SDWA and monitoring to manage the City's aquifers. Operational monitoring is used to verify the City’s water facilities are functioning effectively to deliver high quality drinking water, and includes measuring chlorine and fluoride concentrations, pumping rates for each production well, and pH measurements as part of the corrosion control program. Regulatory monitoring includes analytical testing for microbial pathogens, organic and inorganic chemicals, disinfection byproducts, and radionuclides. The sampling is performed at locations and at frequencies required by state and federal regulations. Aquifer monitoring is used to identify contamination and to track water levels in the aquifers. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-13 Table 6.4 Source Treatment Facility Sources Treated Treatment Type Treatment Liberty Park CT Pipe 1 Wells RW-1, RW-2 and RW-3 Chlorination (gaseous chlorine) 4-log virus inactivation (CT=6) and measurable chlorine residual (at least 0.2 mg/L) Liberty Park Wellhouse RW-1-2-3 Wells RW-1, RW-2 and RW-3 Fluoridation 0.7 mg/L Liberty Park CT Pipe 2 Emergency Well EW-3R Chlorination (gaseous chlorine) 4-log virus inactivation (CT=6) and measurable chlorine residual (at least 0.2 mg/L) Liberty Park Wellhouse EW-3R Emergency Well EW-3R Fluoridation 0.7 mg/L Cedar River Park CT Pipe Wells PW-8 and PW-9 Chlorination (gaseous chlorine) 4-log virus inactivation (CT=6) and measurable chlorine residual (at least 0.2 mg/L) Cedar River Park Fluoridation Facility Wells PW-8 and PW-9 Fluoridation 0.7 mg/L Corrosion Control Treatment Facility (CCTF) All Downtown Wells pH adjustment using sodium hydroxide Corrosion control to meet requirements of the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) Springbrook Springs CT Pipe Springbrook Springs Infiltration Galleries Chlorination (gaseous chlorine) 4-log virus inactivation (CT=6) and measurable chlorine residual (at least 0.2 mg/L) Springbrook Springs Treatment Facility Springbrook Springs Infiltration Galleries pH adjustment using sodium hydroxide Corrosion control to meet requirements of the LCR Springbrook Springs Treatment Facility Springbrook Springs Infiltration Galleries Fluoridation 0.7 mg/L Maplewood Treatment Plant Wells PW-11, PW-12 and PW-17 Chlorination (sodium hypochlorite) 4-log virus inactivation (CT=6) and measurable chlorine residual (at least 0.2 mg/L) Maplewood Treatment Plant Wells PW-11, PW-12 and PW-17 Chlorination (sodium hypochlorite) Convert ammonia to nitrogen gas (monochloramine less than 0.02 mg/L, dichloramine = 0-mg/L, trichloramine = 0-mg/L) Maplewood Treatment Plant Wells PW-11, PW-12 and PW-17 Dissolved oxygen plus granular activated carbon Convert hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen sulfate (dissolved hydrogen sulfide less than 0.001 mg/L) Maplewood Treatment Plant Wells PW-11, PW-12 and PW-17 Greensand filters using chlorine (sodium hypochrorite) as the oxidant Remove iron and manganese (no staining) Maplewood Treatment Plant Wells PW-11, PW-12 and PW-17 Fluoridation 0.7 mg/L Wellhouse PW-5A(1) Well PW-5A Fluoridation 0.7 mg/L Wellhouse PW-5A Well PW-5A None Similar treatment as Maplewood Note: (1) This well currently serves as a backup to other sources. (2) Abbreviations: CT - contact time; LCR - Lead and Copper Rule; mg/L - milligrams per liter. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-15 Water quality sampling is the responsibility of the Water Maintenance Services Division and is carried out on a daily basis by a team of Water Treatment Operators. In addition to ensuring that water treatment and maintenance are performed effectively, the Water Maintenance Services Division is responsible for ensuring that monitoring is carried out and for managing water quality data and records both for routine and special monitoring programs. A detailed description of the water quality sampling methods, the sampling locations, sampling frequency, and record keeping procedures are listed in the Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Program included as Appendix N. The estimated costs for the City's water quality monitoring are included in Chapter 8 - Operations and Maintenance. 6.8 State and Federal Regulatory Requirements This section presents the water quality standards of the DOH and USEPA through the SDWA. The SDWA, which was enacted in 1974 (and amended in 1986 and 1996), is the main federal law that establishes standards for drinking water quality for public water systems. The DOH has adopted the federal drinking water regulations under WAC 246-290 and has accepted primary responsibility (or “primacy”) for enforcement of water quality monitoring and reporting. All existing and anticipated drinking water regulations that apply to the City are summarized in the following subsections and shown in Table 6.5. 6.8.1 Revised Total Coliform Rule The Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR), which replaced the 1989 Total Coliform Rule, requires monitoring to demonstrate that a water system is minimizing the risk of bacterial growth. Drinking water samples must be collected for bacteriological analysis from representative points in the distribution system at regular time intervals. The number of water samples is dependent upon the population being served by the system. Currently, testing for bacteria (total coliforms) is conducted weekly, with a total of 100 samples required each month. Over the past 6 years, the City has collected approximately 7,000 coliform samples (post-treatment) and only 2 have come back positive for total coliforms. Follow-up actions were taken following the detections, but repeat samples showed no indication of contamination. The City is required to have a Coliform Monitoring Plan that identifies coliform monitoring locations and sampling procedures. The City’s Coliform Monitoring Plan is included as Appendix A of the Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Plan, which can be found in Appendix N. 6.8.2 Stage 1 and 2 Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts Rules Because the City uses chlorine for disinfection, it needs to meet the requirements of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts Rules (D/DBPR). In general, the City’s high-quality source water and applied treatment result in low concentrations of disinfection byproducts, which are produced from the reactions between chlorine and natural organic matter. Based on the low levels of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids, which are the two most common disinfection byproducts, the City is approved for reduced monitoring. D/DBPR compliance monitoring is described in detail in the City’s Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Monitoring Plan, which is included as Appendix B of the Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Plan. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-16 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 6.5 Existing and Future Requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act Regulation Effective / Compliance Dates Regulation Summary and City Status Existing Requirements RTCR Effective February 2013. Compliance by April 2016. The City meets the requirements of this rule. Groundwater Rule Effective January 2007. Compliance by November 2010. The City meets the requirements of this rule. Arsenic Rule Effective February 2002. Compliance by January 2006. The City meets the requirements of this rule. Radionuclides Rule Effective December 2003. Compliance by December 2006. The City meets the requirements of this rule. LCR Effective June 1991 with minor revisions in 2000. The City meets the requirements of this rule. Inorganic Chemicals Various The City meets the requirements of the rules regulating these contaminants. Organic Chemicals Various The City meets the requirements of the rules regulating these contaminants. Stage 1 D/DBPR Effective December 1998. Compliance by January 2004. The City meets the requirements of this rule. Stage 2 D/DBPR Effective January 2006. Compliance by October 2012. The City meets the requirements of this rule. LCR Short-term Revisions Effective October 2011 The City meets the requirements of this rule. Fluoride Effective May 2016 The City reduced fluoride treatment target to 0.7 mg/L in accordance with new DOH rule. UCMR3 Effective May 2012. Compliance Period 2013 to 2015. UCMR3 monitoring was completed in 2014 and 2015. UCMR4 Effective December 2016. Compliance Period 2018 to 2020. UCMR4 monitoring was completed in 2018 and 2019. Consumer Confidence Report Rule Effective December 2012 The City meets the requirements of this rule. Public Notification Rule Effective May 2000 The City meets the requirements of this rule. Future Requirements Perchlorate In February 2011, USEPA decided to regulate perchlorate The City is monitoring the development of the rule. The City tested all of its sources for perchlorate in 2002 and 2003 (and Maplewood Wellfield in 2009). All samples were non-detect. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-17 Regulation Effective / Compliance Dates Regulation Summary and City Status PFAS DOH began rulemaking for PFAS in drinking water in late 2017 The City tested all of its sources for 6 PFAS chemicals as part of UCMR3 sampling in 2014 and 2015. All samples were non-detect. Strontium USEPA is considering issuing a regulatory standard based on UCMR3 results The City is monitoring the development of a national primary drinking water regulation for strontium. LCR Long-Term Revisions USEPA is considering additional revisions to the LCR The City is monitoring the development of the rule revisions. UCMR5 Anticipating final rule in 2021, with a compliance period of 2023 to 2025. Note: Abbreviations: UCMR3 / UCMR4 / UCMR5 - Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rules 3, 4, and 5; PFAS - per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. 6.8.3 Groundwater Rule The Groundwater Rule builds on the Total Coliform Rule by addressing the health risks of microbial pathogens (bacterial and viral) in community public water systems that use groundwater sources. The City has 4-log virus treatment (99.99 percent inactivation) at each source of supply and conducts routine compliance monitoring. The City also conducts periodic sanitary surveys to address system deficiencies at risk of microbial contamination. 6.8.4 Arsenic Rule The Arsenic Rule was adopted by the DOH as a revision to the arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) under WAC 249-290-310. The City samples for arsenic during the inorganic chemical analysis and all samples were non-detect for arsenic during the last monitoring period. 6.8.5 Radionuclides Rule The City conducts periodic monitoring (once every 6 years) for radiological contaminants (radionuclides) at each source after treatment. During the last monitoring period (June 2016), all samples were non-detect for Gross Alpha particles and Radium 228. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-18 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 6.8.6 Inorganic Chemical Analysis Inorganic contaminants are metals, salts, and other non-carbon compounds that can be naturally occurring in the environment or are present as a result of human activities such as urban stormwater runoff or industrial wastewater discharges. Physical properties of inorganic chemicals that affect water quality are also included in the analysis such as hardness, turbidity, color, conductivity, and total dissolved solids. The City is required by DOH to take samples for inorganic chemical analysis at each source after treatment. The complete inorganic chemical and physical analysis includes the primary and secondary chemical and physical drinking water contaminants specified in WAC 246-290. Based on historically low levels, the City has been approved by DOH for reduced monitoring (once every nine years) with the exception of nitrate, which is monitored annually. The City also has a permanent waiver for asbestos monitoring from DOH. During the last monitoring period, no samples exceeded the MCLs for inorganic chemicals. Fluoridation of the City’s water supply began in 1985 after Renton citizens voted for fluoride treatment. In 2016, the City adjusted its fluoride target level to 0.7 mg/L with an operating tolerance of 0.5 to 0.9 mg/L as recommended by both DOH and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). During the last 6 years, no samples have exceeded the MCL for fluoride. 6.8.7 Organic Chemical Analysis Volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) are carbon-containing substances that easily become vapors or gases under typical room temperature. Some VOCs are hydrocarbons that are associated with petroleum fuels and solvents. VOCs are divided into regulated and unregulated VOCs. There are currently 21 regulated VOCs that have been determined to pose a significant risk to human health. This group does not include organic pesticides, herbicides, or insecticides, which are regulated separately as synthetic organic chemicals (SOCs). There are currently 33 regulated SOCs. The City is required by DOH to take samples for organic chemical analyses at each source after treatment. Based on historically low levels, the City has been approved by DOH for reduced monitoring (once every 6 years for VOCs and once every 9 years for herbicides). The City has also been granted waivers for pesticides and soil fumigants. State-wide waivers have been issued for insecticides, dioxin, diquat, endothall, glyphosate, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), ethylene dibromide (EDB), and dibromochloropropane (DBCP). Recent chemical analyses of the City's supply sources show no contamination from VOCs or SOCs. The City must test for trihalomethanes at all wells once a year since they are chlorinated. During the last monitoring period, low levels of trihalomethanes were detected in the samples, but were significantly below the MCL for total trihalomethanes. 6.8.8 Lead and Copper Rule Action levels were established for lead and copper under the 1991 LCR. The goal of the LCR is to protect public health by minimizing lead and copper levels at consumers’ taps, primarily by reducing water corrosivity within the distribution system. The 2007 Short-Term Revisions to the LCR enhanced monitoring, treatment, lead service line replacement, public education, and customer awareness. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-19 The City’s source water contains no significant amounts of lead and copper. However, potential health risks come from the leaching of lead and copper from the distribution system components and private plumbing. The City reduces the risk of leaching by continuously treating its source water to raise the pH of the water. Additional details on these facilities are provided in the Corrosion Control section. LCR sampling was most recently conducted in 2016. There were 41 samples tested for lead and copper from residential water taps. All of the samples tested had levels far below the action levels for both lead and copper. A detailed description of the 2016 LCR sampling is provided in Appendix N, Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Program. Although the LCR has resulted in substantial reductions in lead in drinking water, the EPA is proposing additional revisions to improve the rule and strengthen public health protections. Proposed revisions to the LCR include requirements for accelerated lead service line replacement programs, improved optimal corrosion control treatment requirements, incorporating a lower trigger level for lead, point of use filters, improving sampling procedures, increased transparency and information sharing, and public education. 6.8.9 Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule The SDWA establishes periodic monitoring of contaminants that are suspected to be in drinking water, but not yet subject to drinking water regulations. This is the fourth cycle of monitoring for unregulated contaminants (UCMR4). Because the City uses groundwater supply sources, UCMR4 monitoring consists of 20 unregulated chemical contaminants: two metals, eight pesticides plus one pesticide manufacturing byproduct, three brominated haloacetic acid disinfection byproducts groups, three alcohols, and three semivolatile organic chemicals. The City submitted a Groundwater Representative Monitoring Plan proposing three representative sampling locations (Springbrook Springs, Downtown Wellfield, and Maplewood Wellfield). The monitoring plan was approved by USEPA in January 2018. The City performed UCMR4 sampling in October 2018 and April 2019. Unregulated contaminants that were detected during these UCMR4 sampling events will be reported in the 2019 and 2020 Water Quality Reports. While these contaminants do not have established drinking water standards, the data collected during UCRM4 provides a basis for potential future regulatory actions to protect public health. 6.8.10 Consumer Confidence Report Rule The Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) is an annual water quality report that a community public water system is required to prepare for its customers. Each year, the report documents regulated contaminants detected during the water system’s most recent monitoring period (within five years), and the concentrations of these detected contaminants compared to regulatory standards. The report must also include the health effects related to violations of the maximum contaminant levels. The information in the report is provided to help consumers make informed decisions about their drinking water. The City’s Water Quality Monitoring Reports are electronically available at: https://rentonwa.gov/city_hall/public_works/utility_systems/water_quality_report CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-20 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 6.8.11 Public Notification Rule The Public Notification Rule requires public water systems to notify their consumers of drinking water violations or situations that may pose a risk to public health. Public notification is intended to ensure that consumers will know if there is a problem with their drinking water. There are three categories of public notification: • Tier 1 (Immediate Notice) – Notification within 24 hours. • Tier 2 (Notice as Soon as Practical) – Notification as soon as possible, but within 30 days. • Tier 3 (Annual Notice) – Up to a year to provide notification. The City has not had a drinking water violation in the last 6 years requiring public notice. The City has a detailed public notification procedure summarized in the Coliform Monitoring Plan included in Appendix N. 6.8.12 Future Regulations The City is monitoring the developments surrounding the following potential rules and rule changes: • Revisions to the LCR are being monitored and changes to the City’s LCR activities will be made if necessary. • Proposed Strontium Monitoring – not anticipated to effect the City. • Proposed PFAS Monitoring – not anticipated to effect the City. • Proposed Perchlorate Monitoring – not anticipated to effect the City. 6.9 Corrosion Control Program 6.9.1 Corrosion Protection: Source of Supply In the past, there were relatively high copper levels, and occasionally high lead levels, at home taps because of the relatively low pH of Cedar Valley Aquifer and Springbrook Springs water supplies. In 2017, the raw water pH ranged from 6.6 to 6.9 for the Downtown Wells and about 6.9 to 7.1 for Springbrook Springs. Water with pH less than 7.2 is aggressive in leaching copper and lead from water mains and private plumbing. As a result of the low pH levels, the City has added corrosion control treatment to its Downtown Wells and Springbrook Springs. Sodium hydroxide is added to these sources to raise the pH to between 7.3 and 8.1. The pH of the raw water from the Maplewood Wells is approximately 8.1 and that of the treated water is about the same. Well PW-5A water has a pH of approximately 8. The Corrosion Control Recommendation Report (March 1995) found that no additional corrosion control treatment processes are required for these sources. 6.9.2 Corrosion Protection: Distribution Mains The City uses Aqua Mag® blended phosphates in areas of the distribution system that contain a high number of unlined cast iron water mains. It acts to control the corrosion of the interior surfaces of water mains. The City uses sampling stations to monitor pH levels in the distribution system. In 2017, the pH averaged 7.7 at these stations. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-21 Since about 1976 the City has required that all water mains installed in the City be cement-lined ductile iron pipe. Additionally, since 1980, the City has required that water mains installed in high resistivity soils be wrapped in polyethylene. Beginning in 1994, the City specifications have required that all water mains be wrapped in polyethylene. These requirements were established to reduce the internal and external corrosion of water mains. In a few of the locations where the City’s water mains are within the influence area of other utility lines that are protected with impressed current cathodic protection systems, the City’s water mains are electrically bonded and/or protected with sacrificial anodes. Test stations are installed. Testing is random and infrequent at this time. 6.9.3 Corrosion Protection: Steel Reservoirs and CT Pipeline Three of the City’s seven steel reservoirs are protected with impressed current cathodic protection systems (Mt Olivet, Highlands 565, and Rolling Hills 590). The West Hill reservoir has an active impressed current cathodic protection system installed. The seven reservoirs are inspected by a corrosion control consultant approximately every five years. The inspections consist of examining the protective coatings as well as the cathodic protection systems. The interior and exterior protective coatings are repaired and/or replaced as recommended by the consultant. Impressed current systems are checked annually. Adjustments and maintenance actions are made to the impressed current systems based upon the consultant’s recommendations. The CT Pipeline used to provide primary disinfection for wells RW-1, RW-2, and RW-3 has an impressed current cathodic protection system installed but there has not been a need to energize it. 6.10 Wellhead Protection Program The 1986 amendments to the federal SDWA mandated that every state develop a WHPP to protect ground waters that serve as drinking water sources for public water supplies. In 1994 DOH adopted WAC 246-290, which directed Group A public water systems using wells or springs to implement wellhead protection measures. The City prepared its WHPP, which was approved by DOH in December 1999. Updates to the City’s WHPP were completed under this Plan and the changes to the WHPP are included as Appendix J. DOH stipulates that local WHPPs shall, at a minimum, include the following elements: • A completed susceptibility assessment. • A delineated wellhead protection area for each well, wellfield, or spring. • An inventory of contamination sources located in the wellhead protection area that have the potential to contaminate wells or springs. • Documentation that delineation and inventory findings are distributed to property owners and regulatory agencies. • Contingency plans for providing alternate sources of drinking water in the event that contamination does occur. • Coordination with local emergency responders for appropriate spill response measures. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-22 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Compliance with WHPP requirements is part of a broader City effort referred to as the “Aquifer Protection Program.” The Aquifer Protection Program was established in 1988 when the Renton City Council designated Aquifer Protection Areas (APAs) with the intent of safeguarding the City’s supply sources. The APAs that were initially delineated in 1988 were redefined during this WHPP update to be consistent with the capture zones, which were delineated using the City’s Groundwater Model. As part of its Aquifer Protection Program, the City has enacted aquifer protection regulations within the APAs to protect the aquifers used as potable water supply sources from contamination by hazardous materials. The regulations include restrictions on hazardous material quantities, storage, and handling; land use restrictions; facility operating standards; construction activity standards; fill quality standards; and other measures intended to prevent contamination. Other components of the Aquifer Protection Program include public education, aquifer water quality and level monitoring, coordination with emergency responders, and coordination with surrounding land use authorities on groundwater protection issues. 6.11 System Reliability The City continues to meet its responsibility to its customers and as a water purveyor by addressing the reliability of the water system through the quality and condition of its facilities described earlier in this chapter; through system redundancy; and through the development and implementation of its Vulnerability Assessment and its Water Shortage Response Plan. 6.11.1 Reliability Efforts The City continues to provide reliable water service to its existing customers and plan for long-term reliability of its system for its sources and its distribution network. The City’s primary supply is from its Downtown Wells and Springbrook Springs. Emergency Well EW-3R can be used in the event that the normal supply wells are unavailable. In addition to the Cedar Valley Aquifer, the City can supply its system from two different sources within its service area, the Maplewood Aquifer (not additive) and Well PW-5A. In 2007 the City added emergency electrical generation facilities to supply power to Wells RW-1, RW-2, and RW-3 and to Mt. Olivet and North Talbot BPSs. See Chapter 2 - Existing System and Chapter 9 - Capital Improvements Program for further discussion of existing and planned emergency backup power. In addition to its own sources of supply, the City also has 10 existing interties with four neighboring water utilities: seven from SPU, one from Tukwila, one from Kent, and one from Skyway (plus two 10-inch supply lines to the Renton Boeing Plant from SPU). The City is also actively participating in and is studying other options to increase supply reliability. These options include the City’s ongoing Conservation Plan, a future aquifer recharge study, and the continuing examination of opportunities for the use of reclaimed water. 6.11.2 Water Shortage Response Planning The City developed a Water Shortage Response Plan in 1989 to meet its responsibility for planning for emergencies or other short- or long-term shortages that may occur. The updated Water Shortage Response Plan is included in Appendix O. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-23 6.12 System Wide Water Supply Planning The City has been decisive and progressive in its water supply planning. The City has pursued its independent acquisition of water sources in order to maintain control over this utility, which is vital to the public health and economic well-being of its customers. An important consideration has also been concerning the cost of water supply and the desire to keep water rates low and competitive with neighboring systems and with the region as a whole. The City’s supplies were evaluated to identify if they provide adequate capacity is available to serve future demands. Reliable and redundant supplies were evaluated on maximum day demand (MDD) with the largest pump or source out of service. For the purpose of this study, the term “reliable” refers to a non-emergency source of supply that has backup power. The City has more than sufficient supplies to meet the system wide MDD through 2039, as shown in Table 6.6. The City-owned supplies are sufficient to meet the system-wide MDD through 2029, with a small amount of SPU supply required by 2039. Note, only SPU reliable supplies (i.e. with back-up power) are included in this analysis. The City currently purchases wholesale supply from SPU to address operational challenges in providing supply to some areas of the system. The following section addresses considers supplying each operating area to evaluate and address these challenges, if necessary. Table 6.6 System-wide Supply Comparison 2019 2029 2039 TOTAL MDD (gpm) 9,646 11,125 12,306 Source Well Status Qi (gpm) Springbrook Springs Active 1,050 1,050 1,050 Downtown Wellfield Well RW-1 Active 2,200 2,200 2,200 Downtown Wellfield Well RW-2 Active 2,200 2,200 2,200 Downtown Wellfield Well RW-3 Active 2,200 2,200 2,200 Downtown Wellfield Well PW-8 Active 3,500 3,500 3,500 Downtown Wellfield(1) Well PW-9 Active 1,200 1,200 1,200 Well PW-5A Well PW-5A Backup NA NA NA Maplewood Wellfield Well PW-11 Active 2,500 2,500 2,500 Maplewood Wellfield Well PW-12 Active 500 500 500 Maplewood Wellfield Well PW-17 Active 0 0 0 Downtown Wellfield Well EW-3R Emergency NA NA NA City Supply Total 15,350 15,350 15,350 SPU Supply Interties Total Active 7,195 7,195 7,195 Total Reliable Capacity 22,545 22,545 22,545 Largest Pump/Supply Capacity Well PW-8 3,500 3,500 3,500 Total Reliable Capacity with Largest Pump/Supply Capacity offline 19,045 19,045 19,045 SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) 9,399 7,920 6,739 Note: (1) Reliable pump capacity for Well PW-9 is only 1,200 gpm. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-24 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 6.13 Operational Water Supply Planning The City’s supplies and pump stations were evaluated to ensure adequate capacity is available to serve future demands. The City’s criteria identified in Chapter 2 is to provide sufficient reliable sources / pumps to provide the MDD for each operational area with the largest pump or source out of service. This section describes the capacity of the existing system and system recommendations to meet the City’s criteria. 6.13.1 Operational Areas For the purpose of evaluating supply and pumping capacity, the City’s water distribution system was divided into seven different operational areas, which feed a total of 16 pressure zones. Table 6.7 summarizes the various operational areas and their associated pressure zones. Figure 6.1 provides an overview of the City’s operational areas and pressure zones. Table 6.7 Operational Areas and Pressure Zones Operational Area Pressure Zone Valley 196 Valley 196 West Hill 495 West Hill 300 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 Highlands 435 Highlands 435 Kennydale 320 Kennydale 218 Highlands 565 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 Rolling Hills 490 Scenic Hill 370 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 Talbot Hill 350 Talbot Hill 270 West Talbot Hill 300 !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands1.5 & 2.0MG 435Reservoirs Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 15, 2021 pw:\\IO-PW-INT.Carollo.local:Carollo\Documents\Client\WA\Renton\10899A00\Data\GIS\Operational_Areas.mxd CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 6.1 Operational Areas O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton Legend !S(Spring "5 PRVs !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir X7 Water Treatment Plant !W(Production Well Water Main by Diameter 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16" and larger Retail Service Area City Limits Waterbody Parcel Operational Area Highlands 435 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 Rolling Hills 590 Talbot 350 Valley 196 West Hill 495 Pressure Zones Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 435 Kennydale 320 Kennydale 218 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 Scenic Hill 370 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-27 6.13.2 Existing System The supply and pumping analyses only account for non-emergency supply sources. The emergency sources are identified in this section, but not included in the analysis tables. The supply and pumping capacity of each operational area was compared to the projected MDD for planning years 2019, 2029, and 2039. Demands were developed for this Plan in Chapter 3. The following sections summarize results for each operational area identified above. Results are summarized in the following sections. 6.13.2.1 Valley 196 Operational Area The Valley 196 Operational Area sources and source capacities are outlined in Table 6.8. The total reliable supply capacity of the Valley Operational Area is 15,150 gpm. Well PW-8 is the largest source capacity within the Valley Operational Area, bringing the total reliable capacity with the largest pump / supply capacity offline to 11,650 gpm. In addition to serving the Valley 196 Operational Area, the Valley sources also provide source capacity to all the higher zones with the exception of the West Hill 495 Operational Area. For this analysis, the West Hill 495 Operational Area is assumed to be served by the Dimmitt BPS and the SPU Bow Lake Intertie as described in Section 6.5. Note, emergency supplies to Kent through PRV 25 and to Coal Creek through PRV 53 were not considered in this analysis. Table 6.8 Valley 196 Operational Area Source Capacities Source Maximum Capacity (gpm) Reliable Capacity(1) (gpm) Emergency Source? Well RW-1 2,200 2,200 No Well RW-2 2,200 2,200 No Well RW-3 2,200 2,200 No Well PW-8 3,500 3,500 No Well PW-9 1,200 1,200 No Springbrook Springs 1,050 1,050 No PRV 24 / SPU Bow Lake Pipeline Sta. #196 2,800 2,800 No Well EW-3R 1,600 n/a Yes PRV 23 / Tukwila Intertie 1,250 n/a Yes Note: (1) Reliable capacity considers backup power. The comparison with the reliable sources capacity is summarized in Table 6.9. As shown in the table, the available source capacity within the Valley Operational Area is sufficient to provide MDD to the customers in the Valley Operational Area and the higher Operational Areas that rely on the Valley sources. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-28 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 6.9 Valley 196 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis Demands / Sources (gpm) 2019 2029 2039 Projected MDD (Operational Area + Offsite) Valley 196 2,924 3,215 3,493 Highlands 435 2,118 2,701 3,049 Highlands 565 2,368 2,736 3,125 Rolling Hills 490 451 479 514 Rolling Hills 590 472 500 542 Talbot Hill 350 694 729 785 Total MDD 9,027 10,360 11,508 Available Reliable Capacity Springbrook Springs 1,050 1,050 1,050 Well RW-1 2,200 2,200 2,200 Well RW-2 2,200 2,200 2,200 Well RW-3 2,200 2,200 2,200 Well PW-8 3,500 3,500 3,500 Well PW-9(1) 1,200 1,200 1,200 PRV 24 / SPU Bow Lake Pipeline Sta. #196 2,800 2,800 2,800 Total Reliable Capacity 15,150 15,150 15,150 Largest Pump/Supply: Well PW-8 3,500 3,500 3,500 Total Reliable Capacity with Largest Pump/Supply Offline 11,650 11,650 11,650 Surplus/(Deficit) 2,623 1,290 142 Note: (1) Reliable pump capacity for Well PW-9 is only 1,200 gpm. 6.13.2.2 West Hill 495 Operational Area The West Hill 495 Operational Area sources and source capacities are outlined in Table 6.10. Table 6.10 West Hill 495 Operational Area Source Capacities Source Maximum Capacity (gpm) Reliable Capacity(1) (gpm) Emergency Source? West Hills BPS 2,200 1,000 No Dimmitt BPS 1,600 n/a Yes PRV 28 / SPU Sta. #33(2) 700 700 No PRV 35 / SPU Sta. #38 700 700 No Notes: (1) Reliable capacity considers backup power. (2) PRV-28 / SPU Station #33 serves the Talbot Hill 350 and the West Hill 495 Operational Areas for summer peaking supply. For this analysis, it is assumed that the flow from SPU Station #33 serves the West Hill 495 Operational Area. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-29 The total reliable source / pump capacity of the West Hill 495 Operational Area is 2,400 gpm. Pump 3 at the West Hill BPS is the largest pump within the Operational Area, bringing the total reliable capacity with the largest pump / supply capacity offline to 1,400 gpm. In addition to the West Hill 495 Operational Area demands, the Operational Area sources must also provide source capacity for Skyway Wholesale. A comparison of the projected MDD and the source capacity for the West Hill 495 Operational Area is presented in Table 6.11 and demonstrates that there is sufficient capacity to meet the MDD in the West Hill 495 Operational Area in 2019, 2029, and 2039. Table 6.11 West Hill 495 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis Demands / Sources (gpm) 2019 2029 2039 Projected MDD for West Hill 495 (Operational Area + Offsite) 618 764 799 Projected MDD for Skyway Wholesale (Operational Area + Offsite) 112 126 142 Total MDD 730 890 941 Available Reliable Capacity West Hill BPS 1,000 1,000 1,000 PRV 28 / SPU Sta. #33 700 700 700 PRV 35/ SPU Sta. #38 700 700 700 Total Reliable Capacity 2,400 2,400 2,400 Largest Pump/Supply: Pump 3 at West Hill BPS 1,000 1,000 1,000 Total Reliable Capacity with Largest Pump/Supply Offline 1,400 1,400 1,400 Surplus/(Deficit) 670 510 459 6.13.2.3 Highlands 435 Operational Area The Highlands 435 Operational Area sources and source capacities are outlined in Table 6.12. Table 6.12 Highlands 435 Operational Area Source Capacities Source Maximum Capacity (gpm) Reliable Capacity(1) (gpm) Emergency Source? Mt. Olivet BPS 4,350 4,350 No Houser Way BPS 4,100 4,100 No Well PW-5A 1,500 1,250 No Note: (1) Emergency Sources are not considered a reliable source for the supply and pumping analysis. The total reliable source / pump capacity of the Highlands 435 Operational Area is 9,700 gpm. Pump 2 at the Houser Way BPS is the largest pump within the Operational area, bringing the total reliable capacity with the largest pump / supply capacity offline to 7,650 gpm. In addition to the Highlands 435 Operational Area demands, the Operational Area sources must also provide source capacity for the Highlands 565 Operational Area. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-30 | MAY 2021 | FINAL The comparison of the Highlands 435 sources to the Highlands 435 and 565 demands is summarized in Table 6.13. As shown in the table, the available source capacity within the Operational Area is sufficient to fulfill the MDD of the Highlands 435 Operational Area for 2019, 2029, and 2039. Table 6.13 Highlands 435 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis Demands / Sources (gpm) 2019 2029 2039 Projected MDD for Highlands 435 (Operational Area + Offsite) 2,118 2,701 3,049 Projected MDD for Highlands 565 (Operational Area + Offsite) 2,368 2,736 3,125 Total MDD 4,486 5,437 6,174 Available Reliable Capacity Mt. Olivet BPS 4,350 4,350 4,350 Houser Way BPS 4,100 4,100 4,100 Well PW-5A 1,250 1,250 1,250 Total Reliable Capacity 9,700 9,700 9,700 Largest Pump/Supply: Pump 2 at Houser Way BPS 2,050 2,050 2,050 Total Reliable Capacity with Largest Pump/Supply Offline 7,650 7,650 7,650 Surplus/(Deficit) 3,164 2,213 1,476 6.13.2.4 Highlands 565 Operational Area The Highlands 565 Operational Area sources and source capacities are outlined in Table 6.14. Table 6.14 Highlands 565 Operational Area Source Capacities Source Maximum Capacity (gpm) Reliable Capacity(1) (gpm) Emergency Source? Highlands BPS 3,900 3,900 No Monroe Ave BPS 2,500 0 No Maplewood BPS(2) 2,400 1,550 No Notes: (1) Emergency Sources are not considered a reliable source for the supply and pumping analysis. (2) The Maplewood system can either serve the Highlands 565 Operational Area or the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area. For this analysis, it is assumed that it serves the Highlands 565 Operational Area. As discussed in Section 6.3, the City operates the Downtown Wells and Maplewood Wells such that withdrawals do not exceed the total Qi authorized for the Downtown Wells (11,400 gpm). It was assumed that for the Valley Operational Area, Well PW-8 was out of service (3,500 gpm). The total reliable capacity used by the Valley Operational Area for this analysis was 9,700 gpm, which leaves sufficient capacity within the authorized water rights for 1,550 gpm from the Maplewood system. The total reliable source / pump capacity of the Highlands 565 Operational Area is 5,450 gpm. Pump 5 at the Maplewood BPS is the largest pump within the Operational Area, bringing the total reliable capacity with the largest pump / supply capacity offline to 3,900 gpm. The Highlands 565 Operational Area demands also include the PRV-53 / Coal Creek Utility District projected emergency demands (1,250 gpm), but these emergency demands were not included in the pumping and source capacity analysis. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-31 The comparison of the source capacity and demands for the Highlands 565 Operational Area are summarized in Table 6.15. As shown in the table, the Operational Area has sufficient source capacity for 2019, 2029, and 2039. Table 6.15 Highlands 565 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis Demands / Sources (gpm) 2019 2029 2039 Projected MDD for Highlands 565 (Operational Area + Offsite) 2,368 2,736 3,125 Total MDD 2,368 2,736 3,125 Available Reliable Capacity Highlands BPS 3,900 3,900 3,900 Monroe Ave BPS 0 0 0 Maplewood BPS 1,550 1,550 1,550 Total Reliable Capacity 5,450 5,450 5,450 Largest Pump/Supply: Pump 5 at Maplewood PS 1,550 1,550 1,550 Total Reliable Capacity with Largest Pump/Supply Offline 3,900 3,900 3,900 Surplus/(Deficit) 1,532 1,164 775 6.13.2.5 Rolling Hills 490 The Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area sources and source capacities are outlined in Table 6.16. Table 6.16 Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area Source Capacities Source Maximum Capacity (gpm) Reliable Capacity(1) (gpm) Emergency Source? North Talbot BPS 4,183 4,183 No SPU Station #36(2) 700 n/a No PRV-6 / SPU Sta. #37(2) 320 n/a No Notes: (1) Emergency Sources are not considered a reliable source for the supply and pumping analysis. (2) The SPU Stations were not included in the supply and pumping analysis, as they were not considered reliable (i.e. back-up power). The total reliable source/pump capacity of the Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area is 4,183 gpm. Pump 1 at the North Talbot BPS is the largest pump within the Operational area, bringing the total reliable capacity with the largest pump/supply capacity offline to 2,433 gpm. In addition to the Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area demands, the Operational Area sources must also provide source capacity for the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area. The comparison of the source capacity and demands for the Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area are summarized in Table 6.17. As shown in the table, the Operational Area has sufficient source capacity for 2019, 2029, and 2039. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-32 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 6.17 Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis Demands / Sources (gpm) 2019 2029 2039 Projected MDD for Rolling Hills 490 451 479 514 Projected MDD for Rolling Hills 590 472 500 542 Total MDD 923 979 1,056 Available Reliable Capacity North Talbot BPS 4,183 4,183 4,183 Total Reliable Capacity 4,183 4,183 4,183 Largest Pump/Supply: Pump 1 at North Talbot BPS 1,750 1,750 1,750 Total Reliable Capacity with Largest Pump/Supply Offline 2,433 2,433 2,433 Surplus/(Deficit) 1,510 1,454 1,377 6.13.2.6 Rolling Hills 590 The Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area sources and source capacities are outlined in Table 6.18. Table 6.18 Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area Source Capacities Source Maximum Capacity (gpm) Reliable Capacity(1) (gpm) Emergency Source? Rolling Hills BPS 5,000 5,000 No Fred Nelson / SPU Sta. #34(2) 925 n/a No Tiffany Park / SPU Sta. #39(2) 1,050 n/a No Maplewood PS(3) 2,400 n/a No Notes: (1) Emergency Sources are not considered a reliable source for the supply and pumping analysis. (2) The SPU Stations were not included in the supply and pumping analysis, as they were not considered reliable (i.e. with back-up power). (3) The Maplewood system can either serve the Highlands 565 Operational Area or the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area. For this analysis, it is assumed that it serves the Highlands 565 Operational Area. The total reliable source / pump capacity of the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area is 5,000 gpm. Pump 1 at the Rolling Hills BPS is the largest pump within the Operational Area, bringing the total reliable capacity with the largest pump / supply capacity offline to 2,500 gpm. The comparison of the source capacity and demands for the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area are summarized in Table 6.19. As shown in the table, the Operational Area has sufficient source capacity for 2019, 2029, and 2039. The City has sufficient redundant and reliable supply capacity with its own supplies, without relying on SPU for normal conditions. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-33 Table 6.19 Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis Demands / Sources (gpm) 2019 2029 2039 Projected MDD for Rolling Hills 590 (Operational Area + Offsite) 472 500 542 Total MDD 472 500 542 Available Reliable Capacity North Talbot BPS 5,000 5,000 5,000 Total Reliable Capacity 5,000 5,000 5,000 Largest Pump/Supply: Pump 1 at Rolling Hills BPS 2,500 2,500 2,500 Total Reliable Capacity with Largest Pump/Supply Offline 2,500 2,500 2,500 Surplus/(Deficit) 2,028 2,000 1,958 6.13.2.7 Talbot Hill 350 The Talbot Hill 350 Operational Area sources and source capacities are outlined in Table 6.20. Table 6.20 Talbot Hill 350 Operational Area Source Capacities Source Maximum Capacity (gpm) Reliable Capacity(1) (gpm) Emergency Source? South Talbot BPS(2) 3,500 3,500 No North Talbot BPS 500 500 No PRV-28 / SPU Sta. #33(2) 700 n/a No Notes: (1) Emergency Sources are not considered a reliable source for the supply and pumping analysis. (2) The South Talbot BPS has two 3,500-gpm fire pumps, but only one of these pumps can run at a time. (3) PRV-28 / SPU Station #33 serves the Talbot Hill 350 and West Hill 495 Operational Areas. For this analysis, it is assumed that the flow from SPU Station #33 serves the West Hill 495 Operational Area. The total reliable source / pumping capacity of the Talbot Hill 350 Operational Area is 4,000 gpm (since only one of the 3,500 gpm fire pumps can be run at one time). Pump 3 at the South Talbot BPS is the largest pump within the Operational Area, bringing the total reliable capacity with the largest pump / supply capacity offline to 4,000 gpm. The comparison of the source capacity and demands for the Talbot Hill 350 Operational Area are summarized in Table 6.21. As shown in the table, the Operational Area has sufficient source capacity for 2019, 2029, and 2039. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-34 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 6.21 Talbot Hill 350 Operational Area Source Capacity Analysis Demands / Sources (gpm) 2019 2029 2039 Projected MDD for Talbot Hill 350 694 729 785 Total MDD 694 729 785 Available Reliable Capacity North Talbot BPS 500 500 500 South Talbot BPS(1) 3,500 3,500 3,500 Total Reliable Capacity 4,000 4,000 4,000 Largest Pump/Supply: Pump 3 at South Talbot BPS(1) 3,500 3,500 3,500 Total Reliable Capacity with Largest Pump/Supply Offline 4,000 4,000 4,000 Surplus/(Deficit) 3,306 3,271 3,215 Note: (1) The South Talbot BPS has two 3,500-gpm fire pumps so when one pump is offline, the BPS can still pump 3,500 gpm. 6.13.3 System Recommendations This analysis found that each of the operational areas had sufficient source / pumping capacity to meet the projected demands through 2039. The City has sufficient supply to serve its customers with solely its own supplies, with the exception of the West Hill 495 Operational Area. The City needs to rely on its interties with SPU in the West Hill 495 Operational area to provide the MDD demands in the planning period. As discussed above the predicted range in time that the City’s annual water rights will meet demand is large, whether or not Well PW-5A is available as a source affects that predicted range. The City will pursue several different approaches to supplement its peak demand requirements (20-year and longer planning period). This includes expanded conservation efforts and strategies, additional storage, the purchase of wholesale water from SPU, perfecting additional Qi water rights (Maplewood Wells), and the possible use of other technologies such as reclaimed water and aquifer recharge. The City actively participates with other water systems on regional planning, supply, and operating issues. For example, the City is a member of the East King County Regional Water Association and the Water Conservation Coalition of Puget Sound. Another example is the City’s participation in the recent Puget Sound Regional Water Supply Outlook Study, which assessed the supply sources of the Central Puget Sound Region, explored ways that systems can support each other, and evaluated regional supply options to meet future needs. Under the City’s new contract with SPU, the City will be participating in the Seattle Regional Supply System (SRSS) via its attendance and participation at SRSS Operating Board meetings. CHAPTER 06 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 6-35 6.13.4 Regional Water Supply Issues The City draws its supply, primarily from aquifers in the lower reaches of the Cedar River Watershed. The Cedar Valley Aquifer in particular is relatively shallow. However, there is no evidence from studies conducted to date that the City’s water use has an impact on flows in the Cedar River. The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe has an interest in the Cedar River and its fishery resources. The Tribe is concerned with low stream flows that can affect water quality. The City is monitoring the river as a condition of its water rights and will continue to cooperate with the other parties in the management of this resource. SPU is the regional water purveyor for much of King County. It serves most of the cities and water districts in the vicinity of the City. The City itself has agreements with Seattle for supply as already discussed. In recent years, SPU has implemented a successful conservation program that has delayed the need for new sources. The water utilities in the Puget Sound Region have individually and collectively addressed future sources of supply to meet their future needs. SPU has constructed a 120-mgd water filtration plant on its Tolt River source. This improvement in water quality meets current water quality standards and allows SPU to make better use of the Tolt River source to meet existing and future demands. The City of Tacoma is the regional system to the south, serving much of Pierce County and some areas in south King County. Tacoma has completed construction of its second supply project. This involves a second supply pipeline from its Green River source which adds another 60 cubic feet per second of supply to the Tacoma system. The Tacoma Second Supply Project serves a number of water districts in south King County, some of which are also supplied by SPU. See: http://www.mytpu.org/tacomawater/water-system/supply/regional-water-supply/Default.htm The Growth Management Act (GMA) requires cities in Washington State to prepare 20-year plans for their future development, including the provision of adequate water supply to support this growth. This has raised concerns with many water utilities because they are often not consulted when the land use planning and economic development decisions are made for GMA and many water systems are reaching the capacity of their sources and don’t have the necessary future capacity to meet GMA projections. In addition, the process of obtaining water rights in Washington State has become extremely difficult and time-consuming because of concerns over instream flows and the suspected influence of groundwater withdrawals on stream flows. The current situation has prompted water systems in the Central Puget Sound area to pursue new source development as a top priority. The Cascade Water Alliance was created several years ago with participation of many of the water systems in King County to pursue new regional supplies as an alternative, or in conjunction with SPU and Tacoma. Many of the same systems have also participated in the Puget Sound Outlook Study, which included water utilities in King, Pierce, and Snohomish Counties. As a result of planning by individual water utilities and the efforts of the consortiums mentioned in the previous paragraphs, a number of regional projects have been proposed. The following list describes two of these regional solutions: • The Cascade Water Alliance has purchased water rights formerly held by Puget Sound Energy for hydroelectric generation on the White River, including storage in Lake Tapps and is currently working to get approval to use Lake Tapps as a municipal water supply. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 06 6-36 | MAY 2021 | FINAL • The Snohomish River Regional Water Authority acquired a 36-mgd water right formerly used by Weyerhauser (S1-10617C) for its now abandoned plant in Everett. Various schemes have been proposed for delivering this water to utilities, including some in King County. Use of the water right continues to be under study. The water supply situation is continually changing with alternatives proposed, studied, and sometimes put on the shelf. A number of other alternatives have been considered including the North Fork Tolt River, Snoqualmie Aquifer under the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River, the North Fork Snoqualmie River, direct withdrawal from Lake Washington, and even sources as far away as the Skagit River. At the present time, none of these appear to be in serious contention as the next source due to water rights or environmental, cost, or institutional issues. As a participant in forums proposing new supplies, the City is keeping itself involved and informed of new developments. It will make decisions and act as appropriate to preserve its current supply and/or to participate with other utilities in new or alternative source development. 6.14 Recommended Water Supply Improvements Recommended improvement projects for water supply can be grouped into the main areas of interties and reliability. Specific projects associated with the supply projects are included in Chapter 9. It is recommended that the City maintain and/or renew its existing intertie agreements with adjacent utilities. The City does not anticipate applying for any new water rights or changes to its existing water rights, no new well is recommended. The City will utilize its reservoirs and interties with SPU to supply peaking demands. System reliability can be improved through several approaches that include security and system redundancy. Security upgrades are incorporated into water facilities projects when appropriate. Ongoing security program costs are included in the City’s CIP. As redevelopment occurs, the City can improve system reliability by considering options for new PRVs and other control valves that provide additional supply to zones. Additional possible projects for improving supply reliability are aquifer recharge and the use of reclaimed water. The City has not investigated artificial aquifer recharge but plans to proceed with a study within the next 20 years to look at the feasibility of such a project. The use of reclaimed water has been attempted by the City with limited success to date. Feasible alternatives for using reclaimed water are not anticipated within the next 10 years. The City has completed the King County Water Reclamation Evaluation Checklist, which is provided as Appendix I. CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-1 Chapter 7 SYSTEM ANALYSIS 7.1 Introduction This chapter summarizes potential future system deficiencies in the City of Renton’s (City) water distribution and recommends improvements to the system. Carollo Engineers, Inc. (Carollo) evaluated the capacity of the pipelines using the City’s updated and calibrated hydraulic model. Evaluations of the remaining utilities were conducted in Microsoft Excel. Improvements identified in this chapter are summarized in the Capital Improvements Plan (CIP) in Chapter 9. 7.2 Operational Areas and Distribution System Assumptions To evaluate storage and pumping capacities, the City’s water distribution system was divided into 7 different operational areas that contain 16 pressure zones. The City is currently in the process of implementing major distribution system improvements and changes to pressure zones. These improvements are either under design, in construction, or being operationally implemented. This new infrastructure and changes to the distribution system were assumed to be implemented for the purpose of the system analysis. Improvements included the following: • Construction of the new Highlands 445 Reservoir. • Decommissioning of the existing Highlands 435 Pressure Zone (PZ). • Creation of the Highlands 445 PZ (formerly Highlands 435 PZ). • Construction of the new Kennydale 308 Reservoir. • Creation of the Kennydale 308 PZ (formerly Kennydale 320 PZ). • Extension of the Highlands 445 PZ boundary. Figure 7.1 shows the distribution system and pressure zone boundaries used for the system analysis. This base map figure is different from the existing system figure in Chapter 3, which consists of infrastructure that existed until June 2018. The calibration of the hydraulic model also accounts for the system as of June 2018, instead of the system analysis infrastructure presented in Figure 7.1. Figure 7.2 illustrates the hydraulic profile for the system analysis, which includes all improvements stated above. Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-1_Water_Facility_Locations.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.1 Water Facility Locations (System Analysis) O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Highlands 445 City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-7 Table 7.1 summarizes the various operational areas and their associated pressure zones used for the system analysis, including the new Highlands 445 and Kennydale 308 PZs. Table 7.1 Operational Areas and Pressure Zones Operational Area Pressure Zone Valley 196 Valley 196 West Hill 495 West Hill 300 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 Highlands 445 Highlands 445 Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Highlands 565 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Rolling Hills 490 Rolling Hills 490 Scenic Hill 370 East Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 350 Talbot Hill 350 Talbot Hill 270 West Talbot Hill 300 7.3 Storage Analysis The City’s reservoir storage requirements depend on the water system’s configuration, seasonal and daily variation in water-use patterns, and the reliability of various water system components. The following section describes four components of storage, summarizes the existing system’s capacity to meet the storage needs of each operational area, and makes recommendations to address any identified storage deficits. 7.3.1 Components of Storage Water storage volumes are comprised of five components: • Operational storage. • Equalizing storage. • Standby storage (SS). • Fire-suppression storage (FSS). • Dead storage. Figure 7.3 schematically shows these components. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 07 7-8 | MAY 2021| FINAL Figure 7.3 Illustration of Storage Components 7.3.1.1 Operational Storage Operational storage is the volume of water used on a day-to-day basis to supply the water system while the sources of supply are in the “off” position. This volume is dependent on the sensitivity of the water level sensors controlling the pumps and is designed to prevent the pump motors from excessive starts and stops (cycling). Summarized in Table 7.2, the operational storage volume for the City’s reservoirs were determined from the hydraulic model’ supply sources on and off settings. Table 7.2 Operational Storage Volumes Reservoir (Nominal Volume, MG) Diameter (ft) Height (ft) Operational Band (MG) Percent of Total Storage North Talbot (5.0) Varies 26.5 0.91 18% Mt Olivet (3.0) 113.5 37.2 0.00 0% West Hill (1.4) 48 103 0.22 15% Highlands 435 (2.0) Decommissioned Highlands 435 (1.5) Decommissioned Highlands 445 (6.3) 233 20 0.56 9% Kennydale 308 (1.3) 50 88 0.04 3% Highlands 565 (0.75) Varies 35 0.20 27% Hazen (4.2) 80 111.8 0.36 8% South Talbot (1.5) 100 27 0.13 9% Rolling Hills 590 (0.3) Varies 28 0.03 9% Rolling Hills 490 (3) 119 36.5 0.36 12% Note: Abbreviations: ft – feet; MG – million gallons. Note: Abbreviation: psi - pounds per square inch CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-9 South Talbot Reservoir – 1.5 MG 7.3.1.2 Equalizing Storage Equalizing storage is the total volume needed to satisfy the peak hourly demands (PHD) that exceed the supply system’s capacity. The State of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-290-253 requires that equalizing storage provide peak demands. Furthermore, WAC 246-290-230 (5) states as such: New public water systems or additions to existing systems shall be designed with the capacity to deliver the design PHD quantity of water at 30 pounds per square inch (psi) (210 kPa [kilopascals]) under PHD flow conditions measured at all existing and proposed service water meters or along property lines adjacent to mains if no meter exists, and under the condition where all equalizing storage has been depleted. PHD is calculated using hourly demand data from the season of highest water consumption. For this plan, hourly demand data during the two-week period from July 1, 2018 to July 20, 2018 was averaged for each hour of the day for each operational area. The demand value for the hour of highest demand was considered PHD, while the average of the 24-hourly demands was the maximum day demand (MDD). Table 7.3 shows the PHD for each pressure zone based on peaking factor developed from Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) data recorded and hourly Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) data provided by the City. Table 7.3 Diurnal Summer Demand by Pressure Zone Pressure Zone 2029 PHD (gpm) 2039 PHD (gpm) Peaking Factor (PHD/MDD) Valley 196 5,428 5,896 1.69 West Hills 300 182 203 1.54 West Hills 495 845 856 1.54 Earlington 370 150 171 1.54 Highlands 435 2,039 2,267 1.32 Kennydale 320 1,454 1,682 1.32 Kennydale 218 64 64 1.32 CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 07 7-10 | MAY 2021| FINAL Pressure Zone 2029 PHD (gpm) 2039 PHD (gpm) Peaking Factor (PHD/MDD) Highlands 565 3,918 4,474 1.43 Rolling Hills 590 597 651 1.28 Rolling Hills 395 45 45 1.28 Rolling Hills 490 588 639 1.46 Scenic Hill 370 41 41 1.46 East Talbot Hill 300 71 71 1.46 Talbot Hill 350 1,045 1,105 1.71 Talbot Hill 270 48 71 1.71 West Talbot Hill 300 154 166 1.71 Total 16,668 18,403 Notes: (1) Peaking factors were developed for the existing pressure zones. At the time the SCADA data was recorded, the new Kennydale 308 and Highlands 445 PZs were not implemented. Abbreviation: gpm – gallons per minute. Equalizing volume requirements were calculated for each reservoir using the following equation and are summarized in Table 7.4: 150 min x (PHD – MDD) where the PHD was calculated based on peak hour to max day peak factors measured for each operational area. Table 7.4 Equalizing Storage Volumes Operational Area PHD / MDD(1) 2029 Equalizing Volume (MG) 2039 Equalizing Volume (MG) Valley 196 1.69 0.330 0.361 West Hill 495 1.54 0.062 0.065 Highlands 445 1.32 0.128 0.145 Highlands 565 1.43 0.177 0.202 Rolling Hill 590 1.28 0.021 0.023 Rolling Hill 490 1.46 0.033 0.036 Talbot Hill 350 1.71 0.078 0.084 Note: (1) PHD peak factor measured for each operational area. 7.3.1.3 Standby Storage and Fire-Suppression Storage Standby Storage volumes are required to supply reasonable system demands during a system emergency, such as the disruption of the water supply caused by a transmission pipeline or equipment failure, power outage, valve failure, or other system interruptions (as discussed in Chapter 5). Table 7.5 shows the required standby storage for each operational area. The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) Water System Design Manual recommends a minimum standby storage of no less than 200 gallons per Equivalent Residential Unit (gal/ERU). CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-11 Table 7.5 Standby Storage Volumes Operational Area ERUs Standby Storage Volume (MG) 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 Valley 196 14,600 15,995 17,290 2.92 3.20 3.46 West Hill 495 1,693 1,910 2,070 0.67(1) 0.71(1) 0.74(1) Highlands 445 10,575 13,385 15,060 2.12 2.68 3.01 Highlands 565 11,820 13,590 15,445 2.36 2.72 3.09 Rolling Hills 590 2,365 2,495 2,695 0.47 0.5.0 0.54 Rolling Hills 490 2,265 2,385 2,550 0.45 0.48 0.51 Talbot Hill 350 3,475 3,640 3,875 0.69 0.73 0.77 Note: (1) Includes Standby Storage for the Skyway Water and Sewer District (Skyway). Fire flow demand is the quantity of water required for firefighting as defined by applicable water system criteria and fire codes. Firefighting often places the largest demands on a water system because a high volume of water must be supplied over a short time. Such demands require each component of the system to operate at its optimal condition. With that being said, the FSS level depends on maximum flow rates and duration. Water systems must have storage reservoirs that can meet fire flow requirements while maintaining 20 psi throughout the distribution system. Table 7.6 outlines the required maximum fire flow, duration, and FSS volume for each operational area. Table 7.6 Required Maximum Fire Flow Operational Area Required Fire Flow (gpm) Required Duration (hours) Required FSS (MG) Location Valley 196 6,000 4 1.44 Boeing Plant West Hill 495 3,000 3 0.54 Sky Lanai Apartments Highlands 445 4,500 4 1.08 Southport Commercial Development Highlands 565 4,500 4 1.08 Safeway/Highlands Shopping Center Rolling Hills 590 5,000 4 1.20 Rolling Hills Apartments Rolling Hills 490 5,000 4 1.20 Eagle Ridge Apartments Talbot Hill 350 5,500 4 1.32 Valley Medical Center Either standby storage or fire-suppression storage, whichever volume is smaller, can be excluded from each zone’s total storage requirement (this is also known as “nested” storage). Table 7.7 outlines the nested standby storage and fire-suppression storage for each operational area. Table 7.7 Nested Standby Storage and Fire-Suppression Storage Operational Area Volume (MG) Controlling Factor (FSS or SS)(1) 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 Valley 196 2.92 3.20 3.46 Standby Standby Standby West Hill 495 0.67 0.71 0.74 Standby Standby Standby Highlands 445 2.12 2.68 3.01 Standby Standby Standby Highlands 565 2.36 2.72 3.09 Standby Standby Standby CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 07 7-12 | MAY 2021| FINAL Operational Area Volume (MG) Controlling Factor (FSS or SS)(1) 2019 2029 2039 2019 2029 2039 Rolling Hills 590 1.20 1.20 1.20 Fire Fire Fire Rolling Hills 490 1.20 1.20 1.20 Fire Fire Fire Talbot Hill 350 1.32 1.32 1.32 Fire Fire Fire 7.3.1.4 Dead Storage Dead storage volume is the volume at the bottom of the storage tank that cannot be used because it’s physically too low to be withdrawn from the tank or, if withdrawn from the tank, would result in water pressures in the distribution system that are below the acceptable criteria of 20 psi during a fire or emergency situation. Storage volume is considered dead if it’s located below the outlet pipe and cannot be used because of system hydraulic limitations or if it cannot be used because of water-quality problems associated with the volume in this lowest portion of the tank. One other major cause of dead storage in storage tanks is customer elevations. Water levels in tanks cannot be lowered more than 20 psi at the highest customer in the zone served by the tank. Figure 7.4 shows the elevation of the highest customer served by each reservoir. Table 7.8 summarizes the dead volume calculations for each reservoir. Table 7.8 Reservoir Dead Storage Reservoir (Nominal Volume, MG) Base Elevation (ft) Maximum elevation served (ft) Required elevation at 20 psi (ft) Outlet Elevation (ft) Dead Volume (MG) North Talbot (5.0) 173.2 128.8 175.0 199.7 0.00 Mt Olivet (3.0) 146.9 128.8 175.0 184.1 2.13 Highlands 435 (1.5) Decommissioned Highlands 435 (2.0) Decommissioned Highlands 445 (6.3) 425.3 367.5 413.7 445.0 0.00 Kennydale 308 (1.3) 220.0 216.0 262.2 308 0.62 Highlands 565 (0.75) 534.1 472.5 530.7 569.3 0.00 Hazen (4.2) 457.5 472.5 530.7 569.3 2.75 Rolling Hills 590(0.3) 565.5 476 522.2 593.6 0.00 Rolling Hills 490(3) 458 392.4 438.6 494.5 0.00 West Hill (1.4) 395.6 392.9 439.1 498.6 0.59 South Talbot (1.5) 326.6 253.8 300.0 353.6 0.00 Note, there are two customers in the North Talbot/Mt Olivet area with higher service elevations than the one noted in Table 7.8. One property is a vacant lot (4521 Talbot Rd S) with a service elevation of 159 ft (the nearest model junction is J4367), while the other property is a single-family home located at 5218 Talbot Rd S with a service elevation of 140 ft (the nearest model junction is J6057). The City is in the process of moving these customers to the Talbot Hill 350 PZ; therefore, they are not included in the group of customers with the highest elevations in that service area. Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç !5 RollingHills 590(476 ft) South Talbot(254 ft) West Hill(393 ft) Kennydale 308(216 ft) Rolling Hills490 (392 ft) Highlands 565& Hazen 565(473 ft) North Talbot& Mt. Olivet(129 ft) LakeBoren LakeDesire ShadyLake LakeWashington Lake YoungsPantherLake Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-3_Highest_Elevation_Customers.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.4 Highest Elevation Customers O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Highest Elevation Customer Highlands 445 City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-15 7.3.2 Storage Analysis by Operational Area The seven operational areas were evaluated as separate systems to ensure that each has the required usable operational, equalizing, fire, and standby storage volume, as summarized below. Recommendations for operational areas that require storage improvements are offered subsequently in Section 7.3.3. 7.3.2.1 Valley Operational Area Storage for the Valley Operational Area is contained within the North Talbot and Mt. Olivet Reservoirs, which have a combined total storage volume of 7.89 MG. According to the highest customer elevation, the available storage at 20 psi is 5.76 MG combined for the Valley. Table 7.9 summarizes the storage analysis for the Valley. As shown in the analysis presented in Table 7.9, this area has sufficient storage through 2039 to serve its customers at 20 psi. However, the operational and equalizing storage must be available at a minimum of 30 psi for the highest resident served. The total available reservoir volume available at 30 psi is only 0.36 MG, which is 0.88 MG less than what is required in 2029 and 0.91 MG less than what is required in 2039. Table 7.9 Valley Storage Analysis 2029 2039 Required Storage Components (MG) Operational 0.91 0.91 Equalizing 0.33 0.36 Standby / Fire Suppression 3.20 3.46 Total Required Storage at 30 psi (MG) 1.24 1.27 Total Required Storage at 20 psi (MG) 4.44 4.73 Existing Storage (MG) Total Storage 7.89 7.89 Available Storage at 30 psi 0.36 0.36 Available Storage at 20 psi 5.76 5.76 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 30 psi (MG) (0.88) (0.91) Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 20 psi (MG) 1.32 1.04 7.3.2.2 West Hill 495 Operational Area Storage for the West Hill 495 Operational Area is contained within the West Hill Reservoir, which has a total storage volume of 1.39 MG. According to the highest customer elevation, only 0.81 MG is available to the distribution system customers at 30 psi. The West Hill Reservoir also provides fire suppression storage and standby storage for Skyway based on the existing agreement with Skyway (Appendix D). It was assumed that no two simultaneous fires will occur in the West Hill 495 Operational Area and Skyway so the maximum fire flow requirement between the City and Skyway was considered. Table 7.10 summarizes the storage analysis for the West Hill 495 Operational Area. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 07 7-16 | MAY 2021| FINAL With the existing reliable sources and reservoirs, this area does not have sufficient storage through 2039. The City currently operates the tank with a 16 ft operational band, which has a 0.22 MG operational storage volume (as shown in Table 7.10). Table 7.10 West Hill 495 Storage Analysis 2029 2039 Required Storage Components (MG) Operational 0.22 0.22 Equalizing 0.06 0.07 Standby / Fire Suppression 0.71 0.74 Total Required Storage at 30 psi (MG) 0.28 0.28 Total Required Storage at 20 psi (MG) 0.99 1.03 Existing Storage (MG) Total Storage 1.39 1.39 Available Storage at 30 psi 0.49 0.49 Available Storage at 20 psi 0.81 0.81 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 30 psi (MG) 0.22 0.21 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 20 psi (MG) (0.19) (0.22) 7.3.2.3 Highlands 445 Operational Area Storage for the Highlands 445 Operational Area is contained within the two new reservoirs the City is currently building: Highlands 445 Reservoir and Kennydale 308 Reservoir. These reservoirs have a total capacity of 7.59 MG. According to the highest elevations in the operational area, Highlands 445 has a total available storage of 6.97 MG at 20 psi but only 2.58 MG at 30 psi. Table 7.11 summarizes the storage analysis for the Highlands 445 Operational Area. With the existing reliable sources and reservoirs, this area has sufficient storage through 2039. Table 7.11 Highlands 445 Storage Analysis 2029 2039 Required Storage Components (MG) Operational 0.61 0.61 Equalizing 0.13 0.15 Standby / Fire Suppression 2.68 3.01 Total Required Storage at 30 psi (MG) 0.74 0.75 Total Required Storage at 20 psi (MG) 3.41 3.77 Existing Storage (MG) Total Storage 7.59 7.59 Available Storage at 30 psi 2.58 2.58 Available Storage at 20 psi 6.97 6.97 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 30 psi (MG) 1.85 1.83 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 20 psi (MG) 3.56 3.20 CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-17 7.3.2.4 Highlands 565 Operational Area Storage for the Highlands 565 Operational Area is contained within the Hazen and Highlands 565 Reservoirs, which together have a total storage volume of 4.95 MG. According to the highest customer elevations, available storage in the Highlands 565 equates to 1.20 MG at 30 psi and 2.20 MG at 20 psi. Additionally, because of significant headloss to some of the customers with high fire flow requirements, dead storage was increased by 16 feet. Table 7.12 summarizes the storage analysis for the Highlands 565 Operational Area. Even with the existing reliable sources and reservoirs, this area does not have sufficient storage for all planning years until 2039 and will be by 1.26 MG in 2029 and 1.65 MG in 2039. Table 7.12 Highlands 565 Storage Analysis 2029 2039 Required Storage Components (MG) Operational 0.56 0.56 Equalizing 0.18 0.20 Standby / Fire Suppression 2.72 3.09 Total Required Storage at 30 psi (MG) 0.74 0.76 Total Required Storage at 20 psi (MG) 3.46 3.85 Existing Storage (MG) Total Storage 4.95 4.95 Available Storage at 30 psi 1.20 1.20 Available Storage at 20 psi 2.20 2.20 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 30 psi (MG) 0.46 0.43 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 20 psi (MG) (1.26) (1.65) 7.3.2.5 Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area Storage for the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area is contained within the Rolling Hills 590 Reservoir, which has an available storage volume of 0.3 MG. Table 7.13 summarizes the storage analysis for the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area. Like the Highlands 565 Operational Area, the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area also does not have sufficient storage for all planning years until 2039. Existing storage is limited to 0.3 MG and required emergency and fire flow is four-times larger than the size of the tank providing water to the zone. Additional storage is required in this operational area. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 07 7-18 | MAY 2021| FINAL Table 7.13 Rolling Hills 590 Storage Analysis 2029 2039 Required Storage Components (MG) Operational 0.03 0.03 Equalizing 0.02 0.02 Standby / Fire Suppression 1.20 1.20 Total Required Storage at 30 psi (MG) 0.05 0.05 Total Required Storage at 20 psi (MG) 1.25 1.25 Existing Storage (MG) Total Storage 0.30 0.30 Available Storage at 30 psi 0.30 0.30 Available Storage at 20 psi 0.30 0.30 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 30 psi (MG) 0.25 0.25 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 20 psi (MG) (0.95) (0.95) 7.3.2.6 Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area Storage for the Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area is contained within the Rolling Hills 490 reservoir, which has an available storage volume of 3.04 MG. Table 7.14 summarizes the storage analysis for the Rolling Hills 490 Operational Area. With the existing reliable sources and reservoir, this area has sufficient storage through 2039. Table 7.14 Rolling Hills 490 Storage Analysis 2029 2039 Required Storage Components (MG) Operational 0.36 0.36 Equalizing 0.03 0.04 Standby / Fire Suppression 1.20 1.20 Total Required Storage at 30 psi (MG) 0.40 0.40 Total Required Storage at 20 psi (MG) 1.60 1.60 Existing Storage (MG) Total Storage 3.04 3.04 Available Storage at 30 psi 2.73 2.73 Available Storage at 20 psi 3.04 3.04 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 30 psi (MG) 2.34 2.34 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 20 psi (MG) 1.44 1.44 7.3.2.7 Talbot Hill 350 Operational Area Storage for the Talbot Hill 350 Operational Area is contained within the South Talbot reservoir, which has an available storage volume of 1.59 MG. Table 7.15 summarizes the storage analysis for the Talbot Hill 350 Operational Area. CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-19 With the existing reliable sources and reservoir, this area has sufficient storage for all planning years until 2039. Table 7.15 Talbot Hill 350 Storage Analysis 2029 2039 Required Storage Components (MG) Operational 0.14 0.14 Equalizing 0.08 0.08 Standby / Fire Suppression 1.32 1.32 Total Required Storage at 30 psi (MG) 0.21 0.22 Total Required Storage at 20 psi (MG) 1.53 1.54 Existing Storage (MG) Total Storage 1.59 1.59 Available Storage at 30 psi 1.59 1.59 Available Storage at 20 psi 1.59 1.59 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 30 psi (MG) 1.37 1.37 Excess (Deficit) Existing Storage at 20 psi (MG) 0.05 0.05 7.3.3 Storage Recommendations Storage deficits were identified in the following operational areas: the Valley, Highlands 565, West Hill 495, and Rolling Hills 590. The identified storage deficits can be mitigated by constructing additional storage or making changes to the operational strategy. In some cases, small improvements to the existing infrastructure, such as adding backup power to provide reliability, can better alleviate the storage deficiencies than adding storage. All recommended projects are summarized in the sections below. 7.3.3.1 Valley Storage Recommendation Storage analysis showed that although this area has sufficient storage at 20 psi, the Valley is deficient for all planning years until 2039 in supplying operational and equalizing volumes at 30 psi to the highest customers. As mentioned before, to address this issue, the City is connecting high-elevation residents within the Valley 196 PZ to higher pressure infrastructure. These improvements will then provide adequate operating pressures and fire flow pressures to these high-elevation residents. 7.3.3.2 Highlands 565 Storage Recommendation The Highlands 565 Operational Area does not have sufficient storage for all planning years until 2039. Excess storage located in the Highlands 445 Operational Area is sufficient to offset deficiencies in Highlands 565. A backup power generator is recommended at the Monroe Avenue booster pump station (BPS) to allow storage to be provided from the Highlands 445 PZ to the Highlands 565 PZ, which will also improve pumping capacity in the long term. The City is already planning on adding a generator at Monroe BPS as part of constructing a new 6.3-MG reservoir in the Highlands 445 PZ. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 07 7-20 | MAY 2021| FINAL 7.3.3.3 West Hill 495 Storage Recommendation Even with the existing reliable sources and reservoirs, the West Hill 495 Operational Area does not have sufficient storage through 2039. Excess storage located in the Valley Operational Area is sufficient to offset deficiencies in the West Hill 495. The Valley Operational Area has 1.04 MG of excess storage available by 2039, which can be reliably pumped to the West Hill 495 Operational Area via the new West Hill BPS. The City is currently planning on expanding capacity of the West Hill PS and adding a generator at the West Hill BPS as part of the West Hill BPS Improvement Project. Additionally, the City currently operates the tank with a 16 ft operational band, which equates to a 0.22-MG operational storage volume. It is recommended that the City update operational strategy and reduce the operational band thus decreasing the operational volume and helping to mitigate deficiencies. 7.3.3.4 Rolling Hills 590 Recommendation As shown in the storage analysis, the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area does not have sufficient storage for all planning years, being deficient by 0.95 MG by 2039. The City has a few options to mitigate this deficiency: • Add backup power to the Maplewood BPS to increase pumping capacity from the Rolling Hills 490 PZ to the Rolling Hills 590 PZ, and add auto-start, auto-transfer, and backup power to the Rolling Hills BPS so that three pumps can be operated at the same time. • Construct a new 1.5-MG standpipe for the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area, replacing the existing 0.3-MG tank. 7.4 Distribution System Analysis The calibrated InfoWater model of the City’s distribution system was used to analyze the system for future planning years, and projected system demands were added for the 2019, 2029, and 2039 planning years. The hydraulic model was used to evaluate typical system conditions during diurnal operations and fire flow availability. Then, the model was updated and calibrated for both extended period simulation with temporary pressure loggers and steady state with hydrant flow tests. CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-21 Fire Hydrant Test – June 2018 Pressure Recording Equipment used during field testing Model calibration uses fire flow tests intended to stress the City’s distribution system by creating a differential in pressure in the system. Pressure recording devices and pressure loggers were used to record pressures throughout the system during the flow tests CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 07 7-22 | MAY 2021| FINAL Hydrant Set-up for one of the fire flow tests Flow Management during fire flow tests Appendix P summarizes the calibration field plans and testing locations while Appendix Q details the model update and calibration steps and calibration results. Flowing water was typically routed to the closest stormwater catchments. Dechlorination equipment was used by City crew. City crew used diffusers with flow readings to record flowing flow at the hydrants during each test. CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-23 7.4.1 Evaluation Criteria Chapter 5 discussed system policies and criteria in detail. Key parameters evaluated with the model were for the system pressure criteria during normal operations and fire flow testing of the system. During normal operations, the minimum pressure as set by the DOH during MDD and PHD was 30 psi at the service meter. The City’s goal is to provide a maximum of 110 psi at the service meter. The Building Code requires individual pressure-reducing valves (PRVs) to be installed by property owners when the meter pressure exceeds 80 psi. 7.4.1.1 Land-Use-Based Fire Flow Requirements Table 7.16 summarizes the required fire flow and duration of this flow according to land use. During any fire event, the minimum pressure should be greater than 20 psi at the end of the fire in the entire distribution system. Figure 7.5 additionally shows the fire flow required at nodes throughout the system according to land use. Only junctions near hydrants were assigned a fire flow. Table 7.16 Service Criteria for Required Fire Flow Land Use Required Flow (gpm) Required Duration (hours) Single family 1,000 2 Multifamily and Commercial/Industrial 3,000 3 !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-4_Fire_Flow_Req.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.5 Fire Flow Requirements O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger 1,000 gpm Fire Flow Requirement 3,000 gpm Highlands 445 City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-27 7.4.1.2 Large Fire Requirements Beyond the general fire requirements presented in Section 7.4.1.1, some locations have higher fire requirements as specified by the Renton Fire Marshal (RFA). Table 7.17 summarizes the largest of these fires for each zone, whose locations are also shown in Figure 7.6. Table 7.17 Large Fire Requirements Zone Fire Flow Node ID Large Fire Locations Fire Flow (gpm) Duration (hours) 196-1 J5297 4050 Maple Valley Highway (Maplewood Golf Course Clubhouse) 3,000 3 196-2 J2032 South of Martin Luther King Jr. Way & 68th Ave. S (Creston Point Apartments) 3,000 3 196-3 J3616 Northeast of S Carr Rd. & Talbot Rd. S 3,000 3 196-4 J2306 Park Ave. N, between N 6th St. & N 8th St. (Boeing Plant) 6,000 4 196-xx J1008 400 S 2nd St (Renton High School) 5,000 4 196-xx J3287 2201 SE Maple Valley Highway (Riviera Apartments) 4,000 4 300WH-5 J6841 NW 4th St. & Taylor Ave. NW (Sky Lanai Apartments) 3,000 3 300-6 J6379 Morris Ave. S & S 18th St. 1,500 2 320-8 J2613 N 29th St. & Park Ave. NE 1,500 2 320-9 J2345 East of Garden Ave. N & N 6th St. (Paccar Kenworth Plant) 3,000 3 320-xx J2998 Lake Washington Blvd N & N Park Dr. (Southport Commercial Development) 4,500 4 320-xx J1213 5021 Ripley Ln. N (Misty Cove Condominiums) 4,500 4 350-12 J5002 Talbot Rd. S & S 43rd St. (Valley Medical Center) 5,500 4 370-13 J3120 Southwest of SW Sunset Blvd & Earlington Ave. SW (Sunpointe Townhomes) 1,500 3 435-14 J4036 Kirkland Pl. SE & SE 4th St. 1,500 2 435-15 J1196 NE 27th St. & Camas Ave. NE 1,500 2 435-16 J1149 North of NE 10th Pl. & Sunset Blvd NE (Cypress Pine Apartments) 3,000 3 435-17 J2319 West of Monroe Ave. NE & NE 4th St. (Renton Technical College) 3,000 3 490-18 J3285 West of Jones Ave. S & S 7th St. 1,500 2 490-19 J758 S 18th St. between Eagle Ridge Dr. S & Grant Ave. S (Eagle Ridge Apartments) 5,000 4 565-22 J4727 Northwest of Hoquiam Ave. NE & NE 10th St. (Hazen High School) 3,000 3 565-23 J996 Northwest of NE 4th St. & Monroe Ave. NE (Renton Technical College) 3,000 3 565-24 J894 West of Union Ave. SE & SE 4th St. (Sunnydale Mobile Home Park) 3,000 3 565-25 J2425 Union Ave. NE & NE 4th St. (Safeway/Highlands Shopping Center) 4,500 4 590-26 J2087 Pierce Ave. SE & SE 19th Ct. 1,500 2 590-27 J1771 East of Benson Rd S & S 23rd St. (Fred Nelson Middle School) 3,000 3 590-28 J897 Royal Hills Dr. & Monroe Ave SE (Rolling Hills Apartments) 5,000 4 ?æ ?Å ?ç !5 West of Jones Ave.S & S 7th St.:1500 gpm 2 hr Boeing Plant: 6000 gpm 4 hr Safeway/ HighlandsShopping Center:4500 gpm 4 hr Renton TechnicalCollege: 3000 gpm 3 hr Sunnydale Mobile HomePark: 3000 gpm 3 hr Eagle RidgeApartments:5000 gpm 4 hr Valley MedicalCenter: 5500gpm 4 hr Rolling HillsApartments:5000 gpm 4 hr Hazen HighSchool: 3000gpm 3 hr Kirkland Pl. SE& SE 4th St.:1500 gpm 2 hr Renton TechnicalCollege: 3000 gpm 3 hr RivieraApartments:4000 gpm 4 hr South of Martin LutherKing Jr. Way & 68thAve. S: 3000 gpm 3 hr Sky LanaiApartments:3000 gpm 3 hr Northeast of S CarrRd. & Talbot Rd.S: 3000 gpm 3 hr Misty CoveCondominiums:4500 gpm 4 hr Fred NelsonMiddle School:3000 gpm 3 hr Pierce Ave. SE& SE 19th Ct.:1500 gpm 2 hr SunpointeTownhomes:3000 gpm 3 hr Southport CommercialDevelopment:4500 gpm 4 hr North of NE 10thPl. & Sunset BlvdNE: 3000 gpm 3 hr NE 27th St. & Camas Ave.NE: 1500 gpm 2 hr N 29th St. &Park Ave. NE:1500 gpm 2 hr Morris Ave. S& S 18th St. :1500 gpm 2 hr Renton High School:5000 gpm 4 hr Maplewood GolfCourse Clubhouse:3000 gpm 3 hr Paccar KenworthPlant: 3000gpm 3 hr LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-5_Large_Fire_Flow_Req.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.6 Large Fire Requirements O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Large Fire Requirement Highlands 445 City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-31 7.4.2 Pressure Results The model was run in extended period simulation (EPS) for 1 week at average day demand (ADD) and MDD to evaluate general pressure-system conditions for the near-term and long-term planning years. This approach allows the sources, pumps, and tanks to operate as their SCADA and controls are set. Using the criteria presented in the section above, the hydraulic model provides both maximum pressures and minimum pressures under ADD and PHD conditions, respectively. Figure 7.6 shows the nodes with maximum pressures for ADD outside of the planning criteria in 2020. Planning years 2029 and 2039 showed similar results but was not included in this chapter. Although the City has no maximum pressure requirement, system pressure above 80 psi (in yellow) and 110 psi (in orange) are identified for informational purposes. As seen in Figure 7.7, many high pressures exist in the system. Some of the pressure zones cover large-elevation ranges, leading to high pressures at lower elevations. In addition, BPSs commonly discharge into pressure zones near the bottom of a hill, forcing flow to the tank through the distribution system. This requires the hydraulic grade line (HGL) at the bottom of the hill to be higher than the tank overflow level at the top of the hill. In turn, this boosts the pressure in the lower elevations even higher during pumping than under static conditions as proven by tank overflow and meter elevation. The City completed a rezone evaluation in 2015 that identified potential rezoning improvements to reduce the range of pressures in each zone by creating additional pressure zones. The City is still in the process of reviewing and deciding on the best action plan based on the rezone evaluation results. Figure 7.8 identifies nodes with pressures lower than 30 psi during PHD. These results are for planning year 2039, which corresponds to the worst-case scenario with the highest demands. Of the low-pressure nodes (below 30 psi), some exist adjacent to the Springbrook transmission line. The City has been working on moving the customer connections to this line to the adjacent higher-pressure line. The model results had other low-pressure nodes near reservoirs; these nodes were excluded in the evaluation as service connections do not exist according to City staff. ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 15, 2021 pw:\\IO-PW-INT.Carollo.local:Carollo\Documents\Client\WA\Renton\10899A00\Data\GIS\Fig7-6_MaxPressureduring2020ADD_RPUpdate.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.7 Maximum Pressure under ADD Condition inPlanning Year 2020 ADD without Improvements O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir WaterMain by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger 80 - 110 psi Maximum Pressure 110 - 150 psi Greater than 150 psi Highlands 445 City Limits !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 09, 2021 pw:\\IO-PW-INT.Carollo.local:Carollo\Documents\Client\WA\Renton\10899A00\Data\GIS\Fig5_MinPressureDuring2039PHD.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.8 Minimum Pressure under PHD Condition inPlanning Year 2039 without Improvements O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 435 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 320 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches or smaller 8 to 14 inches 16 inches and larger < 30 psi Minimum Pressure 30 - 40 psi City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-37 7.4.3 Velocity Results The City's goal is to maintain velocities under 8 feet per second (fps) in distribution pipes during PHD. One segment of piping was found to exceed the velocity criteria in every planning year: this 8-inch line is located at Maple Valley Highway and Interstate 405 (I-405), where velocity reaches 9.5 fps, as shown in Figure 7.9. This section of pipe is surrounded by 12-inch pipes. Figure 7.9 Maximum Velocity in Planning Year 2039 without Improvements 7.4.4 Fire Flow Analysis Fire flows are typically the largest flows a system experiences and often a major factor in pipe sizing and network configurations. Using the fire flow test feature, the hydraulic model tested the fire capabilities at the 27 large fire locations. Specifically, it systematically simulated a fire at each model node representing a fire hydrant for each of the planning years. All system nodes with service connections were tested for a minimum pressure of 20 psi during the point fire demands. Table 7.18 summarizes the available fire flow at these locations in both 2029 and 2039. Figure 7.10 shows the low-pressure node results from the fire flow analysis for the large fire locations. All of the locations have adequate fire flow available, except for one location at Northeast of S Carr Rd. and Talbot Rd. S. The model was also used to perform a general system-wide fire analysis at 1,000 gpm and 3,000 gpm, testing all system nodes with service connections for 20 psi in both 2029 and 2039. Figure 7.11 shows nodes that do not meet the 20-psi requirement during required fire flows. Areas of particular susceptibility were dead-end mains, areas of older 4-inch and 6-inch asbestos cement (AC) piping networks, and areas near high elevation points in a pressure zone. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 07 7-38 | MAY 2021| FINAL Table 7.18 Large Fire Results Fire Flow Node ID Large Fire Locations Fire Flow (gpm) Available Fire Flow in 2039 (gpm) J5297 4050 Maple Valley Highway (Maplewood Golf Course Clubhouse) 3,000 8,461 J2032 South of Martin Luther King Jr. Way & 68th Ave. S (Creston Point Apartments) 3,000 3,796 J3616 Northeast of S Carr Rd. & Talbot Rd. S 3,000 1,644 J2306 Park Ave. N, between N 6th St. & N 8th St. (Boeing Plant) 6,000 16,455 J1008 400 S 2nd St (Renton High School) 5,000 11,894 J3287 2201 SE Maple Valley Highway (Riviera Apartments) 4,000 6,307 J6841 NW 4th St. & Taylor Ave. NW (Sky Lanai Apartments) 3,000 6,296 J6379 Morris Ave. S & S 18th St. 1,500 2,408 J2613 N 29th St. & Park Ave. NE 1,500 4,257 J2345 East of Garden Ave. N & N 6th St. (Paccar Kenworth Plant) 3,000 14,788 J2998 Lake Washington Blvd N & N Park Dr. (Southport Commercial Development) 4,500 15,592 J1213 5021 Ripley Ln. N (Misty Cove Condominiums) 4,500 6,137 J5002 Talbot Rd. S & S 43rd St. (Valley Medical Center) 5,500 19,289 J3120 Southwest of SW Sunset Blvd & Earlington Ave. SW (Sunpointe Townhomes) 1,500 5,701 J4036 Kirkland Pl. SE & SE 4th St. 1,500 4,229 J1196 NE 27th St. & Camas Ave. NE 1,500 2,911 J1149 North of NE 10th Pl. & Sunset Blvd NE (Cypress Pine Apartments) 3,000 7,111 J2319 West of Monroe Ave. NE & NE 4th St. (Renton Technical College) 3,000 11,293 J3285 West of Jones Ave. S & S 7th St. 1,500 4,717 J758 S 18th St. between Eagle Ridge Dr. S & Grant Ave. S (Eagle Ridge Apartments) 5,000 6,196 J4727 Northwest of Hoquiam Ave. NE & NE 10th St. (Hazen High School) 3,000 3,088 J996 Northwest of NE 4th St. & Monroe Ave. NE (Renton Technical College) 3,000 14,173 J894 West of Union Ave. SE & SE 4th St. (Sunnydale Mobile Home Park) 3,000 6,816 J2425 Union Ave. NE & NE 4th St. (Safeway/Highlands Shopping Center) 4,500 11,243 J2087 Pierce Ave. SE & SE 19th Ct. 1,500 2,919 J1771 East of Benson Rd S & S 23rd St. (Fred Nelson Middle School) 3,000 5,202 J897 Royal Hills Dr. & Monroe Ave SE (Rolling Hills Apartments) 5,000 7,968 ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 15, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-9_Large_Fire_Locations_Below_MinP.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.10 Large Fire Locations Below Minimum Required Residual Pressure(less than 20 psi) during 2039 MDD and Fire Flow without Improvements) O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton Legend Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 Parcel Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger < 20 psi Residual Pressure > 20 psi Highlands 445 "5 XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Water Treatment PlantX7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( City Limits ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 15, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-10_Areas_Below_Min_Req_Res_Pressure.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.11 Areas Below Minimum Required Residual Pressure (less than 20 psi)during 2039 MDD and Fire Flow without Improvements O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Residual Pressure < 20 psi Highlands 445 City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-43 7.4.5 Distribution System Recommendations This section offers recommendations to meet the deficiencies identified in the previous section. Improvements include actions such as pipe upsizing, main looping, and modifying pressure zone boundaries. Each of the recommended improvements requires a further site-specific and project-level engineering analysis before implementation. Recommendations are summarized by type of improvement in the following sections. 7.4.5.1 Projects to Address Low Peak-Hour Pressure Some low-pressure nodes (below 30 psi) exist adjacent to the Springbrook transmission line. The City has been working to remove connections to this line and relocate them onto an adjacent higher-pressure line. The model also found other low-pressure nodes near reservoirs; however, these nodes were excluded in the evaluation as City staff indicated that service connections do not exist at these sites. Figure 7.12 shows the location of piping improvements to address remaining low-pressure nodes (see project PZ-01). 7.4.5.2 Projects to Address Excessive Velocity One 8-inch line located at Maple Valley Highway and I-405 was found to exceed maximum velocity in the distribution system. This section of pipe is surrounded by 12-inch pipes and is recommended to also be upsized to 12-inch. Project D-13 will upsize 70 ft of 8-inch to 12-inch. 7.4.5.3 Improvements to Address Fire Flow in Non-Dead-End Areas Deficiencies identified in Section 7.4.4 and shown in Figure 7.10 require improvements to address fire flow deficiencies. The projects include upsizing 4-inch and 6-inch pipes and changing hydrant lateral connections. Detailed information on each recommended pipe improvement can be found in Table 7.19, where individual projects may be referenced based on Project Identification. Once implemented, these projects will eliminate the identified deficiencies. Figure 7.13 shows the recommended improvements to address fire flow deficiencies in areas that do not include dead-end pipes. ?æ ?Å SPU Station #33 Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #34 Fred Nelson BPS Kent Intertie South TalbotReservoir WTPPZ-02Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-11_LowPress_Rec_Imp.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.12 Low Pressure Recommended Improvements O 0 1,000500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 Rolling Hills 490 Rolling Hills 590 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment PlantX7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Pressure Zone Project City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-47 Table 7.19 Recommended Piping Projects for Fire Flow Deficiencies ID Project Name Improvement Type Existing Pipe Dia. (in) Proposed Pipe Dia. (in) Location Fire Flow Requirement (gpm) D-01 NE 10th Place Pipe Upsize Upsize Pipe 6 8 NE 10th Place between Sunset Blvd NE and Edmonds Ave NE 3,000 D-02 Ferndale Place NE Pipe Upsize Upsize Pipe 4 8 Ferndale Pl NE between NE 7th St and Ferndale Ave NE 1,000 D-03 Windsor Heights Pipe Project Upsize Pipe 4 8 Windsor Pl NE between Bronson Pl NE and Windsor Way NE 1,000 D-04 Sunset Blvd N Pipe Upsize Upsize Pipe 6 8 Sunset Blvd N between N 3rd St and N 4th St. 3,000 D-05 Maplewood Place SE Pipe Upsize Upsize Pipe 6 8 Maplewood Pl SE from SE 6th St to SE 7th Ave, SE 7th Ave. 3,000 D-06 NW 4th St Pipe Upsize Upsize Pipe 6 8 NW 4th St between Taylor Ave NE and Hardie Ave NE. 3,000 D-07 SW Sunset Blvd at Crestview Apartments Pipe Upsize Upsize Pipe / New PRV 6 12 SW Sunset Blvd at Crestview Apartments 3,000 D-08 Downtown Renton Pipe Project Upsize pipe / Replace Pipe 4, 6 8 S 4th St between Burnett Ave S and Whitworth Ave S; Whitworth Ave S from Houser Way S to S 6th St, S 6th St from Whitworth Ave S to Morris Ave S. 3,000 D-09 Glenwood Ave NE Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 4 8 Glenwood Ave NE and NE 9th Pl 3,000 D-10 S 178th St Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 6 8 S 178th St from 98th Ave S south to end of street; Talbot Rd S between SE Carr Rd and S 177th St. 3,000 D-11 N 4th St Pipe Upsize Upsize Pipe 6 8 N 4th St from Houser Way N west to end of pipe. 3,000 D-12 Hydrant Lateral Connection at Benson Condominium Change hydrant lateral connection n/a n/a Hydrant S-00110 at Benson Condominium (Benson Rd S) 3,000 D-14 Hydrant Lateral Connection on Sunset Blvd NE Change hydrant lateral connection n/a n/a Sunset Blvd NE at split to Houser Way Bypass. 3,000 D-15 S 17th St Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 4 8 S 17th St between Talbot Rd S and Morris Ave S. 1,000 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç D-07 D-05 D-11 D - 0 8D-07D-12D-13D-01 D-14D-08 D-02D-06 D-15 D-09D-10D - 0 3 D-04LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 15, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\Fig7-12_Rec_Pipe_Imp_Projects.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.13 Recommended Pipeline Improvement Projects O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Highlands 445 Recommended Pipeline Improvement Projects City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-51 7.4.5.4 Dead-end Pipes in Non-Single Family Areas The City has multiple older 4-inch, 6-inch, or 8-inch diameter dead-end pipes in non-single-family areas that do not have the capacity to provide the City’s fire flow requirements of 3,000 gpm. It is recommended that the City evaluate each case individually to determine how fire flows can be provided to each customer. In some cases, a customer may be protected by multiple hydrants on different water mains. As long as the total fire flow from the multiple hydrants meets the fire flow requirement, no improvements are necessary in these cases. In other cases where only one water main serves the customer, looping may be required or the dead-end main may need to be upsized to 12-inch to meet the fire flow requirements. Figure 7.14 identifies the location of dead-end pipes that cannot meet their fire flow requirements of 3,000 gpm. 7.4.5.5 Dead-End Pipes in Single-Family Areas The City also has multiple older 4-inch and 6-inch dead-end pipes in single-family areas that do not have the capacity to provide the City’s fire flow requirements of 1,000 gpm. It is recommended that the City evaluate each case individually to determine how fire flows can best be provided to each customer. The City has been programmatically moving hydrants from the dead-end to the closest main with 1,000 gpm. It is recommended that the City continue with this approach. Figure 7.15 identifies the location of dead-end pipes that cannot meet their fire flow requirements of 1,000 gpm. !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-13_Dead_End_Pipes_NonSF.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.14 Dead-end Pipes in Non-Single Family Areas O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Dead-End Pipes in Non-Single Family Areas Highlands 445 City Limits !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-14_Dead_End_Pipes_SF.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.15 Dead-end Pipes in Single Family Areas O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Dead-End Pipes in Single Family Areas Highlands 445 City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-57 7.5 Limiting Capacity Analysis The limiting capacity of the City’s physical water system was determined for the 2039 planning year with the assumption that all recommended improvement projects will be online. The limiting capacity analysis uses the methodology described in DOH Water System Design Manual (2009) Worksheet 6-1 and Table 6-1. Table 7.20 describes the method used to calculate capacity for each component. Table 7.20 Limiting Capacity Calculations Water System Component Equation / Notes Sources (ADD) N = 𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅 𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑅𝑅 𝐶𝐶𝑅𝑅𝐶𝐶𝑅𝑅𝑆𝑆𝑅𝑅𝐶𝐶𝐶𝐶𝐴𝐴𝐴𝐴𝐴𝐴 𝐸𝐸𝑅𝑅𝐸𝐸 𝑣𝑣𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑆𝑆𝑅𝑅 where Reliable source capacity = capacity of sources with backup power or generators Sources (MDD) N = 𝐹𝐹𝑅𝑅𝑆𝑆𝐹𝐹 𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑅𝑅 𝐶𝐶𝑅𝑅𝐶𝐶𝑅𝑅𝑆𝑆𝑅𝑅𝐶𝐶𝐶𝐶𝑀𝑀𝐴𝐴𝐴𝐴 𝐸𝐸𝑅𝑅𝐸𝐸 𝑣𝑣𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑅𝑆𝑆𝑅𝑅 where Firm source capacity = source capacity with largest source (Well 1) offline Treatment The City has designed treatment capacity with sufficiency capacity to serve its sources. Equalizing Storage (ES) N = 1𝐶𝐶[�1440𝑀𝑀𝐴𝐴𝐴𝐴��𝐸𝐸𝑆𝑆150 +𝑄𝑄𝑠𝑠−18�− 𝐹𝐹] where MDD = MDD, gpd/ERUs C = Coefficient associated with ranges of ERUs F - Factor associated with ranges of ERUs Qs = Total source pumping capacity, gpm Standby Storage (SB) N = 𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑡𝑡(𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑆𝑖𝑖)(𝐶𝐶𝑑𝑑) where SBt = total volume of water in standby storage component (gal) SBi = Design level of standby storage to meet reliability considerations per ERU (gpd/ERU) td = time that storage is to be used (days) Distribution Not considered capacity limited because the City has planned projects to address all identified deficiencies and design standards confirm all new development meets City standards. Transmission Assumed to be addressed as part of source and pumping capacity. Note: Abbreviation: ERU – Equivalent Residential Unit; gpd/ERU – gallons per day per Equivalent Residential Unit. The capacity of many water system components can be expressed as the number of ERUs that can be served. As described in Chapter 3, an ERU for the City’s system is one that consumes 160 gallons per day (gpd) on an average demand day. On a maximum day, an ERU consumes 288 gpd. These values do not include distribution system leakage. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 07 7-58 | MAY 2021| FINAL To determine how many ERUs the City’s sources can serve on a maximum demand day, the supply to each operational area was divided by the MDD ERU value of 288 gpd. The MDD ERU value was also used to calculate the capacity of the City’s equalizing storage in ERUs. The ERU capacity of standby storage was calculated by subtracting out each tank’s equalizing storage and operational storage under 2039 demand conditions from its total available storage capacity. The capacity of each operational area is either limited by source supply or standby storage. None of the service areas are limited by the amount of equalizing storage available. In total, based on sources, equalizing storage, and standby storage, the District’s water system has a limiting capacity of approximately 89,160 ERUs. This is shown in Table 7.21. As presented in Chapter 3, the City predicts serving approximately 60,860 ERUs in 2039. Considering sources, equalizing storage, and standby storage, the City’s water system is anticipated to have sufficient capacity to meet expected growth within the 20-year planning period. Fire suppression storage is not a function of ERUs and therefore is not represented in Table 7.21. Table 7.21 Calculated Capacity in ERUs for Each Water System Component Water System Component System-wide 2039 ERU 60,860 Sources(1) 104,480 Treatment 104,480 Equalizing Storage 247,860 Standby Storage(2) 89,160 Limiting Capacity 89,160 Notes: (1) Does not include SPU’s interties used for summer peaking supply. (2) Standby Storage available was calculated by subtracting 2039 required equalizing storage and operational storage from available storage above the 20 psi HGL. 7.6 Pipeline Condition Evaluation 7.6.1 Methodology The pipe condition evaluation incorporates two types of data: remaining useful life (RUL) and maintenance-identified projects. As outlined in Section 7.5.3 below, the RUL analysis examined the pipe’s material, installation year, and material’s useful life to determine the year in which each pipe would reach its RUL. The pipes identified in this analysis serve as a starting point for the pipeline condition evaluation. Additional pipeline condition projects have been identified by the City’s Maintenance Department based on field observation, excessive maintenance, and staff general experience. These projects, in addition to the RUL analysis projects, make up the pipeline condition evaluation. CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-59 7.6.2 Maintenance Projects The City’s Maintenance Department identified nine water-main replacement projects, prioritizing them according to City needs, maintenance history, pipe age, and pipe type. Many of these projects overlap with RUL projects and projects identified by the hydraulic model. Table 7.22 summarizes these projects, while Figure 7.16 shows their locations in the system. Table 7.22 Maintenance-Identified Condition Projects Project ID Project Description Approximate Pipe Length (ft) City Prioritization D-03(1) Replace 4-inch and 6-inch cast iron water mains in the Windsor Hills area. Pipes were installed in 1942. 5,900 4 D-08(1) Replace 4-inch and 6-inch cast iron water mains in north (downtown) Renton. Pipes were installed in the 1920s. 4,200 1 D-16 Replace old AC water main on NE 24th St from Jones Ave NE to Edmonds Ave in the Kennydale area. 1,700 6 D-17 Replace 8-inch AC water mains along NE 12th St with 12-inch ductile iron piping. In the new Highlands 445 Reservoir project, the City is replacing an 8-inch water main from the Reservoir site to Queen Ave NE. This project will continue pipe replacement east to Union Ave NE. 1,400 2 D-18 Replace old steel water mains off on Monroe Ave NE, south of the Highlands Reservoir and President Park. 3,000 8 D-19 Replace 6-inch cast iron pipe on Shattuck Ave S., north of S. 36th St. 500 3 D-20 Replace old 12-inch asbestos cement water mains in Garden Ave N from N 3rd St to The Landing (N 8th St). 2,500 7 D-21 Replace old 4-inch, 6-inch, and 8-inch steel water mains along Stevens Ave S from the south end of Stevens Ave to NW 4th St. 1,500 9 D-22 Replace steel-wrapped water mains in the Tiffany Park area. 11,200 5 Note: (1) These maintenance condition-related projects are combined with capacity projects identified in Section 7.4.5. !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç D-21 D-16 D-17 D-18D-03D-20 D-08 D-22 D-19 !5 LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-15_Matinance_Identified_Condition_Proj.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.16 Maintenance-Identified Condition Projects O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Maintenance-Identified Condition Projects Highlands 445 City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-63 7.6.3 Remaining Useful Life Evaluation As part of the pipeline replacement program, the City’s existing pipes were assessed for their conditions through a RUL analysis. The length of time that a pipe is anticipated to remain functional is called useful life. Useful life depends largely on the pipe material but can also depend on soil conditions, water constituents, and methods of installation. When a pipe is in service beyond its useful life, the increasing costs of maintenance associated with a failing pipe typically warrant replacement. Table 7.23 presents the estimated useful life of various types of pipe materials found in the City’s pipe data. Table 7.23 Useful Life Assumptions by Pipe Material Pipe Material Useful Life Assumption (years) Asbestos-Cement (AC) 50 Cast iron (CI) 80 Copper (COP) 50 Ductile iron (DI) 100 Galvanized iron (GI) 50 Galvanized steel (GS) 50 High-density polyethylene (HDPE) 50 Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) 50 Stainless steel (SSTL) 50 Steel (STL) 50 RUL is defined as the length of time left before a pipe will reach the end of its useful life. Pipe age and material type, derived from the City’s geographic information system (GIS) data, were used to determine the RUL of the pipes. Approximately 0.03 percent of the pipes have unknown installation dates. Table 7.24 presents the total length of piping according to the year installed and material type. The majority of the system is cast iron and ductile iron. Cast iron was primary installed between 1900 and 1979. Ductile iron installation started slowly in the 1960’s and became the predominate pipe material installed by the 1970’s. The cells of Table 7.24 are color-coded to show the RUL of pipes in each category. For example, the lengths of pipe in the red cells have all reached the end of their useful life, meaning they have an RUL of zero. Using these assumptions, approximately 122,000 linear feet (LF) of pipe or 7.4 percent of the City’s pipes have an RUL of 10 years or less. Furthermore, approximately 9.0 percent of the City’s pipes are expected to reach the end of their useful life in the next 20 years. Figure 7.17 shows the total length of pipe reaching the end of its assumed useful life for each year for the next 100 years, starting in 2019 and ending in 2119. All pipes that have already exceeded their useful life are shown in the year 2019. If the City wished to start annually replacing all its pipes from 2019 to 2119, approximately 16,600 LF of piping must be replaced each year, shown as the dashed black line on the figure. If the City wishes to start annually replacing pipes that will reach their RUL within the 20-year planning horizon, approximately 7,000 LF of piping must be replaced each year. This is shown as the orange line on the figure. The City is recommended to continue its annual pipe-replacement program and replace approximately up to 7,000 LF per year, targeting the pipes that have reached the end of their useful life and to offset the depreciation of this City asset. Figure 7.18 presents the locations of these pipes. CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-65 Table 7.24 Pipe Length by Decade Installed and Material Type Material Type Total Length (ft) by Decade Installed Unknown 1900-1909 1910-1919 1920-1929 1930-1939 1940-1949 1950-1959 1960-1969 1970-1979 1980-1989 1990-1999 2000-2009 2010-2019 Total (ft) Asbestos-Cement (AC) 53 316 12,946 2,700 1,590 17 17,621 Copper (COP) 45 45 Galvanized Iron (GI) 259 10 57 10 337 Galvanized Steel (GS) 1,567 139 1,399 85 23 20 3,233 High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) 145 594 740 Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) 761 2,182 2,942 Stainless Steel (SSTL) 30 10 40 Steel (STL) 2,157 7,922 17,143 219 219 34 1,969 29,664 Cast Iron (CI) 142 8,717 29,762 1,783 328 34,967 22,500 212,329 92,580 7,752 178 46 117 411,201 Ductile Iron (DI) 317 15 478 16,631 167,804 338,705 303,115 256,612 92,810 1,176,488 Total Length (ft) 512 8,976 29,762 1,783 328 39,022 43,986 250,203 260,603 349,156 303,383 261,045 93,552 1,642,311 Legend 0 years Useful Life Between 0 and 10 years of RUL Between 10 and 20 years of RUL Over 20 years of RUL Unknown years of RUL CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-67 Figure 7.17 Pipes Reaching End of Useful Life 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000 100,000 Total Length of Pipe (LF)Year When Pipe Reaches End of Useful Life Annual Replacement per year for Planning Period (2019-2039)Annual Replacement per year for System Life Cycle (2019-2119) !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-17_RUL_Analysis.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.18 Pipeline Identified in Remaining Useful Life Analysis O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( Highlands 445 Pipeline Remaining Useful Life Past RUL Reach RUL in 0-10 years Reach RUL in 10-20 years Water Main City Limits CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-71 7.7 Summary of Recommendations The system analysis yielded a number of recommended improvements for the BPSs, reservoirs, pipelines, and pressure zones, which are summarized in Table 7.25, Figure 7.19, and Figure 7.20. Figure 7.21 shows all deficiencies mitigated with the recommended improvements. CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-73 Table 7.25 Summary of Recommended Improvement Projects Project ID Project Name Improvement Type Existing Diameter (in) Proposed Diameter (in) Location Purpose Description D-01 NE 10th Place Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 6, 1 6, 8 NE 10th Place between Sunset Blvd NE and Edmonds Ave NE. 1. Fire flow deficiency (3,000 gpm fire flow requirement). 2. Maintenance condition (pipe size). 1. Upsize 6-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. Pipe size and age contribute to fire flow deficiencies. 2. Upsize 1-inch pipe on dead end due to size. D-02 Ferndale Place NE Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 4 8 Ferndale Pl NE between NE 7th St and Ferndale Ave NE. Fire flow deficiency (3,000 gpm fire flow requirement). Upsize 4-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. Deficiency due to pipe size and age. D-03 Windsor Heights Pipe Project Upsize pipe 4,6 8 Fire flow deficiency location: Windsor Pl NE between Bronson Pl NE and Windsor Way NE. Maintenance Condition: Windsor Heights Area. 1. Fire flow deficiency (1,000 gpm fire flow requirement). 2. Maintenance condition (pipe age and size). 1. Upsize 4-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. Deficiency due to pipe size and age. 2. Replace 4-inch and 6-inch cast iron water main in the Windsor Hills area. D-04 Sunset Blvd N Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 6 8 Sunset Blvd N between N 3rd St and N 4th St. Fire flow deficiency (3,000 gpm fire flow requirement). Upsize 6-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. Deficiency due to pipe size. D-05 Maplewood Place SE Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 6 8 Maplewood Pl SE from SE 6th St to SE 7th Ave, SE 7th Ave. Fire flow deficiency (3,000 gpm fire flow requirement). Upsize 6-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. Deficiency due to pipe size. D-06 NW 4th St Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 6 8 NW 4th St between Taylor Ave NE and Hardie Ave NE. Fire flow deficiency (3,000 gpm fire flow requirement). Upsize 6-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. Deficiency due to pipe size. D-07 SW Sunset Blvd at Crestview Apartments Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe / New PRV 6 12 SW Sunset Blvd at Crestview Apartments. Fire flow deficiency (3,000 gpm fire flow requirement). 1. Install new PRV from EARL370 to WH300 on 8-inch pipe at intersection of SW Sunset Blvd and Stevens Ave SW. 2. Upsize 30 ft of 6-inch to 12-inch pipe on Langston Rd at intersection with SW Sunset Blvd. Deficiency is due to long, 8-inch dead-end pipe. D-08 Downtown Renton Pipe Project Upsize pipe / Replace pipe 4,6 8 Fire flow deficiency locations: - S 4th St between Burnett Ave S and Whitworth Ave S. - Whitworth Ave S from Houser Way S to S 6th St, S 6th St from Whitworth Ave S to Morris Ave S. Maintenance condition & RUL locations: - 4-inch & 6-inch Cast Iron main replacement in north (downtown) Renton. Installed in the 1920s." 1. Fire flow deficiency (1,000 gpm fire flow requirement). 2. Maintenance condition (pipe age and size). 3. RUL analysis (pipes are past remaining useful life). 1. Upsize 6-inch and 4-inch pipe. Pipe size and age contribute to fire flow deficiencies. 2. Replace pipes based on installation year and size. Pipes are past RUL. D-09 Glenwood Ave NE Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 4 8 Glenwood Ave NE and NE 9th Pl. Fire flow deficiency (1,000 gpm fire flow requirement). Upsize 4-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. Deficiency due to pipe size and age. D-10 S 178th St Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 6 8 S 178th St from 98th Ave S south to end of street; Talbot Rd S between SE Carr Rd and S 177th St. Fire flow deficiency (3,000 gpm fire flow requirement). Upsize 6-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. Pipe is dead end with pipes 12-inch then 6-inch then 8-inch. Upsize middle section to 8-inch. D-11 N 4th St Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 6 8 N 4th St from Houser Way N west to end of pipe. Fire flow deficiency (3,000 gpm fire flow requirement). Upsize 6-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. Deficiency due to pipe size. D-12 Hydrant Lateral Connection at Benson Condominium Change hydrant lateral connection n/a 8 Hydrant S-00110 at Benson Condominium (Benson Rd S). Fire flow deficiency (3,000 gpm fire flow requirement). Move hydrant from 6-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. D-13 S 17th St Pipe Upsize Upsize pipe 4 8 S 17th St between Talbot Rd S and Morris Ave S. Fire flow deficiency (1,000 gpm fire flow requirement). Upsize 4-inch pipe to 8-inch pipe. Deficiency due to pipe size and age. CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-75 Table 7.25 Summary of Recommended Improvement Projects (continued) Project ID Project Name Improvement Type Existing Diameter (in) Proposed Diameter (in) Location Purpose Description D-14 Hydrant Lateral Connection on Sunset Blvd NE Change hydrant lateral connection n/a 8 Sunset Blvd NE at split to Houser Way Bypass. Fire flow deficiency (3,000gpm fire flow requirement). Move hydrant from 8-inch dead-end pipe to 14-inch main line pipe. D-15 Maple Valley Hwy Pipe Upsize at Henry Moses Aquatic Center Upsize pipe 8 12 Maple Valley Hwy at the Henry Moses Aquatic Center. High velocity. Upsize 8-inch pipe that is between 12-inch segments of pipe. D-16 Maintenance Condition Project: Kennydale (NE 24th) Replace pipe 8,12 NE 24th from Jones Ave NE to Edmonds Ave. Maintenance condition. Replace pipe due to condition. D-17 Maintenance Condition Project: Highlands Reservoir to Queen Ave. Replace pipe 8 Maintenance condition. Replace pipe due to condition. D-18 Maintenance Condition Project: Monroe Ave NE Replace pipe 4, 6 Monroe Ave NE (south of Highlands Reservoir & President Park). Maintenance condition. Replace and/or upsize pipe due to condition. D-19 Maintenance Condition Project: Shattuck Ave Replace pipe 6 Shattuck Ave S. (north of S. 36th St). Maintenance condition. Replace and/or upsize pipe due to condition. D-20 Maintenance Condition Project: Garden Ave N Replace pipe 12 12 Garden Ave N from N 3rd St to The Landing (N 8th St). Maintenance condition. Replace pipe due to condition. D-21 Maintenance Condition Project: West Hill Replace pipe 4, 6, 8 Stevens Ave S from the south end of Stevens Ave to NW 4th St. Maintenance condition. Replace and/or upsize pipe due to condition. D-22 Maintenance Condition Project: Tiffany Park Area Replace pipe 4, 6, 8, 12 Tiffany Park Area. Maintenance condition. Replace and/or upsize pipe due to condition. PZ-01 HLD 445/565 Pipe Reconfiguration Re-zone n/a n/a Development between Sunset Ln SE and NE Sunset Blvd. Fire flow deficiency (3,000-gpm fire flow requirement). Connect new developments from HLD 445 pipe to HLD 565 pipe, as area gets re-developed. PZ-02 VLY196 Re-zone Re-zone n/a n/a Area around intersection of SE Carr Rd and Talbot Rd S. Low pressure and fire flow deficiency (3,000-gpm fire flow requirement). Re-zone area to address low pressure and fire flow deficiencies and in VLY196 on transmission main north of Springbrook Springs. Hydrant S-00235 at 401 S 43rd St & Talbot Rd will need to be re-zoned, decommissioned, or removed. PS-01 Monroe Ave BPS Generator Pump station n/a n/a Monroe Ave BPS. Pumping deficiency. Install generator at Monroe Ave BPS to increase firm pumping capacity in Highlands 565 Operational Area. ST-01 Rolling Hills 590 Storage Storage n/a n/a Rolling Hills 590 Storage Site. Storage deficiency. ST-02 West Hill 495 Storage Storage n/a n/a West Hill 495 PZ. Storage deficiency. CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021| 7-77 Table 7.25 Summary of Recommended Improvement Projects (continued) Project ID Project Name Improvement Type Existing Diameter (in) Proposed Diameter (in) Location Purpose Description P-01 Dead-End 3,000-gpm Fire Flow Program Program Varies Varies - Hydrant NW-00091 at 801 Rainier Ave N - SW CRN of Complex. - Hydrant S-00364 at 17910 Talbot Rd S. - Hydrant S-00174 at 1400 Talbot Rd S Renton Plaza NE CRN. - Hydrant S-00107 at 1301 Thomas Ln S. - Hydrant S-00123 at 1817 Grant Ave S - NW CRN of APT. - Hydrant S-00167 at 1 S Grady Way Renton Village- W SD of Red Lion Hotel. - Hydrant S-00053 at 400 S 2nd St Renton High School - E End. - Hydrant S-00218 at 400 S 2nd St Renton High School - N SD. (5,000-gpm fire flow requirement). - Hydrant N-00129 at 480 Houser Way N. - Hydrant SE-00020 at 2205 Maple Valley Hwy Riviera Apt. - Hydrant NE-00038 at 1442 Hillcrest Ln NE. Fire flow deficiency (3,000 gpm fire flow requirement) on dead-end pipe. Hydrants are on dead ends but main-line pipes can supply 3,000 gpm fire flow demand. Review these areas when new development takes place and potentially looped or upsized. P-02 Dead-End 1,000-gpm Fire Flow Program Program Varies Varies - Hydrant S-00189 at 616 S 25th St & Smithers Ave S. - Hydrant NE-00801 at 1180 Monterey Ave NE. - Hydrant NE-01092 at 2025 NE 15th St. - Hydrant N-00172 at 2600 Garden Ct N. - Hydrant S-00182 at 2500 Talbot Dr S. Fire flow deficiency (1,000 gpm fire flow requirement) on dead-end pipe. Hydrants are unable to supply 1,000 gpm fire flow requirement in dead-end pipes. Move hydrants from dead-end pipes to main-line pipes. P-03 Pipeline Repair and Replacement Program Replace pipe Varies Varies System-wide. Pipes past remaining useful life (or will reach RUL in planning period). Replace pipes that have reached or will reach their RUL in the planning period based on installation date and pipe material type. Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-18_Rec_Imp_Projects.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.19 Recommended Improvement/Capacity Projects !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir UUT UUT UUT XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d SE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç PS-02 PS-03 * Projects D-01, D-03, and D-08 are also identified as part of the condition assessment project. This map only includes the portion related to Fire Flow. Total CIP projects are larger than shown when combined with condition projects D-07 D-05 D-11 D - 0 8 *D-07D-12D-13D-01*D-14D-08*D-02D-06 D-15 D - 0 9 D-10D - 0 3 *D-04PZ-01PZ-02ST-01 ST-03 PS-01/ST-01 LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger XÚ Recommended Improvements Pump Station Projects Highlands 445 Pressure Zone Projects Distribution System Improvement Projects Storage ProjectsUUT City Limits Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-19_rec_Pipe_Condition_Projects.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.20 Recommended Pipeline Condition Projects Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç D-21 D-16 D-17 D-18D-03D-20 D-08 D-22 D-19 !5 LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Specific Condition Projects Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( Highlands 445 Pipeline Condition Projects Past RUL RUL in 0 - 10 years RUL in 10 - 20 years Water Main Maintenance-Identified Pipeline Projects Annual Condition Projects City Limits Last Revised: February 15, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig7-20_Mitigated_DeficicenciesWithRecImp.mxd CHAPTER 07 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 7.21 Mitigated Deficiencies with Recommended Improvements !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 !( !(!(!( !( !( !( !( !( !(!( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !(!( !(!( !( !( !(!( !( !( !(!(!(!(!( !( !( !( !( !( !( !(!(!( !(!( !( !( !( !( !(!(!( !( !( !( !( !(!( !( !( !( !( !( !( !(!( !(!( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !(!( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( !( Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç * Projects D-01, D-03, and D-08 are also identified as part of the condition assessment project. This map only includes the portion related to Fire Flow. Total CIP projects are larger than shown when combined with condition projects LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger !(Fire Flow Deficiencies Mitigated Highlands 445 Pressure Deficiencies Mitigated!( City Limits CHAPTER 08 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 8-1 Chapter 8 OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE 8.1 Water System Management This section describes the tasks and responsibilities of the operations and maintenance (O&M) staff that serve the City of Renton’s (City) water system. Each member functions under the City’s Maintenance Services Division. Chapter 1 – Introduction (specifically, Figure 1.2, City of Renton Drinking Water Organization) explains how the water system is organized. 8.1.1 Normal Day-to-Day Operations Normal, day-to-day operations of the Water Utility fall under the responsibility of the Water Maintenance Services Section directed by Water Maintenance Manager, George Stahl. The Water Maintenance Services Unit (Services Unit) is led by Gregg Seegmiller and conducts the following tasks: • Main flushing. • Tank and reservoir cleaning. • Exercising of valves and hydrants. • Leak detection and repair. • PRV maintenance and setting. • Small meter maintenance, repair, and calibration. • Hydrant maintenance and repair. • Tie-in of water main extensions. The Water Utility Maintenance Unit (Maintenance Unit) is led by Craig Pray and is responsible for the operation, maintenance, and repair of the pump stations, pressure reducing valves (PRVs), wells, treatment systems, treatment plants, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system. This unit also samples water quality for operations and regulatory compliance. 8.1.2 Preventive Maintenance Preventive maintenance is performed by both City staff and contracted private parties. For example, maintenance and calibration for large meters are contracted out, whereas painting of pump station components is usually performed by City staff. Large maintenance projects (e.g., elevated tank painting) is done through Public Works contracts with contractors selected under public bidding rules. These projects are usually managed by the Water Utility Engineering Section of the Utility Systems Division. The City’s preventative maintenance program is detailed later in this chapter in Section 8.3.5. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 08 8-2 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 8.1.3 Field Engineering Field engineering support is supplied by both City staff and contracted private parties such as engineering consultant firms. 8.1.4 Water Quality Monitoring The Maintenance Unit conducts water quality monitoring for both operations and regulatory compliance. Operational practices monitor chlorine, fluoride, turbidity, temperature, phosphate, iron, manganese, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, pH, well water levels, and well production rates. Compliance water quality monitoring is required by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act of which most requirements are administered by the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and are published in State of Washington Administrative Code (WAC)-246-290. This practice monitors volatile organic chemicals, synthetic organic chemicals, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, physical parameters, bacteriological, radionuclides, and lead and copper (via customer tap sampling). The City systematically checks its network of groundwater monitoring wells to detect and prevent contaminants in the aquifers from reaching the production wells. Water table levels in the aquifers are also monitored. Except for those of coliform monitoring sampling and monthly fluoride meter calibration check sampling, all test results of compliance monitoring are stored in the City’s enterprise-wide database. This database also stores results of monitoring for aquifer contamination and water level data collected by a portable sounder. Water level and water temperature data collected by an automated sounder is stored on one of the City’s network servers. More information on the City’s records and reports can be found later in this chapter in Section 8.9. 8.1.5 Emergency Response The City’s Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP) defines how the City will respond to emergencies. This plan is maintained by the City’s Emergency Management Section. As a sub-plan to the CEMP, the Water System Emergency Response Plan includes information on the system’s security and methods of response to various terrorism threats. The Water Maintenance Manager prepares for and responds to emergencies involving the drinking water system, while the Maintenance Services Division maintains an emergency call-up list for employees on standby to respond to emergencies after hours on weekdays, on weekends, and on holidays. The response to an emergency may vary from a single maintenance technician addressing a relatively minor problem to the City activating the Emergency Operations Center and calling on the state or federal government to lead the response to a large disaster or terrorism incident. The Water System Emergency Response Plan is detailed later in this chapter in Section 8.6. 8.1.6 Cross Connection Control Most potential cross connections are identified during the plan review and building permit review processes. Specifically, the Water Utility Engineering Section and the Development Engineering Section work together to identify potential cross connections when reviewing the CHAPTER 08 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 8-3 plans for proposed development projects. Then, the Cross Connection Control (CCC) Specialist in the Water Utility Engineering Section works with the Development Engineering Section’s building inspectors to ensure that identified cross connections are either eliminated or are controlled through installed backflow prevention assemblies. The CCC Specialist maintains records on the City’s enterprise-wide database, noting information about particular cross connections and the backflow prevention assemblies that are installed (e.g., installation and test history). The database also generates test notices to send to the owners of the backflow prevention assemblies. The City uses XC2 Software LLC’s, XC2 software, to input information, query information, and generate reports, including those test notices from the database. Members of the Water Maintenance Services Section, Water Utility Engineering Section, Development Engineering Section, and Building Section remain alert of cross connections as they go about their duties throughout the City and its built environment. If cross connections are discovered, they are reported to the City’s CCC specialist. Appendix L presents the City’s Cross Connection Control Plan. 8.1.7 Capital Improvement Planning The Water Utility’s capital improvement plan (CIP) is implemented by its Engineering Supervisor, who works closely with the Water Maintenance Manager to identify and prioritize CIP projects. Most selected improvements are completed by public-bid contracts. Chapter 9, Capital Improvement Plan, details this information further. 8.1.8 Budget Formulation The Water Utility Engineering Supervisor formulates the budget for the Water Utility’s CIP while the Water Maintenance Manager formulates the O&M budget. To formulate their budgets, both work closely with their division directors and the Public Works’ Principal Financial and Administrative Analyst, who then works with the Finance Division’s staff to formulate the complete Water Utility budget. 8.1.9 Response to Complaints Complaints and questions are fielded by members of both the Water Utility Engineering Section and Water Maintenance Services Section. All water quality complaints are forwarded to the Maintenance Services Division’s secretary at (425) 430-7400. The Water Maintenance Services Section log, respond to, track, and follow-up with said complaints. Further information on the City’s Customer Complaint Response Program can be found later in this chapter in Section 8.8. 8.1.10 Public and Press Contact The City’s Communications Director or their representative handles contact with the media. The Development Services Division mans a customer service counter on the sixth floor of City Hall. Members of the Water Utility Engineering Section often report to this counter to assist customers with questions about water quality and water service availability. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 08 8-4 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 8.1.11 Billing The Utility Billing Division of the Administrative Services Department handles customer service, billing, and revenue collections for the Water Utility, as well as for the Wastewater Utility and Surface Water Utility. 8.2 Operator Certification The City’s water system serves a population of greater than 50,000, thus is classified as a Class 4 distribution system. Considered a Class 3 purification plant by the Association of Boards of Certifications, the Maplewood Water Treatment Plant (WTP) completes the following processes: • Treats water by removing iron and manganese using green sand filtration. • Treats water using fluoride and sodium hydroxide. • Converts hydrogen sulfide to sulfate through the addition of oxygen in conjunction with catalytic conversion of granular activated carbon. • Removes ammonia by reacting it with chlorine to convert it to nitrogen gas. Other treatment in the system includes in-line fluoridation, in-line chlorination, and the addition of sodium hydroxide and ortho-polyphosphates to inhibit the internal corrosion of water mains and private plumbing. These treatment systems are not considered purification plants. The requirements of WAC 246-292 are as follows: • The City’s water system must be managed by a Water Distribution Manager (WDM) 4. • The Maplewood WTP must be operated by a Water Treatment Plant Operator (WTPO) 3 or higher. • Wells RW-1, RW-2, and RW-3 must be operated by a Basic Treatment Operator or higher. • The CCC Program must be managed by a CCC Specialist. The City meets or exceeds all of these requirements. Table 8.1 lists the certifications of the drinking water staff. As the City’s water system becomes increasingly complex, its staff must be trained to efficiently to keep up with advancements in technology and ever-expanding federal and state regulations. New employees require utility orientation and basic information while experienced employees need training in regulatory requirements and technological updates. In-service training consists of special courses and seminars specifically designed for operation and maintenance groups. The training is offered through organizations like the American Water Works Association, Pacific Northwest Section; Evergreen Rural Water Association; Washington Environmental Training Center; equipment vendors; and local colleges, universities, and trade organizations. The City supports and promotes operator training. CHAPTER 08 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 8-5 Table 8.1 Staff Certification Name Certification George Stahl WDM4 (Mandatory certifications for the operation of the water system) Craig Pray WDM4, WTPO3 (Mandatory certifications for the operation of the water system) Gregg Seegmiller WDM3 Jason Burkey WDM1 Sean Campbell WDM3 Mark Combs WDM2 John Dimond WDM1 Charles (Greg) Durbin WDM3, WTPO2 Joe Ferrer WDS Jayson Gallaway WDM1 Todd Hamblin WDM1 Danny Hribal WDM3, WTPO3 Joel McCann WDM1 Joshua O’Neill WDM4, WTPO3 Patrick Pierson WDM2 James Rodriguez WDM1 Tyler Schwartzenberger WDM1, WTPO1 Mick Holte WDM4, CCS Eric Ott WDM4 Note: Abbreviation: WDS - Water Distribution Specialist. WTP operation requires an on-call staff 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The City currently has five WTP staff members. To allow for more staffing flexibility, training or hiring an additional licensed WTP operator is recommended. This licensed staff member can also perform other duties for the utility. In addition, additional maintenance staff may aid the City in conducting additional routine preventative maintenance activities that are currently being deferred due to lack of resources. Additional operators beyond the recommendations would allow the City to expand activities, such as acoustic leak detection of the distribution system and perform a consistent flushing program. 8.3 System Operation and Control The following sections review the water system’s routine operation practices conducted by staff, performance evaluation, operations under abnormal conditions, and preventative maintenance program that manages the condition and operations of all the Water Utility’s major components and assets. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 08 8-6 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 8.3.1 Identification of Major System Components Chapter 2 - Existing System details the major components of the water system including wells, treatment plants, interties, pump stations, PRVs, reservoirs, and piping. 8.3.2 Routine System Operation 8.3.2.1 General System Operation In general, the water supply is produced in the Valley 196 Pressure Zone (PZ) and is pumped to reservoirs on the surrounding hills. The majority of customers are located in the valley or on the hill pressure zones, which have reservoirs. Customers in the intermediate pressure zones are served through PRVs from higher pressure zones. Chapter 2 provides additional detail on system operations. Supply is generated by City-owned wells. Wholesale supply provided by Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) addresses system operational challenges in the Bow Lake Area (PRV 24) and on West Hill. Additional SPU interties are used for emergencies. 8.3.2.2 Start-up and Shut-down Procedures Each major system component has an O&M manual that describes start-up and shut-down procedures and safety procedures. Additionally, the City has written procedures for both electrical and hydraulic lock-out and tag-out of the water system facilities. 8.3.2.3 Meter Reading In October 2011, the City installed an Automated Meter Infrastructure (AMI) System. The AMI allows City staff to remotely read water meters. Meters are typically read remotely by the Utility Billing Division for purposes of billing. The Maintenance Services Division and Utility Engineering Divisions can also access meter readings for operational purposes or to support a capital project. In addition to reading usage, the City uses AMI meters to alerts customers about potential leaks. The Maintenance Services Division operates and maintains the AMI meters (e.g., addresses communication errors, calibrates large meters, etc.). Meanwhile, the City’s Information Technology Division operates and maintains the information technology resources needed to maintain the AMI system. 8.3.2.4 System Control All sources and pump stations are metered, and the SCADA system monitors and records all their flows, as well as the flow through the metered connections to the SPU pipelines at the Fred Nelson Booster Pump Station (BPS), Tiffany Park BPS, and Bow Lake Pipeline. In addition to the information recorded by the SCADA system, Water Maintenance Services staff read and record meter readings at all sources and pump stations daily if the facility is in operation and twice a week if the facility is on standby. New telemetry using Ubiquiti technology is planned to be implemented for the Water Utility and other utilities in the next 5 years. The City currently contracts Emerson programmable logic controller (PLC) from California but plans to upgrade the PLCs to Allen Bradly and maintain consistent configuration of PLC ports across all stations. For operational reasons, the City prefers to own its fiber communications where practical and cost-effective. CHAPTER 08 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 8-7 8.3.3 System Performance Evaluation System performance is evaluated by its ability to meet federal and state drinking water quality requirements, maintain customer satisfaction, control cost production and delivery of water, and meet system policy goals for service pressure and fire flow. 8.3.4 Operation during Abnormal Conditions City operators are trained and experienced to operate the water system during abnormal conditions such as a power outage or equipment failure. The City has multiple approaches to maintain reliability during such abnormal conditions: • Using redundant infrastructure and equipment to reduce effects to customers during abnormal conditions, e.g., the City has a redundant pump in each BPS and multiple PRVs for all PRV-fed pressure zones. • Applying maintenance best practice (as resources allow) such as conducting preventative maintenance and keeping spare parts and pipe on hand. • Keeping standby power available for key water facilities to continue providing service during power outages: as discussed in Chapters 2 and 9, the City plans to install on-site backup power generators at additional water system facilities. • Maintaining emergency interties with four adjacent utilities to provide supply when needed. • Maintaining emergency storage in its reservoirs, which can be distributed to the entire system by gravity through redundant PRVs. 8.3.5 Preventive Maintenance Program The preventive maintenance program is documented and tracked by CityWorks, a computer-based system that schedules preventive maintenance, assign resources to where they will be most valuable, predicts equipment reliability problems and prevent them from happening, and manages assets to best meet the organization’s goals. The following section explains how various components of the City’s water system are addressed by the preventative maintenance program. 8.3.5.1 Pipelines Pipeline repair and replacement (R&R) is planned and performed by the City’s Utility Services Division. The current distribution mains are generally in good condition. Pipes reaching the end of their usable life are identified and repaired or replaced based on the City’s available resources. 8.3.5.2 Reservoirs Reservoirs act as storage and regulating devices for water flow, and maintaining them in prime physical condition is essential for any water distribution system. Operators control and monitor reservoirs through the SCADA system. Additionally, operators conduct visual checks regularly for evidence of vandalism, forced entry, or damage and control functionality. The reservoirs are maintained on a periodic basis through weekly, quarterly, and annual activities. Periodic reservoir replacement is recommended to maintain a reliable water system. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 08 8-8 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 8.3.5.3 Wells and Pump Stations Reliable service from the City’s wells and pumps stations is key to producing and transmitting water to customers. Operators control and monitor wells and pump stations through the SCADA system. As previously discussed, WTPs associated with the wells are staffed on-site by certified operators who conduct visual checks regularly for evidence of vandalism, forced entry, or damage and control functionality. These facilities are maintained on a periodic basis including weekly, quarterly, and annual activities. Periodic replacement is recommended to maintain a reliable water system. 8.3.5.4 Pressure Reducing Valve Stations PRV stations allow distribution systems to transfer water from higher pressure zones to lower pressure zones without exceeding the allowed pressures in the lower pressure zones. Water is transferred through a valve that reduces the pressure to a specified pressure setting. Every month, Water Maintenance Services staff inspects the City’s PRVs. These inspections are supplemented by a more thorough inspection conducted by a contractor that specializes in PRVs to determine which stations need to be rehabilitated or upgraded. Maintenance on the PRVs is conducted by City staff. The Services Unit replaces the parflex tubing and fittings on all of the PRVs annually, and completely rebuilds typically 10 valves each year. According to the rebuild schedule, PRVs are typically rebuilt every 5 years. 8.3.5.5 Backup Power To maintain system operations during an unforeseen power outage, backup power to critical communications elements and sites is desirable. Currently, the City runs and periodically maintains on-site standby generators to keep them in good working order. 8.3.5.6 Hydrants Fire hydrants supply water for fire protection and other purposes. The City’s hydrants are tested annually to check if they can provide available fire flow in the event of an emergency. The inspection also improves water quality since, during this practice, stagnant water that is purged from the hydrant stubs. A follow-up inspection 2 weeks after testing is recommended to listen for potential leaks. Maintenance of the hydrants includes replacement or rebuilding of older hydrants, rust removal, and painting or repainting hydrants. Hydrants replaced on 4-inch diameter mains are made with lower-capacity, 2-inch diameter ports that limit flow and do not have a hard connection. These ports prevent a pumper truck from drawing a vacuum and collapsing the pipes. With its current funding, the City currently replaces 10 hydrants per year. An increase in funds would allow the City to replace more hydrants per year. Painting hydrants is mostly handled by City staff with the exception of the South Renton neighborhood. The City received grant funding in 2019 for a public arts campaign for community artists to paint murals on 20 City-owned fire hydrants. 8.3.5.7 Meters The City uses data from AMI meters to monitor unusual changes in amounts of water, which indicate potential leaks. According to the manufacturer, the City’s AMI system (Sensus), including CHAPTER 08 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 8-9 system components and batteries in the radios, is anticipated to have a 20-year life. Thus, meter replacement is currently set on a 20-year program to coincide with the AMI system’s end of life. Large meters are calibrated according to the manufacturer recommendations. 8.3.5.8 Valves The City inspects its valves twice a year, at least annually. As part of the inspection, blow offs and airvacs are inspected as well. 8.4 Sanitary Survey From the last survey in 2012 the following were addressed: Table 8.2 Sanitary Survey Summary – Completed and On-going Actions Task Completed? Document routine inspections of reservoirs with photos Completed for 2012 survey Modify external overflow pipelines at each reservoir to incorporate an air gap and screen/flapper valve On-going Install inverted screen well vent on Well EW-3R, PW-11, and PW-17 Completed Check integrity of Springbrook springs gasket seals on collection box hatches Completed Identify Springbrook springs collection box overflows and screen them to keep out potential contaminants. Completed Submit a Stage 2 Disinfection by Product (DBP) Monitoring Plan to DOH Completed Consider raising well PW-12 S15 above ground Completed Provide a watertight seal on the North Talbot Reservoir access hatch Completed Groundwater Rule Compliance Monitoring Completed A sanitary survey was conducted in 2017. From the 2017 survey, all recommended actions were completed; with one remaining on-going: Table 8.3 Sanitary Survey Summary – Recommended Actions in 2017 Survey Task Completed? Highlands 1.5 MG Concrete Reservoir. Clean out insects and debris. Seal crack in the concrete. Completed North Talbot Reservoir. Ensure there is a seal between inner rim of gutter and lid. Completed Please document routine inspection of reservoir with photos. Completed Modify external overflow pipelines at each reservoir to incorporate an air gap and screen/flapper valve On-going Continue to label tanks and plumbing in treatment plants and booster stations. Completed Review and update sources listed on the water facilities inventory. Completed CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 08 8-10 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 8.5 Equipment, Supplies, and Chemical Listing The City has vehicles and major equipment assigned to the Water Shop. Inventoried supplies (items stocked on shelves or stored in the yard) are purchased and tracked by the Maintenance Services Division. In addition to stock items, a list of vendors is maintained for parts and equipment items that are not stocked on the shelf or in the yard because they aren’t purchased or they are large in size. The Water Maintenance Manager maintains information regarding service representatives for major water system components and chemical suppliers. Additionally, the Water System Emergency Response Plan contains lists of contacts for suppliers and support services. Both the Water Maintenance Services Section and the Water Utility Engineering Section maintain copies of O&M manuals for all major components of the water system. These manuals list manufacturer part numbers and descriptions as well as technical specifications for components and chemicals used. 8.6 Emergency Response Program As mentioned earlier, the Water Utility maintains a Water System Emergency Response Plan, which is a sub-plan to the City’s CEMP. 8.6.1 Water System Personnel Emergency Call-up List The Water Maintenance Services Section publishes two emergency call-up lists: one for emergencies dealing with wells and pump stations and one for emergencies dealing with water mains, PRVs, and reservoirs. The SCADA system is connected to an auto-dialer that contacts call-up personnel when an alarm is triggered after office hours. The auto-dialer is programmed to move down a list of phone numbers until its call is acknowledged. After-office-hours calls to 911 that are related to the water system are handled by the 911 dispatcher who then contacts a cell phone that is carried by on-call staff. If the on-call staff does not answer the cell phone, the dispatcher will attempt to contact the Water Maintenance Manager, the Water Maintenance Services Supervisor, or the Water Utility Maintenance Supervisor. Other phone numbers are available to the dispatcher including the Maintenance Services Director’s cell phone number. 8.6.2 Notification Procedures – Water Quality Emergencies See Appendix N, Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Program. 8.6.3 Vulnerability Analysis As required by the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, the City’s Water Utility completed a security vulnerability assessment in December 2003 and updated the city-wide CEMP in October 2017. The Water Utility budgets for such security improvements through its CIP. Typically, this money is transferred into specific project budgets when security upgrades are incorporated into the overall project scope. Chapter 5, Policies, Criteria, and Standards, further details for the Water Utility’s reliability and vulnerability policies. Periodically, the Water Utility assesses the vulnerability of its drinking water system to threats from earthquakes, floods, power outages, etc. CHAPTER 08 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 8-11 New facilities are designed and constructed to the latest building code standards. In addition, extra emphasis is placed on hazard engineering when the new facilities are critical to the operation of the water system. Meanwhile, retrofits of existing facilities typically incorporate security and safety upgrades and sometimes structural modifications to enhance survivability and operability of the facility after natural or manmade disasters. The Water Utility designs and constructs redundancy in its water main network, supply sources, booster pumps and PRV stations, and other facilities to increase the system’s overall reliability and reduce its vulnerability to disruptions. America's Water Infrastructure Act of 2018 (AWIA) requires community water systems serving more than 3,300 people to develop or update risk assessments and emergency response plans. The risk and resilience assessment must be completed, and certification submitted to the United States Environmental Protection Agency by December 31, 2020 for systems serving between 50,000 and 99,999 people, and it must be repeated every 5 years. 8.6.4 Site Security Site security is necessary to protect the City’s assets at each facility site. Surveillance cameras are recommended at all of the facilities. The City plans to explore opportunities for grants from Homeland Security to aid in funding the cameras. In addition, the City plans to seek partnerships with the local Fire and Police departments to install higher quality cameras on several reservoirs, which would provide a wider view of the City for emergency personnel. In these cases, it is anticipated the Fire or Police departments would fund the cameras at the facilities. 8.7 Safety Procedures The goal of the Water Maintenance Services Section is to comply with all Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act of 1973 (WISHA) regulations applicable to the operation of the section. All workplace hazards, related safety and first aid equipment, and procedures are identified and communicated to the Water Maintenance Services staff through safety briefings, facility-specific standard operating procedures, facility O&M Manuals, and safety data sheets. 8.8 Customer Complaint Response Program Each year the Water Maintenance Services Section receives approximately 10,000 service requests, of which the majority are complaints in regard to water leaks and meter malfunctions. In 2018 there was a total of 7,150 requests and of that 177 requests were for meter inspections and 145 requests were to have large meters tested or repaired. Only a handful of water quality complaints are received each year and 99 percent of them are internal household plumbing issues. Each call is logged by customer service staff. When applicable, a staff member is assigned to the complaint. The following information is documented about the complaint: its location, the individual assigned to investigate and fix the problem, observations and discoveries in the field, what was done to address the complaint, and how much time and materials were expended. 8.9 Record Keeping and Reporting Maintenance and operating records are essential tools in utility management and operation that provide supporting data necessary for long-term planning. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 08 8-12 | MAY 2021 | FINAL The Water Utility keeps several types of records: • Water quality sampling for operations and mandatory water quality sampling records (see Appendix N): mandatory water quality sampling test results are reported to the state and maintained by the City. • Chemical dosing records. • Water main disinfection records. • Hydrant flushing records. • Source production and pumping records. • Reservoir level records. • Aquifer level records. • Personnel records. • Customer contact records. • Meter records. • Inventory records. The City’s records are legible, permanent, accurate, and accessible, and hard copies are maintained in the Water Maintenance Manager’s office. The Water Utility Engineering Section maintains records of backflow assembly test results, tester certifications, test notifications, backflow assembly information, and cross connection information in a database in the City’s enterprise database management system. Meanwhile, the SCADA system (described in Chapter 2) records the flow rates and flow quantities of all wells, booster pumps, and spring; water levels in reservoirs and production wells; levels in chemical storage tanks; pH levels of raw and treated water; pump starts and fails; alarm conditions; and other data. Current maps of the water system are available electronically in an ESRI ArcGIS platform. Maps are available to the Water Maintenance Services Section, the Fire Department, Development Services Division, and other departments. Geographic information system (GIS) data is periodically updated as required. On the other hand, paper forms of the maps including valve, hydrant, and fire flow map books at 1 inch = 400 inch scale and wall maps at various scales are available upon request. Maps are also available in PDF format. All records are kept in accordance with Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and WAC requirements. The City’s file maintenance plan outlining specific instructions for keeping and destroying files is maintained and managed by the City Clerk. 8.10 O&M Summary The City’s water system is well operated and maintained, meeting or exceeding its statutory requirements. The evaluation of O&M practices identified the following potential improvements: • Train or hire an additional water treatment plant operator for operational flexibility. • Additional resources, if available, could allow expansion of preventative maintenance and replacement activities. CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-1 Chapter 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 9.1 Introduction This chapter combines the various projects recommended in the Water System Plan (Plan) for the City of Renton (City) water distribution system and presents them as a comprehensive Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). With this CIP, the City will have a guideline to plan and budget for the water system over the next 20 years, as well as the recommended timing and cost estimates for each identified project. Project phasing is described as either short term (0 to 10 years, which corresponds to 2020-2029) or long term (10 to 20 years, which corresponds to 2030-2039). The City has a separate Capital Investment Plan that prioritizes all City projects and identifies funding plans for a 6-year period. The City updates the budget for the Capital Investment Plan every 2 years. As part of the planning and development of the capital improvement plan, the water utility will continue to consider programs and projects to support the City’s business plan, vision and mission for economic growth, social equity, and environmental sustainability goals. The water utility will continue to implement capital improvement projects in a transparent manner, informed by system and community needs and the financial, environmental, and social costs and benefits, to provide long-term community value. Appendix R details each project with cost estimates and detailed implementation timing and prioritization. 9.1.1 Capital Project Categories The Plan’s CIP projects are categorized by the following infrastructure: • Distribution pipeline(D). • Pressure Zone (PZ). • Storage Facilities (ST) • Annual Repair and Replacement (R&R) Programs (P). • Pump Station (PS). • General and On-Going Capital Projects and Programs (G). • Regulatory Compliance Programs (R). The abbreviations presented above were used during project identification to delineate each project category. The City’s Water Main Replacement Annual Program (WM) consist of the replacement of aging and undersized water mains throughout the water distribution and transmission system. The prioritization and selection of pipes are based on several factors including degree of fire flow deficiencies identified from the hydraulic model, frequency of leaks and breaks, remaining useful life of the pipes, and coordination with other City capital projects. This program reduces the CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 09 9-2 | MAY 2021 | FINAL likelihood of system failures, unplanned service interruptions, and claims for damages against the City. The following project categories identified in this Plan will be ultimately included in the City’s WM Program: • Distribution Pipeline Projects (D), which consist of sited specific projects to help mitigate deficiencies identified in Chapter 7, and sited maintenance main projects. • Annual R&R Programs (P), which included non-sited pipelines. The City will prioritize every year based on the City’s priorities and opportunities such as major roadways improvements and redevelopment areas. Pressure zone (PZ), storage (ST), and pump station (PS) projects are in their respective categories. Storage Projects include the construction of the new Highlands 445-reservoir, and Kennydale reservoir, the recommendation of a new reservoir in Rolling Hills 590 PZ and the Blackriver reservoir. Pump Station Projects include recommendations at West Hill, South Talbot, Monroe, Mt Olivet Pump Stations. Meanwhile, general projects (G) include studies and seismic-related projects for the distribution system, and on-going capital projects and programs, such as security improvements, or pressure-reducing valve (PRV) rehabilitation. Finally, regulatory (R) projects represent general water quality compliance projects, water system plan updates, and water conservation program. An overview of the City’s recommended CIP is presented in Section 9.2. 9.1.2 Capital Project Types To support the City's financial evaluation, CIP projects were allocated into three types: 1. Capacity: Projects that add system capacity to meet future demand growth. These projects are typically funded with connection fees and are recommended to meet the analysis criteria detailed in Chapter 7. 2. Improvement: Projects that increase the level-of-service (e.g., redundant pumping, backup power, pipe upsizing, fire flow, system reliability) of existing infrastructure. These projects are typically funded with rates and are needed whether demand increases or stays the same. 3. R&R: Projects that replace or maintain existing infrastructure without increasing capacity or level-of-service. These projects are typically funded with reserves and are meant to renew infrastructure that is in poor condition. Individual projects may include elements of multiple capital project types, meaning that each project was defined as one or more of the three types and assigned a percentage of the total project cost to each type. The allocations between multiple types were made using professional judgment. 9.2 CIP Program Overview This section summarizes the CIP program and illustrates the locations of recommended projects, both specific and programmatic. Tables 9.1 and 9.2 summarize the CIP projects by project category and priority, respectively. Figures 9.1 and 9.2 summarize the percent of each project identified by project category and project type, respectively. Specific project details are provided at the end of the chapter in Table 9.15. CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-3 When considering CIP costs by project category as shown in Table 9.1 and Figure 9.1, the majority of CIP costs (47.3 percent) are accrued from programmatic projects. Distribution pipeline projects and general projects comprise the other high-cost categories and account for 17.3 percent and 10.4 percent of the CIP, respectively. When considering CIP costs by priority (more detail in Section 9.4) as shown in Table 9.2 and Figure 9.2, approximately 63 percent of the CIP costs are annual programs. The total water CIP cost over the next 20 years is approximately $124 million, which equates to approximately $6 million per year for the planning period. Of the total cost, approximately $28 million is budgeted for the short term, approximately $18 million is budgeted for the long term, and approximately $79 million is budgeted for the annual category. Table 9.1 CIP Summary by Project Category Project Category Annual Cost Total Cost Percentage Distribution (D) $ 1,075,550 $ 21,511,000 17.3% Pressure Zone (PZ) $ 21,250 $ 425,000 0.3% Annual R&R Programs (P) $ 2,937,600 $ 58,752,000 47.3% Pump Station (PS) $ 225,250 $ 4,505,000 3.6% Storage (ST) $ 869,750 $ 17,395,000 14.0% General (G) $ 645,000 $ 12,900,000 10.4% Regulatory (R) $ 440,000 $ 8,800,000 7.1% Total Cost $ 6,214,400 $ 124,288,000 100% CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 09 9-4 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 9.1 CIP Summary by Project Category Table 9.2 CIP Summary by Project Priority Project Priority Total Cost Percentage 0-10 years $ 27,658,000 22.3% 10-20 years $ 18,033,000 14.5% Annual $ 78,597,000 63.2% Total Cost $ 124,288,000 100% CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-5 Figure 9.2 CIP Summary by Project Priority 9.3 Cost Estimating Assumptions 9.3.1 Cost Estimate Level The CIP cost estimates in this chapter are Class 5 estimates (budget-level estimates). These costs were determined using both Carollo Engineers, Inc. (Carollo) understanding of project locations and current conditions and the City’s costs of similar and recently constructed capital projects. Note, actual costs may vary from these estimates by -50 percent to +100 percent. All costs are in 2019 dollars. The Engineering News Report’s (ENR’s) U.S. 20-City Construction Cost Index for June 2019 is 11,268. As previously stated, the estimates are subject to change as the project design matures and because costs for labor, materials, and equipment may vary in the future. 9.3.2 Baseline Unit Cost Baseline construction costs were estimated using unit costs with the assumptions presented below. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 09 9-6 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 9.3.2.1 Pipeline Unit Costs Table 9.3 shows unit cost assumptions for pipelines provided by the City. These costs were developed from recent construction costs for various water pipeline projects and were rounded to the nearest tenth. To be conservative, these unit costs assume open-trench construction in improved areas. The estimated construction costs cover pavement-cutting, excavation, hauling, shoring, pipe materials, hydrants, valves, service lines and installation, backfill material and installation, and pavement replacement. The unit costs are for typical field conditions for construction in stable soil at depths ranging between three to five feet. Table 9.3 Pipeline Unit Costs Pipe Size (Inches) Pipeline Unit Cost(1) ($/LF) 8 $300 10 $350 12 $400 16 $500 18 $550 24 $700 Notes: (1) The unit cost does not include the additional 25 percent for construction contingency, 30 percent for design and admin. Abbreviation: LF – linear feet. 9.3.2.2 Pump Station Generator Costs Costs for pump station generators were developed based on Carollo’s and the City’s past experience with similar projects. Unit cost for generators was assumed to be $200,000 per 100 horsepower (hp). As presented in Table 9.4, pump station generator costs are based on pump horsepower. Table 9.4 Pump Station Generator Unit Cost Generator Size (hp) Generator Unit Cost(1) ($/hp) Any $200,000 Note: (1) The unit cost does not include the additional 25 percent for construction contingency, 30 percent for design and admin. 9.3.2.3 Storage Costs Project costs for new storage were developed according to typical costs from past City projects. Conceptual costs for reservoirs vary by type (ground, standpipe, or elevated) and are estimated based on reservoir volume in gallons (gal), as presented in Table 9.5. Storage costs are sensitive to site-specific geotechnical and seismic considerations; therefore, the City is recommended to conduct a reservoir siting study at the start of every new storage project. CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-7 Table 9.5 Reservoir Unit Costs Reservoir Type Storage Unit Cost(1) ($/gal) Ground $3 Standpipe $6 Elevated $8 Note: (1) The unit cost does not include the additional 25 percent for construction contingency, 30 percent for design and admin. 9.3.2.4 Pressure-Reducing Valve Costs Other costs for the CIP include that of the PRV station. The conceptual cost presented in Table 9.6 was estimated based on Carollo’s recent projects. Table 9.6 Valve Costs Cost(1) (Lump Sum) Pressure Reducing Valve Station $200,000 Note: (1) The unit cost does not include the additional 25 percent for construction contingency or 30 percent for design and admin. 9.3.3 Construction Contingency Contingency costs must be reviewed on a case-by-case basis because they will vary considerably with each project. Consequently, the preliminary layout of a project will contain uncertainties such as unexpected construction conditions, the need for unforeseen mechanical items, and variations in final quantities; because all these items increase project costs, allowances should be made for them in preliminary estimates. To assist the City in making financial decisions for these future construction projects, a construction contingency cost of 25 percent is added to the baseline construction cost. 9.3.4 Design/Admin Costs Design and administration costs include expenses associated with project engineering, professional services during the construction phase, and project administration. More specifically, engineering services associated with new facilities include the following tasks: • Conducting preliminary investigations and reports. • Preparing drawings and specifications during construction. • Surveying and staking. • Sampling of testing material. • Providing start-up services. Meanwhile, construction phase professional services cover items such as construction management, engineering services, materials testing, and inspection during construction. Finally, project administration costs cover items such as legal fees, financing expenses, administrative costs, and interest during construction. In general, the City suggested that the projects in this CIP include a design and administration cost of 30 percent of the construction cost with contingency. Per City’s direction, no specific planning contingency was added to the capital costs. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 09 9-8 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 9.3.5 Tot al Capital Improvement Cost The costs presented in this CIP are high-level planning costs that will help the City make financial decisions The sample capital improvement project cost calculation shown below demonstrates how construction contingency as well as design and administrative costs were added to the baseline construction cost to determine the total project cost. The construction contingency plus design and administration costs make up 38.5 percent ($625,000/$1,625,000) of the total project cost estimate. Example: Baseline Construction Cost $1,000,000 Construction Contingency (25%) $250,000 Estimated Construction Cost $1,250,000 Engineering Design Cost + Project Administration (30%) $375,000 Total Capital Improvement Cost $1,625,000 9.4 CIP Development and Implementation The capital improvement implementation was separated into two phases: • Short term: 0 to 10 years. • Long term: 10 to 20 years. The City developed prioritization criteria to prioritize all projects and recommendations from this Plan between Short-term and Long-term. Short-term projects have already started or are committed to starting within a reasonable timeframe and include high-priority projects, such as the following: • High priority multi-feature projects. • Projects improving system reliability. • Maintenance-identified projects. All other CIP projects, including single feature projects are long term. Table 9.7 summarizes the high-level prioritization matrix for different project types and purposes. Table 9.7 Overall Prioritization Criteria Project Types(1) 0-10 years 10-20 years Dead-end pipes in existing non-single-family areas (3,000 gpm): X Dead-end pipes in existing single-family areas (1,000 gpm): X Maintenance projects X Pipe upsize due to excessive velocity (over 8 fps) X R&R pipes only – past RUL Annual replacement $ R&R pipes only – reaching RUL 0-10 years R&R pipes only – reaching RUL 10-20 years Pipe upsize for fire flow only X Pipe upsize for fire flow, maintenance, and past RUL X CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-9 Project Types(1) 0-10 years 10-20 years Pipe upsize for fire flow, and RUL reached in 0-10 years X Pipe upsize for fire flow, and RUL reached in 10-20 years X Pressure Zone projects (PZ-02) X Pump Station projects (PS-01, PS-02, PS-03) X Note: Abbreviations: gpm – gallons per minute; RUL – remaining useful life; fps – feet per second. A detailed and customized scoring method using weighting factors was developed to help refine rankings and prioritize specific pipeline projects after the general method stated above. Appendix S details this scoring method. This detailed method resulted in the same project allocation between 0-10 years and 10-20 years as the simplified method presented in this section. This is an initial evaluation of the projects; however, it is recommended that the City develop a systematic method to prioritize projects, especially R&R projects The following sections summarize recommended projects identified in previous chapters and incorporated in the summary in Section 9.5. Figures and detailed tables are located at the end of this chapter. 9.4.1 Recommended Distribution Pipeline Projects Distribution pipeline projects (D) were developed using: • The hydraulic model and were identified for areas not meeting velocity and pressure criteria, as detailed in Chapter 7. • City staff input, specifically projects identified by the maintenance staff as areas of improvement. Projects identified under this category will be part of the City’s WM, which consists of the replacement of aging and undersized water mains throughout the water distribution and transmission system. The prioritization and selection of pipes are based on several factors including degree of fire flow deficiencies identified from the hydraulic model, frequency of leaks and breaks, remaining useful life of the pipes, and coordination with other City capital projects. This program reduces the likelihood of system failures, unplanned service interruptions, and claims for damages against the City. Pipelines identified under project P-03 (see section 9.4.3) will also be included in the City’s WM Program for funding purpose. 9.4.1.1 D-1 through D-14: Fire Flow Recommended Pipeline Projects To address fire flow deficiencies identified in Chapter 7, projects and recommendations presented in that chapter should be implemented. Namely, projects will upsize 4-inch and 6-inch pipes and change hydrant lateral connections. Once implemented, these projects will help mitigate the identified deficiencies. Section 9.5 details each fire flow pipeline project and references it according to its project identification. In the CIP, these are projects D-01 through D-14. Given the results of the remaining useful life analysis presented in Chapter 7, some of these projects are also recommended to address the asset condition. In summary, approximately 19,650 LF of piping is recommended to be upsized or built to mitigate fire flow deficiencies. These projects are estimated to total $10.06 million (including design and admin and construction contingency) and are recommended in both short-term and long-term phases, as shown in the Prioritization Criteria in Table 9.7. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 09 9-10 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 9.4.1.2 D-15: Velocity Improvement Projects One 8-inch line located at Maple Valley Highway and Interstate 405 (I-405) was found to exceed maximum velocity during peak hour demand (PHD) in the distribution system. This section of the pipe is surrounded by 12-inch piping and is recommended to also be upsized to 12 inches. This velocity improvement project will upsize 70 feet of 8-inch line to 12 inches and is listed as the Maple Valley Hwy Pipe Upsize at Henry Moses Aquatic Center (D-15) in the CIP. D-13 is estimated at $46,000 and recommended in the long term. It is anticipated that this deficiency will be corrected as part of the water main improvements required for a proposed commercial development of the old Stoneway Concrete site along Maple Valley Highway. 9.4.1.3 D-16 through D-22: Maintenance-Identified Condition Projects The City’s maintenance department identified nine water main replacement projects and prioritized them according to City needs, maintenance history, pipe age, and pipe type. In the CIP, they are projects D-16 through D-22 in detailed Table 9.15. Many of these projects overlap with RUL projects and projects identified by the hydraulic model. Per the City’s policies on new pipe sizes, existing pipes with 4-inch or 6-inch diameters are recommended to be upsized to 8 inches. Through these maintenance-identified condition projects, a total of approximately 21,660 feet of piping is recommended to be replaced for a total of $11.4 million. They are all recommended to be implemented in the short term. 9.4.1.4 Distribution Pipeline Recommendations Summary Table 9.8 summarizes the footage and the cost of different diameter piping that must be replaced in the short and long terms. This table includes all projects recommended in the above sections. Table 9.8 Distribution Pipelines Projects Summary Pipe Diameter 0-10 years 10-20 years Length (LF) Cost(2) Length (LF) Cost(2) 8-inch(1) 30,850 $15,041,000 3,350 $1,634,000 10-inch(1) -- -- 1,800 $1,024,000 12-inch(1) 5,210 $3,387,000 100 $391,000 Hydrant Lateral Connections -- -- 70 $34,000 Total 36,060 $18,428,000 5,320 $3,083,000 Notes: (1) Both 4-inch and 6-inch existing diameters will be replaced with larger-diameter pipes. (2) The cost includes 25 percent construction contingency and 30 percent engineer/legal/admin contingency. 9.4.2 Recommended Pressure Zone Projects This CIP has two pressure zone projects, both of which are summarized in Table 9.9 with their respective priorities and costs. Table 9.9 Pressure Zone Recommendations Project Number Project Name Priority Cost(1) PZ-01 HLD 445/565 Pipe Reconfiguration 10-20 years $325,000 PZ-02 VLY196 Re-zone 0-10 years $100,000 Note: (1) The cost includes 25 percent construction contingency and 30 percent engineer/legal/admin contingency. CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-11 9.4.2.1 PZ-01: HLD 445/565 Pipe Reconfiguration Several low-pressure nodes (below 30 pounds per square inch [psi]) exist adjacent to the Highlands 565 transmission line. The City has been working to relocate connections currently located on the lower-pressure line to adjacent higher-pressure lines. In addition, as this area gets re-developed, new developments must connect to the neighboring Highland 565 PZ due to fire flow deficiencies on the Highland 445 adjacent pipe. This pipe reconfiguration project is labeled HLD 445/565 Pipe Reconfiguration (PZ-01) in the CIP. PZ-01 is anticipated to be implemented in the long term and estimated at approximately $325,000. 9.4.2.2 PZ-02: VLY196 Re-Zone The storage analysis detailed in Chapter 7 showed that, although this area has sufficient storage at 20 psi, the Valley 196 PZ is deficient in its ability to supply operational and equalizing volumes at 30 psi to the highest customers. To address this issue, the City is connecting high-elevation residents within the Valley 196 PZ to higher-pressure infrastructure, thus providing them adequate operating and fire flow pressures. This project is labeled VLY196 Re-zone (PZ-02) in the CIP and, in addition to the re-zoning, includes improvement of hydrant S-00235 at 401 S 43rd St and Talbot Rd. More specifically, the hydrant needs to be re-zoned, decommissioned, or removed. PZ-02 is estimated at $100,000 and recommended to be implemented in the short term. 9.4.3 Recommended Annual Repair and Replacement Programs Two types of programmatic projects (P) are recommended: annual R&R pipeline projects and dead-end programs. 9.4.3.1 P-01: Dead-End Pipes in Non-Single-Family Areas Program The City has multiple 4-inch, 6-inch, or 8-inch diameter dead-end pipes in non-single family areas that are older and do not have the capacity to provide the City’s fire flow requirements of 3,000 gpm. In some cases, customers are protected by multiple hydrants on different water mains. As long as the total fire flow from the multiple hydrants meets the fire flow requirement, no improvements are necessary. In other cases where only one water main serves customers, looping may be required or the dead-end main may need to be upsized to 12 inches to meet the fire flow requirements. The City is recommended to individually evaluate each case of these dead-end pipes to determine how fire flow s can be provided to customers. These areas should be reviewed when new development takes place and potentially looped or upsized. No cost was developed for the annual Dead-End Pipes in Non-Single-Family Areas Program (P-01). 9.4.3.2 P-02: Dead-End Pipes in Single Family Areas Program The City has multiple 4-inch and 6-inch dead-end pipes in single family areas that are also old and do not have the capacity to provide the City’s fire flow requirements of 1,000 gpm. To address this situation, the City has been programmatically moving hydrants from the dead-end to the closest main with 1,000 gpm. The City is recommended to continue this approach and to also evaluate each case individually to determine how fire flows can best be provided customers. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 09 9-12 | MAY 2021 | FINAL The estimated cost for the Dead-End Pipes in Single Family Areas Program (P-02) is approximately $1.16 million and is recommended in the short term. 9.4.3.3 P-03: Pipeline Repair and Replacement Program As outlined in Chapter 7, the RUL analysis examined the pipes’ material and installation year, as well as their materials’ useful life, to determine the year during which each pipe would reach the end of its useful life. The City is recommended to continue its annual pipe-replacement program and replace approximately 6,000 LF of pipe per year, targeting pipes that have reached the end of their useful life and offsetting the depreciation of this City asset. Table 9.10 summarizes the footage and the cost for each pipe diameter that’s included in the CIP and also presents the total annual LF and cost. Additionally, it is recommended that the City invest in developing an Asset Management Program (AMP) to help prioritize which pipelines need to be replaced each year (see project G-11). Table 9.10 Remaining Useful Life Repair and Replacement Summary Pipe Diameter R&R Annual Program Statistics Total Length (LF) Total Cost(1) 6-inch and less 65,630 $ 26,662,000 8-inch 17,950 $ 8,751,000 10-inch 4,620 $ 2,628,000 12-inch 20,270 $ 13,176,000 14-inch 770 $ 563,000 16-inch 4,410 $ 3,583,000 18-inch 2,360 $ 2,109,000 24-inch 110 $ 125,000 Total 116,120 $ 57,597,000 Annual Length/Cost 5,806 $ 2,879,850 Notes: (1) The cost includes 25 percent construction contingency and 30 percent engineer/legal/admin contingency. (2) Linear feet in this table are different than the ones presented in Chapter 7. Some of the recommended R&R pipelines were also included as part of the specific sited Distribution Pipeline projects. Linear feet from these projects were removed from the Remaining Useful Life R&R in this table. P-03 is estimated to cost approximately $57.6 million or $2.9 million annually over the 20-year period. Note, the total linear feet of pipes in Table 9.10 differ from the analysis performed in Chapter 7. Some of the pipelines identified in the RUL evaluation were also included as part of the specific sited Distribution Pipeline projects (P-16 through P-22) and were therefore not included here. No specific projects were identified as part of the Pipeline R&R Program (P-03). Instead, the City is recommended to decide which pipes to replace every year. It is recommended that the City continues to enhance its asset management program to help prioritize and time the R&R of its aging water infrastructure by weighing the costs of continued maintenance against the costs of R&R. This will help prioritize which pipelines identified under Project P-03 need to be replaced each year and will include additional data than remaining useful analysis only. These plans CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-13 ultimately reduce operation and maintenance risks, thus resulting in overall lower costs burdened by ratepayers. Currently, the City wishes to focus on the pipelines located in the downtown and Highlands areas and take advantage of opportunities such as implementing projects in conjunction with major roadway improvements as much as possible. Water Main Improvements in conjunction with Major Roadway Improvements This program consists of taking advantage of major roadway improvements planned by the City in areas where pipeline reaching their remaining useful life were identified. This would include the design and construction of new water mains as part of major roadway improvements, including Rainier Avenue Phase 4, Duvall Avenue and water main relocation to accommodate the I-405 corridor improvement project by WSDOT. Water Main Improvements in Redevelopment Areas – Downtown and Highlands Redevelopment activities can have a substantial impact on the ability of the existing distribution system to provide sufficient water to customers for fire protection service and for domestic uses. Significant activities are planned during the S 2nd and S 3rd 2-way conversion anticipated in 2019 - 2022. Typically, detailed hydraulic models are used in conjunction with area water demand forecasts and fire flow requirements to identify potential water main improvements in redevelopment areas. Water main improvements needed for redevelopment projects are typically installed and paid for by the developers. The developers may recoup some of their costs from future benefitting properties by applying to City Council for a latecomer agreement. In some cases, with the approval of funding from the City Council, the City may install the improvements or participate in the cost of the improvements with the developers and the City recovers its costs from benefitting properties through a Special Assessment District. The pipe replacement program for redevelopment projects is designed to balance the City’s investments in pipe replacement projects to reduce risks associated with aging pipe infrastructure with investments in major pipe replacement projects to support growth and development. 9.4.4 Recommended Pump Station Projects Table 9.11 summarizes three pump station projects (PS), all of which are prioritized for the short term. Table 9.11 Pump Station Recommendations Project Number Project Name Priority Cost(1) PS-01 Monroe BPS 0-10 years $ 488,000 PS-02 West Hill BPS 0-10 years $ 1,842,000 PS-03 South Talbot BPS 0-10 years $ 2,175,000 Notes: (1) The cost includes 25 percent construction contingency and 30 percent engineer/legal/admin contingency. Abbreviation: BPS – booster pump station. 9.4.4.1 PS-01: Monroe BPS Project With the existing reliable sources and reservoirs, the Highlands 565 Operational Area does not have enough storage for all planning years until 2039. As described in Chapter 7, the Highlands 565 area will be deficient by 1.26 million gallons (MG) by 2029 and 1.65 MG by 2039. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 09 9-14 | MAY 2021 | FINAL However, excess storage located in the Highlands 445 Operational Area is sufficient to offset Highland 565 deficiencies. For the Monroe BPS Project (PS-01), the City is recommended to install backup power generators at the Monroe Avenue BPS to allow storage to be provided from the Highlands 445 PZ to the Highlands 565 PZ, which will also improve pumping capacity in the long term. The City is planning on adding a generator at Monroe BPS and is phased for the short term in the CIP. The total capital cost is estimated at approximately $488,000. 9.4.4.2 PS-02: West Hill BPS Project The West Hill BPS Project (PS-02) will install a generator at the West Hill BPS, increasing pumping capacity and implementing electrical, structural, and mechanical improvements. PS-02 is currently under design and, therefore, phased for the short term in the CIP. The cost is estimated at $1.8 million based on a 2018 pre-design study. 9.4.4.3 PS-03: South Talbot BPS Project The South Talbot BPS Project (PS-03) will replace fire and duty pumps in the South Talbot BPS and implement electrical, structural, and mechanical improvements. This project is currently under design and, therefore, phased for the short term. The cost is estimated at $2.2 million based on a 2018 pre-design study. 9.4.5 Recommended Storage Projects This section summarizes the recommended storage projects (ST) that were identified through the storage analysis detailed in Chapter 7. Table 9.12 shows the two recommended projects. Table 9.12 Storage Recommendations Project Number Project Name Priority Cost(1) ST-01 Rolling Hill 590 Storage (1.5-MG) 0-20 years $ 17,395,000 ST-02 West Hill 495 Storage 0-10 years N/A Operational change only Note: (1) The cost includes 25 percent construction contingency and 30 percent Engineer/Legal/Admin contingency. 9.4.5.1 ST-01: Rolling Hill 590 Storage Project As identified during the storage analysis, Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area does not have sufficient storage for all planning years until 2039. The analysis in Chapter 7 shows that the operational area will be deficient by 0.95 MG by 2039. The Rolling Hill 590 Storage Project (ST-01) will mitigate this storage deficiency in two phases: • Phase 1: Add backup power to the Maplewood BPS to increase pumping capacity from the Rolling Hills 490 PZ to the Rolling Hills 590 PZ, and add auto-start, auto-transfer, and backup power to the Rolling Hills BPS so that three pumps can be operated at the same time. • Phase 2: Construct a new 1.5-MG standpipe for the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area. The new standpipe will replace the existing 0.3-MG elevated tank. CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-15 Phase 1 is recommended to be implemented in the short term and is estimated to cost approximately $2.8 million. Phase 2 is recommended to be implemented in the long term and is estimated to cost approximately $14.6 million. After both phases are implemented, the Rolling Hills 590 Operational Area will have sufficient storage for the future and added redundancy with reliable pumping from the Maplewood BPS and Rolling Hills BPS. Siting studies and property acquisition may be necessary for this project. Hydraulic analysis using the City’s updated hydraulic model is recommended to confirm reservoir sizing and system hydraulics. The new facilities and related pipelines will be designed and constructed in accordance to the latest seismic codes and standards. 9.4.5.2 ST-02: West Hill 495 Storage Even with the existing reliable sources and reservoirs, the West Hill 495 Operational Area does not have sufficient storage through 2039. Excess storage located in the Valley Operational Area is sufficient to offset deficiencies in the West Hill 495. The Valley Operational Area has 1.04 MG of excess storage available by 2039, which can be reliably pumped to the West Hill 495 Operational Area via the new West Hill BPS. The City is currently planning on expanding capacity of the West Hill PS and adding a generator at the West Hill BPS as part of the West Hill BPS Improvement Project. Additionally, the City currently operates the tank with a 16 ft operational band, which equates to a 0.22-MG operational storage volume. It is recommended that the City update operational strategy and reduce the operational band thus decreasing the operational volume and helping to mitigate deficiencies. 9.4.6 Recommended General and on-going Projects and Programs Eleven general projects (G) were recommended for this CIP and are summarized in Table 9.13. Table 9.13 Recommended General Projects Summary Project Number Project Name Priority 20-year Total Cost(1) G-01 Reservoir Repair, Painting, Cathodic Protection Annual $ 3,000,000 G-02 Emergency Response Water Projects Annual $ 2,000,000 G-03 Pump Station Condition Evaluation (mechanical, structural, electrical) 0-10 years $ 300,000 G-04 Storage Condition Evaluation (structural, seismic) 0-10 years $ 400,000 G-05 Security Improvements Annual $ 200,000 G-06 Telemetry System and SCADA Upgrades Annual $ 1,000,000 G-07 PRV Rehabilitation Annual $ 2,000,000 G-08 Improvements to pipelines on bridge Annual $ 4,000,000 Total $ 12,900,000 Notes: (1) The cost includes 25 percent construction contingency and 30 percent engineer/legal/admin contingency. Abbreviation: SCADA - Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 09 9-16 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 9.4.6.1 G-01: Reservoir Repair, Painting, Cathodic Protection The Reservoir Repair, Painting, Cathodic Protection project (G-01) consists of a scheduled recoating of the interior and exterior surfaces of the existing steel standpipe and elevated tanks to extend the useful life of the structures. The project will also install seismic and safety upgrades and a cathodic protection system. The budget for this program is $150,000 per year for an estimated total of $3 million for the 20-year planning period. 9.4.6.2 G-02: Emergency Response Water Projects Under G-02, the City wishes to budget $100,000 per year for an estimated planning total of $2 million for any emergency response water projects that may arise or are currently unknown. 9.4.6.3 G-03: Pump Station Condition Evaluation The City is recommended to perform a condition evaluation of their existing pump stations in the short term. Any pump stations constructed before 1985 are anticipated to require replacement or repair within the planning period. The Pump Station Condition Evaluation (G-03) is estimated to cost $300,000. The outcome of this evaluation will result in pump station rehabilitation projects and recommend emergency power supply for the remaining pump station without emergency supply. This will result in the design and installation of upgrades and/or replacement of mechanical and electrical equipment, correcting deficiencies to pump buildings including the installation of backup power supply with auto-start transfer switches. The goal for these recommendations is to extend the useful life of the pump stations reduces the likelihood of pump failures and unplanned service interruptions for fire protection and for domestic uses. 9.4.6.4 G-04: Storage Condition Evaluation The City is recommended to also perform a condition evaluation of its existing storage reservoirs since those that were constructed before 1975 may need to be replaced, repaired, or recoated within the planning period. G-01 is included as a capital project for potential costs and necessary repairs resulting from this storage evaluation. The Storage Condition Evaluation (G-04) is a study recommended in the short term and $400,000 was allocated to this effort in the CIP. 9.4.6.5 G-05: Security Improvements This project plans, designs, and installs security improvements to the existing water system facilities according to findings and recommendations derived from the security vulnerability assessment. The budget for the Security Improvements program (G-05) is $10,000 per year for a total of $200,000 during the planning period. 9.4.6.6 G-06: Telemetry System and SCADA Upgrades This project systematically replaces the remote telemetry units (RTUs) in the City’s various water facilities. Currently, some replacement parts for the existing RTUs are unavailable and, in any case, the City should be prepared with replacement units should the original system’s manufacturers go out of business. This project also designs, reconfigures, programs, and conducts functional testing on the master telemetry unit (MTU) and the human-machine interface (HMI) in the City’s operation and maintenance headquarters. CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-17 The Telemetry System and SCADA Upgrades project (G-06) will occur on a 5-year cycle and is estimated to cost $50,000 per year for a total cost of $1 million during the planning period. 9.4.6.7 G-07: PRV Rehabilitation This program consists of the rehabilitation and replacement of 45 existing PRV’s throughout the system. The improvements include the verification of the sizing and set points of the PRV’s based on the hydraulic model analysis of the system, adequacy of pressure relief valves, metering, and integration with the City’s SCADA system. The replacement criteria and schedule will be determined based on a PRV rehabilitation and replacement study that will be completed the City by June 2020. The City is recommended to continue its PRV rehabilitation and maintenance program for its 45 PRVS, which are critical pieces of its distribution system. The PRV Rehabilitation project is budgeted $100,000 per year for an estimated total of $2 million for the planning period. 9.4.6.8 G-08: Improvements to Pipelines on Bridge This program consists of the replacement of existing water mains located under existing bridges that are going to be retrofitted as part of the City’s Transportation Division capital improvement plan. The City owns and maintains the following water mains on bridges: • One 12-inch water main on the Logan Ave N bridge. • One 8-inch water main on the Williams Ave S bridge. • Two 18-inch water mains on the Wells Ave S bridge. • One 8-inch water main on the Bronson Way S bridge. • One 16-inch water main on the Houser Way S bridge. • One 16-inch water main on the SW 43rd St bridge. • One 24-inch water main on the SW 43rd St bridge. The Improvements to Pipelines on Bridge project (G-08) evaluates the condition and seismic resiliency of these locations, as well as makes seismic improvements and repairs as necessary. This project is budgeted $200,000 per year for an estimated total of $4 million for the planning period. 9.4.7 Recommended Regulatory Compliance Projects Three regulatory Compliance projects (R) were recommended for this CIP and are summarized in Table 9.14. Table 9.14 Recommended Regulatory Compliance Projects Summary Project Number Project Name Priority 20-year Total Cost(1) R-01 Water Quality Compliance Projects Annual $ 4,000,000 R-02 Water Conservation Program Implementation Annual $ 4,000,000 R-03 Water System Plan 0-10 years and 10-20 years $ 800,000 9.4.7.1 R-01: Water Quality Compliance Projects A budget of $200,000 per year for regulatory compliance projects (R-01) is recommended to be set aside for an estimated total of $4 million for the 20-year planning period. CITY OF RENTON | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 09 9-18 | MAY 2021 | FINAL 9.4.7.2 R-02: Water Conservation Program Implementation As recommended in Chapter 4, the Water Use Efficiency (WUE) rule, given the number of connections the City has, requires the City to evaluate or implement efforts for nine measures of its choice. These measures support the City’s proposed goals for water use efficiency, in addition to the mandatory measures. The selected measures are as follows: • Water bill consumption history. • School outreach. • Utility bill inserts. • Natural yard care workshops. • Advertising and public outreach. • City demonstration garden. • WashWise washing machine rebates. • Hose gaskets. • Web page. A budget of $200,000 per year was allocated to the Water Conservation Program Implementation project (R-02) in the CIP for a total estimated cost of $4 million for the 20-year planning period. 9.4.7.3 R-03: Water System Plan The Water System Plan project (R-03) includes the development of 10-year and 20-year updates to the City’s Plan. Each plan is estimated to cost $400,000 for a total of $800,000 in the planning period. 9.4.8 Other Projects - Future Reservoirs to Increase Storage and Enhance Operational Flexibility The City can meet its future storage requirements by adding new reservoirs and replacing its existing reservoirs. To improve operational flexibility and redundancy in the distribution system, the City plans to install larger reservoirs in the future by maximizing their footprints within the current City-owned properties. These larger reservoirs will provide added reliability when the City needs to take an existing reservoir out of service for maintenance. These projects will need siting studies and property acquisition if necessary, hydraulic analysis and reservoir sizing, pre-design, final design and construction of storage facilities to increase storage in the water system operational areas to meet growth demand projection and to provide operational reliability and flexibility. The new facilities and related pipelines will be designed and constructed in accordance to the latest seismic codes and standards. The following projects were identified for this effort. Proposed reservoir sizes will be confirmed during pre-design. These projects are planned for the long term (past our planning period of 20 years) and no detailed costs were developed at this time. 9.4.8.1 Blackriver Reservoir – Valley 196 PZ This project acquires property and then plans, designs, constructs a new reservoir in the Valley 196 PZ to provide the City with additional storage along with operational flexibility, reliability, and redundancy of system capacity in case the City needs to take the existing North Talbot Reservoir out of service for maintenance. The new Blackriver Reservoir will supplement the storage that the North Talbot and Mt. Olivet Reservoirs provide to this operational area. The proposed reservoir size will be confirmed during the project’s pre-design. CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-19 In 2011, the City completed a site assessment and geotechnical investigations of a potential site in the Blackriver Quarry. A pre-design report was completed for a proposed 6.6-MG reservoir and related transmission main. 9.4.8.2 Replacement of Existing Mt. Olivet Reservoir and Pump Station – Valley 196 PZ This project plans, designs, and constructs the replacement of the existing 3-MG Mt. Olivet Reservoir and Pump Station, which were constructed in 1954. This reservoir provides storage to the Valley’s operational area and, once replaced, will supplement the storage that the North Talbot and future Blackriver Reservoirs provide to this operational area. In the past, the City recoated the existing tank’s interior and exterior and installed a cathodic protection system to extend its useful life. The City plans to replace the existing reservoir with a new 7-MG tank. In addition, the booster pump station will be replaced with two 150-hp and two 125-hp pumps, with a total capacity of 9,000-gpm. The reservoir size and pump sizes will be confirmed during the project’s pre-design. 9.5 CIP Program Detailed Summary The summary table in Section 9.1 summarizes the CIP projects and labels them as D, P, PZ, PS, ST, G, or R. As mentioned before, each project is assigned a CIP Identification. Table 9.15 details all projects identified and defined in this chapter and identifies the planning period (short-term, long-term, or annual) determined for each project and project type. Figure 9.3 illustrates the locations of the specific projects identified, while Figure 9.4 illustrates these projects phased between short and long terms. Distribution system improvements highlighted on Figure 9.3 includes both fire flow and velocity recommendations. Figure 9.5 and Figure 9.6 illustrate the location of projects included in the programmatic CIP, which are not included in any of the specific projects. Figure 9.5 presents City’s recommended program P-01, while Figure 9.6 presents City’s recommended program P-03. An individual project sheet was generated for each CIP project and includes project identifier, description, costs, project type, timeline, and comments to help with future implementation. To help the City identify individual projects, project sheets are separated by project category. Appendix T includes all the project sheets. Last Revised: February 15, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig9_3_CIPSpecific.mxd Figure 9.3 Recommended Specific CIP Projects !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 UUT XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd?æ ?Å ?ç PS-02 PS-03 * Projects D-01, D-03, and D-08 were identified as part of both the system analysis and the recommendations made by City staff for maintenance projects. ST-01 ST-01 !5 D-07 D-05 D-11 D - 0 8 *D-07D-12D-15D-01*D-14D-08*D-02D-06 D-13 D - 0 9 D-10D - 0 3 *D-04PZ-01PZ-02ST-01 ST-02 PS-01 D-21 D-16 D-17 D-18 D-03 D-20 D-08 D-22 D-19 LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger XÚ Recommended Improvements Pump Station Projects Highlands 445 Pressure Zone Projects Distribution SystemImprovement Projects Storage ProjectsUUT Maintenance-IdentifiedPipeline Projects CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Pump Station for Storage ProjectsXÚ City Limits Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig9_4_CIPPriority.mxd CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 9.4 CIP Specific Project Priority !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ XÚ UUT UUT East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç PS-02 * Projects D-01, D-03, and D-08 are also identified as part of the condition assessment project. This map only includes the portion related to Fire Flow. Total CIP projects are larger than shown when combined with condition projectsGreen River TrailGreen River Trail!5 D-07 D-05 D-11 D-07D-12D-15D-01*D-14D-08*D-02D-06 D-13 D - 0 9 D-10D - 0 3 *D-04PZ-01PZ-02LT-01 ST-02 PS-01 D-16 D-17 D-18 D-03 D-20 D-21 D-08 D-22 D-19 ST-01 ST-01 LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger CIP Project Priority Highlands 445 UUT Short term Storage Projects Short term Pipeline Projects Long term Pipeline Projects UUT Long term Storage Projects XÚ XÚ Short term Pump Station Projects Long term Pump Station Projects City Limits Emergency Intertie!5 !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig9-5P01DeadEnd3000FFProgram.mxd Figure 9.5 P-01: Dead-end 3,000 gpm Fire Flow Program O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Water Main by Diameter Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( 6 inches and smaller 8 - 14 inches 16 inches and larger Dead-End 3,000gpm Fire Flow Program Highlands 445 CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON City Limits Last Revised: February 08, 2021 \\io-fs-1\Data\GIS\GISBackup\Renton\WaterSystemPlan2017\Fig9_6_P03RemainingUsefulLife.mxd CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON Figure 9.6 P-03: Remaining Useful Life !W(!W( !W( !W( !W(!W(!W(!W(!W( !W( !W( X7 X7 X7 WTP WTP WTP UUTUUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUT UUTUUT UUT UUTUUT UUT XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚ XÚ XÚXÚXÚ XÚXÚXÚXÚXÚXÚ !5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5!5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !5 !5!5 !5 !5 !S(!S( "5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5"5 "5 "5"5 "5"5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 "5 East Valley RdRainier Ave NS 133rd St Oakesdale Ave SWBenson D r S SW 7th St 140th Ave SEN E S u n set Blvd §¨¦405 Map l e V a l l e y H w y 164th Ave SESE Jones Rd Lake Youngs Service RdSE May Valle y R d Union Ave NESE Petrovitsky Rd Rolling HillsReservoirs 490 (3 MG)and 590 (0.3 MG) Springbrook SpringsInfiltration Galleries Springbrook SpringsTreatment Plant South Talbot Reservoir Kent Intertie TukwilaIntertie Bow LakePipeline SPU Station #33 SPUStation#34 FredNelsonBPS North Talbot BPSNorth TalbotReservoir Tiffany Park BPS RollingHills BPS MaplewoodChlorinationFacilityMaplewoodClearwell MaplewoodBPS PW-12 PW-11PW-17 Mt OlivetReservoir& BPS MonroeAvenue BPS WD 90Intertie HouserWay BPS RW-1,2 & 3 Renton/Seattle IntertiePW-8 PW-9EW-3RBoeing PlantMeter - Eastand West West HillReservoirDimmit BPS SkywayWholesale West Hill BPS Highlands BPS Highlands 6.3 MG445 Reservoir Highlands0.75 MG565 Reservoir Hazen Reservoir PW-5A Coal Creek Intertie PW-4 SouthTalbot BPS SPU Station #39 Kennydale 308Reservoir ?æ ?Å ?ç LakeBoren LakeDesire Lake Youngs ShadyLake PantherLake LakeWashington O 0 3,0001,500 Feet Disclaimer: Features shown in this figure are for planning purposes and represent approximate locations. Engineering and/or survey accuracy is not implied. Data Sources: City of Renton "5 Legend XÚ Pump Station UUT Reservoir Retail Service Area Waterbody Pressure Zone Name Valley 196 West Hill 495 Earlington 370 West Hill 300 Highlands 565 Rolling Hills 490 East Talbot Hill 300 Rolling Hills 590 Rolling Hills 395 Talbot Hill 350 West Talbot Hill 300 Talbot Hill 270 !5 Intertie !5 Emergency Intertie Pressure Reducing Station Parcel Water Treatment Plant Kennydale 308 Kennydale 218 Scenic Hill 370 X7WTP Spring Production Well!W( !S( Highlands 445 Remaining Useful Life Program 0-10 years (High Priority) 0-10 years (Lower Priority) 10-20 years Water Main Replacement Target City Limits CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-29 Table 9.15 CIP Recommended Projects Summary Total Cost Distribution Piping $ 21,511,000 Pressure Zone Rezoning $ 425,000 Annual Programs $ 58,752,000 Pump Stations $ 4,505,000 Storage $ 17,395,000 General $ 12,900,000 Regulatory $ 8,800,000 TOTAL $ 124,288,000 CIP ID 2012 Plan ID Project Name Improvement Type Pipe Length (LF) Proposed Size Units Project Priority Total Cost Distribution Piping D-01 R-33 NE 10th Place Pipe Upsize Upsize 1,030 8 Inches 0-10 years $ 502,000 D-02 n/a Ferndale Place NE Pipe Upsize Upsize 500 8 Inches 0-10 years $ 244,000 D-03 R-27 Windsor Hills Pipe Project Upsize 6,850 8 Inches 0-10 years $ 3,339,000 D-04 R-20 Sunset Blvd N Pipe Upsize Upsize 1,800 10 Inches 10-20 years $ 1,024,000 D-05 R-7 Maplewood Place SE Pipe Upsize Upsize 1,200 8 Inches 10-20 years $ 585,000 D-06 R-25 NW 4th St Pipe Upsize Upsize 210 8 Inches 10-20 years $ 102,000 D-07 R-24 R-26 SW Sunset Blvd at Crestview Apartments Pipe Upsize Upsize / New PRV 30 12 Inches 10-20 years $ 345,000 D-08 R-11 R-14 R-16 Downtown Renton Pipe Project Upsize/Replace 5,900 8 Inches 0-10 years $ 2,876,000 D-09 n/a Glenwood Ave NE Pipe Upsize Upsize 850 8 Inches 10-20 years $ 414,000 D-10 R-4 S 178th St Pipe Upsize Upsize 460 8 Inches 10-20 years $ 224,000 D-11 R-35 N 4th St Pipe Upsize Upsize 120 8 Inches 0-10 years $ 59,000 D-12 R-1 Hydrant Lateral Connection at Benson Condominium Change hydrant lateral connection 50 8 Inches 10-20 years $ 24,000 D-13 n/a S 17th St Pipe Upsize Upsize 630 8 Inches 10-20 years $ 309,000 D-14 n/a Hydrant Lateral Connection on Sunset Blvd NE Change hydrant lateral connection 20 8 Inches 10-20 years $ 10,000 D-15 n/a Maple Valley Hwy Pipe Upsize at Henry Moses Aquatic Center Upsize 70 12 Inches 10-20 years $ 46,000 D-16 n/a Maintenance Condition Project: Kennydale (NE 24th) Replace 1,670 8 & 12 Inches 0-10 years $ 1,024,000 D-17 n/a Maintenance Condition Project: Highlands Reservoir to Queen Ave NE Replace 1,400 8 Inches 0-10 years $ 683,000 D-18 n/a Maintenance Condition Project: Monroe Ave NE Replace 2,970 8 Inches 0-10 years $ 1,448,000 D-19 n/a Maintenance Condition Project: Shattuck Ave S Replace 490 8 Inches 0-10 years $ 239,000 D-20 n/a Maintenance Condition Project: Garden Ave N Replace 2,500 12 Inches 0-10 years $ 1,625,000 D-21 n/a Maintenance Condition Project: West Hill Replace 1,440 8 Inches 0-10 years $ 703,000 D-22 n/a Maintenance Condition Project: Tiffany Park Area Replace 11,190 8 & 12 Inches 0-10 years $ 5,686,000 Pressure Zone Rezoning PZ-01 R-29 HLD 445/565 Pipe Reconfiguration 1,200 12 Inches 10-20 years $ 325,000 PZ-02 n/a VLY196 Re-zone 300 12 Inches 0-10 years $ 100,000 Annual R&R Programs P-01 R-34 R-6 R-19 R-3 R-2 Dead-end 3,000 gpm fire flow program (see Figure 9.5) n/a n/a n/a 10-20 years $ - P-02 n/a Dead-end 1,000 gpm fire flow program n/a 2,370 8 Inches 0-10 years $ 1,155,000 P-03 Pipeline R&R Program (High Priority, see Figure 9.6) Replace 116,120 n/a Annual $ 57,597,000 Pump Stations PS-01 Monroe Ave BPS Generator Pump Station n/a 125 hp 0-10 years $ 488,000 PS-02 West Hill BPS Pump Station n/a n/a 0-10 years $ 1,842,000 PS-03 South Talbot BPS Pump Station n/a n/a 0-10 years $ 2,175,000 CHAPTER 09 | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 9-31 Table 9.15 CIP Recommended Projects (continued) CIP ID 2012 Plan ID Project Name Improvement Type Pipe Length (LF) Proposed Size Units Project Priority Total Cost Storage ST-01 Rolling Hills 590 Storage Storage n/a n/a 0-20 years $ 17,395,000 ST-02 West Hill 495 Storage Storage n/a n/a 0-10 years $ - General G-01 Reservoir Repair, Painting, Cathodic Protection General 20 Years Annual $ 3,000,000 G-02 Emergency Response Water Projects General 20 Years Annual $ 2,000,000 G-03 Pump Station Condition Evaluation (mechanical, structure, electrical) General 1 Study 0-10 years $ 300,000 G-04 Storage Condition Evaluation (structural, seismic) General 1 Study 0-10 years $ 400,000 G-05 Security Improvements General 20 Years Annual $ 200,000 G-06 Telemetry System and SCADA Upgrades General 20 Years Annual $ 1,000,000 G-07 PRV Rehabilitation General 20 Years Annual $ 2,000,000 G-08 Improvements to pipelines on bridge General 20 Years Annual $ 4,000,000 Regulatory R-01 Regulatory Compliance Projects General 20 Years Annual $ 4,000,000 R-02 Water Conservation Program Implementation General 20 Years Annual $ 4,000,000 R-03 Water System Plan General 2 Plans $ 800,000 CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 10-1 Chapter 10 FINANCIAL PROGRAM 10.1 Introduction This chapter summarizes the City of Renton’s (City) financial status and provides a cursory evaluation of its ability to finance the necessary capital improvements identified in the capital improvement plan (CIP). The following sections present the financial status of the City’s Water Utility, the funding required to finance the scheduled improvements, potential funding sources, and the impact that water system improvements will have on user rates. 10.2 Historical Financial Performance The City accounts for its water revenues and other funding sources in two main separate funds: Fund 405 (Operating Fund) and Fund 425 (Construction Fund). The Finance Department maintains the financial records for the Water Utility, and both the Finance Department and the Public Works Department monitor and evaluate the Water Utility’s fiscal performance. 10.2.1 Rates The City serves meter sizes ranging from 3/4 to 12 inches under the following customer classes: • Single family. • Multi-family. • Non-residential. • Private irrigation. • City irrigation. • Hydrant meter. The City offers reduced rates for water, wastewater, surface water, and garbage for low-income senior citizens (61 years of age and over), and low-income disabled citizens. Additional information can be found here: https://rentonwa.gov/city_hall/administrative_services/finance/utility_billing/reduced_rates_and _tax_rebate#:~:text=CITY%20OF%20RENTON%20WASHINGTON&text=The%20City%20of%2 0Renton%20offers,who%20meet%20these%20same%20qualifications 10.2.1.1 Monthly Base Rates and Charges Table 10.1 shows the City’s monthly base service charges for the calendar year (CY) 2019 and CY 2020. The rates shall be adjusted on January 1 of each year. CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-2 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Table 10.1 CY 2019 and CY 2020 Monthly Base Service Charges Meter Size Basic Charge Charge for Irrigation Fire Meter 2019 2020 2019 2020 2019 2020 3/4” $17.60 $17.95 $10.58 $10.79 n/a n/a 1” $34.89 $35.59 $18.92 $19.30 $6.27 $6.40 1-1/2” $67.33 $68.68 $32.29 $32.94 $7.01 $7.15 2” $105.52 $107.63 $49.46 $50.45 $9.01 $9.19 3” $216.81 $221.15 $104.57 $106.66 $23.79 $24.27 4” $330.75 $337.37 $155.65 $158.76 $29.27 $29.86 6” $645.28 $658.19 $294.81 $300.71 $42.06 $42.90 8” $1,262.94 $1,288.20 $645.13 $658.03 $56.65 $57.78 10” $1,882.63 $1,920.28 $829.55 $846.14 $73.08 $74.54 12” $2,739.86 $2,794.66 $1,197.90 $1,221.86 $87.68 $89.43 Note: (1) 2019 City of Renton Utility Rates Brochure and 2020 City of Renton Utility Rates Brochure. 10.2.1.2 Commodity Rates In addition to monthly base services charges, customers pay a usage-based charge per water consumed in 100 cubic feet (CCF). Table 10.2 compares CY 2019 and CY 2020 commodity rates the City charges its water customers. Single family customers are charged based on a three-tier inclining block-rate structure. Multi-family, non-residential, private irrigation, City irrigation, and hydrant meter customers pay a unique uniform rate per CCF. Table 10.2 CY 2019 and CY 2020 Commodity Rates Class Type CY 2019 CY 2020 Single Family Less than 500 cf per month $2.54/ CCF $2.59/ CCF 500 - 1,000 cf per month $3.41/ CCF $3.48/ CCF Over 1,000 cf per month $4.30/ CCF $4.39/ CCF Multi-Family $3.29/ CCF $3.36/ CCF Non-Residential $3.48/ CCF $3.55/ CCF Private Irrigation $5.58/ CCF $5.69/ CCF City Irrigation $3.92/ CCF $4.00/ CCF Hydrant Meter $5.58/ CCF $5.69/ CCF Note: Abbreviation: cf – cubic feet. (1) 1 ccf = 748 gallons 10.2.2 Financial Operations Based on the information provided, the Water Utility’s revenues and expenditures in the period from CY 2016 to CY 2019 are summarized in Tables 10.3 and 10.4. Other Revenues in Table 10.3 include debt proceeds, reimbursements, transfer-in funds from other departments, and other miscellaneous revenues. A total debt of $8 million was issued in CY 2016 and CY 2017, resulting in higher revenues. CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 10-3 Over the last 3 years, the City’s water fund balance, which represents the total unexpended resources carried forward to future years, increased from $28.5 million to $38.0 million. CY 2019’s estimated ending balance of $7.2 million indicates that the City starts using the reserve to fund capital project expenditures in CY 2019. Table 10.3 Summary of Historical Revenues Revenues CY 2016 CY 2017 CY 2018 CY 2019 (Estimated) Service Charges $16,885,230 $17,270,694 $17,478,657 $17,843,483 Other Revenues 5,332,306 4,228,275 932,288 597,709 Interdepartmental 13,961 - - - Total: $22,231,497 $21,498,969 $18,410,945 $18,441,192 Fund Reserve Ending Balances $28,512,792 $33,897,303 $37,986,499 $7,206,612 Table 10.4 Summary of Historical Expenditures Expenditures CY 2016 CY 2017 CY 2018 CY 2019 (Estimated) Fund 405: Water Utility Billing $118,176 $156,221 $160,368 $185,707 Fund 405: Water Utility Admin 283,042 309,018 346,858 410,037 Fund 405: Engineering 9,452,384 8,386,699 5,186,161 5,770,669 Fund 405: Maintenance 5,623,549 5,932,879 5,960,807 6,227,377 Fund 405: Water Conservation 98,964 157,837 133,728 138,000 Total: $15,576,114 $14,942,654 $11,787,922 $12,731,791 Debt-Service Payments 238,086 300,140 1,401,997 1,435,173 Total including Debt Service: $15,814,199 $15,242,794 $13,189,919 $14,166,963 Figure 10.1 shows a graphical representation of the Water Utility’s historical financial performance. Due to the debt proceeds, revenues were higher in CY 2016 and CY 2017 than those of later years. As illustrated in the figure, expenditures rose in CY 2019 because of increased capital spending, and not enough revenue is generated to fund upcoming capital project expenditures without a drawdown on reserves. CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-4 | MAY 2021 | FINAL Figure 10.1 Historical Revenues vs Expenses 10.2.3 Outstanding Debt In the past, the City’s Water Utility funded a share of capital projects using debt and currently holds the following outstanding bonds: • 2012 Water/Sewer Refunding Revenue Bonds (2004): Principal and interest payments averaging approximately $265,000 per year from CY 2020 to CY 2022 and $853,000 per year from CY 2023 to CY 2027. • 2016 Water/Sewer Refunding Revenue Bonds (2008A): Principal and interest payments averaging approximately $502,000 per year, ending in 2027. • 2017 Water/Sewer Refunding Revenue Bonds (2007 & 2007 [02]): Principal and interest payments averaging approximately $693,000 per year, ending in 2022. The Water Utility’s debt-service coverage ratio (DSCR) is calculated by dividing the net income (revenues less expenses) by the annual debt-service payment. The City’s current bond documents require a DSCR of 1.25, meaning the City is required to have sufficient funds to meet all ongoing O&M expenses, as well as 1.25 times the total annual debt service payment. In practice, the City has maintained a coverage factor well above the requirement due to its relatively small amount of debt. 10.3 Methodology The financial sufficiency evaluation developed for this chapter aims to determine whether existing and adopted rates are sufficient to cover the capital program developed as a part of Master Plan and, if not, the level of rate increases that would be required to do so. The evaluation relies on a revenue requirements analysis, which is used to test revenue sufficiency against expected revenue needs. CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 10-5 10.3.1 Financial Sufficiency Tests There are two tests used to define the annual revenues necessary to provide both sufficient (1) cash flow, and (2) debt coverage. These sufficiency tests are commonly used to determine the amount of annual revenue that must be generated from an agency’s rates: • Cash Flow Sufficiency Test defines the amount of annual revenue that a utility must generate in order to meet annual expenditure obligations. In the same lieu, the cash-flow test identifies projected cash requirements in each year. Cash requirements include operations and maintenance (O&M) expenses, debt-service payments, policy-driven additions to working capital, miscellaneous capital outlays, and rate-funded capital expenditures. These expenses are compared to the total annual projected revenues, and shortfalls are used to calculate the needed rate increases. In this analysis, the cash flow test is the driver of the rate increase. • Debt-Coverage Test refers to the collection of revenues to meet all operating expenses, debt service payments, and debt service obligations, such as DSCR. The debt-coverage test measures an agency’s ability to meet policy-driven revenue obligations. Currently, the City holds three outstanding debt obligations and does not have any plans to issue additional debt to fund capital projects in the near future. Typical DSCRs range from 1.10x to 1.35x depending on an agency’s financial situation and the type of debt being issued. For this analysis, the debt coverage test was set to meet a 1.25x DSCR based on the City’s outstanding bond’s requirements, meaning that the City must collect sufficient revenue through user rates to meet all on-going O&M expenses, as well as 1.25 times the total debt-service requirements due each year. The debt coverage test was sufficient in this analysis. 10.3.2 Assumptions and Inputs Financial projections in this analysis relied on the following assumptions and inputs: • Customer, demand, and revenue growth: Based on the Chapter 3, the demand is expected to increase 1.5 percent per year in average from CY 2020 to CY 2029. However, the City requested that revenue growth in the financial model be equal to the expected growth in retail customers, which is conservatively assumed as 0.5 percent per year. • Non-rate revenues: Given general inflation, interest and other revenue sources are anticipated to grow by 3 percent per year from CY 2020 to CY 2029. • O&M cost projection: O&M costs are expected to increase annually by 3 percent from CY 2020 to CY 2029 according to historical trends and projected benefit cost increases in the Seattle Consumer Price Index (CPI-U). • CIP costs: Capital improvement construction costs are escalated annually by 3 percent over the CIP’s 10-year period to account for inflationary increases in construction costs. • Debt-coverage ratio: The debt coverage test was set to meet a 1.25x coverage ratio per the City’s outstanding debt obligations. • Reserve target: Based on the City’s input, the target reserve’s ending balance is estimated at 90 days (24.7 percent) of annual O&M expenses. CY 2019’s ending fund balance of $7.2 million was used in the analysis. • Financing assumptions: The following assumptions were used for possible debt issuances: - Interest rate: 4 percent. CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-6 | MAY 2021 | FINAL - Loan period: 20 years. - Issuance costs: 1 percent. • Existing debt: The City provided annual debt-service expenses for current outstanding revenue bond issues. 10.3.3 CIP Funding Strategy Scenarios Three funding strategy scenarios were developed to evaluate the 10-year CIP’s impact on the Water Utility’s financial status. Each scenario assumes a different amount of debt to fund the CIP projects. All scenarios include the expected debt issuance with the financing assumptions mentioned above: • Scenario 1, PAYGO (No Additional Debt): This scenario assumes that all 10-year CIP projects are funded by Pay-As-You-Go (PAYGO), using revenues from user rates and available reserves. The City has indicated that this is the preferred scenario as it hopes to no longer rely on debt as a means of controlling long-term expenses. • Scenario 2, Maximized Additional Debt: This scenario maximizes the use of debt to mitigate rate increases in the short term. The first additional debt issuance would be needed in CY 2022 with debt proceeds needed every 3 years of the analysis. • Scenario 3, Moderate Additional Debt: This scenario assumes that rate increases are front loaded in the first 5 years of the analysis, then additional debt issuances are used to smooth out peaks in CIP spending. The first additional debt issuance would be required in CY 2021 and another in CY 2025. The City has indicated that Scenarios 1 or 3 are the preferred scenarios as they would decrease reliance on debt. All three scenarios are detailed in Section 10.5. 10.4 Financial Projections Financial projections from CY 2020 through CY 2029 were developed using the assumptions and inputs described above, as well as other inputs provided by the City or developed for the project. All three scenarios used the same assumptions for O&M costs, capital expenditures, and most offsetting revenues (all except interest earnings). The financial forecast gives the City a snapshot of its current financial status. As numerous assumptions were made for analysis, projected results can vary from the actual data depending on factors such as actual customer use, demand projection, and growth. Therefore, this high-level projection should be updated and evaluated during future City budget development to confirm the assumptions and adjust as needed. 10.4.1 O&M Cost Projections Common to all scenarios, projected O&M costs are expenditures that the City incurs for day-to-day operations such as employee salaries and benefits, fuel, chemicals, and power. The City’s CY 2020 operating budget served as the basis for forecasting the future operating expenses for each utility. The budget was compared to actual financial information from the previous year to identify any anomalies or one-time expenditures that are not useful to the present projections. Table 10.5 presents the projected O&M costs for the 10-year analysis period. CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 | 10-7 10.4.2 CIP Expenditures Table 10.6 presents the expenditures of short-term CIP projects identified in Chapter 9. All listed projects are “replacement and rehabilitation” related to existing infrastructure. This analysis organized projects based on priority and broke them down further into the following seven project types: • Distribution piping. • Pressure zone. • Annual repair and replacement programs. • Pump stations. • Storage. • General. • Regulatory. Each project total is spread out throughout the anticipated project years. Costs are escalated at 3 percent per year from CY 2020. Funding these CIPs is a primary driver for future rate increases and/or debt issuances. 10.4.3 Fund Balance and Reserves The City currently holds reserves that have been generated through user rates and other revenue sources. Based on the data provided by the City, money is held and tracked in the following separate funds: • Fund 405 (Operating Fund). This fund was created in 2006 to identify water utility revenues and expenses. Revenue sources for this fund are generally from water sales and collections but also include plan review and inspection fees, water meter installation fees, utility billing fees, rent and leases, and inter-fund reimbursements from other City’s departments for services provided. Expenses include O&M, debt service payments for Public Works Trust Fund (PWTF) loans, revenue bonds, taxes, and transfers to the Construction Fund. • Fund 425 (Construction Fund) is held for the design, construction, and project management of capital improvement projects. Revenues from this fund include transfers from the Operating Fund, special assessment fees, system development charges, water connection charges, City issued bonds, proceeds from revenue bonds, proceeds from PWTF loans, and from Community, trade, and economic development grants. The starting fund balance included in the analysis is based on each fund’s ending balance in CY 2019: $6 million in the Operating Fund and $1.2 million in the Construction Fund for a total of $7.2 million. Projected reserve balances for each funding strategy scenario vary year-to-year based on fluctuations in capital spending. The total target is typically made up of several components, which may include an operating reserve, capital reserves, rate stabilization reserves, debt service reserves. The City’s reserve target is 60 to 90 days. CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-8 | MAY 2021 | DRAFT Table 10.5 O&M Cost Projections CY 2020 CY 2021 CY 2022 CY 2023 CY 2024 CY 2025 CY 2026 CY 2027 CY 2028 CY 2029 Fund 405: Water Utility Billing $192,444 $197,815 $203,337 $209,015 $214,853 $220,854 $227,025 $233,370 $239,893 $246,600 Fund 405: Water Utility Admin 466,687 478,896 491,427 504,288 517,488 531,035 544,940 559,211 573,858 588,891 Fund 405: Water Engineering 5,862,038 6,014,140 6,170,211 6,330,356 6,494,680 6,663,295 6,836,313 7,013,849 7,196,022 7,382,954 Fund 405: Water Maintenance 6,467,097 6,641,988 6,821,647 7,006,206 7,195,800 7,390,567 7,590,649 7,796,193 8,007,348 8,224,270 Fund 405: Water Conservation 163,515 167,603 171,793 176,088 180,490 185,002 189,627 194,368 199,227 204,208 TOTAL O&M EXPENDITURES $13,151,781 $13,500,443 $13,858,416 $14,225,953 $14,603,311 $14,990,754 $15,388,554 $15,796,989 $16,216,348 $16,646,923 CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON DRAFT | MAY 2021 | 10-9 Table 10.6 Short-Term CIP Expenditures (Escalated) Capital Projects CY 2020 CY 2021 CY 2022 CY 2023 CY 2024 CY 2025 CY 2026 CY 2027 CY 2028 CY 2029 Distribution Piping $1,700,000 $1,973,223 $2,291,279 $2,093,392 $2,946,863 $2,118,863 $2,182,429 $2,667,699 $1,582,935 $1,362,618 Pressure Zone Rezoning 100,000 - - - - - - - - - Annual Programs 2,995,350 3,085,211 3,177,767 3,273,100 3,371,293 3,472,432 3,576,605 3,683,903 3,794,420 3,908,252 Pump Stations - 632,420 651,393 670,934 815,994 840,474 865,688 - - 636,729 Storage - - - - - - - 1,135,584 1,169,651 1,204,741 General 610,000 628,300 647,149 666,563 686,560 1,054,939 1,205,993 750,223 772,730 795,912 Regulatory 400,000 412,000 424,360 437,091 450,204 463,710 477,621 491,950 506,708 1,043,819 TOTAL CIP Expenditures (2020 Dollars) $5,805,350 $6,731,153 $7,191,947 $7,141,080 $8,270,914 $7,950,418 $8,308,335 $8,729,358 $7,826,443 $8,952,071 CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-10 | MAY 2021 | DRAFT 10.5 Findings and Results This section summarizes the results of the financial sufficiency evaluation according to the three funding strategy scenarios introduced in Section 10.3.3. 10.5.1 Projection Results without Rate Increases Figure 10.2 summarizes the Water Utility’s overall financial forecast, assuming that no further rate increases (beyond the CY 2020) are implemented. O&M expenditures and revenues increase with the escalator factors discussed earlier. With no additional debt issuances, the current debt-service payments will end in CY 2027. If the CIP is implemented as scheduled without any debt issuances or rate increases, reserve levels would begin to drop in CY 2020 and be fully depleted by CY 2023, meaning the City will not be able to fund future capital investments. Figure 10.2 Ten-Year Financial Forecast Without Rate Increases or Additional Debt Issuances The following sections present the three funding scenarios, their results, and the necessary rate increases required to implement them. 10.5.2 Scenario 1- PAYGO (No Additional Debt) Scenario 1 assumes that all 10-year CIP projects are PAYGO-funded, and no additional debt would be issued. Figure 10.3 shows the cash funding required to pay a total of $76.9 million over the 10-year analysis period. Figure 10.4 presents the annual rate increases required to fully implement the CIP. The compounded rate increase over the 10-year projection period would be approximately 32.8 percent. CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON DRAFT | MAY 2021 | 10-11 Figure 10.3 Scenario 1 (PAYGO) Capital Funding Sources Figure 10.4 Scenario 1 (PAYGO) Rate Increases Under Scenario 1, user rates would increase in the initial years to build the financial capacity necessary to fund CIP expenditures in peak years. Once that funding capacity begins to grow with the compounding effects of the rate increases, less severe increases could be implemented. Rate increases could also potentially be smoothed if the City elects to further decrease reserves in years with high levels of capital spending. CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-12 | MAY 2021 | DRAFT Figure 10.5 summarizes 10-year financial projection under Scenario 1. With the rate increases noted in Figure 10.4, the City would have sufficient cash available every year to fund capital projects. Figure 10.5 Scenario 1 (PAYGO) Financial Projection If the City ultimately decides to adopt a cash-funding model such as Scenario 1, prudent financial planning will be imperative to ensure that sufficient revenues or reserves are available every year and to avoid delaying projects. Table 10.7 summarizes the revenue requirement, cash flow, and fund balances for the next 10 years if Scenario 1 is implemented. CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON DRAFT | MAY 2021 | 10-13 Table 10.7 Scenario 1 (PAYGO) Revenue Requirement, Cash Flow, and Fund Balances CY 2020 CY 2021 CY 2022 CY 2023 CY 2024 CY 2025 CY 2026 CY 2027 CY 2028 CY 2029 Rate Increase 0.00% 5.00% 5.00% 5.00% 5.00% 5.00% 1.00% 1.00% 1.00% 1.00% Revenues Rate Revenues (w/o Rate Increase) $18,593,943 $18,686,912 $18,780,347 $18,874,249 $18,968,620 $19,063,463 $19,158,780 $19,254,574 $19,350,847 $19,447,601 Revenues From Rate Increase 0 934,346 1,924,986 2,975,053 4,087,856 5,266,883 5,537,738 5,813,626 6,094,630 6,380,830 Other Revenues 747,709 606,420 615,349 624,501 633,882 643,498 653,353 663,456 673,810 684,424 Total Revenues $19,341,652 $20,227,678 $21,320,681 $22,473,803 $23,690,358 $24,973,844 $25,349,871 $25,731,656 $26,119,287 $26,512,855 Expenditures Ongoing O&M Expenses (Fund 405) $13,151,781 $13,500,443 $13,858,416 $14,225,953 $14,603,311 $14,990,754 $15,388,554 $15,796,989 $16,216,348 $16,646,923 Rate-Funded Capital 4,582,497 3,811,047 5,788,836 6,982,473 8,270,914 7,950,418 8,308,335 8,729,358 7,826,443 7,450,276 Debt Service 1,428,121 1,427,106 1,426,554 1,393,919 1,393,115 1,391,509 1,394,051 1,393,173 0 0 Total Expenditures $19,162,400 $18,738,595 $21,073,806 $22,602,346 $24,267,340 $24,332,680 $25,090,940 $25,919,520 $24,042,791 $24,097,198 Operating Cash Flows $179,252 $1,489,083 $246,875 ($128,543) ($576,982) $641,163 $258,932 ($187,864) $2,076,496 $2,415,657 Beginning Fund Balance (405 & 425) $7,206,612 $6,163,011 $4,731,988 $3,575,751 $3,288,601 $2,711,619 $3,352,782 $3,611,714 $3,423,850 $5,500,346 Operating Cash Flows $179,252 $1,489,083 $246,875 ($128,543) ($576,982) $641,163 $258,932 ($187,864) $2,076,496 $2,415,657 Interest Earnings 175,000 53,478 43,580 33,231 27,457 24,001 24,258 27,858 28,142 35,697 Use of Reserves for Capital Projects (1,222,853) (2,920,106) (1,403,111) (158,607) - - - - - (1,501,795) Ending Fund Balance (405 & 425) $6,338,011 $4,785,466 $3,619,331 $3,321,832 $2,739,076 $3,376,783 $3,635,971 $3,451,708 $5,528,489 $6,449,905 CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-14 | MAY 2021 | DRAFT Given the rate increases discussed for Scenario 1, Figure 10.6 estimates the monthly bills for 3/4-inch meter single family residential customers with monthly use of 7 CCF for each year of the analysis: bills would increase from $48.65 in CY 2020 to $64.61 by CY 2029. After CY 2029, no further rate increases would likely be required to keep up with increases in O&M costs and continued capital investments. Figure 10.6 Scenario 1 (PAYGO) Estimated Single Family Residential (SFR) Monthly Bills 10.5.3 Scenario 2 – Maximum Additional Debt Scenario 2 assumes the maximized use of additional debt to fund CIP projects. The first additional debt issuance would need to take place in CY 2022, and debt proceeds for capital funding would be required in every 3 years thereafter. This heavy use of debt would allow the City to spread costs out over time to mitigate rate increases in the short term. Table 10.8 shows the projected required debt issuances, issuance costs associated with each issuance, and the estimated debt service payment. The Annual Debt Service in the table indicates average annual debt service payment during the analysis years (CY 2020 –2029). The actual debt service payment would vary each year. Table 10.8 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Projected Debt Issuances Year Proceeds Required (millions) Issuance Amount (millions) Annual Debt Service (millions) CY 2022 $6.50 $0.596 $0.454 CY 2025 $10.50 $0.963 $0.791 CY 2028 $6.50 $0.596 $0.522 Total $23.50 $0.256 Notes: (1) Totals may not sum due to rounding. (2) Issuance amount includes 1 percent issuance costs and a debt-service reserve requirement equal to 1 year of debt-service payments. CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON DRAFT | MAY 2021 | 10-15 Figure 10.7 shows the expected capital funding sources for each year of the analysis under Scenario 2. Approximately, $53.4 million in cash funding and $23.5 million in new bond proceeds would be required to fund the $76.9 million CIP, as summarized in Table 10.9. Figure 10.7 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Capital Funding Sources Table 10.9 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Capital Funding Summary 10-Year Sum (Millions) Cash Funded Capital (PAYGO and Reserves) $53.4 Additional Debt $23.5 Total CIP Funding $76.9 Note: (1) Totals may not sum due to rounding. Under Scenario 2, rate increases could be held constant at 2 percent per year from CY 2021 to CY 2024, as shown in Figure 10.8. After CY 2024, higher increases at 3.2 percent per year would be required in order to meet debt coverage requirements. The compounded rate increase over the 10-year projection period would be approximately 26.7 percent. CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-16 | MAY 2021 | DRAFT Figure 10.8 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Rate Increases Figure 10.9 summarizes 10-year financial projection under Scenario 2. With the increases noted above, the City would have sufficient cash available every year to fund capital projects. The projected working capital balance would exhibit less year-to-year fluctuation as compared to Scenario 1 since the use of debt helps smooth the impact of peaks in CIP expenditures. At the end of the projection period, the City would have approximately $21.9 million in outstanding debt principal. Table 10.10 summarizes the revenue requirement, cash flow, and fund balances for the next 10 years if Scenario 2 is implemented Figure 10.9 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Financial Projection CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON DRAFT | MAY 2021 | 10-17 Table 10.10 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Revenue Requirement, Cash Flow, and Fund Balances CY 2020 CY 2021 CY 2022 CY 2023 CY 2024 CY 2025 CY 2026 CY 2027 CY 2028 CY 2029 Rate Increase 0.00% 2.00% 2.00% 2.00% 2.00% 3.20% 3.20% 3.20% 3.20% 3.20% Revenues Rate Revenues (w/o Rate Increase) $18,593,943 $18,686,912 $18,780,347 $18,874,249 $18,968,620 $19,063,463 $19,158,780 $19,254,574 $19,350,847 $19,447,601 Revenues from Rate Increase 0 373,738 758,726 1,155,255 1,563,624 2,231,759 2,927,773 3,652,715 4,407,677 5,193,789 Other Revenues 747,709 606,420 615,349 624,501 633,882 643,498 653,353 663,456 673,810 684,424 Total Revenues $19,341,652 $19,667,071 $20,154,422 $20,654,005 $21,166,126 $21,938,720 $22,739,906 $23,570,745 $24,432,334 $25,325,815 Expenditures Ongoing O&M Expenses (Fund 405) $13,151,781 $13,500,443 $13,858,416 $14,225,953 $14,603,311 $14,990,754 $15,388,554 $15,796,989 $16,216,348 $16,646,923 Rate-Funded Capital 4,582,497 3,811,047 0 2,206,637 6,051,383 0 2,230,163 6,378,299 1,315,456 4,661,462 Debt Service 1,428,121 1,427,106 1,426,554 1,916,061 1,893,984 1,870,254 2,693,245 2,634,074 1,180,277 1,639,368 Total Expenditures $19,162,400 $18,738,595 $15,284,971 $18,348,651 $22,548,678 $16,861,007 $20,311,962 $24,809,363 $18,712,081 $22,947,753 Operating Cash Flows $179,252 $928,475 $4,869,451 $2,305,354 $1,382,551 $5,077,712 $2,427,944 $1,238,618 $5,720,253 $2,378,062 Beginning Fund Balance (405 & 425) $7,206,612 $6,163,011 $4,171,380 $8,198,327 $5,722,497 $2,125,218 $7,202,930 $6,124,294 $2,555,820 $8,276,073 Operating Cash Flows $179,252 $928,475 $4,869,451 $2,305,354 $1,382,551 $5,077,712 $2,427,944 $1,238,618 $5,720,253 $2,378,062 Interest Earnings 175,000 53,478 41,338 49,479 55,683 31,391 37,313 53,309 34,720 43,328 Use for Reserves for Capital Projects (1,222,853) (2,920,106) (842,504) (4,783,886) (2,219,531) (4,201) (3,524,389) (2,351,059) (10,987) (4,290,609) Ending Fund Balances (405 & 425) $6,163,011 $4,171,380 $8,198,327 $5,722,497 $2,125,218 $7,202,930 $6,124,294 $2,555,820 $8,276,073 $6,376,613 CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-18 | MAY 2021 | DRAFT Given the rate increases discussed for Scenario 2, Figure 10.10 estimates the monthly bills of 3/4-inch meter single family residential customers with monthly use of 7CCF for each year of the analysis: bills will increase from $48.65 in CY 2020 to $61.64 by CY 2029. Beyond CY 2029, higher rate increases would likely be required to keep up with annual debt services. Figure 10.10 Scenario 2 (MAX DEBT) Estimated SFR Monthly Bills 10.5.4 Scenario 3 – Moderate Additional Debt Scenario 3 assumes moderate use of debt to fund the CIP projects. The first additional debt issuance would take place in CY 2021, and additional debt proceeds would be required in CY 2025 to smooth their impact on the Water Utility’s finances. Table 10.11 shows the projected debt issuances that would be required, issuance costs associated with each issuance, and estimated debt service payment. The Annual Debt Service in the table indicates average annual debt service payment during the analysis years (CY 2020 –2029). The actual debt service payment would vary each year. Table 10.11 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Projected Debt Issuances Year Proceeds Required (millions) Issuance Amount (millions) Annual Debt Service (millions) CY 2021 $4.00 $0.367 $0.321 CY 2025 $4.00 $0.367 $0.321 Total $8.00 $0.734 Notes: (1) Totals may not sum due to rounding. (2) Issuance amount includes 1 percent issuance costs and a debt-service reserve requirement equal to 1 year of debt-service payments. CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON DRAFT | MAY 2021 | 10-19 Figure 10.11 shows the expected capital funding by source for each year of the analysis under Scenario 3. Approximately $68.9 million in cash funding and $8 million in new bond proceeds would be required to fund the $76.9 million CIP, as shown in Table 10.12. Figure 10.11 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Capital Funding Sources Table 10.12 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Capital Funding Summary 10-Year Sum (Millions) Cash Funded Capital (PAYGO and Reserves) $68.9 Additional Debt $8.0 Total CIP Funding $76.9 Note: (1) Totals may not sum due to rounding. Under Scenario 3, increases in user-service charges would be held constant at 3.5 percent per year from CY 2021 to CY 2024, as summarized in Figure 10.12. After CY 2024, higher increases at 3.8 percent per year would be required to meet debt-coverage requirements. The compounded rate increase over the 10-year projection period will be approximately 38.3 percent. CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-20 | MAY 2021 | DRAFT Figure 10.12 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Rate Increases Figure 10.13 summarizes 10-year financial projection under Scenario 3. With the rate increases in Figure 10.12, the City’s Water Utility would have sufficient cash available every year to fund capital projects. The projected working capital balance will have less year-to-year fluctuation as compared to Scenarios 1 and 2 since the use of debt helps smooth the impact of peaks in CIP expenditures. Figure 10.13 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Financial Projection At the end of the projection period the City would hold $6.8 million in outstanding debt principal. Table 10.13 summarizes the revenue requirement, cash flow, and fund balances for the next 10 years if Scenario 3 is implemented. CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON DRAFT | MAY 2021 | 10-21 Table 10.13 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Revenue Requirement, Cash Flow, and Fund Balances CY 2020 CY 2021 CY 2022 CY 2023 CY 2024 CY 2025 CY 2026 CY 2027 CY 2028 CY 2029 Rate Increase 0.00% 3.50% 3.50% 3.50% 3.50% 3.80% 3.80% 3.80% 3.80% 3.80% Revenues Rate Revenues (w/o Rate Increase) $18,593,943 $18,686,912 $18,780,347 $18,874,249 $18,968,620 $19,063,463 $19,158,780 $19,254,574 $19,350,847 $19,447,601 Revenues From Rate Increase 0 654,042 1,337,630 2,051,968 2,798,308 3,643,578 4,528,978 5,456,258 6,427,246 7,443,848 Other Revenues 747,709 606,420 615,349 624,501 633,882 643,498 653,353 663,456 673,810 684,424 Total Revenues $19,341,652 $19,947,374 $20,733,326 $21,550,718 $22,400,810 $23,350,539 $24,341,112 $25,374,288 $26,451,904 $27,575,873 Expenditures Ongoing O&M Expenses (Fund 405) $13,151,781 $13,500,443 $13,858,416 $14,225,953 $14,603,311 $14,990,754 $15,388,554 $15,796,989 $16,216,348 $16,646,923 Rate-Funded Capital 4,582,497 0 2,067,091 4,166,060 6,915,487 3,947,832 6,626,335 8,532,738 7,821,273 8,370,613 Debt Service 1,428,121 1,427,106 1,747,872 1,715,237 1,714,433 1,712,827 2,036,686 2,035,808 642,635 642,635 Total Expenditures $19,162,400 $14,927,548 $17,673,379 $20,107,251 $23,233,231 $20,651,413 $24,051,574 $26,365,535 $24,680,256 $25,660,171 Operating Cash Flows $179,252 $5,019,826 $3,059,947 $1,443,467 -$832,422 $2,699,126 $289,537 -$991,247 $1,771,648 $1,915,702 Beginning Fund Balance (405 & 425) $7,206,612 $6,163,011 $8,262,731 $6,388,823 $4,860,611 $2,675,348 $5,374,473 $3,985,888 $2,803,191 $4,574,838 Operating Cash Flows $179,252 $5,019,826 $3,059,947 $1,443,467 -$832,422 $2,699,126 $289,537 -$991,247 $1,771,648 $1,915,702 Interest Earnings 175,000 53,478 57,703 58,606 44,998 30,144 32,199 37,441 27,156 29,512 Use of Reserves for Capital Projects (1,222,853) (2,920,106) (4,935,903) (2,975,020) (1,355,427) (2,585) (1,682,001) (196,620) (5,170) (581,457) Ending Fund Balance (405 & 425) $6,163,011 $8,262,731 $6,388,823 $4,860,611 $2,675,348 $5,374,473 $3,985,888 $2,803,191 $4,574,838 $5,914,253 CITY OF RENTON| WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CHAPTER 10 10-22 | MAY 2021 | DRAFT Given the rate increases discussed for Scenario 3, Figure 10.14 estimates the monthly bills of 3/4-inch meter single family residential customers with monthly use of 7-CCF for each year of the analysis: bills will increase from $48.65 in CY 2020 to $67.27 by CY 2029, the lowest overall increase seen among the scenarios tested. Figure 10.14 Scenario 3 (MODERATE DEBT) Estimated SFR Monthly Bills 10.6 Conclusion Figure 10.15 compares each scenario’s total capital funding sources from CY 2020 to CY 2029. As shown, Scenario 2 would require substantial use of debt to hold rate increases to 2 percent per year through CY 2025 and still implement the full 10-year CIP. Figure 10.15 Capital Funding Comparison Figure 10.16 compares the outstanding debt principal and projected interest payments that the water funds would hold after CY 2029 for each scenario. Under Scenario 2, the City would still need to pay off approximately $21.9 million in debt principal with almost $11 million in interest CHAPTER 10 | WATER MASTER PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON DRAFT | MAY 2021 | 10-23 payments. This will lead to higher long-term costs and rate increases beyond CY 2029 as compared to what’s demanded by the other scenarios. Furthermore, the City may not be able to issue debt at the frequency required for Scenario 2. Figure 10.16 Comparison of Outstanding Debt After CY 2029 Figure 10.17 compares estimated single family residential bills from CY 2020 to CY 2029 under each scenario. As shown, the long-term rate outlook for each scenario has the same general magnitude with estimated single family charges ranging from about $61 to $68 per month by CY 2029. Increasing the amount of debt issued allows rate increases to be smoothed over time for a more gradual ramp-up to the ultimate rates. Figure 10.17 Estimated SFR Bill Comparison The projections presented in this chapter are intended to guide the financial planning of the City’s Water Utility, not to serve as the basis for any implemented rate increases. The City will need to confirm the capital projects that could be included within future budget development. This will give the City the opportunity to develop a funding strategy using their rate model and proposed recommended rate modifications. Water System Plan Update FINAL | MAY 2021 Appendices APPENDICES | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 Appendix A SEPA CHECKLIST AND DETERMINATION OF NON-SIGNIFICANCE Local Government Consistency Determination Form Water System Name: City of Renton __________________________________ PWS ID: 71850L Planning/Engineering Document Title: 2019 Water System Plan Updat Plan Date: March 2020 Draft ____ Local Government with Jurisdiction Conducting Review: Before the Department of Health (DOH) approves a planning or engineering submittal under Section 100 or Section 110, the local government must review the documentation the municipal water supplier provides to prove the submittal is consistent with local comprehensive plans, land use plans and development regulations (WAC 246-290-108). Submittals under Section 105 require a local consistency determination if the municipal water supplier requests a water right place-of-use expansion. The review must address the elements identified below as they relate to water service. By signing this form, the local government reviewer confirms the document under review is consistent with applicable local plans and regulations. If the local government reviewer identifies an inconsistency, he or she should include the citation from the applicable comprehensive plan or development regulation and explain how to resolve the inconsistency, or confirm that the inconsistency is not applicable by marking N/A. See more instructions on reverse. For use by water system For use by local government Local Government Consistency Statement Identify the page(s) in submittal Yes or Not Applicable a) The water system service area is consistent with the adopted land use and zoning within the service area. 3-1 to 3-6 Yes b) The growth projection used to forecast water demand is consistent with the adopted city or county’s population growth projections. If a different growth projection is used, provide an explanation of the alternative growth projection and methodology. 3-38 to 3-49 Yes c) For cities and towns that provide water service: All water service area policies of the city or town described in the plan conform to all relevant utility service extension ordinances. 5-3 to 5-5 Yes d) Service area policies for new service connections conform to the adopted local plans and adopted development regulations of all cities and counties with jurisdiction over the service area. 5-3 to 5-5 Yes e) Other relevant elements related to water supply are addressed in the water system plan, if applicable. This may include Coordinated Water System Plans, Regional Wastewater Plans, Reclaimed Water Plans, Groundwater Management Area Plans, and the Capital Facilities Element of local comprehensive plans. Thoughout Yes I certify that the above statements are true to the best of my knowledge and that these specific elements are consistent with adopted local plans and development regulations. _________________________________________________________________________ ______________ Signature Date Vanessa Dolbee, Planning Director, City of Renton ____________________ Printed Name, Title, & Jurisdiction 2/4/2021 City of Renton February 2016 Page 2 of 2 Consistency Review Guidance For Use by Local Governments and Municipal Water Suppliers This checklist may be used to meet the requirements of WAC 246-290-108. When using an alternative format, it must describe all of the elements; 1a), b), c), d), and e), when they apply. For water system plans (WSP), a consistency review is required for the service area and any additional areas where a municipal water supplier wants to expand its water right’s place of use. For small water system management programs, a consistency review is only required for areas where a municipal water supplier wants to expand its water right’s place-of-use. If no water right place-of-use expansion is requested, a consistency review is not required. For engineering documents, a consistency review is required for areas where a municipal water supplier wants to expand its water right’s place-of-use (water system plan amendment is required). For noncommunity water systems, a consistency review is required when requesting a place-of-use expansion. All engineering documents must be submitted with a service area map (WAC 246-290- 110(4)(b)(ii)). A) Documenting Consistency: The planning or engineering document must include the following when applicable. a) A copy of the adopted land use/zoning map corresponding to the service area. The uses provided in the WSP should be consistent with the adopted land use/zoning map. Include any other portions of comprehensive plans or development regulations that relate to water supply planning. b) A copy of the growth projections that correspond to the service area. If the local population growth projections are not used, explain in detail why the chosen projections more accurately describe the expected growth rate. Explain how it is consistent with the adopted land use. c) Include water service area policies and show that they are consistent with the utility service extension ordinances within the city or town boundaries. This applies to cities and towns only. d) All service area policies for how new water service will be provided to new customers. e) Other relevant elements the Department of Health determines are related to water supply planning. See Local Government Consistency – Other Relevant Elements, Policy B.07, September 2009. B) Documenting an Inconsistency: Please document the inconsistency, include the citation from the comprehensive plan or development regulation, and explain how to resolve the inconsistency. C) Documenting a Lack of Local Review for Consistency: Where the local government with jurisdiction did not provide a consistency review, document efforts made and the amount of time provided to the local government for review. Please include: name of contact, date, and efforts made (letters, phone calls, and emails). To self-certify, please contact the DOH Planner. The Department of Health is an equal opportunity agency. For persons with disabilities, this document is available on request in other formats. To submit a request, please call 1-800-525-0127 (TTY 1-800-833-6388). February 4, 2021 RE: Local Government Consistency Determination Form – City of Renton Planning Department a) The water system service area is consistent with the adopted land use and zoning within the service area. City of Renton Water Utility Engineering Response: Evaluating land use and zoning within the water service area is an important aspect of planning how the system will address future needs as land use patterns change. During this water system plan update, an existing land use map and a future land use map were prepared to guide water service and long-term planning for system improvements. However, the water service area’s land use maps, as shown in Figures 3.2 and 3.3, were prepared using a modified list of land use designations, different from the City’s adopted land use schema, shown on Figure 3.1. Renton’s adopted land use schema identifies six types of land uses: Residential Low Density, Residential Medium Density, Residential High Density, Commercial Mixed Use, Employment Area, and Commercial Office Residential (Ordinance #5915). Each of these land uses has designated zones that detail the types of land uses allowed in those zones. Overall, there are 19 zoning designations in the Land Use Plan. For water system planning purposes, the adopted land uses and zones were compiled into 11 land- use designations: single-family, multi-family, commercial, industrial, mixed use, vacant, agriculture, open space, park, public/quasi-public, and right-of-way. While land-use designations in this Water System Plan Update are a modified version of the adopted land use schema, the consolidated list maintains consistency with the foundation and rationale of the adopted land use and zoning. DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 1 ENV ENVIRONMENTAL CHECKLIST Planning Division 1055 South Grady Way-Renton, WA 98057 Phone: 425-430-7200 | www.rentonwa.gov PURPOSE OF CHECKLIST: The State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), Chapter 43.21C RCW, requires all governmental agencies to consider the environmental impacts of a proposal before making decisions. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) must be prepared for all proposals with probable significant adverse impacts on the quality of the environment. The purpose of this checklist is to provide information to help you and the agency identify impacts from your proposal (and to reduce or avoid impacts from the proposal, if it can be done) and to help the agency decide whether an EIS is required. INSTRUCTIONS FOR APPLICANTS: This environmental checklist asks you to describe some basic information about your proposal. Governmental agencies use this checklist to determine whether the environmental impacts of your proposal are significant, requiring preparation of an EIS. Answer the questions briefly, with the most precise information known, or give the best description you can. You must answer each question accurately and carefully, to the best of your knowledge. In most cases, you should be able to answer the questions from your own observations or project plans without the need to hire experts. If you really do not know the answer, or if a question does not apply to your proposal, write “do not know“ or “does not apply“. Complete answers to the questions now may avoid unnecessary delays later. Some questions ask about governmental regulations, such as zoning, shoreline, and landmark designations. Answer these questions if you can. If you have problems, the governmental agencies can assist you. The checklist questions apply to all parts of your proposal, even if you plan to do them over a period of time or on different parcels of land. Attach any additional information that will help describe your proposal or its environmental effects. The agency to which you submit this checklist may ask you to explain your answers or provide additional information reasonably related to determining if there may be significant adverse impact. 2 USE OF CHECKLIST FOR NONPROJECT PROPOSALS: Complete this checklist for non-project proposals, even though questions may be answered "does not apply." IN ADDITION, complete the SUPPLEMENTAL SHEET FOR NONPROJECT ACTIONS (part D). For non-project actions (actions involving decisions on policies, plans and programs), the references in the checklist to the words “project," "applicant,“ and "property or site“ should be read as "proposal," "proposer,“ and "affected geographic area," respectively. A. BACKGROUND 1. Name of proposed project, if applicable: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update 2. Name of applicant: City of Renton – Utility Systems Division 3. Address and phone number of applicant and contact person: Abdoul Gafour, Water Utility Engineering Manager 1055 South Grady Way, Renton, WA 98057 425-430-7210 agafour@rentonwa.gov 4. Date checklist prepared: January 3, 2020 5. Agency requesting checklist: City of Renton 6. Proposed timing or schedule (including phasing, if applicable): The City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update (Plan) is scheduled for adoption in 2020. 7. Do you have any plans for future additions, expansion, or further activity related to or connected with this proposal? If yes, explain. No. This Plan lists capital improvement projects planned by the City within the next 10 years and long-term projects over the next 20 years. Proposed locations are shown in the Plan. 8. List any environmental information you know about that has been prepared, or will be prepared, directly related to this proposal. Depending upon the scope of the projects proposed in the Plan, an individual environmental checklist and threshold determination would be completed as specified projects are proposed for construction. 9. Do you know whether applications are pending for governmental approvals of other proposals directly affecting the property covered by your proposal? If yes, explain. At this time, there are no known pending applications for general applicability related to the area covered by the water system. There may be applications pending related to improvements to the water system such as various on-going plats and developer extensions occurring within the water service area. The City plans to adopt the capital improvement plan outlined in this document as part of the City’s 10-year capital improvements plan. 3 10. List any government approvals or permits that will be needed for your proposal, if known. The Plan must be approved by the City of Renton, King County, the Washington State Department of Health, and the Washington State Department of Ecology. 11. Give brief, complete description of your proposal, including the proposed uses and the size of the project and site. The City of Renton proposes the adoption of a new Water System Plan to supersede the existing Water System Plan adopted in 2012. This Plan is an updated version of the City’s 2012 Water System Plan. The purpose of this Plan is to document changes to the City’s water system, to identify required system modifications, and to appropriately outline capital improvement projects proposed to meet future water demands as well as system maintenance and improvement activities. Maintaining a current plan is required to meet regulations of the Washington State Department of Health and the requirements of the Washington State Growth Management Act. The Plan examines the existing water service area, which includes a majority, but not all, of the city limits. The water service area encompasses an area of approximately 17.25 square miles. The City of Renton has no plans to serve beyond the limits of the current water service area. 12. Location of the proposal. Give sufficient information for a person to understand the precise location of your proposed project, including a street address, if any, and section, township, and range, if known. If a proposal would occur over a range of area, provide the range or boundaries of the site(s). Provide a legal description, site plan, vicinity map, and topographic map, if reasonably available. While you should submit any plans required by the agency, you are not required to duplicate maps or detailed plans submitted with any permit applications related to this checklist. The policies and guidance of this Plan are applicable throughout the City of Renton’s water service area. The existing water service area includes a large portion, but not all, of the city limits. The water service area encompasses an area of approximately 17.25 square miles and is shown as the Retail Water Service Area on Figure 1.3. 4 B. ENVIRONMENTAL ELEMENTS 1. EARTH a. General description of the site (check or circle one): Flat, rolling, hilly, steep slopes, mountainous, other _____________. The water service area includes steep slopes, several hills, a plateau, and river valley areas. b. What is the steepest slope on the site (approximate percent slope)? The slopes vary from flat (zero percent) to very steep (over 40 percent). Steep slopes exist along the Maple Valley Highway to the north and south of the Cedar River Valley (southern edge of Renton Highlands; northern edge of Scenic Hill and Rolling Hills), along the eastern side of I-405 (eastern edge of the Renton Highlands), along the southern (SR 900) and eastern (Rainier Ave N) edges of Renton West Hill, along the western (SR 167) and northern (I-405) edges of Talbot Hill and the western edge (I-405) of Scenic Hill. c. What general types of soils are found on the site (for example, clay, sand, gravel, peat, muck)? If you know the classification of agricultural soils, specify them and note any agricultural land of long-term commercial significance and whether the proposal results in removing any of these soils. According to the USDA’s Web Soil Survey, the main soil types within the water service area include: Alderwood gravelly sandy loam, Alderwood and Kitsap soils, Arents-Alderwood material, and Indianola loamy sand. Alderwood gravelly sandy loam makes up over 30% of the water service area and is considered prime farmland. Using engineering classifications: there is a wide variety of highly variable glacial deposits in the water service area that include clay, silt, sand, gravel, cobbles, and boulders. In the river valley areas, there is a variety of modern alluvium and undifferentiated deltaic deposits. Adoption of the Water System Plan Update will not itself result in the removal of agricultural soil. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their impact to agricultural soils prior to implementation. d. Are there surface indications or history of unstable soils in the immediate vicinity? If so, describe. Within the City, there are areas of unstable soils including steep slopes and historic coal mines. Some alluvial deposits in the Cedar River Valley and old Black River Valley may be subject to liquefaction during seismic events. Sensitive areas are mapped by the City and are subject to regulation under Renton Municipal Code Title IV, Development Regulations. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their soil conditions prior to implementation. 5 e. Describe the purpose, type, total area, and approximate quantities and total affected area of any filling, excavation, and grading proposed. Indicate source of fill. N/A, non-project action. However, the water system construction projects identified in the Plan will require excavation and grading of an undetermined quantity of material. Specific projects will be subject to individual environmental review before implementation. f. Could erosion occur as a result of clearing, construction, or use? If so, generally describe. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in the clearing, construction, or use of soils, however, the Plan’s programs and projects may result in erosion from construction. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for erosion potential prior to implementation. g. About what percent of the site will be covered with impervious surfaces after project construction (for example, asphalt or buildings)? N/A, non-project action. Specific projects will be subject to individual environmental review before implementation. h. Proposed measures to reduce or control erosion, or other impacts to the earth, if any: N/A, non-project action. Where applicable, best management practices, along with erosion and sedimentation control measures, will be used in all areas of potential erosion. Specific projects will be subject to individual environmental review before implementation. 2. AIR a. What types of emissions to the air would result from the proposal during construction, operation, and maintenance when the project is completed? If any, generally describe and give approximate quantities if known. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in air emissions, however, the Plan’s programs and projects may be a source of emissions from construction activity and increased usage of generators during maintenance, testing, and power outages events. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for air emissions potential prior to implementation. b. Are there any off-site sources of emissions or odor that may affect your proposal? If so, generally describe. N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for off-site sources of emissions prior to implementation. c. Proposed measures to reduce or control emissions or other impacts to air, if any: N/A, non-project action. However, standard emissions controls for construction equipment will be utilized during construction of projects recommended by this Plan. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their potential impact and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 6 3. WATER a. Surface Water: 1) Is there any surface water body on or in the immediate vicinity of the site (including year-round and seasonal streams, saltwater, lakes, ponds, wetlands)? If yes, describe type and provide names. If appropriate, state what stream or river it flows into. There are multiple surface water bodies within the water system area. The northwest boundary of the water service area is the shoreline of Lake Washington. The rivers and streams that run through the water service area include the Cedar River, Green River, May Creek, and Springbrook Creek. The Cedar River is tributary to Lake Washington and the Green River is a tributary to Puget Sound. May Creek flows into Lake Washington and Springbrook Creek flows into the Green River. All water bodies and wetland boundaries are cataloged in the City’s GIS (COR Maps). 2) Will the project require any work over, in, or adjacent to (within 200 feet) the described waters? If yes, please describe and attach available plans. N/A, non-project action. However, the Plan’s programs and projects may require work within 200 feet of surface water bodies. These projects will be subject to individual review and compliance with the City’s Shoreline Master Program. 3) Estimate the amount of fill and dredge material that would be placed in or removed from surface water or wetlands and indicate the area of the site that would be affected. Indicate the source of fill material. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan Update will not itself result in the direct alteration of the environment, however, the Plan’s programs and projects may result in the addition or removal of fill and dredge material. The potential impacts of these actions are currently unknown. Projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 4) Will the proposal require surface water withdrawals or diversions? Give general description, purpose, and approximate quantities if known. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan Update will not itself result in the withdrawal or diversion of surface water. Projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 5) Does the proposal lie within a 100-year floodplain? If so, note location on the site plan: N/A, non-project action. However, some portions of the City are within or adjacent to 100-year floodplains. Projects that are subject to environmental review will identify floodplain boundaries prior to implementation. 7 6) Does the proposal involve any discharges of waste materials to surface waters? If so, describe the type of waste and anticipated volume of discharge. N/A, non-project action. However, no waste material will be discharged into surface waters during construction of projects recommended by this Plan. Projects that are subject to environmental review will identify discharge plans prior to implementation. b. Ground Water: 1) Will groundwater be withdrawn from a well for drinking water or other purposes? If so, give a general description of the well, proposed uses and approximate quantities withdrawn from the well. Will water be discharged to groundwater? Give general description, purpose, and approximate quantities if known. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan Update will not itself result in the withdrawal of groundwater. A description of the City’s groundwater wells and spring (infiltration gallery) is provided in the Plan and includes detailed information on source locations, water rights, and withdrawal quantities. The City’s current and future groundwater withdrawal is limited by the water rights that have been granted by the Washington State Department of Ecology. 2) Describe waste material that will be discharged into the ground from septic tanks or other sources, if any (for example: Domestic sewage; industrial, containing the following chemicals; agricultural; etc.). Describe the general size of the system, the number of such systems, the number of houses to be served (if applicable), or the number of animals or humans the system(s) are expected to serve. N/A, non-project action. However, no waste material will be discharged into the ground during projects recommended by this Plan. Projects that are subject to environmental review will identify discharge plans prior to implementation. c. Water runoff (including storm water): 1) Describe the source of runoff (including storm water) and method of collection and disposal, if any (include quantities, if known). Where will this water flow? Will this water flow into other waters? If so, describe. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan Update will not itself result in runoff. Projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 2) Could waste materials enter ground or surface waters? If so, generally describe. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan Update will not itself result in waste materials entering ground or surface waters. Projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 8 3) Proposed measures to reduce or control surface, ground, and runoff water, and drainage pattern impacts, if any: N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan Update will not itself result in any such impacts. Projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts and their corresponding reduction and control measures prior to implementation. 4. PLANTS a. Check the types of vegetation found on the site: __X__deciduous tree: alder, maple, aspen, other __X__evergreen tree: fir, cedar, pine, other __X__shrubs __X__grass __X__pasture ____crop or grain ____orchards, vineyards or other permanent crops __X__wet soil plants: cattail, buttercup, bullrush, skunk cabbage, other __X_water plants: water lily, eelgrass, milfoil, other __X_other types of vegetation b. What kind and amount of vegetation will be removed or altered? N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan Update will not itself result in the direct removal or alteration of vegetation, however, the Plan’s programs and projects may result in these impacts. The potential impacts of these actions are currently unknown. Projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential vegetation impacts and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. c. List threatened and endangered species known to be on or near the site. N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their potential impact to threatened or endangered plant species on or near the site. d. Proposed landscaping, use of native plants, or other measures to preserve or enhance vegetation on the site, if any: N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for vegetation plans before implementation. e. List all noxious weeds and invasive species known to be on or near the site. N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for noxious and invasive plant species on or near the site before plan implementation. 9 5. ANIMALS a. List any birds and other animals which have been observed on or near the site or are known to be on or near the site. N/A, non-project action. Many of the following birds and animals could be present within the water service area. Specific projects will be subject to individual environmental review prior to implementation. Examples include: Birds: hawk, heron, eagle, songbirds, other: gulls Mammals: deer, bear, elk, beaver, other: possum, raccoon, rabbits, squirrels Fish: bass, salmon, trout, herring, shellfish, other: b. List any threatened and endangered species known to be on or near the site. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the following animals are listed as threatened within the water service area: bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus), streaked horned lark (Eremophila alpestris strigata), and yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). According NOAA, the City is within the critical habitat for Puget Sound ESU Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Puget Sound DPS Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their potential impact to threatened or endangered wildlife species on or near the site. c. Is the site part of a migration route? If so, explain. N/A, non-project action. However, the entire state of Washington is within the Pacific flyway and two rivers within the water service area (Cedar and Green Rivers) are spawning routes for salmon and steelhead trout. Specific projects will be subject to individual environmental review prior to implementation. d. Proposed measures to preserve or enhance wildlife, if any: N/A, non-project action. Projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts to wildlife and their corresponding preservation or enhancement measures prior to implementation. e. List any invasive animal species known to be on or near the site. N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for invasive animal species on or near the site prior to implementation. 10 6. ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES a. What kinds of energy (electric, natural gas, oil, wood stove, solar) will be used to meet the completed project's energy needs? Describe whether it will be used for heating, manufacturing, etc. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself use energy. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for energy and other natural resource uses prior to implementation. b. Would your project affect the potential use of solar energy by adjacent properties? If so, generally describe. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself affect the use of solar energy. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for effects on solar energy by adjacent properties prior to implementation. c. What kinds of energy conservation features are included in the plans of this proposal? List other proposed measures to reduce or control energy impacts, if any: N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in the direct reduction or control of energy impacts, however, the Plan’s programs and projects may result in energy conservation features. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for energy conservation features prior to implementation. 7. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH a. Are there any environmental health hazards, including exposure to toxic chemicals, risk of fire and explosion, spill, or hazardous waste that could occur as a result of this proposal? If so, describe. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in direct environmental hazards, however, the potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential environmental health hazards and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 1) Describe any known or possible contamination at the site from present or past uses. N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for known or possible contamination at the site prior to implementation. 11 2) Describe existing hazardous chemicals/conditions that might affect project development and design. This includes underground hazardous liquid and gas transmission pipelines located within the project area and in the vicinity. N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for existing hazardous chemicals or conditions at the site prior to implementation. 3) Describe any toxic or hazardous chemicals that might be stored, used, or produced during the project's development or construction, or at any time during the operating life of the project. N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for toxic or hazardous chemicals during the development, construction, or lifetime of the project prior to implementation. 4) Describe special emergency services that might be required. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself require emergency services, however, the potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for special emergency services prior to implementation. 5) Proposed measures to reduce or control environmental health hazards, if any: N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself require the reduction or control of environmental health hazards, however, the potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for environmental health hazards and corresponding reduction or control measures prior to implementation. b. Noise 1) What types of noise exist in the area which may affect your project (for example: traffic, equipment, operation, other)? N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for surrounding noise prior to implementation. 2) What types and levels of noise would be created by or associated with the project on a short-term or a long-term basis (for example: traffic, construction, operation, other)? Indicate what hours noise would come from the site. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself create any long-term or short-term noise, however, the potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential project noise prior to implementation. 12 3) Proposed measures to reduce or control noise impacts, if any: N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential project noise and corresponding measures to reduce or control noise impacts prior to implementation. 8. LAND AND SHORELINE USE a. What is the current use of the site and adjacent properties? Will the proposal affect current land uses on nearby or adjacent properties? If so, describe. The following land uses are present within the water service area: industrial, commercial, residential, public, park, and other land uses. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself affect any land use on nearby or adjacent properties, however, the potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for individual land uses prior to implementation. b. Has the project site been used as working farmlands or working forest lands? If so, describe. How much agricultural or forest land of long-term commercial significance will be converted to other uses as a result of the proposal, if any? If resource lands have not been designated, how many acres in farmland or forest land tax status will be converted to nonfarm or non-forest use? In the past, the City contained working farmlands as a small part of the economic base. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself convert any agricultural or forest land. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for effects to working farm or forest land prior to implementation. 1) Will the proposal affect or be affected by surrounding working farm or forest land normal business operations, such as oversize equipment access, the application of pesticides, tilling, and harvesting? If so, how: N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself affect or be affected by surrounding working farm or forest land, however, the potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for affects by or affects to working farm or forest land prior to implementation. c. Describe any structures on the site. There are many types of structures in the water service area including: industrial, commercial, residential, schools, hotels, and other common structures. d. Will any structures be demolished? If so, what? N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself demolish any structures, however, the potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for planned demolition prior to implementation. 13 e. What is the current zoning classification of the site? The water service area encompasses a wide variety of zoning classifications including: resource conservation, residential, commercial, urban, and industrial areas. f. What is the current comprehensive plan designation of the site? The water service area encompasses multiple comprehensive plan land use designations including: residential low density, residential medium density, residential high density, commercial & mixed use, commercial office residential, and employment area. g. If applicable, what is the current shoreline master program designation of the site? The water service area encompasses multiple areas classified with shoreline designations including: natural, urban conservancy, single family residential, shoreline high-intensity, shoreline isolated high-intensity, and aquatic environments. Specific projects recommended by the Plan will be required to comply with the City’s Shoreline Master Program. h. Has any part of the site been classified as a critical area by the city or county? If so, specify. The water service area encompasses multiple areas classified as critical areas. These include: flood hazard areas, seismic hazard areas, steep slopes, habitat conservation areas, streams, lakes, wellhead protection areas, and wetlands. i. Approximately how many people would reside or work in the completed project? The City’s water system provided service to a full time residential population of approximately 68,664 in 2017, and is estimated to increase to 75,416 in 2025 and 82,704 by 2040. j. Approximately how many people would the completed project displace? N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself displace any people. The potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown, however, it is unlikely any project would lead to displacement. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for displacement prior to implementation. k. Proposed measures to avoid or reduce displacement impacts, if any: N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for displacement prior to implementation. l. Proposed measures to ensure the proposal is compatible with existing and projected land uses and plans, if any: The City of Renton Water System Plan is written in accordance with all existing local, county, and state regulations including the City’s Comprehensive Plan. 14 m. Proposed measures to reduce or control impacts to agricultural and forest lands of long- term commercial significance, if any: N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts to agricultural and forest lands, and their corresponding preservation or enhancement measures, prior to implementation. 9. HOUSING a. Approximately how many units would be provided, if any? Indicate whether high, middle, or low-income housing. N/A, non-project action. The adoption of the Water System Plan and its corresponding programs and projects are not intended to provide housing units. b. Approximately how many units, if any, would be eliminated? Indicate whether high, middle, or low-income housing. N/A, non-project action. The adoption of the Water System Plan and its corresponding programs and projects are not intended to eliminate housing units. c. Proposed measures to reduce or control housing impacts, if any: N/A, non-project action. The adoption of the Water System Plan and its corresponding programs and projects are not intended to affect housing. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for housing impacts prior to implementation. 10. AESTHETICS a. What is the tallest height of any proposed structure(s), not including antennas; what is the principal exterior building material(s) proposed? N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in a structure. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for structure height and material prior to implementation. b. What views in the immediate vicinity would be altered or obstructed? N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for view alteration or obstruction prior to implementation. c. Proposed measures to reduce or control aesthetic impacts, if any: N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their potential aesthetic impacts and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 15 11. LIGHT AND GLARE a. What type of light or glare will the proposal produce? What time of day would it mainly occur? N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in light or glare. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential light or glare prior to implementation. b. Could light or glare from the finished project be a safety hazard or interfere with views? N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in light or glare. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential light or glare prior to implementation. c. What existing off-site sources of light or glare may affect your proposal? N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan itself will not be affected by existing off-site sources of light or glare. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for existing off-site light or glare prior to implementation. d. Proposed measures to reduce or control light and glare impacts, if any: N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan itself will not be affected by existing off-site sources of light or glare. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their potential light impacts and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 12. RECREATION a. What designated and informal recreational opportunities are in the immediate vicinity? Within and near the water service area are numerous parks and recreational opportunities, including Maplewood Golf Course. There are also streams and rivers within the water service area that provide recreational opportunities. b. Would the proposed project displace any existing recreational uses? If so, describe. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself displace any recreational uses. c. Proposed measures to reduce or control impacts on recreation, including recreation opportunities to be provided by the project or applicant, if any: N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their impacts on recreation and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 16 13. HISTORIC AND CULTURAL PRESERVATION a. Are there any buildings, structures, or sites, located on or near the site that are over 45 years old listed in or eligible for listing in national, state, or local preservation registers ? If so, specifically describe. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself involve any historical buildings or sites. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their proximity to historical buildings or sites prior to implementation. b. Are there any landmarks, features, or other evidence of Indian or historic use or occupation? This may include human burials or old cemeteries. Are there any material evidence, artifacts, or areas of cultural importance on or near the site? Please list any professional studies conducted at the site to identify such resources. N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself involve any cultural resources. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their proximity to cultural resources prior to implementation. c. Describe the methods used to assess the potential impacts to cultural and historic resources on or near the project site. Examples include consultation with tribes and the department of archeology and historic preservation, archaeological surveys, historic maps, GIS data, etc. N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their impacts on historic sites and cultural resources on or near the project site. d. Proposed measures to avoid, minimize, or compensate for loss, changes to, and disturbance to resources. Please include plans for the above and any permits that may be required. N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their impacts on historic and cultural resources and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 14. TRANSPORTATION a. Identify public streets and highways serving the site or affected geographic area and describe proposed access to the existing street system. Show on site plans, if any. Many streets and highways serve the Water System Plan area. Major highways passing through the city include: Interstate 405 and State Routes 167, 169, 515 and 900. Major arterials providing access to and from the city include Rainier Avenue, Benson Road, Carr Road, and Duvall Avenue. 17 b. Is the site or affected geographic area currently served by public transit? If so, generally describe. If not, what is the approximate distance to the nearest transit stop? Public transportation within the City includes bus and train services provided by Sound Transit and King County Metro. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their proximity to public transit prior to implementation. c. How many additional parking spaces would the completed project or non-project proposal have? How many would the project or proposal eliminate? N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself impact any parking features. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their impacts to parking spaces and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. d. Will the proposal require any new or improvements to existing roads, streets, pedestrian, bicycle or state transportation facilities, not including driveways? If so, generally describe (indicate whether public or private). N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself require any new or improved transportation features. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their impacts to transportation prior to implementation. e. Will the project or proposal use (or occur in the immediate vicinity of) water, rail, or air transportation? If so, generally describe. N/A, non-project action. The Plan’s programs and projects may occur in the immediate vicinity of water, rail, or air transportation. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for transportation prior to implementation. f. How many vehicular trips per day would be generated by the completed project or proposal? If known, indicate when peak volumes would occur and what percentage of the volume would be trucks (such as commercial and non-passenger vehicles). What data or transportation models were used to make these estimates? N/A, non-project action. Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself affect the amount of vehicular trips per day in the area, however, the potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for effects to transportation prior to implementation. g. Will the proposal interfere with, affect or be affected by the movement of agricultural and forest products on roads or streets in the area? If so, generally describe. N/A, non-project action. The potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown, however, it is unlikely any project would affect or be affected by the movement of agricultural or forest products. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for the movement of products prior to implementation. 18 h. Proposed measures to reduce or control transportation impacts, if any: N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their impacts on transportation and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 15. PUBLIC SERVICES a. Would the project result in an increased need for public services (for example: fire protection, police protection, public transit, health care, schools, other)? If so, generally describe. N/A, non-project action. The potential impacts from the Plan’s programs and projects are currently unknown, however, it is unlikely any project would increase the need for public services. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for public service needs prior to implementation. b. Proposed measures to reduce or control direct impacts on public services, if any. N/A, non-project action. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their impacts on public services and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. 16. UTILITIES a. Circle utilities currently available at the site: electricity, natural gas, water, refuse service, telephone, sanitary sewer, septic system, other b. Describe the utilities that are proposed for the project, the utility providing the service, and the general construction activities on the site or in the immediate vicinity which might be needed. The recommended repairs, replacements, improvements, or extensions to infrastructure in the Water System Plan are required to meet the level of service criteria set forth by local, county, and state governments. The infrastructure includes wells, springs, reservoirs, pump stations, treatment facilities, pressure reducing stations, water mains, and related appurtenances. Each specific recommended project, subject to environmental review, will be evaluated for its impacts prior to implementation. 19 C. SIGNATURE The above answers are true and complete to the best of my knowledge. I understand that the lead agency is relying on them to make its decision. Proponent Signature: Name of Signee (printed): Position and Agency/Organization: Date Submitted: Water Utility Engineering Manager, City of Renton Abdoul Gafour Type text hereAPRIL 3, 2020 20 D. SUPPLEMENTAL SHEET FOR NONPROJECT ACTIONS (IT IS NOT NECESSARY to use these sheets for project actions.) Because these questions are very general, it may be helpful to read them in conjunction with the list of the elements of the environment. When answering these questions, be aware of the extent the proposal or the types of activities likely to result from the proposal, would affect the item at a greater intensity or at a faster rate than if the proposal were not implemented. Respond briefly and in general terms 1. How would the proposal be likely to increase discharge to water; emissions to air; production, storage, or release of toxic or hazardous substances; or production of noise? The Water System Plan will not itself increase discharge to water, emissions to air, hazardous substances, or production of noise, however, the Plan’s programs and projects have the potential for these effects. For example, projects recommended by the Plan that require construction may result in exhaust emissions, dust, and noise from construction equipment as well as temporary storage of hazardous materials. All hazardous materials storage within the Aquifer Protection Area will be required to comply with the Aquifer Protection Code in order to prevent contamination of the City’s main drinking water source. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. Proposed measures to avoid or reduce such increases are: For the Water System Plan adoption, there are no specific measures planned to reduce these impacts. Best management practices will be used to minimize impacts, in accordance with local, state, and federal laws, during the planning and construction of any applicable projects. Proposed projects will be reviewed and addressed on an individual basis by appropriate agencies prior to implementation. 2. How would the proposal be likely to affect plants, animals, fish, or marine life? Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in direct effects to plants, animals, fish, or marine life. It is not anticipated that any of the proposed projects within the Plan will have an impact upon vegetation or wildlife, however, there is potential for impacts to occur during construction efforts. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts to vegetation and wildlife and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. Proposed measures to protect or conserve plants, animals, fish, or marine life are: Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for their potential impact to plants, animals, fish, and marine life. Potential impacts will be reported with corresponding mitigation measures to protect or conserve vegetation and wildlife. Proposed projects and mitigation measures will be reviewed and addressed on an individual basis by appropriate agencies prior to implementation. 21 3. How would the proposal be likely to deplete energy or natural resources? Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in the direct depletion of energy or natural resources. It is not anticipated that any of the proposed projects within the Plan will have a strong impact on energy or natural resources, however, some projects may require the use of energy resources. For example, the running or testing of water system facilities uses electricity and construction projects require fuel for equipment operation and delivery of materials. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts to energy resources and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. Proposed measures to protect or conserve energy and natural resources are: For the Water System Plan adoption, best management practices will be used to minimize energy usage. For example, the water utility maximizes the potential for gravity flow in the water system whenever possible. Additionally, the Plan includes a water use efficiency program intended to provide water resource savings over time. Programs and projects proposed in the Water System Plan may also result in energy conservation features such as improvements to pump stations and strategies to increase system efficiency. Best management practices will be used in the design, construction and operations of the infrastructure proposed by the Plan, in accordance with local, state, and federal laws, during the planning and construction of any applicable projects. Proposed projects will be reviewed and addressed on an individual basis for energy and natural resources impacts by appropriate agencies prior to implementation. 4. How would the proposal be likely to use or affect environmentally sensitive areas or areas designated (or eligible or under study) for governmental protection; such as parks, wilderness, wild and scenic rivers, threatened or endangered species habitat, historic or cultural sites, wetlands, floodplains, or prime farmlands? Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in direct effects to environmentally sensitive areas or areas designated for governmental protection, however, there is potential for the Plan’s programs and projects to occur in the immediate vicinity of sensitive areas. The potential impacts from these actions are currently unknown. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for potential impacts and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. Proposed measures to protect such resources or to avoid or reduce impacts are: Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated by the appropriate agencies for their potential impact and corresponding mitigation measures prior to implementation. All such projects will be required to comply with applicable local, state, and federal guidelines and regulations regarding environmental protection. 22 5. How would the proposal be likely to affect land and shoreline use, including whether it would allow or encourage land or shoreline uses incompatible with existing plans? Adoption of the Water System Plan will not itself result in direct effects to land and shoreline use and will not allow or encourage land or shoreline uses incompatible with existing plans. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for land and shoreline use prior to implementation. Proposed measures to avoid or reduce shoreline and land use impacts are: The Water System Plan is designed to support City land use plans, including adhering to the guidelines set by the state Growth Management Act. All such projects will be required to comply with applicable local, state, and federal guidelines and regulations regarding shoreline and land use. Proposed projects will be reviewed and addressed on an individual basis by appropriate agencies prior to implementation. 6. How would the proposal be likely to increase demands on transportation or public services and utilities? Adoption of the Water System Plan will not increase the demand for transportation, public services, or utilities. The Plan itself is partly in response to population growth and increased demands on the water utility. Water demand projections are included in Chapter 3 of the 2019 City of Renton Water System Plan Update. Proposed measures to reduce or respond to such demand(s) are: The proposed Water System Plan was developed, in part, as a response to increased demands on the City’s water utility system. 7. Identify, if possible, whether the proposal may conflict with local, state, or federal laws or requirements for the protection of the environment. The 2019 City of Renton Water System Plan Update does not conflict with any known local, state, or federal environmental laws or requirements. Specific projects that are subject to environmental review will be evaluated for adherence to environmental laws or requirements prior to implementation. DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SIGNATURES: Martin Pastucha Public Works Administrator Date Rick M. Marshall, Administrator Renton Regional Fire Authority Date Kelly Beymer, Administrator Community Services Department Date Cliff Long, Econ. Dev., Director Date Interim Community & Econ. Dev. Administrator Interim Chair ENVIRONMENTAL (SEPA) DETERMINATION OF NON-SIGNIFICANCE (DNS) PROJECT NUMBER: LU20-000107, ECF APPLICANT: Abdoul Gafour, City of Renton/1055 S Grady Way, Renton, WA 98057/agafour@rentonwa.gov PROJECT NAME: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The applicant, the City of Renton Public Works Department, is requesting SEPA Environmental (SEPA) Review for the City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update. The subject plan will reviewed as a non-project action, as defined by Section 197-11-774 in the Washington Administrative Code. The plan primarily serves as an update to the City of Renton’s 2012 Water System Plan and was developed collaboratively by City staff, Carollo Engineers, Inc. (Carollo), and Pacific Groundwater Group. The plan documents the current status of the water system and evaluates future needs of the water utility and will be used as a guide in maintaining and improving the water system in the short-term over the next 10 years. It also provides a planning framework for the 20-year, long-term planning horizon. The primary purpose of this plan is to document changes to the City’s water system, identify required system modifications, and appropriately outline capital improvement projects to meet future water demands. Maintaining a current Plan is required to meet the regulations of the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and the requirements of the Washington State Growth Management Act. The plan also contains estimated timeframes, which are the intended framework PROJECT LOCATION: City-Wide Water Service Area LEAD AGENCY: City of Renton Environmental Review Committee Department of Community & Economic Development The City of Renton Environmental Review Committee has determined that it does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required under RCW 43.21C.030(2)(c). This Determination of Non-Significance is issued under WAC 197-11-340. When the DNS becomes appealable, the appeal period will be 14 days. DATE OF DECISION: June 8, 2020 DocuSign Envelope ID: C46EA432-77DC-47C0-9AC1-38AD8385DA05 6/8/2020 | 1:34 PM PDT 6/8/2020 | 1:56 PM PDT 6/8/2020 | 1:38 PM PDT 6/8/2020 | 2:12 PM PDT DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Planning Division 1055 South Grady Way, 6th Floor | Renton, WA 98057 | 425-430-7200, ext. 2 www.rentonwa.gov OF ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINATION ISSUANCE OF A DETERMINATION OF NON-SIGNIFICANCE (DNS) POSTED TO NOTIFY INTERESTED PERSONS OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION DNS: THE CITY OF RENTON ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW COMMITTEE (ERC) HAS DETERMINED THAT THE PROPOSED ACTION DOES NOT HAVE A SIGNIFICANT ADVERSE IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT. DATE OF NOTICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINATION: June 8, 2020 PROJECT NAME/NUMBER: PR20-000002 City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update / LU20-000107, ECF PROJECT LOCATION: City-Wide Water Service Area APPLICANT/PROJECT CONTACT PERSON: Abdoul Gafour, City of Renton/1055 S Grady Way, Renton, WA 98057/agafour@rentonwa.gov LOCATION WHERE APPLICATION MAY BE REVIEWED: Applicant documents are available online through the City of Renton Document Center website. See also https://bit.ly/2WUb05A PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The applicant, the City of Renton Public Works Department, is requesting SEPA Environmental (SEPA) Review for the City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update. The subject plan will reviewed as a non-project action, as defined by Section 197-11-774 in the Washington Administrative Code. The plan primarily serves as an update to the City of Renton’s 2012 Water System Plan and was developed collaboratively by City staff, Carollo Engineers, Inc. (Carollo), and Pacific Groundwater Group. The plan documents the current status of the water system and evaluates future needs of the water utility and will be used as a guide in maintaining and improving the water system in the short-term over the next 10 years. It also provides a planning framework for the 20- year, long-term planning horizon. The primary purpose of this plan is to document changes to the City’s water system, identify required system modifications, and appropriately outline capital improvement projects to meet future water demands. Maintaining a current Plan is required to meet the regulations of the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and the requirements of the Washington State Growth Management Act. The plan also contains estimated timeframes, which are the intended framework for future funding decisions. The applicant submitted an Environmental (SEPA) Checklist with the application. Per WAC197-11-340(2)(c) any person, affected tribe, or agency may submit comments to the City within fourteen days of the date of issuance of the DNS. Per WAC197-11-340(2)(a) an agency shall not act upon a proposal for fourteen days after the date of issuance of a DNS. There is no agency appeal. CONTACT PERSON: Alex Morganroth, Senior Planner; Tel: (425) 430-7219; Email: amorganroth@rentonwa.gov NOTICE Enclosure cc: Boyd Powers, Department of Natural Resources King County Wastewater Treatment Div. Matthew Feldmeyer, Renton Schools Larry Fisher, WDFW Misty Blair, Department of Ecology Jalaine Madura, Seattle Public Utilities Minnie Dhaliwal, City of Tukwila Stephanie Jolivette, Office of Archaeology & Historic Preservation Duwamish Tribal Office Duffy McColloch WSDOT, NW Region Erin George, City of Kent US Army Corp. of Engineers Andy Swayne, Puget Sound Energy John Greene, King County Transit Wendy Weiker, Puget Sound Energy Karen Walter, Fisheries, Muckleshoot Indian Tribe Jim Ishimaru, King County Transportation Laura Murphy, Muckleshoot Cultural Resources Puget Sound Clean Air Steve Osguthorpe, City of Newcastle Brantley Bain, Renton Schools June 8, 2020 Washington State Department of Ecology Environmental Review Section PO Box 47703 Olympia, WA 98504-7703 Subject: ENVIRONMENTAL (SEPA) THRESHOLD DETERMINATION Transmitted herewith is a copy of the Environmental Determination for the following project: SEPA DETERMINATION: Determination of Non-Significance (DNS) DETERMINATION DATE: June 8, 2020 PROJECT NAME: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update PROJECT NUMBER: LUA20-000107, ECF Appeals of the environmental determination must be filed pursuant to RMC 4-9-070.R. Please refer to the enclosed Notice of Environmental Determination for complete details. If you have qu estions, please call me at (425) 430-7219. For the Environmental Review Committee, Alex Morganroth Senior Planner NOTICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINATION ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW COMMITTEE RENTON, WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT The Environmental Review Committee has issued a Determination of Non-Significance (DNS) for the following project under the authority of the Renton municipal code. City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update LUA20-000107 Location: City-wide. The applicant, the City of Renton, is requesting SEPA Review for the City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update. The subject plan will reviewed as a non-project action, as defined by Section 197-11 -774 in the Washington Administrative Code. The primary purpose of this plan is to document changes to the City’s water system, identify required system modifications, and appropriately outline capital improvement projects to meet future water demands. Appeals of the environmental determination must be filed pursuant to RMC 4-9-070R. Publication Date: June 12, 2020 APPENDICES | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 Appendix B AGENCY/ADJACENT PURVEYOR COMMENTS AND APPROVAL Water System Plan ‐ Agency Review Draft DistributionCity of RentonKVN_03/25/2020Last revised 01/25/2021State Agency Contact First Name Contact Last NameTitleContact Info ElectronicHard Copies Comments Received Received DateDepartment of Health  Richard RodriguezNW Regional PlannerRichard.Rodriguez@DOH.WA.GOV2 + FlashLetter11/6/2020Department of Health (cc) Brietta CarterNW Regional Engineerbrietta.carter@doh.wa.gov    Email8/14/2020County AgencyContact First Name Contact Last NameTitleContact InfoElectronicHard CopiesKing CountyJaeHillUtilities Technical Review Committee jhill@kingcounty.gov2 + FlashLetter9/10/2020Adjacent PurveyorsContact First Name Contact Last NameTitleContact InfoElectronicHard Copies Consistency checklistSeattle Public UtilitiesKelly O'RourkeWater Conservation ManagerKelly.ORourke@seattle.govno responseSkyway Water and Sewer DistrictCynthia Lamothe General Managercynthial@skywayws.orgemail w/ excel table8/31/2020City of KentSean BauerWater Systems Managersbauer@ci.kent.wa.usemail w/ checklist7/21/2020Hari  Ponnekanti  Public Works Deputy Director/City Engineer Hari.Ponnekanti@TukwilaWA.govAdib  Altallal  Utilities Engineer Adib.Altallal@TukwilaWA.govccCoal Creek Utility DistrictSteve MoyeWater & Sewer TechMoye smoye@ccud.orgno responseKing County Water District #90Darcey PetersonDistrict Managerdarceyp@kcwd90.comno responseCedar River Water and Sewer DistrictMike AmburgeyGeneral Managermamburgey@crwsd.comno responseSoos Creek Water and Sewer DistrictRon SpeerGeneral Managerrspeer@sooscreek.comemail w/ letter8/26/2020Local Governments with jurisdiction Contact First Name Contact Last NameTitleContact InfoElectronicHard Copies Consistency checklistCity of NewcastleSteveOsguthorpeCommunity Development Directorsteveo@newcastlewa.govemail response that checklist is not applicable for Newcastle6/27/2020**SEPA Notification performed by COR Planner, see ERC Agency Letter for agencies notified (key stakeholders)City of TukwilaDOH will send to DOE ‐ no need to send to DOEno response From:Katie Nolan To:"richard.rodriguez@doh.wa.gov" Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:50:51 PM Attachments:DOH Submittal Form 331-397-F.pdf DOH Checklist.pdf Hi Mr. Rodriguez, The City of Renton has prepared our 2019 Water System Plan Update for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to our adjacent utilities and local governments with jurisdiction for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are currently out of the office, working remotely. For immediate review, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at Water Utility Engineering. However, if requested, the City can also provide a hardcopy of this Plan, but may take an additional 2-3 weeks to mail out. Please provide a preferred mailing address and the number of hardcopies requested. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* Attachments: Water System Plan Submittal Form (331-397-F), DOH Water System Plan Checklist From:McAfeeEmailGateway@rentonwa.gov To:Katie Nolan Subject:Delivery Status Bounce Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:53:10 PM Attachments:deliverystatus.txt City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft.msg --- The following addresses had delivery problems --- <Steve.Hirschey@kingcounty.gov> (5.4.1 Recipient address rejected: Access denied. AS(201806281) [CY1GCC01FT010.eop-gcc01.prod.protection.outlook.com]) From:Katie Nolan To:"Cynthia Lamothe" Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:54:36 PM Hi Cynthia, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at COR Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* From:Katie Nolan To:Kelly O"Rourke (kelly.orourke@seattle.gov) Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:54:16 PM Hi Kelly, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is now available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at COR Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* From:Katie Nolan To:"Steve Moye" Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:54:58 PM Hi Steve, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager City of Renton Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* From:Katie Nolan To:"sbauer@ci.kent.wa.us" Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:55:18 PM Attachments:Local Govt Consist Cklst 331-568.docx Hi Mr. Bauer, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at COR Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. Additionally, as you may know, we are required to obtain a consistency review for our water service area from local governments with jurisdiction. I have attached the Local Government Consistency Determination Form and we ask that you please return the completed form, which will be included in the final approved plan. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* Attachment: DOH Local Government Consistency Determination Form From:Katie Nolan To:"steveo@newcastlewa.gov" Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:55:41 PM Attachments:Local Govt Consist Cklst 331-568.docx Hi Mr. Osguthorpe, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at COR Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. Additionally, as you may know, we are required to obtain a consistency review for our water service area from local governments with jurisdiction. I have attached the Local Government Consistency Determination Form and we ask that you please return the completed form, which will be included in the final approved plan. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* Attachment: DOH Local Government Consistency Determination Form From:Katie Nolan To:"Hari.Ponnekanti@TukwilaWA.gov" Cc:"Adib.Altallal@TukwilaWA.gov" Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:55:56 PM Attachments:Local Govt Consist Cklst 331-568.docx Hi Mr. Ponnekanti, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at COR Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. Additionally, as you may know, we are required to obtain a consistency review for our water service area from local governments with jurisdiction. I have attached the Local Government Consistency Determination Form and we ask that you please return the completed form, which will be included in the final approved plan. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* Attachment: DOH Local Government Consistency Determination Form From:Katie Nolan To:"mamburgey@crwsd.com" Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:56:51 PM Hi Mr. Amburgey, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* From:Katie Nolan To:"darceyp@kcwd90.com" Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:56:20 PM Hi Darcey, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* From:Katie Nolan To:"rspeer@sooscreek.com" Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Friday, June 26, 2020 6:57:19 PM Hi Mr. Speer, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* From:McAfeeEmailGateway@rentonwa.gov To:Katie Nolan Subject:Delivery Status Bounce Date:Tuesday, June 30, 2020 12:27:40 PM Attachments:deliverystatus.txt City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update Transmittal of Agency Review Draft.msg --- The following addresses had delivery problems --- <Steve.Hirschey@kingcounty.gov> (5.4.1 Recipient address rejected: Access denied. AS(201806281) [DM2GCC01FT006.eop-gcc01.prod.protection.outlook.com]) From:Katie Nolan To:"Hill, Jae" Subject:City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Tuesday, June 30, 2020 1:30:28 PM Jae, Great, I was on the right track! The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update can be downloaded from our website at COR Water Utility Engineering (the files are too large to email). This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. If requested later on, we can provide hardcopies for the review. Please let me know if you need anything else for the submittal. This is my first time going through this process. And if you have any questions regarding the draft plan, please feel free to contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* From: Hill, Jae <jhill@kingcounty.gov> Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 1:13 PM To: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Subject: RE: King County UTRC - Water System Plan Review Hi Katie, I’m the new UTRC chair (aka the new Steve Hirschey), so please send it to me. We’re only accepting digital submittals right now anyway for draft plans, so that all works. Submitting your plan within the next week or two should get you on September’s UTRC agenda. All of our meetings are being held remotely right now, for better or worse. Please let me know if you have any other questions. Regards, Jae Hill, AICP, CFM Principal Planner | Utilities Technical Review Committee King County Dept. of Local Services jhill@kingcounty.gov o: 206-263-5690 | m: 206-485-6499 PLEASE NOTE– King County Permitting is temporarily suspending lobby services in our Snoqualmie and Vashon Island offices. For details of available and alternative services, please read our customer service bulletin From: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 12:58 PM To: Hill, Jae <jhill@kingcounty.gov> Subject: King County UTRC - Water System Plan Review [EXTERNAL Email Notice! ] External communication is important to us. Be cautious of phishing attempts. Do not click or open suspicious links or attachments. Hello, I’m reaching out because the City of Renton is prepared to submit our draft 2019 Water System Plan Update to the King County UTRC for review. To date, our correspondence has been with Steve Hirschey, but I received a message that my recent email attempts to Steve have failed. The emails keep bouncing back. Because of the 2019 coronavirus situation, City of Renton staff are working remotely and we are only able to provide an electronic pdf version of the draft plan at this time. Could you please confirm whom I should send the electronic submittal to? Thank you, Katie Nolan Water Utility Engineer, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 rentonwa.gov/pw *The best way to reach me is by email. I am currently teleworking and have limited access to my work phone* CAUTION: This email originated from outside the City of Renton. Do not click links, reply or open attachments unless you know the content is safe. From:Katie Nolan To:ORourke, Kelly Subject:RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft - following up Date:Thursday, November 19, 2020 11:30:00 AM Attachments:image001.png image003.png Hi Kelly, Just wanted to touch base again about SPU comments for Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update. We are in the process of finalizing our comments log because we recently received comments back from DOH. The comments from DOH and others appear to be pretty minor so we anticipate a quick turnaround. There is still some time to prepare your comments, but I think we will be trying to present the plan to our city council directly after the holidays. Thank you, Katie Nolan (she/her) Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 (desk) The best way to reach me is by email. I am currently teleworking and have limited access to my desk phone. From: ORourke, Kelly <Kelly.ORourke@seattle.gov> Sent: Saturday, September 26, 2020 9:32 PM To: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Subject: RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft - following up Hi Katie – I’m afraid I let this slip thru the cracks with all the chaos this summer. I am heading out tomorrow on vacation and will return on Tuesday Oct 6. I will make this a priority when I return and let you know then when you can expect comments from us. I apologize for not getting the review done in a timely manner. Thank you - Kelly Kelly O’Rourke Water Conservation Manager City of Seattle, Seattle Public Utilities Saving Water Partnership 206-684-5881 | kelly.orourke@seattle.gov Facebook | Twitter From: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Sent: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 3:19 PM To: ORourke, Kelly <Kelly.ORourke@seattle.gov> Subject: RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft - following up CAUTION: External Email Hi Kelly, I’m checking back to see if SPU has had a chance to review our draft 2019 Water System Plan Update. This summer has been crazy especially given that we recently experienced some major computer/email issues here at Renton so just wanted to follow-up to make sure I hadn’t missed anything from you guys during our cyber incident. We have received comments back from several other adjacent systems and anticipate hearing back from DOH soon so we’ll be moving forward on finalizing the plan. Hope you're doing well. Thanks! Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 The best way to reach me is by email. I am currently teleworking and have limited access to my work phone. From: Katie Nolan Sent: Friday, June 26, 2020 6:54 PM To: Kelly O'Rourke (kelly.orourke@seattle.gov) <kelly.orourke@seattle.gov> Subject: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update – Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Hi Kelly, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is now available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at COR Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* Katie Nolan Subject:FW: Comment Letter on 2019 Water System Plan Draft (DOH Submittal #20-0803) From: Wood, Doug (ECY) <DWOO461@ECY.WA.GOV>   Sent: Thursday, August 13, 2020 3:21 PM  To: Abdoul Gafour <Agafour@Rentonwa.gov>  Cc: Rodriguez, Richard (DOH) <Richard.Rodriguez@DOH.WA.GOV>  Subject: Comment Letter on 2019 Water System Plan Draft (DOH Submittal #20‐0803)    August 14, 2020 Abdoul Gafour, Manager City Renton Water Utility Engineering 1055 South Grady Way Renton, WA 98057 RE: Water System Plan Comment Letter City of Renton – 2019 Water System Plan (DOH Submittal #20-0803) Dear Mr. Gafour: Thank you for the opportunity to review the City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan (WSP), dated March 2020 and received by Ecology on August 10, 2020. Consistent with the Memorandum of Understanding between the Department of Health (DOH) and Department of Ecology (Ecology), regarding joint review and approval of WSPs, this letter is being sent to your office with Ecology’s comments. Specific elements of the WSP review included the Water Rights Self-Assessment as well as additional water rights documentation, including Ecology’s water right files and previous City of Renton WSPs and project reports, as applicable. My review did not reveal any major issues of concern with the WSP and supplemental documentation. There are however a few lesser issues that should addressed. The terms used to identify the city’s water rights were not the same as those used in Ecology’s database, which made it difficult to access files for review. Since 1971 Ecology has referenced water rights using what are referred to as tracking numbers. This system removes issues with duplication of certificate numbers for surface and groundwater rights issued prior to 1971 and with 1945 groundwater claims/declarations. The table below provides a list of Renton’s thirteen (13) certificates and four (4) permits, including the tracking numbers, as found in Ecology’s databases. Table 1. City of Renton Water Rights Certificate Tracking # Source Priority QiGPM QiCFS QaA QaNA  SWC 463 S1‐*02983C Springbrook Creek 17‐May‐30 1,032 2.30 1,650    GWC 884‐D G1‐*00814S Well 4 01‐Nov‐42 170   273.5    GWC 886‐D G1‐*00816S RW‐1 01‐Jan‐44 1,040   1,676    GWC 887‐D G1‐*00817S  RW‐2 01‐Jan‐44 1,040   838    GWC 3591‐A G1‐*03040C PW‐5A 18‐Feb‐53 1,300   2,000    GWC 5838‐A G1‐*08042C  RW‐1 14‐Apr‐66 960      1,536  GWC 5835‐A G1‐*08040C  RW‐3 14‐Apr‐66 1,600      2,560  GWC 5836‐A G1‐*08041C  RW‐1, 2. 3 14‐Apr‐66 1,960      3,136  GWC 5834‐A G1‐*08039C PW‐5A 14‐Apr‐66 200   320    GWC 6775‐A G1‐*09349C PW‐8 01‐Apr‐68 3,000   4,532 307  GWC 6776‐A G1‐*09985C PW‐8 21‐Jan‐69 500   800    G1‐20605C G1‐20605C Infiltration Gallery 03‐May‐73 1,050   1,680    Certificate Tracking # Source Priority QiGPM QiCFS QaA QaNA  G1‐24191C G1‐24191C PW‐9 18‐Oct‐82 1,300   1,040    G1‐24781P G1‐24781P PW‐11 02‐Jan‐86 1,600      1,792  G1‐24782P G1‐24782P PW‐12 02‐Jan‐86 1,600      1,792  G1‐25396P G1‐25396P PW‐11 13‐Feb‐89 900      1,008  G1‐25397P G1‐25397P PW‐17 23‐Feb‐89 1,500      1,680  Totals  20,752   14,809.5 13,811  QiGPM = Pumping Rate in Gallons per Minute   QiCFS = Original SW Qi in Cubic Feet per Second   QaA = Additive (Primary) Annual Quantity in Acre‐Feet per Year   QaNA = Non‐Additive (Supplemental) Annual Quantity in Acre‐Feet per Year   Also, please note that there is a typo in section 6.4.2 on page 6-5 states there are five (5) permits when only four (4) are shown in Table 6.2 on page 6.7. Ecology found that there are currently only four (4) permits in the Renton water rights portfolio. Please contact me with any questions you may have at (425) 649-7077 or by email at Doug.Wood@ecy.wa.gov. Sincerely, Douglas H. Wood, M.S., P.Geo., LHG Hydrogeologist and Permitting Specialist Water Resources Program ecc: Richard Rodriguez, Department of Health        This communication is a public record and may be subject to disclosure as per the Washington State Public Records Act, RCW 42.56.    CAUTION: This email originated from outside the City of Renton. Do not click links, reply or open attachments unless you know the content is safe. From:Hill, Jae To:Katie Nolan Subject:RE: Draft Renton WSP Comments Date:Thursday, December 03, 2020 12:14:05 PM Attachments:Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916 signed.pdf Hi Katie, There were no additional comments from the UTRC added to the 9/16 draft letter, so it can be considered the final comments of the UTRC. We request that, when you resubmit, you include a letter that addresses these points (even though some were explained on the record at UTRC) and as applicable where the information can be found in the revised plan. We also ask that, if you’ve made significant or important changes based on review from other organizations, that you identify those and direct us to them in the new version as well. Thanks, Jae Hill, AICP, CFM Principal Planner | Utilities Technical Review Committee King County Dept. of Local Services jhill@kingcounty.gov o: 206-263-5690 | m: 206-485-6499 PLEASE NOTE– King County Permitting is temporarily suspending lobby services in our Snoqualmie and Vashon Island offices. For details of available and alternative services, please read our customer service bulletin From: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2020 11:32 AM To: Hill, Jae <jhill@kingcounty.gov> Subject: RE: Draft Renton WSP Comments [EXTERNAL Email Notice! ] External communication is important to us. Be cautious of phishing attempts. Do not click or open suspicious links or attachments. Hi Jae, Renton is in the process of finalizing the comments log for our 2019 Water System Plan Update. I just wanted to follow up with you to see if UTRC would be issuing a revised list of comments based on our discussion during the September 16 skype meeting. Thank you, Katie Nolan (she/her) Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 (desk) The best way to reach me is by email. I am currently teleworking and have limited access to my desk phone. From: Hill, Jae <jhill@kingcounty.gov> Sent: Thursday, September 10, 2020 2:55 PM To: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Subject: Draft Renton WSP Comments Katie, Attached is a draft comment letter that the UTRC will deliberate on at next week’s meeting. Included are a combination of comments, questions, and requests based on my review and analysis. Please note that you don’t need to have materials prepared or submitted before the meeting. You’ll have an opportunity to obtain clarification, and to provide any answers that are readily available. Also note that the UTRC may make changes/additions/subtractions to this letter at the meeting, or after. Please forward this along to your team. We look forward to discussing next Wednesday. Regards, Jae Hill, AICP, CFM Principal Planner | Utilities Technical Review Committee King County Dept. of Local Services jhill@kingcounty.gov o: 206-263-5690 | m: 206-485-6499 PLEASE NOTE– King County Permitting is temporarily suspending lobby services in our Snoqualmie and Vashon Island offices. For details of available and alternative services, please read our customer service bulletin Utilities Technical Review Committee Department of Local Services 35030 SE Douglas St #210 Snoqualmie, WA 98065 www.kingcounty.gov City of Renton Water System Plan Review – Initial Comments September 16, 2020 Katie Nolan [sent via email only] On June 30, 2020, the King County Utilities Technical Review Committee (UTRC) received a water system plan for review from the City of Renton. On September 16, 2020, the UTRC held an open public meeting and deliberated the plan content. The Committee agreed that the plan is thorough and very well prepared. The UTRC requests the following changes or clarifications before advancing the plan to the King County Council for approval: • We request city limits to be shown on all maps, to better identify which areas are subject to City jurisdiction, and which are unincorporated county. • Figure ES.1 and 1.3 – Service Area Map – The service area and future service area are shown as overlapping in the southern portion of Skyway-West Hill. Please clarify. • Figure ES.1 and 1.3 – Service Area Map – Areas depicted as “Urban Growth Boundary” should be correctly labeled as “Potential Annexation Areas” or “Unincorporated County.” • Figure ES.2 and 2.1 – Water Facility Locations – There is no pressure zone in the northeast corner, nor infrastructure in much of the western portion of the Earlington 370 pressure zone. • Figures 3.1 and 3.2 – Maps should show zoning and land use of future service areas as well as the current service areas. • Figure 3.2 – Future Land Use Based on Zoning – The map is correct in showing the areas in UKC in the southern end of SWH as SF land use, but many of them can be redeveloped to yield 3-4 units. • Figure 3.8 – Historical Consumption Trends by Customer Category – The bottom grouping shows two customers decreasing by nearly 5% and one increasing by 8% but it is unclear which number goes with which customer, and the 8% number seems like a very large change compared to what the lines are showing. • Table 3.9 – What explains the significant drop in connections from 2009-2010? • Table 3.11 – Portions of the Earlington 370 zone (and adjacent West Hill zone) are currently large- lot single-family zoning or multi-family that may redevelop and quadruple the number of units. Would such growth be supported with minimal impacts to planning forecasts? • Question: Does the City have a program of providing reduced rates for seniors or low-income property owners or renters? • Question: Skyway Water and Sewer is capped at 300,000 gallons. Is there an overage charge to Skyway if they exceed? • Table 3.17 ERU Projections –Why does the medium demand scenarios exceed the high demand scenario? City of Renton Water System Plan – Initial Review Prepared by J. Hill | 9/16/2020 2 • 5.3.1.6 Urban Growth Area – The Urban Growth Area is different from the Potential Annexation Areas. PAAs may be annexed to the City, while the Urban Growth Area is a regional boundary. Please use PAAs instead. • 5.3.1.16 Water Service to Properties in King County – Please clarify this section. We’re unclear by what a “developed area within unincorporated King County that is within the City’s RSA. However, there are three additional areas outside of the RSA served by Renton Water…” • 5.3.1.2 – Service Availability – Is there a definition or decision criteria of “timely and reasonable” used by Renton? • 7.3.3.3 – West Hill 495 Storage Recommendation – Is the only solution to reduce the operating band? Is this suitable for future growth in the associated pressure zones? • 9.4.7.2 – Water Conservation Program Implementation – Given the large non-English-speaking population in the area, are there such materials available in additional languages or simplified English? • Its unclear, given the resolution of maps such as 9.4 (CIP Specific Project Priority) where the current service boundaries and infrastructure are in relationship to properties on S 134th St between S Langston Rd and SW Sunset Blvd. Given King County’s ongoing Skyway-West Hill Subarea Planning process, we request a specific map for this area to aid in discussions about land use planning in the area. The UTRC thanks you for the opportunity to review and comment. We look forward to seeing a completed plan. Regards, Jae Hill, AICP, CFM Principal Planner | Chair of the Utilities Technical Review Committee King County Dept. of Local Services jhill@kingcounty.gov o: 206-263-5690 From:Bauer, Sean To:Katie Nolan Subject:RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Tuesday, July 21, 2020 8:27:55 AM Attachments:0478_001.pdf Hi Katie; Attached is our completed Local Consistency Form. Let me know if you needanything else. I don’t have any comments on the plan, looks good to me. Thanks. Sean M. Bauer, Water System Manager Water Division | Public Works Department 220 Fourth Avenue South, Kent, WA 98032 Phone 253-856-5610 | Cell 253-740-7089 sbauer@KentWA.gov CITY OF KENT, WASHINGTON KentWA.gov Facebook Twitter YouTube PLEASE CONSIDER THE ENVIRONMENT BEFORE PRINTING THIS E-MAIL From: Katie Nolan [mailto:KNolan@Rentonwa.gov] Sent: Friday, June 26, 2020 6:55 PM To: Bauer, Sean <SBauer@kentwa.gov> Subject: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft EXTERNAL EMAIL Hi Mr. Bauer, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at COR Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. Additionally, as you may know, we are required to obtain a consistency review for our water service area from local governments with jurisdiction. I have attached the Local Government Consistency Determination Form and we ask that you please return the completed form, which will be included in the final approved plan. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* Attachment: DOH Local Government Consistency Determination Form fuw;;rn ""'#;rl,:lt;1.ilfi ill;l]"'' LOCa I Government Consistency Determination Form Water System Name: City of Renton PWS ID: 718501 Planning/Engineering Document Title: 201-9 Water System Plan Updat Plan Date: March 2020 Draft Local Government with Jurisdiction Conducting Review:At Before the Department of Health (DOH) approves a planning or engineering submittal under Section 100 or Section LLO, the local government must review the documentation the municipal water supplier provides to prove the submittal is consistent with local comprehensive plans, land use plans and development regulations (WAC 246-290-108). Submittals under Section L05 require a local consistency determination if the municipal water supplier requests a water right place-of-use expansion. The review must address the elements identified below as they relate to water service. By signing this form, the local government reviewer confirms the document under review is consistent with applicable local plans and regulations. If the local government reviewer identifies an inconsistency, he or she should include the citation from the applicable comprehensive plan or development regulation and explain how to resolve the inconsistency, or confirm that the inconsistency is not applicable by marking N/A' See more instructions on reverse' Forusebywater Forusebyrocar Local Government Consistency Statement Identify the page(s) in submittal Yes or Not Applicable a) The water system service area is consistent with the adopted land use and zonino within the service area.3-1- to 3-6 Not Aoolicable b) The orowth projection used to forecast water demand is consistent with the adopted city or county's population growth projections. If a different growth projection is used, provide an explanation of the alternative growth projection and methodology. 3-38 to 3-49 Not Applicable c) For cities and towns that provide water service: All water service area policies of the city or town described in the plan conform to all relevant utility service extension ord inances. 5-3 to 5-5 Not Applicable d) Service area policies for new service connections conform to the adopted local plans and adopted development regulations of all cities and counties with jurisdiction over the service area. 5-3 to 5-5 Not Applicable e) Other relevant elements related to water supply are addressed in the water system plan, if applicable. This may include Coordinated Water System Plans, RegionalWastewater Plans, Reclaimed Water Plans, Groundwater Management Area Plans, and the Capital Facilities Element of local comprehensive plans. Not Applicable I certify that the above statements are true to the best of my knowledge and that these specific elements are nt with ad opted local plans and development regulations I Sign Date v( 1 7-l Zoza Printed Name, Title, & Jurisdiction h fuUe rrt th elf Consistency Review Guidance For Use by Local Governments ond Municipal Water Suppliers This checklist may be used to meet the requirements of WAC 246-290-108. When using an alternative format, it must describe all of the elements; 1-a), b), c), d), and e), when they apply. For water system plans (WSP), a consistency review is required for the service area and any additional areas where a municipal water supplier wants to expand its water right's place of use For small water system management programs, a consistency review is only required for areas where a municipal water supplier wants to expand its water right's place-of-use. If no water right place-of-use expansion is requested, a consistency review is not required. For engineering documents, a consistency review is required for areas where a municipal water supplier wants to expand its water right's place-of-use (water system plan amendment is required). For noncommunity water systems, a consistency review is required when requesting a place-of-use expansion. All engineering documents must be submitted with a service area map (WAC 246-290- 110(4XbXii)). A) Documenting Consistency: The planning or engineering document must include the following when applicable. a) A copy of the adopted land use/zoning map corresponding to the service area. The uses provided in the WSP should be consistent with the adopted land use/zoning map. Include any other portions of comprehensive plans or development regulations that relate to water supply planning. b) A copy of the growth projections that correspond to the service area. If the local population growth projections are not used, explain in detail why the chosen projections more accurately describe the expected growth rate. Explain how it is consistent with the adopted land use. c) Include water service area policies and show that they are consistent with the utility service extension ordinances within the city or town boundaries. This applies fo cifies and towns only. d) All service area policies for how new water service will be provided to new customers. e) Other relevant elements the Department of Health determines are related to water supply planning. See Local Government Consistency - Other Relevant Elements, Policy 8.07, September 2009. B) Documenting an Inconsistency: Please document the inconsistency, include the citation from the comprehensive plan or development regulation, and explain how to resolve the inconsistency. C) Documenting a Lack of Local Review for Consistency: Where the local government with jurisdiction did not provide a consistency review, document efforts made and the amount of time provided to the local government for review. Please include: name of contact, date, and efforts made (letters, phone calls, and emails). To self-certify, please contact the DOH Planner. The Department of Health is an equal opportunity agency. For persons with disabilities, this document is available on request in other formats. To submit a request, please call L-800-525-0127 (TTY 1-800-833-6388). February 2016 Page2 of 2 From:Cynthia Lamothe To:Katie Nolan Subject:RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Monday, August 31, 2020 7:23:59 PM Attachments:City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsx Hi Katie, Please see the attached spreadsheet with comments. Please feel free to call me if you have any questions or need more detail. Thank you, Cynthia Lamothe | General Manager Skyway Water & Sewer District | 6723 S 124th Street | Seattle WA 98178 T 206-772-7343 | F 206-772-5860 E-mail Notice. This e-mail and any attachments and replies are considered public documents and are subject to public disclosure under the Public Records Act. If you are not the intended recipient, please delete the e-mail and notify the sender. From: Cynthia Lamothe Sent: Monday, August 31, 2020 10:31 AM To: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Subject: RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Hi Katie, Hope you are doing okay. We are in the process of reviewing the Plan and I’m checking to see if your review deadline has been extended and/or if you’ve already received comments from DOH or when you expect them. Thanks! Cynthia Lamothe | General Manager Skyway Water & Sewer District | 6723 S 124th Street | Seattle WA 98178 T 206-772-7343 | F 206-772-5860 E-mail Notice. This e-mail and any attachments and replies are considered public documents and are subject to public disclosure under the Public Records Act. If you are not the intended recipient, please delete the e-mail and notify the sender. From: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 4:30 PM To: Cynthia Lamothe <cynthial@skywayws.org> Subject: RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Excel is perfect! Appreciate it! -Katie From: Cynthia LamotheSent: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 3:14 PMTo: Katie NolanSubject: RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Hi Katie, Sorry you’re furloughed, but I understand the city’s challenge. I can easily setup a spreadsheet based on your screen shot below and we typically use Microsoft Excel Worksheet (.xlsx). Will that be okay or would you prefer to send me a log you’ve prepared? Thank you, Cynthia Lamothe | General Manager Skyway Water & Sewer District | 6723 S 124th Street | Seattle WA 98178 T 206-772-7343 | F 206-772-5860 E-mail Notice. This e-mail and any attachments and replies are considered public documents and are subject to public disclosure under the Public Records Act. If you are not the intended recipient, please delete the e-mail and notify the sender. From: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 11:16 AM To: Cynthia Lamothe <cynthial@skywayws.org> Subject: RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Hi Cynthia, My apologies for not getting back to you yesterday. Through the end of July, I am out Mondays on furlough to help respond to the economic challenges the City is facing from COVID-19. Our maintenance crews are working normal schedules, but taking similar safety precautions such as self- screenings and face coverings. I really appreciate your response and question - a spreadsheet format would work great for us because we will compile all comments into a spreadsheet for the final plan, similar to the 2012 WSP comment log shown below. Noting the page or section for each comment would be very helpful for our reference. Feel free to reach out with any other questions! Thank you so much! I hope all is well. Katie Nolan Water Utility Engineer, PW (425) 430-7335 The best way to reach me is by email. I am currently teleworking and have limited access to my work phone. From: Cynthia Lamothe <cynthial@skywayws.org> Sent: Monday, June 29, 2020 9:00 AM To: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Subject: RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Hi Katie, I hope you’re doing well. Our office has been working remotely and split shifts. After slowly ramping u[, today is the first day that our entire staff is back at the office, with self-screening and appropriate PPE. However, our lobby remains closed to walk-in traffic. I was able to download the plan and appendices. Before we begin review, is there a certain format you prefer the comments to be provided in, such as a spreadsheet with columns for paragraph reference, comment, and response or simply in letter format? If there is a format yo9u prefer, please let me know. Otherwise, we are likely to provide them in spreadsheet format. Thank you, Cynthia Lamothe | General Manager Skyway Water & Sewer District | 6723 S 124th Street | Seattle WA 98178 T 206-772-7343 | F 206-772-5860 E-mail Notice. This e-mail and any attachments and replies are considered public documents and are subject to public disclosure under the Public Records Act. If you are not the intended recipient, please delete the e-mail and notify the sender. From: Katie Nolan <KNolan@Rentonwa.gov> Sent: Friday, June 26, 2020 6:55 PM To: Cynthia Lamothe <cynthial@skywayws.org> Subject: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Hi Cynthia, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at COR Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* Skyway Water and Sewer DistrictCJL 8‐31‐2020Comment LogComprehesive Water PlanCity of Renton#Comment Source Chapter Section/PageCommentResponseResponder1 SWSD ES ES‐1ES.1 Add space in "next10" in the 2nd paragraph 2 SWSD ES ES‐3/Figure ES.3Revisions are needed to the piping configuration between the Dimmitt BPS and the Skyway Zones 480 & 550.3 SWSD 2 2‐3/Figure 2.1Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)4SWSD2 2‐5/Figure 2.2Revisions are needed to the piping configuration between the Dimmitt BPS and the Skyway Zones 480 & 550.5 SWSD 2 2‐14/2.2.2.9Reconcile reference to Dimmitt BPS intertie (single intertie) and Table 2.3 with  hydraulic profile indicating 3 intertie points.6 SWSD3‐12/3.3.2Largest consumers ‐ please clarify which categories Skyway and other largest consumers were subtracted from for analysis purposes.7 SWSD 3 3‐21/Figure 3.9Please check Skyway Wholesale consumption for 2010.  Our records indicate approximately 141,840 gpd consumed.8 SWSD 3 3‐35/Table 3.9 Historical Number of ERU's by Customer Category9SWSD3 3‐39/3.5.1Is the Demand Projection Methodology as described in this section intended to account for potential increased demand from Skyway?103 3‐41/3.5.2.1 In the second paragraph, first line, "selected and ERU" should be "selected an ERU".11 SWSD 5 5‐8/5.3.2.7Would the City's existing emergency intertie/agreement with Skyway be considered to "serve its exisitng customers"?12SWSD6 6‐25/Figure 6.1Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)13 SWSD 6 6‐28/Table 6.10Dimmitt BPS has an emergency generator, so it seems like the Reliable Capacity would be 1,600 gpm.14 SWSD 7 7‐3/Figure 7.1Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)15 SWSD7 Chapter 7Confirm that the Storage Capacity quantities allocated to Skyway in the Contract for Water Supply and Joint Storage and Transmission (CAG‐93‐097) are accounted for in the storage analysis. 16 SWSD 7 7‐6/7.3.1.1The 2nd paragraph either has an apotrophe that's not needed or is mssing text (….determined from the hydraulic model' supply sources on and off settings.)17 SWSD 7 7‐11/Figure 7.3Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)18 SWSD7 7‐21/Figure 7.4Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)19 SWSD 7 7‐25/Figure 7.5Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)20 SWSD 7 7‐27/Figure 7.6Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)21SWSD7 7‐29/Figure 7.7Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)22 SWSD 7 7‐35/Figure 7.9Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)23 SWSD7 7‐37/Figure 7.10Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)24 SWSD 7 7‐45/Figure 7.12Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)25 SWSD7 7‐47/Figure 7.13Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)26 SWSD 7 7‐49/Figure 7.14Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)27 SWSD7 7‐57/Figure 7.15Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)28 SWSD 7 7‐65/Figure 7.17Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)29 SWSD7 7‐75/Figure 7.18Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)30 SWSD 7 7‐77/Figure 7.19Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)31 SWSD9 9‐19/Figure 9.3Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)32 SWSD 9 9‐21/Figure 9.4Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.) 33 SWSD 9 9‐23/Figure 9.5Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)34 SWSD 9 9‐25/Figure 9.6Revise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.) From:Steve Osguthorpe To:Katie Nolan Cc:Jeff Brauns; Patrick Subject:RE: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Date:Saturday, June 27, 2020 7:05:57 AM Dear Ms. Nolan: Thank you for providing notice of Renton’s water system plan. It does not appear that the plan overlaps into the City of Newcastle jurisdictional boundaries (Newcastle’s water is provided by Coal Creek Utility District). I am therefore not sure if the Local Government Consistency Determination Form you are asking me to complete and return to you is relevant to Newcastle. Unless I hear otherwise from you, I will assume that it is not relevant and will not be returning the form. If there are specific issues you would like us to review or respond to, please let me know and I’ll try to coordinate the response you need. Again, thank you for keeping us informed. It is very much appreciated. Steve Osguthorpe, AICP Community Development Director (425) 649.4143 Ext. 112 City of Newcastle | 12835 Newcastle Way, Suite 200, Newcastle, WA 98056-1316 From: Katie Nolan [mailto:KNolan@Rentonwa.gov] Sent: Friday, June 26, 2020 6:56 PM To: Steve Osguthorpe <SteveO@newcastlewa.gov> Subject: City of Renton 2019 Water System Plan Update - Transmittal of Agency Review Draft Hi Mr. Osguthorpe, The City of Renton’s 2019 Water System Plan Update is available for review and comment. This Water System Plan has been transmitted to the Washington State Department of Health, King County, and adjacent water systems for their review in accordance with WAC 246-290. Given the 2019 Novel Coronavirus situation, we are providing an electronic pdf version, which can be downloaded from our website at COR Water Utility Engineering. If you have any comments after your review of the draft Water System Plan, please provide them to me in writing no later than August 31, 2020. Upon receipt of comments from DOH, the City will promptly revise the plan as necessary and resubmit it to DOH for final approval. Comments received after August 31, 2020 may not be addressed in the final version. Additionally, as you may know, we are required to obtain a consistency review for our water service area from local governments with jurisdiction. I have attached the Local Government Consistency Determination Form and we ask that you please return the completed form, which will be included in the final approved plan. If you have any questions, please contact me by email knolan@rentonwa.gov. I will be teleworking throughout the review period and have limited access to my work phone. Sincerely, Katie Nolan Project Manager Water Utility Engineering, PW City of Renton (425) 430-7335 *Please note that the download may take several minutes due to the large file size* Attachment: DOH Local Government Consistency Determination Form Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson Responsible Status of Change1ES‐1SWSDES.1 Add space in "next10" in the 2nd paragraph Noted.Typo will be fixed.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed2ES‐3/Figure ES.3SWSDRevisions are needed to the piping configuration between the Dimmitt BPS and the Skyway Zones 480 & 550.Noted. Figure ES.3 will be updated based on supplement to comment long received from Skyway. City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD comment log supplement.pdfAurelie Completed3 General DOHProvide a PE Stamp with the final WSP. Final WSP will be stamped.Stamp added. DOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie Completed4 General DOHThe water system plan must meet the consumer input process outlined in WAC 246‐290‐100(8). Please include documentation of a consumer meeting discussing the WSP, prior to DOH approval of the WSP.City will coordinate internally for consumer meeting in January 2021.Documentation will be added when ready.DOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie Completed5GeneralDOHPrior to DOH approval, the City's governing body must approve and adopt the WSP.Final WSP will be presented to Council for approval No change.DOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie Completed6 General DOHA signed SEPA Checklist and DNS was included in the draft WSP.Ok.No change. DOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie Completed7 General DOHInclude any comments from adajecent purveyors and the City's response to those comments.Noted.Comments from adjacent purveyors and response will be included in the appendicesDOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie Completed8General CORChange project title from 2020 to 2019 ‐ change Gregg Zimmerman to Martin PastuchaNoted.Change will be made in the text and figures.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed9Figure ES.2CORhard to see wells b/c of MVH label can we move this labelNoted.Figures will be updated accordingly.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed10Section ES.6CORrepeated sentences; please remove this paragraph Noted.repeated sentences will be removed.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie CompletedExecutive Summary Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson Responsible Status of Change1Section 1.7 ‐ Existing Service Characteristics and Figure 1.4Soos Creek Water & Sewer DistrictIt is noted the City is considering revisions to the boundary line with the District. It is unclear in Figure 1.4 what is under consideration. Please provide clarification on the City's intent for revisions. It is also noted that the City does not propose, under this Water System Plan Update, these revisions be implemented, just noted for future consideration.The City will directly coordinate with Soos Creek. These boundary changes are not included in the Water System Plan, but highlighted as opportunities and needs for further coordination with the City and Soos Creek.No change.SKM_C75920082513310.pdfAurelie Completed2General Water Service BoundarySoos Creek Water & Sewer DistrictIn order to confirm that both the City and District's Water Service Boundaries align, we request the City share its GIS shapefile so it can be overlaid with the District's boundary to avoid any future conflicts.Noted. The City will coordinate directly with Soos Creek to confirm boundary line and next steps.No change.SKM_C75920082513310.pdfAurelie Completed3Section 1.5CORPlease change to Mr. Martin Pastucha Noted. Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed4Figure 1.2CORremove note, update chief administration officer, and administrator public worksNoted. Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed5Section 1.7 CORUpdate CAG‐083‐91 to CAG‐91‐083 Noted.  Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed6Section 1.8CORUpdate CAG‐083‐91 to CAG‐91‐083 Noted.  Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed7Section 1.12CORChange acknowledgements per City's commentsNoted. Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie CompletedChapter 1 ‐ Introduction Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson Responsible Status of Change12‐3/Figure 2.1SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 2.1 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed22‐5/Figure 2.2SWSDRevisions are needed to the piping configuration between the Dimmitt BPS and the Skyway Zones 480 & 550.Noted. Figure 2.2 will be updated based on supplement to comment long received from Skyway. City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD comment log supplement.pdfAurelie Completed32‐14/2.2.2.9SWSDReconcile reference to Dimmitt BPS intertie (single intertie) and Table 2.3 with  hydraulic profile indicating 3 intertie points.With revisions for Figure 2.2/ES.3, there are two interties with Skyway:1. Skyway Wholesale2. Dimmitt BPS (includes connection to Skyway 550 Zone and 460 Zone). No updates needed to Table 2.3 and Section 2.2.2.9.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD comment log supplement.pdfAurelie Completed4 DOHProvide a determinations of local government consistency from the City of Renton Planning Dept.Ok. City will work with Planning Department.Document was added to the final WSP.DOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie Completed5 DOHKing County UTRC will review your WSP. Please respond to their issues. Adequate responses to their issues will be necessary in order to receive a WSP Adoption Ordinance from King County.Noted. King County UTRC provided comments and all will be addressed.Responses to King County UTRC will be incorporated in the Final WSP, record of comments will be included in the appendices.DOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie Completed6Figure 2.2CORUpdate hydraulic profile per City's commentsNoted.  Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed7Table 2.5CORChange note (3) from 2020 to 2021Noted. Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed8Table 2.4CORUpdate elevations to match system analysisNoted. Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie CompletedChapter 2 ‐ Existing System Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson Responsible Status of Change13‐12/3.3.2SWSDLargest consumers ‐ please clarify which categories Skyway and other largest consumers were subtracted from for analysis purposes.Noted, calcs will be checked and revised as needed. Changes will be made if needed.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed23‐21/Figure 3.9SWSDPlease check Skyway Wholesale consumption for 2010.  Our records indicate approximately 141,840 gpd consumed.Data shows Skyway Wholesale consumption for 2010 is 64,040 CCF (131,000 gpd). Figure 3.9 can be updated to reflect records from Skyway.The Skyway Wholesale consumption will be updated for 2010 in Figure 3.9.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed33‐35/Table 3.9SWSDHistorical Number of ERU's by Customer CategoryNo apostrophe needed in ERUs Change will be made.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed43‐39/3.5.1SWSDIs the Demand Projection Methodology as described in this section intended to account for potential increased demand from Skyway?No, the demand projection methodology for the largest consumer demands is outlined in Section 3.5.2.6. No change.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed53‐41/3.5.2.1SWSDIn the second paragraph, first line, "selected and ERU" should be "selected an ERU".Noted.Typo will be fixed.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed6Figure 3.8CORAdd labels for industrial, other, governmentNoted.Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed7Section 3.3.3.1CORText editsNoted.Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed8Section 3.4CORcould we add a table that shows  population data per pressure zonemaybe just for 2017,  2030, and 2040?would be a helpful table to reference for other projectsNoted, we can use the PSRC data and create a population and employement increase tableTables will be added in the chapter. FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgNatalie Completed9Table 3.18CORDP format ‐ move ADD on first lineNoted.Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed10Table 3.19CORDP format ‐ move ADD on first lineNoted.Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie CompletedChapter 3 ‐ Planning Data, and Water Demand Forecasts Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference Docs Person Responsible Status of Changeno commentChapter 4 ‐ Water Use Efficiency and Conservation Plan Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson Responsible Status of Change15‐8/5.3.2.7SWSDWould the City's existing emergency intertie/agreement with Skyway be considered to "serve its exisitng customers"?During emergency situations the City would first look to use our interties with SPU. The City would use this existing emergency intertie with Skyway only during an emergency situation where water is needed to serve a small portion of West Hill.”No change.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelieNot completedChapter 5 ‐ Policies, Criteria, and Standards Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No. Section/Page Comment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson Responsible Status of Change1 6‐25/Figure 6.1SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 6.1 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed2 6‐28/Table 6.10SWSDDimmitt BPS has an emergency generator, so it seems like the Reliable Capacity would be 1,600 gpm.Because Dimmitt BPS is considered an emergency source, it is not considered as reliable capacity.No change.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed3The terms used to identify the city’s water rights were not the same as those used in Ecology’s database, which made it difficult to access files for review. Since 1971 Ecology has referenced water rights using what are referred to as tracking numbers. This system removes issues with duplication of certificate numbers for surface and groundwater rights issued prior to 1971 and with 1945 groundwater claims/declarations. The table below provides a list of Renton’s thirteen (13) certificates and four (4) permits, including the tracking numbers, as found in Ecology’s databases.Table 6.2 was reviewed to confirm that all quantities, priorities, sources, and rates are consistent with Table 1 provided be Ecology. A column for the tracking number and a column for the Original SW Qi in cubic feet per second will be added to Table 6.2 in Chapter 6.Table will be updated to add tracking number columnFW Comment Letter on 2019 Water System Plan Draft (DOH Submittal #20-0803).msgAurelie CompletedAurelie Completed4Also, please note that there is a typo in section 6.4.2 on page 6-5 states there are five (5) permits when only four (4) are shown in Table 6.2 on page 6.7. Ecology found that there are currently only four (4) permits in the Renton water rights portfolio. Noted.Typo will be updatedFW Comment Letter on 2019 Water System Plan Draft (DOH Submittal #20-0803).msgAurelie Completed5 DOERespond to any comments and issues DOE may provide concerning the City's water rights portfolio.Noted.Edits will be made as needed.FW Comment Letter on 2019 Water System Plan Draft (DOH Submittal #20-0803).msgAurelie Completed6Table 6.3CORChange City of Seattle to SPUNoted. Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed7Table 6.3CORRemove supply in type of serviceNoted. Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed8Table 6.6CORwe say here that SPU interties are reliable, but Sections 6.13.2.5 & 6.13.2.6 says SPU interties were not includedI'm not sure why?These interties are pumped and the stations do not include back‐up power. Therefore, not reliable and not included.Text will be added to include the assumptions and description.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed9Figure 6.1CORUpdate to emergency intertiesNoted. Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed10Section 6.13.2.1CORchange 15,250 to 15,150 and 11,750 to 11,650Noted. Change will be made.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie CompletedChapter 6 ‐ Water Supply, Water Rights, and Water Quality Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/Page Comment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson ResponsibleStatus of Change17‐3/Figure 7.1 SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.1 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed2 Chapter 7SWSDConfirm that the Storage Capacity quantities allocated to Skyway in the Contract for Water Supply and Joint Storage and Transmission (CAG‐93‐097) are accounted for in the storage analysis.The maximum fire flow required volume between the City and Skyway was considered. Assumption was that no two simulatenous fires will occur. Skyway Standby volume from contract will be added, recommendation of sharing storage volume between Valley and West Hill will be added. No additional improvements are needed.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxNatalie Completed3 7‐6/7.3.1.1SWSDThe 2nd paragraph either has an apotrophe that's not needed or is mssing text (….determined from the hydraulic model' supply sources on and off settings.)Noted.Will updated "was" to "were" in second paragraph.City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed4 7‐11/Figure 7.3SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.3 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed5 7‐21/Figure 7.4SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.4 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed6 7‐25/Figure 7.5SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.5 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed7 7‐27/Figure 7.6SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.6 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed8 7‐29/Figure 7.7SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.7 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed9 7‐35/Figure 7.9SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.9 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed107‐37/Figure 7.10SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.10 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed117‐45/Figure 7.12SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.12 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed127‐47/Figure 7.13SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.13 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed137‐49/Figure 7.14SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.14 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed147‐57/Figure 7.15SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.15 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie CompletedChapter 7 ‐ System Analysis Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/Page Comment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson ResponsibleStatus of ChangeChapter 7 ‐ System Analysis157‐65/Figure 7.17SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.17 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed167‐75/Figure 7.18SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.18 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed177‐77/Figure 7.19SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 7.19 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed18 DOHConsider including a future hydraulic profile schematic that includes the projects that will be complated in the planning period.Noted. A future profile will be added to the chapter.A future system profile will be created and added. DOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie Completed19General COR include the future hydraulic profile?Yes.See comment above.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed20Table 7.2CORconflicting with Table 2.4;so double checked as‐builts and confirmed height is 36.5for Rolling Hills 490 tankNoted. Elevation will be checked. Elevations will be updated as needed betweem Table 2.4 and Table 7.2.FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed21Figure 7.5CORVMC is not located here. Should be further south near the S Talbot PSNoted. Location will be verified.Location will be verified as well as fire flow results. FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:12/17/2020Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference Docs Person Responsible Status of Change1DOHDoes the City have a valve maintenance program? If so, does the valve maintenance program include testing air/vacuum valves? If not, please consider on both counts.twice a year, annually at least, blow offs and airvacsText will be added to the chapter to describe.DOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie Completed2 DOHAppendix K includes DOH form 331‐146 Construction Complete Report Form for Submittal Exception Process. It might be appropriate to include DOH form 331‐147 Construction Completion Report Form for Distribution Main Projects instead. The types of projects listed on form 331‐146 (booster pump station projects for example) must be submitted to the department for review and approval and are not approved for the submittal exception process.City will look into this and confirm. Appendix K was updated..DOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie Completed3 DOHIt is generally understood that installation of Reduced Pressure Backflow Assemblies (RPBAs) must be above ground to allow for safe and proper drainage. Same for RPDAs. The City takes on great risk by allowing these to be installed in vaults. Consider modifying or eliminating standard plans that show RPBAs or RPDAs in buried vaults. Agreed. City will update details. Appendix K was updated. DOH to Stahl_2020-1106L.pdfAurelie CompletedChapter 8 ‐ Operation and Maintenance Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson Responsible Status of Change19‐19/Figure 9.3SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 9.3 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed29‐21/Figure 9.4SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 9.4 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed39‐23/Figure 9.5SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 9.5 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed49‐25/Figure 9.6SWSDRevise location of Skyway intertie to 115 feet north of So. 116th Street on 80th Ave So.  (Figure 3.10 shows the correct location.)Noted.Location of Skyway Intertie will be updated in Figure 9.6 so that it makes the location in Figure 3.10City of Renton 2019 Water Comp Plan - Skyway WSD review comments.xlsxAurelie Completed5Section 9.4.4.2CORUpdate 2019 to 2018Noted.Change made. FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie Completed6Section 9.4.4.3CORUpdate 2019 to 2018 Noted.  Change made. FW_ Draft Renton WSP Comments.msgAurelie CompletedChapter 9 ‐ Capital Improvement Plan Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson Responsible Status of ChangeGeneralKing Co. UTRCWe request city limits to be shown on all maps, to better identify which areas are subject to City jurisdiction, and which are unincorporated county.City limits can be added to all map figures.Figures will be updated. Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfGIS CompletedFigure ES.1 and 1.3 ‐ Service Area MapKing Co. UTRCThe service area and future service area are shown as overlapping in the southern portion of Skyway‐West Hill. Please clarify.The City's service area includes the retail service area (RSA), the future service area, and the portion of Skyway that is supplied by Renton wholesale water. The overlapping areas indicate that the area will likely be served by the City in the future (future service area) and that it is within the service area (as defined above).No changes.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfN/A CompletedFigure ES.1 and 1.3 ‐ Service Area MapKing Co. UTRCAreas depicted as "Urban Growth Boundary" should be correctly labeled as "Potential Annexation Areas" or "Unincorporated County".Figures will be updated to reflect corrected nomenclature: UGB to Potential Annexation AreasFigures will be updated. Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfGIS CompletedFigure ES.2 and 2.1 ‐ Water Facility LocationsKing Co. UTRCThere is no pressure zone in the northeast corner, nor infrastructure in much of the western portion of the Earlington 370 pressure zone.The area referenced is currently a rock quary (unincorporated KC) and an area developed as a park (owned by KC). Skyway 1999 plan identified areas on the west hill currently served by SPU that the City may take over later in the future.No change.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfN/A CompletedFigures 3.1 and 3.2King Co. UTRCMaps should show zoning and land use of future service areas as well as the current service areas.The service area boundary includes the future service areas (see Figure 1.3). These figures include the zoning and land use of future service areas as well as the current service areas.No change.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfN/A CompletedFigure 3.2King Co. UTRCThis map is correct in showing the areas in UKC in the southern end of SWH as SF land use, but many of them can be redeveloped to yield 3‐4 units. Noted. Demand projections for the Plan used regional TAZ projection that are comforming to land use and regional growth. No change.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfN/A CompletedAgency Review Draft ‐ King County UTRC comments Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson Responsible Status of ChangeAgency Review Draft ‐ King County UTRC commentsFigure 3.8 ‐ Historical Consumption Trends by Customer CategoryKing Co. UTRCThe bottom grouping shows two customers decreasing by nearly 5% and one increasing by 8% but it is unclear which number goes with which customer, and the 8% number seems like a very large change compared to what the lines are showing.The 5% decrease is for the Industrial customer type, which decreased from 0.19 mgd in 2008 to 0.12 mgd in 2017.The 8% increase is for Other Authorized Use, which increased from 0.04 mgd in 2008 to 0.08 mgd in 2017. The figure will be updated to indicate the customer category for the annual growth rates.Figure 3.8 will be updated to specify the customer category for the annual growth rates.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfNatalie CompletedTable 3.9 King Co. UTRCWhat explains the significant drop in connections from 2009‐2010?This table shows the historical number of ERUs by customer category. The decrease in ERUs from 2009 to 2010 is due to the decrease in water consumption (see Table 3.6) ‐ potentially caused by the recession. Table 3.4 shows the Historical Number of Connections.No changes.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfN/A CompletedTable 3.11King Co. UTRCPortions of the Earlington 370 zone (and adjacent West Hill zone) are currently large‐lot single‐family zoning or multi‐family that may redevelop and quadruple the number of units. Would such growth be supported with minimal impacts to planning forecasts?Demand projections for the Plan used regional TAZ projection that are comforming to land use and regional growth. No change.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfN/A CompletedGeneral Question King Co. UTRCDoes the City have a program of providing reduced rates for seniors or low‐income property owners or renters?Yes, the City of Renton offers reduced rates for water for low‐income senior citizens (61 and over), and low‐income disabled citizens. https://rentonwa.gov/city_hall/administrative_services/finance/utility_billing/reduced_rates_and_tax_rebate#:~:text=CITY%20OF%20RENTON%20WASHINGTON&text=The%20City%20of%20Renton%20offers,who%20meet%20these%20same%20qualifications.A statement that the City offers reduced rates for water for low‐income senior citizens and low‐income disabled citizens will be added to Section 10.2.1 Rates.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfAurelie CompletedGeneral Question King Co. UTRCSkyway Water and Sewer is capped at 300,000 gallons. Is there an overage charge to Skyway if they exceed?City will negociate a new contract with Skyway soon. A reference to the current aggreement in the appendix will be added in this section.Reference will be added. Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfCompletedTable 3.17 ERU ProjectionsKing Co. UTRCWhy does the medium demand scenarios exceed the high demand scenario?The ERU calculation appears to be affected by the Skyway Wholesale Large Consumer in the WH495 PZ. There is a cap of 300,000 gpd, which is reached in earlier planning years for the medium and high scenarios. Because the ERU projection calculation is dividing the ADD proj by the ADD ERU Value for large consumers (153 for medium and 160 for high), the medium scenario ERU is higher than the high scenario ERU when the ADD proj reaches 300,000 gpd. The ERU values were not used to develop the projections for the large Note will be added to the table.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfNatalie Completed Project Name:Water System Plan UpdateClient:City of RentonDate Last Updated:2/12/2021Comment No.Section/PageComment ByCommentResponseChange to PlanReference DocsPerson Responsible Status of ChangeAgency Review Draft ‐ King County UTRC commentsSection 5.3.1.6 Urban Growth AreaKing Co. UTRCThe Urban Growth Area is different from the Potential Annexation Areas. PAAs ma be annexed to the City, while the Urban Growth Area is a regional boundary. Please use PAAs instead.Wording will be updated from "Urban Growth Area" to "Potential Annexation Areas" for this section.Text of Section 5.3.1.6 will be updated.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfAurelie CompletedSection 5.3.1.16 Water Service to Properties in King CountyKing Co. UTRCPlease clarify this section. We're unclear by what a "developed area within unincorporated King County that is within the City's RSA. However, there are three additional areas outside of the RSA served by Renton Water…"This can be clarified:‐The first point is that there is one developed area that is within the City's RSA and within unincorporated King County, which could be served by the City. ‐the second point is that the City currently serves three areas outside of it's RSA (and that is has adequate existing infrastructure and is providing water to the areas).Text will be updated to provide clarity.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfNatalie Completed5.3.1.2 ‐ Service AvailabilityKing Co. UTRCIs there a definition or decision criteria of "timely and reasonable" used by Renton?Renton' service area is defined and limited. City typically provides a response about Water Availability within 10 days, though it is not a “policy” of Renton. No change.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfN/A CompletedSection 7.3.3.3 ‐ West Hill 495 Storage RecommendationKing Co. UTRCIs the only solution to reduce the operating band? Is this suitable for future growth in the associated pressure zones?The projected storage deficiency by 2039 in the West Hill 495 Operational Area is minimal (0.02 mg out of a total storage volume of 1.39 mg) so no larger improvements are recommended at this time. The storage deficiency of 0.02 mg includes additional demands for future growth in the associated pressure zones.Standby volume for Skyway was added in the analysis. Excess storage located in the Valley Operational Area is sufficient to offset deficiencies in the West Hill 495.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfAurelie CompletedSection 9.4.7.2 ‐ Water Conservation Program ImplementationKing Co. UTRCGiven the large non‐English‐speaking population in the area, are there such materials available in additional languages or simplified English?Yes, the City of Renton offers both print and digital materials, interpretation, trainings, and customer research in other languages. The “leak kit” is translated and available in Somali, Spanish, Vietnamese, Korean, and Chinese. “How To…” video series on toilet leaks, indoor faucets, outdoor faucets, and using your meter to find leaks are available in Somali, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Chinese. SWP offers use of the language line as our main interpretation tool available to both SWP utilities and program managers to communicate information to non‐English speakers. No change.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfN/A CompletedGeneral Comment King Co. UTRCIts unclear, given the resolution of maps such as 9.4 (CIP Specific Project Priority) where the current service boundaries and infrastructure are in relationship to properties on S 134th St between S Langston Rd and SW Sunset Blvd. Given King County's ongoing Skyway‐West Hill Subarea Planning process, we request a specific map for this area to aid in discussions about land use planning in the area.A zoomed map can be created to show the area requested.Map will be provided to KC.Renton Initial Comments 2020-0916.pdfGIS Completed APPENDICES | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 Appendix C ADOPTING RESOLUTION AND ORDINANCE 1 CITY OF RENTON,WASHINGTON RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF RENTON,WASHINGTON,ADOPTING THE 2019 WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE. WHEREAS,the 2019 Water System Plan Update Plan”)documents the current status of the City’s water system and evaluates future needs of the water utility and will be used as a guide in maintaining and improving the water system in the short term over the next 10 years.It also provides a planning framework for the 20 year,long term planning horizon;and WHEREAS,the primary purpose of the Plan is to document changes to the City’s water system,identify required system modifications,and appropriately outline capital improvement projects to meet future water demands.Maintaining a current Plan is required to meet the regulations of the Washington State Department of Health as set forth in the Washington Administrative Code WAC)246 290 100 and the requirements of the Washington State Growth Management Act;and WHEREAS,the Plan was reviewed by the City of Renton Environmental Review Committee,which issued a Determination of Non Significance on June 8,2020;and WHEREAS,a Notice of Environmental Determination was made public,and no comments or appeals were received during the public comment and appeal periods,which ended June 22, 2020;and WHEREAS,the Plan was presented to the Renton City Council,discussed at a meeting of the Utilities Committee,and recommended for adoption by the full City Council;and RESOLUTION NO. 2 WHEREAS,the Plan is compatible with the intent of the City’s adopted Comprehensive Plan; NOW,THEREFORE,THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RENTON,WASHINGTON,DO RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: SECTION I.The City Council hereby adopts the Plan,a copy of which is attached hereto as Exhibit A”and incorporated by this reference. PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL this day of 2021. Jason A.Seth,City Clerk APPROVED BY THE MAYOR this day of 2021. Armondo Pavone,Mayor Approved as to form: Shane Moloney,City Attorney RES.1870:2/26/2021 RESOLUTION NO. 3 EXHIBIT A” 2019 WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE 2/16/2021 Home - City of Renton https://www.rentonwa.gov 2/2 (425) 430-6400 1055 S. Grady Way, Renton, WA 98057 Internet Policy | Accessibility | Webmaster City of Renton | All Rights Reserved | Powered by CivicLive | © 2021 Intrado Corporation. | Disclaimer celebrations across our community.... Read More > to Renton residents and busi daily.... Read More > View All MEETINGS NOTICES FEB 16 3:00PM - 5:00PM FEB 17 6:00PM - 8:00PM FEB 22 3:30PM - 4:15PM FEB 22 4:15PM - 5:00PM FEB 22 5:00P FEB 22 6:01P Human Services Advisory Committee Planning Commission Utilities Committee Finance Committee Plann Deve Comm Comm Whol View All View All  City of Renton, WA -- Government 27 minutes ago Beyond the Stage presents Owuor Arunga ... Beyond the Stage is our free, virtual series for all ages featuring local and PNW artistic creators. Each performance is an experience of various art forms with the ability to engage in conversation from the comfort of your home. ...See More CiCiCiCiCiiCtytytytytytytytyty ooooooof f fffffff ReReReReReReReReRentntntntntntntntononononononon,,,WWWWWWWWWCCCCCCWWAAA A A WWWWWWWAAAAAAAAA --------WWWWCity of Renton, WA -- ……… 12K12K12K112K2K2KK lilililiikeskeskkeskeskeskesk12K likesLike Page     FEB 20 7:00PM - 8:30PM FEB 23 2:00PM - 3:00PM FEB 23 5:00PM - 7:00PM MAR 27 7:00PM - 8:30PM Downtown Renton in a Box - "Date Night" "Scams, Alerts, & Frauds" - Age- Friendly Virtual Talks 2019 Water System Plan Update Downtown Renton in a Box - "A Celebration of Women in Bi "View All Contact Us Renton Responds City Services City Calendar Departments City History Discover Renton Careers Sitemap Renton Municipal Code Doing Business Permit Center Employee Portal EVENTS Page 1 of 1 WUE PUBLIC FORUM & WSP CONSUMER MEETING SIGN-IN SHEET Project: 2019 Water System Plan Update & WUE Goals Public Forum Meeting Date: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 Organizer: Katie Nolan, Water Utility Lauren Imhoff, Water Utility Place/Room: Zoom, 5pm-7pm Attendee Name Phone Zip Code E-Mail Renton Councilmember Benedetti 425-430-6501 abenedetti@rentonwa.gov Comments Received: WUE public forum: What does Renton do to reduce DSL? Brought up the importance of commitment to equity of service in utilities. Brought up the importance of noting Renton citizens may be outside of Renton water service area. What percentage of our supply for Renton consumers is SPU water? A point of pride that we care so much about our water and that we manage our aquifer well. Water Use Efficiency Public Forum Event Marketing City website: www.rentonwa.gov/waterutility Social media post: APPENDICES | WATER SYSTEM PLAN UPDATE | CITY OF RENTON FINAL | MAY 2021 Appendix D CURRENT SERVICE AREA AGREEMENTS CAG-02-123 AGREEMENT FOR THE SALE OF WATER IN AN EMERGENCY BY THE CITY OF RENTON TO THE CITY OF SEATTLE This AGREEMENT made and entered into this 30th. day of November , 2002, by the CITY OF RENTON, a municipal corporation of the State of Washington, hereinafter called "RENTON" and the CITY OF SEATTLE, a municipal corporation of the State of Washington, acting through Seattle Public Utilities, hereinafter called "SEATTLE". WHEREAS, SEATTLE and RENTON have existing interties between their water systems; WHEREAS, SEATTLE sometimes experiences a Spring water supply shortage due to low snowpack, precipitation and inflows in the Cedar and Tolt River watersheds, or, a hot Summer with high water consumption coupled with a delay in usual Fall rains; WHEREAS, SEATTLE may also experience other types of emergency situations that call for an augmentation of its water supply, such as a transmission pipeline break or an episode of high turbidity in one of its reservoirs; WHEREAS, RENTON, in the spirit of intergovernmental cooperation during such water supply emergencies, is willing to sell an increment of water to SEATTLE when available during non-peak periods; WHEREAS, SEATTLE is willing to sell water to RENTON to allow RENTON's ground water aquifer to recharge, when water is available following a water shortage emergency; and, WHEREAS, the parties desire to enter into an AGREEMENT providing for the sale of water in an emergency from RENTON to SEATTLE, and for the subsequent sale of an equivalent amount of water from SEATTLE to RENTON, if necessary, to allow recharge of RENTON's Aquifer. NOW THEREFORE, IT IS AGREED AS FOLLOWS: 1) Term of AGREEMENT. The effective date of this AGREEMENT shall be November 30 2002. The AGREEMENT shall be in effect until December 31, 2011, unless terminated by either party in accordance with Section 17 of this AGREEMENT. The rates and quantities of water sold are set forth in Sections (2), (8), and (11). I 2) Sale Price of Renton Water. SEATTLE shall pay to RENTON for all water delivered 1.30 per 100 cubic feet, which is a special wholesale rate for 2002; and revised each year during the term of the agreement. The rates charged by RENTON are based on RENTON's analysis of cost of providing non-peaking service to Seattle under the conditions stated herein. This rate was calculated using the American Water Works Association (AWWA) "Base Extra Capacity" method of rate analysis. The rate charged to SEATTLE shall be adjusted each year using the AWWA "Base Extra Capacity" method and RENTON's retail water rate for each year. I CAG-02-123 Agreement for the Sale of Mer in an Emergency by the City of Renjoto the City of Seattle Page 2 of 2 3) Location of Interties: This Agreement is limited to the two (2) intertie locations described as follows: Tiffany Park Pump Station Interties located at the intersection of Kirkland Avenue SE and the Cedar River Pipeline right-of-way (Section 21 Township 23 Range 5); and Union Avenue Intertie, located at the intersection of Union Avenue SE and SE 2nd Street (Section 16 Township 23 Range 5). The physical arrangement of the interties is shown in Exhibits 1 and 2. 4) Metering. SEATTLE shall provide, and RENTON shall own and maintain, an appropriate metering device to measure the water flowing from RENTON's system into SEATTLE's system at the point of service connection. Additional metering equipment approved by RENTON to transmit signals to RENTON's recording equipment located elsewhere shall be provided as determined by RENTON, all at SEATTLE's expense. 5) Meter Charge. A monthly meter charge shall be paid by SEATTLE in accordance with the meter charges as stated in RENTON's City Code at the time the meter is in service. 6) Priority and Continuity of Service. The determination of whether water is available for SEATTLE shall be at the sole discretion of RENTON. In the event of a condition requiring restrictions on the delivery of water, RENTON shall have the right to restrict or interrupt service to SEATTLE. RENTON may voluntarily interrupt or reduce deliveries of water to SEATTLE if RENTON determines that such interruption or reduction is necessary or reasonable. Except in cases of emergency and in order that SEATTLE's operations will not be unreasonably interfered with, RENTON shall give SEATTLE reasonable notice of any such interruption or reduction, the reason therefor, and the probable duration thereof. SEATTLE shall discontinue or reduce service from RENTON upon reasonable notice to RENTON. Service shall be reactivated or increased again subject to the aforementioned conditions. 7) Water Quality. The quality of water delivered under this AGREEMENT shall comply with all applicable provisions of State and Federal law and rules and regulations of the appropriate State agency governing water quality. In addition to the above requirements, RENTON agrees to deliver water which shall be of no less quality than is delivered to its customers throughout the RENTON service area. Prior to any delivery of water, information on current water quality will be provided to the receiving party so that blending, compatibility and other water quality issues can be evaluated and addressed. 8) Quantity of Water. Depending upon water availability in the RENTON system, RENTON shall make available for purchase by SEATTLE up to the approximate amount of two million (2,000,000) gallons per day from the existing emergency intertie located at the Tiffany Park Pump Station. The rate of delivery of water from Tiffany Park Pump Station system to SEATTLE's system shall vary between zero and approximately 1,400 gallons per minute. Also in the fall and winter RENTON may make available an additional amount up to approximately three and one-half million (3,500,000) gallons per day from the intertie at Union Avenue SE and SE 2nd Street. The rate of delivery of water from this intertie shall vary between zero and approximately 2,400 gallons per minute. CAG-02-123 Agreement for the Sale of Voter in an Emergency by the City of Renato the City of Seattle Page 3 of 3 9) Miscellaneous Control Devices. RENTON reserves the right to require SEATTLE to install, as a condition of water service, pressure reducing valves, backflow preventative devices, pressure relief valves, back-pressure sustaining valves, pipeline flow limiting devices or similar devices at locations where RENTON determines a need to protect its facilities. 10) Coordination and Project Management. A) Operations: For the purpose of operating the interties between RENTON and SEATTLE, coordination shall occur between representatives of the systems, who are: Ms. Lys Hornsby, City of Renton and Mr. George Schneider, City of Seattle or their designated representatives or replacements). The coordination shall consist of exchanging operational information such as the interties used, the respective flow rates, back-pressure sustaining valve setpoints, system pressure effects, water quality characteristics, and other operational information as necessary to accomplish the purposes of this AGREEMENT while maintaining safe operation of both systems. B. Engineering: For the purposes of coordinating engineering issues regarding the RENTON and SEATTLE interties, the following personnel shall be the designated representatives: Ms. Lys Hornsby, City of Renton and Mr. George Schneider, City of Seattle or their designated representatives or replacements) The engineering issues addressed shall include operational criteria as well as hydraulic behavior, water quality considerations, and other appropriate engineering issues. C. Administration: For the purposes of AGREEMENT administration and AGREEMENT modifications or interpretations, the following personnel shall be the designated representatives: Ms. Lys Hornsby, City of Renton and Mr. George Schneider, City of Seattle or their designated representatives or replacements) i CAG-02-123 i of to the City ofAgreementfortheSaleofmermanEmergencybytheCityRensy Seattle Page 4 of 4 11) RENTON's Aquifer Recharge. It is recognized that runoff into SEATTLE's surface water storage facilities generally exceeds the storage capacity during the winter and spring months. It may be necessary, due to RENTON supplying water to SEATTLE, to allow RENTON's aquifer to recharge during the winter and spring months. Following a water shortage emergency and recovery of SEATTLE's water system impoundments on the Cedar and Tolt Rivers, SEATTLE will sell water to Renton. The water sale will be based on availability at the intertie locations between SEATTLE and RENTON's systems and at such flow rate as is available from the intertie location during the following winter or spring. The quantity of SEATTLE's water, made available for allowing RENTON's Aquifer to recharge, shall not exceed the quantity of water that was supplied by RENTON to SEATTLE during the water shortage emergency. SEATTLE will sell the water to RENTON at $0.77 per 100 cubic-feet which is SEATTLE's non-peak, old water rate charged by SEATTLE to its purveyors in 2002. This rate shall be revised each year during the term of the agreement. This flow rate, quantity and price is an integral part of this AGREEMENT and should not be considered as a precedent in possible future water sales to RENTON or to other existing or future wholesale customers. The determination of whether water is available for RENTON, to allow RENTON's Aquifer to recharge, shall be at the sole discretion of SEATTLE. SEATTLE may voluntarily interrupt or reduce delivery of said water, providing that such interruption or reduction is necessary or reasonable. Except in cases of emergency, and in order that Renton's operations will not be unreasonably interfered with, SEATTLE shall give RENTON reasonable notice of such interruptions or reduction, the reason therefor, and the probable duration thereof. 12) Payment. The party supplying water shall read the meter once each month at approximately thirty (30) day intervals. Payment shall be made by the party receiving water as soon as possible after receipt of statement from the party supplying water, and in any event, not later than the tenth (10) of the second month following the presentation of the bill. In the event a meter shall fail to register or obviously register incorrectly, the amount of water considered delivered through said meter shall be the amount delivered the previous day or the last day that the meter was previously known to be properly functioning and the total amount registered shall be pro-rated based on the number of days multiplied times the reading used. 13) Penalties For Late Payment. The party supplying water may assess a late charge on the party receiving water for failure to comply with the provisions in Section (12). This charge shall be at the rate of twelve percent (12%) per year. In the event that the party receiving water should fail to make any payment for a period of sixty (60) days after the same becomes due, the party supplying water shall have the right to terminate further water service until such delinquency is cured. 14) Procedure for Amending the Contract. Either party can request the other to consider an amendment of the AGREEMENT. Any proposed amendments shall be made in writing. Amendments may be made if they are mutually acceptable to RENTON and SEATTLE and signed by both parties. CAG-02-123 Agreement for the Sale of *ter in an Emergency by the City of Ren0to the City of Seattle Page 5 of 5 15) Access to Facilities and Records. Each party shall be entitled to inspect the facilities of the other at any reasonable time. Both parties agree to make mutually available such information or records as are at their disposal and as may be reasonably necessary to properly implement any section of this AGREEMENT. 16) Non-Assignability. Neither this AGREEMENT nor any interest therein shall be transferred or assigned by SEATTLE without prior written consent of RENTON. 17) Termination. This AGREEMENT may be terminated in whole or in part by either party any time after one year from the date of this AGREEMENT, upon ten (10) days written notice sent by certified mail to the other party. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have hereunto set their hands this day and year above written. CITY OF NTON CITY OF SEATTLE Jes Tanner, Mayor Chuck Clarke, Director of Seattle Public Utilities ATTEST/AUTHENTICATED: ATTEST/AUTHENTICATED: Michele Neumann, Deputy City Clerk u ith Pippin, City Clerk APP D AS TO LEGAL FORM: arry Warren, Ci ttorney I Emergency_water_supply_contract.DOC H/FI LESYS/WTR-11-0012 I TIFFANY PARK PUMP STATION CITY OF RENTON) A VALVE VAULT METER VAULT _ 2'v t-/Z C P L *3 6 657L. RE PLAN No. - lttb.V C R P L /66 "STL. FtS LIME LAN" NO-TT7-30 i C R P L '2 51a".STL. y•h P. L . K/w -j SCALE . .: 1" =ZO' . RENTON/SEATTLE INTERTIE NO-.I EXHIBIT I VICINIT`- AP 10 y t s • o a t t iDN•_ ii • Y s ts It t. EDGE OF PAVEMENT RETTON MONUMENT T{TR CORNER Of SEC7:OHR 1,) 5T1 UNION AVE SETINSE PROVIDE Kw MANHOLE COVER TMTN WELDED LETTERNG SEE OETATL,SHEET Z A YABT el xSEiNia.::WATER EASING STORM DRAT/PlFE Em-MG 17*HATER EASIRTG IY WATER A CONTRACTOR TO PROVIDE TEMxaAar THRUST RESTRAINT ON VAULT WiMG CONSTRUCTION. PROPOSED PANG t SEE sNEtr i PROPOSED METER VAULT - SEE STEET 2 NEW C CUP ORAN WE d t NEW 17'GATE VALVE(FL 194 PLUG AND CONCRETE 2LOCIMWG O EDGE OF PAVEMENT EDGE OF PAWVEN7 Q 1 I F t z C I WI In SITE PLAN CITY OF RENTON 1 a 1y_D.UNION AVE SE & SE 2ND PLACE SEATTLE—RENTON INTERT'IE SITE PLAN• EXHIBIT 2 l _ - CITY OF RENTON AND SKYWAY WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT CAG-03-197 FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF WATER AND SANITARY SEWER SERVICE BOUNDARIES THIS AGREEMENT is entered into this 3/ Sf day of {) .IL~ , 2oo_L, by and between SKYWAY WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, a Washington municipal corporation, hereinafter referred to as "SWSD", and the CITY OF RENTON, a Washington municipal corporation, hereinafter referred to as "RENTON". WITNESSETH: WHEREAS, SWSD is qualified to provide water and sanitary sewer service within its prescribed area; and WHEREAS, RENTON is qualified to provide public services, including water and sanitary sewer service, within its prescribed areas; and · WHEREAS, the former Skyway Water and Sewer and Bryn Mawr-Lakeridge Water and Sewer Districts have officially merged, with the district subsequently retaining the name of Skyway Water and Sewer District; and WHEREAS, the former Skyway Water and Sewer District had existing water and sewer boundary agreements with RENTON; and WHEREAS, SWSD provides water and sanitary sewer service in an area adjacent to and within RENTON's corporate boundaries and it is in the public interest for the parties herein to enter into an agreement to provide for the efficient planning and development of new water and sanitary sewer services in areas which may be served by either, or both, of the parties; now, therefore, IT IS HEREBY AGREED by and between the parties hereto as follows: 1. Water Service Area Boundary Between RENTON and SWSD. The attached legal description, Exhibit A, describes the line separating the RENTON water service area from SWSD water service area. The attached map, Exhibit B, depicts the line separating the RENTON water service area from SWSD water service area. RENTON shall provide water service for the area generally South and East of the line illustrated. SWSD shall provide water service for the area generally North and West of the line illustrated. Any new construction, upgrading, or replacements within the RENTON City Limits by SWSD for water service shall be in compliance with RENTON design and construction standards then in effect or SWSD design and construction standards, whichever are the higher design and construction standards including: materials, techniques, and fire flow. Page 1 of 5 - 2. City of Seattle Water Service Area: The City of Seattle (SEATTLE) currently provides direct water service to portions of the service area being discussed in this agreement. These areas are not contiguous to the remainder of SEATTLE's service area, but have been served by SEATTLE for some time. These areas, herinafler the "Transfer Area", are identified in the Skyway Coordinated Water System Plan, as to be transferred to the appropriate purveyors as feasible and / or required by new development or annexation. SEATTLE is not a party to this agreement and the agreement should have no direct effect on SEATTLE. This agreement does not directly discuss the transfer of the SEATTLE service areas. This agreement only identifies the boundaries of the local purveyors to whom the service areas would belong to when transferred. 3. Overlaps in Water Service Within Transfer Area: Any overlaps in water service in the Transfer Area will be addressed at the time of the actual transfer and will not be determined as part of this agreement. RENTON and SWSD mutually agree to notify the other and receive concurrence from the other prior to providing service to any additional customers within the Transfer Area. Properties within the transfer area are depicted on Exhibit B 4. Transfer of certain Seattle Public Utilities Water Mains Within and Along the Transfer Area to RENTON: SWSD agrees that RENTON and Seattle Public Utilities have the right and would not be violating the intent of this agreement to transfer the ownership of the following water mains from Seattle Public Utilities to RENTON: a) the twelve inch diameter water main which runs southeasterly along Martin Luther King Way from the intersection of 68th Avenue South and Martin Luther King Way to the intersection of Martin Luther King Way and South 135th Street then northerly within an easement to South 133rd Street then easterly along South 133rd Street to the intersection of South 133rd Street South 132nd Street, and South 134th Street where it is reduced to an eight inch diameter water main, and b) the eight inch diameter water main which runs easterly along South 132nd Street from the twelve inch by eight inch reducer at the intersection of South 133rd Street South 132nd Street, and South 134th Street to the intersection of South Langston Road and South 134th Street, and c) the water main that varies in diameter from eight inches to four inches to six inches which runs easterly along South 135th Street from the intersection of South 135th Street and Martin Luther King Way to the intersection of South 135th Street and 80th Avenue South then northerly along 80th Avenue South to the intersection of 80th Avenue South and South 134th Street. Page 2 of 5 5. Existing SWSD Water Service Connections in RENTON Service Area: SWSD currently provides water service to properties inside RENTON's water service area. RENTON consents to SWSD continuing to provide water service to these properties. The properties are listed in Exhibit E and depicted in Exhibit B. 6. Existing RENTON Water Service Connections in SWSD Service Area: RENTON currently provides water service to properties inside SWSD's water service area. SWSD consents to RENTON continuing to provide water service to these properties. The properties are listed in Exhibit F and depicted in Exhibit B. 7. Overlap Areas: It is understood that RENTON and SWSD will continue providing service within the service area boundaries of the adjacent water utility, as defined in Sections 5 and 6 of this agreement, and which shall be known as overlap areas. RENTON and SWSD agree that any retail water service line extending outside of the service area boundary, as set forth in Section 1, shall be phased out and service transferred to the adjacent utility by mutual agreement. 8. Sewer Service Area Boundary Between RENTON and SWSD. The attached legal description, Exhibit C, describes the line separating the RENTON sewer service area from SWSD sewer service area. The attached map, Exhibit D, depicts the line separating the RENTON sewer service area from SWSD sewer service area. RENTON shall provide sanitary sewer service for the area generally South and East of the line illustrated. SWSD shall provide sanitary sewer service for the area generally North and West of the line illustrated. Any new construction, upgrading, or replacements within the RENTON City Limits by SWSD for sewer service shall be in compliance with RENTON design and constructions standards then in effect, or SWSD design and construction standards, whichever are the higher design and construction standards including: materials and techniques. 9. RENTON's Service Area Boundaries Overlap SWSD's Corporate Boundary: There are areas where RENTON's service area boundaries and SWSD's corporate boundary overlap. RENTON and SWSD acknowledge that, with regard to providing service, it is the water and sanitary sewer service boundaries which govern, not the corporate boundaries. 10. Rescission of Prior Agreements: The former Skyway Water and Sewer District and RENTON entered into an agreement relating to water service area boundaries between the two jurisdictions dated February 2, 1998. That boundary has been incorporated into the SWSD boundary adopted by this document and the agreement is hereby rescinded. The former Skyway Water and Sewer District and RENTON entered into an agreement relating to sanitary sewer service area boundaries between the two jurisdictions dated June 9, 1994. That boundary has been incorporated into the Page 3 of 5 SWSD boundary adopted by this document and the agreement is hereby rescinded. 11. Maintenance of Existing Facilities: SWSD and RENTON will each maintain their own facilities, according to industry standards. 12. SWSD Comprehensive Water and Sewer Planning. SWSD will submit, to RENTON, all future Comprehensive Water and Sewerage Plans and amendments thereto involving area and/or improvements within RENTON City Limits. Said submission of the SWSD Plan(s) is to assure consistency with adopted city plans, policies, and land use controls, assist in the review of new development proposals and right-of-way construction permits, and to fulfill the responsibilities set forth in RCW 57 and King County Title 13. As new facilities are planned, constructed, maintained, and/or replaced within RENTON, they shall comply with RENTON design and construction standards then in effect, or SWSD design and construction standards, whichever are the higher design and construction standards. 13. Extension of Utilities Across Properties. RENTON and SWSD agree that they will require property owners who must extend facilities to service their property in a comprehensive fashion up to and including extending said facilities to the far side of the property, when appropriate, to provide a connection point for the future (or existing) facilities of the next property. 14. Franchise Agreement. Upon RENTON annexing property within the SWSD service area, RENTON shall grant SWSD, for the purposes of continuing use of rights-of-way, a temporary franchise for utility facilities within the annexed territory. This franchise shall have the same provisions as stated in the franchise between King County and SWSD and have a term not to exceed 3 (three) years. RENTON and SWSD will immediately begin negotiations for a new franchise for the purposes of rights-of-way use for SWSD service area within RENTON. The new franchise shall be negotiated within three years. Upon any subsequent annexations by RENTON within the SWSD service area, RENTON shall amend the franchise to include the annexed area, in order to maintain one franchise agreement. The franchise shall maintain the remaining balance of the term of the franchise. The franchise should include any updated provisions as approved by RENTON and agreed to by SWSD. Any franchise agreement issued hereunder shall be consistent with the respective comprehensive plans of the parties and State law. 15. Governmental Approvals. The parties will give notice of the adoption of this Agreement to Metropolitan King County, to the Department of Ecology, to the Department of Health, and to any other agency with jurisdiction, and shall Page 4 of 5 CAG-03-197 EXHIBIT A SKYWAY WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT AND CITY OF RENTON AGREEMENT FOR THE TRANSFER OF FACILITIES AND ESTABLISHMENT OF SERVICE BOUNDARIES (WATER SERVICE BOUNDARY LINE) A water service area boundary line between Skyway Water and Sewer District and the City of Renton through C.E. Brownell Donation Land Claim No. 41 in Sections 13 and 14, Government Lot 8 and the Northeast quarter of Section 13, the Southeast quarter of Section 12, all in Township 23 North, Range 4 East, W.M., and the Southwest quarter and Northwest quarter of Section 7, all in Township 23 North, Range 5 East, W.M., described as follows: Beginning the aforementioned water service boundary line in the Southeast quarter of said Section 14, at the intersection of the northeasterly right of way margin of Burlington Northern Railroad with the northwesterly right of way margin of the vacated street adjoining Lot 33 of Junction Addition to Seattle, as recorded in Volume 12 of Plats, Page 75, Records of King County, Washington, all situated in C.E. Brownell Donation Claim No. 41, as recorded in the Records of King County, Washington, said intersection also being the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 4578 and the existing City limits of Tukwila as annexed by Ordinance Nos. 1503 and 1515; Thence northerly along said northwesterly right of way margin of said vacated street and said existing City limits of Tukwila and Renton, to an intersection with the southwesterly right of way margin of Beacon Coal Mine Road S. Rev.; Thence northwesterly and northerly along said southerly right of way margin, and said existing City limits of Tukwila, to an intersection with the south line of the north half of said Donation Claim No. 41; Thence westerly along said south line, and said existing City limits of Tukwila, to an intersection with the easterly right of way margin of the Union Pacific Railroad; Thence northwesterly along said easterly right of way margin and said existing City limits of Tukwila, to an intersection with the north boundary line of said Donation Claim No. 41; Thence easterly along said north boundary line and said existing City limits of Tukwila, to an intersection with the southwesterly right of way margin of Beacon Coal Mine Road S. Rev.; Thence continuing easterly along said north boundary line, crossing said right of way, to an intersection with the northeasterly right of way margin of Beacon Coal Mine Road S. Rev.; Thence southeasterly, southerly, westerly, southerly and southeasterly, along said northeasterly right of way margin, to the most southwesterly comer of Lot A, King County Lot Line Adjustment No. 8612009, as approved by King County, Washington on February 4, 1987; Thence northeasterly along the southerly line of said Lot A, to an intersection with the south line of the north half of said Donation Claim No. 41; Page 1 - Thence easterly along said south line of the north half of said Donation Claim No. 41, to an intersection with the westerly right of way margin of 68th Avenue S.; Thence northeasterly along said westerly right of way margin, to an intersection with the southerly right of way margin of Martin Luther King Junior Way South (State Road No. 2), the center line of said Martin Luther King Junior Way South right of way being 110 feet northerly of, as measured perpendicular to, said southerly right of way margin; Thence easterly along the easterly extension of said southerly right of way margin, crossing said 68 th Avenue S., to an intersection with the easterly right of way margin of said 68th Avenue S.; Thence northerly along said easterly right of way margin, to an intersection with the southerly right of way margin of said Martin Luther King Junior Way South, the centerline of said Martin Luther King Junior Way South right of way being 50 feet northerly, as measured perpendicular to, said southerly right of way margm; Thence southeasterly along said southerly right of way margin, to an intersection with the east line of the west 419. 61 feet of the northwest quarter of said Section 13; Thence northerly along said east line, crossing said Martin Luther King Junior Way South, to an intersection with the southerly right of way margin of South 133rd Street; Thence easterly along said southerly right of way margin, to an intersection with the southerly right of way margin of S. 134th Street; Thence northwesterly, crossing S. 134th Street, to the point of intersection of the northerly right of way margin of S. 134th Street and the southerly right of way margin of S. 132nd Street; Thence northeasterly along said southerly right of way margin of S. 132nd Street, to an intersection with the westerly right of way margin of76th Avenue S., said westerly right of way margin also being the west line of the northeast quarter of said Section 13; Thence northerly along said westerly right of way margin and said west line of the northeast quarter, crossing S. 132nd Street, to an intersection with the southerly right of way margin of S. Langston Road (also known as John Langston Road No. 3 and 78th Avenue S. Extension Revision); Thence easterly, northeasterly and northerly along said southerly right of way margin of S. Langston Road, crossing said 76th Avenue S. and S. 130th Street, to the northwest corner of Lot 6, Block 7 of Earlington Acre Tracts, as recorded in Volume 15 of Plats, Page 84, Records of King County, Washington; Thence easterly along the north line of Block 7 of said plat, to the northwest corner of Lot 2 of said Block 7· , Thence southerly along the west line of said Lot 2, to an intersection with the south line of the north 100 feet of said Lot 2; Thence easterly along said south line, to an intersection with the east line of said Lot 2; Page2 - Thence northerly along said east line, to the northeast comer of said Lot 2 and a point on the north line of said Block 7; Thence easterly along said north line, to the northeast comer of Lot 1 of said Block 7, said northeast comer also being a point on the westerly right of way margin of 80th Avenue S.; Thence northeasterly, crossing 80th Avenue S., to the point of intersection of the easterly right of way margin of said 80th Avenue S. with the northeasterly right of way margin of Renton Avenue S., said point of intersection also being a point on the west line of Lot 6, Block 2 of said plat; Thence southeasterly along said northeasterly right of way margin, to an intersection with the west line of Lot 3, Block 8 of said plat; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 3, to the northwest comer thereof; Thence easterly along the north line of said Block 8 and Block 9 of said plat, to the northwest comer of Lot 6 of said Block 9, said northwest comer also being the southwest comer of Lot 6, Block 1 of said plat; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 6 of said Block 1, a distance of 88.16 feet; Thence easterly, crossing said Lot 6 and Lots 5, 4, 3 and 2 of said Block 1, to a point on the east line of said Lot 2 being 95.86 feet northerly of the southeast comer thereof; Thence northerly along the east line of said Lot 2, said east line also being the west line of Lot 1 of said Block 1, to an intersection with the south line of the north 70 feet of said Lot 1; Thence easterly along said south line, to an intersection with the east line of said Lot 1, said east line also being the westerly right of way margin of84th Avenue S.; Thence northerly along said east line and said westerly right of way margin, to the northeast comer of said Lot l; Thence northerly, crossing S. 128th Street, to the southeast comer of Lot 20 of the vacated plat of Clinkingbeards One Fourth Acre Tracts, as recorded in Volume 21 of Plats, Page 26, Records of King County, Washington, in the Southeast quarter of Section 12, Township 23 North, Range 4 East, W.M.; Thence northerly along the east line of said Lot 20 and said westerly right of way line of 84th Avenue S., to an intersection with the south line of the north 7 feet of said Lot 20; Thence westerly along said south line and the westerly extension of said south line, to an intersection with the west line of Lot 19 of said plat; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 19 and Lot 2 of said plat, to the northwest comer of said Lot 2 and the north line of said plat; Page 3 - Thence easterly along said north line, to an intersection with the east line of the west 195 feet of the south half of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of said Section 12; Thence northerly along said east line, to an intersection with the north line of said subdivision; Thence easterly along said north line, to an intersection with said westerly right of way margin of 84th Avenue S.; Thence northerly along said westerly right of way margin and its northerly extension, and in part, the east line of Tract A of Mountain View Home Tracts, as recorded in Volume 74 of Plats, Page 28, Records of King County, Washington, crossing S. 126th Street, to an intersection with the easterly extension of the northerly right of way margin of S. 126th Street; Thence westerly along said easterly extension and said northerly right of way margin, said margin also being, in part, the south line of Lot 17 of Hilltop's Suburban Club, as recorded in Volume 77 of Plats, Page 51, Records of King County, Washington, to the southwest comer of said Lot 17; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 17, to the northwest comer thereof, said northwest comer also being a point on the south line of Lot 16 of said plat; Thence westerly along said south line of Lot 16, to the southwest comer thereof, said southwest comer also being the southeast comer of Tract A of said plat; Thence northerly along the east line of Tract A, to the northeast comer thereof, said northeast comer also being the northwest comer of Lot 10 of said plat; Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 10, to the southwest comer of Lot 9 of said plat; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 9, to the northwest comer thereof, said northwest comer also being a point on the southerly right of way margin of S. 124th Street; Thence northwesterly, crossing S. 124th Street, to the southwest comer of Lot 23, Block 60 of Bryn Mawr, as recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Page 58, Records of King County, Washington, said southwest comer being a point on the northerly right of way margin of S. 124th Street; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 23, to the northwest comer thereof; Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 23 and the north line of Lots 22 and 21 of said plat, to the northeast comer of said Lot 21, said northeast comer also being a point on the westerly right of way margin of said 84th Avenue S.; Thence easterly, crossing said 84th Avenue S., to the northwest comer of Lot 28, Block 61 of said plat, said northwest comer also being a point on the easterly right of way margin of said 84th Avenue S.; Page4 - Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 28 and the north line of Lots 27-15, inclusive, of said Block 61, to the northeast comer of said Lot 15, said northeast comer also being a point on the westerly right of way margin of85th Avenue S.; Thence northerly along said westerly right of way margin, crossing S. 123rd Place, S. 123 rd Street and S. 122nd Street, to the northeast comer of Lot 15, Block 48 of said plat; Thence easterly, crossing said 85th Avenue S., to the northwest comer of Lot 38, Block 47 of said plat, said northwest comer being a point on the easterly right of way margin of said 85th Avenue S.; Thence continuing easterly along the north line of said Lot 38 and the north line of Lot 37 of said Block 47, to the northeast comer of said Lot 3 7; Thence southerly along the east line of said Lot 3 7, to the southeast comer thereof; Thence easterly along the south line of said Block 4 7, to an intersection with the west line of Lot 25 of King County Boundary Line Adjustment No. L96L0074, as recorded under King County Recording No. 9709189007; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 25, to the northwest comer thereof; Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 25, to the northeast comer thereof: Thence southerly along the east line of said Lot 25, to the northwest comer of Lot 28 of said boundary line adjustment; Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 28, to the northeast comer thereof, said northeast comer also being the northwest comer of Lot 21 of said Block 4 7; Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 21, to the northeast comer thereof, said northeast comer also being a point on the westerly right of way margin of87th Avenue S.; Thence southerly along said westerly right of way margin, to an intersection with the westerly extension of the south line of Tract 1 ofN.H. Latimer's Lake Washington Plat, as recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page 70, Records of King County, Washington; Thence easterly along said westerly extension, crossing said 87th Avenue S., to the southwest comer of said Tract 1, said southwest comer also being a point on the northerly right of way margin of S. 122nd Street; Thence easterly along the south line of said Tract l and the south line of Tracts 2 and 3 of said plat and said northerly right of way margin, to an intersection with the east line of the west half of vacated 90th Avenue S.; Thence northerly along said east line and the northerly extension of said east line, crossing S. 121 st St., and, in part, along the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 2426, to an intersection with Page 5 ·- the south line of Lot 12, Lenz Farmette Tracts, as recorded in Volume 37 of Plats, Page 36, Records of King County, Washington, said south line also being the northerly right of way margin of S. 121st Street; Thence westerly along said south line and said northerly right of way margin and, in part, said existing City limits, to an intersection with the east line of the west 32 feet of said Lot 12; Thence northerly along said east line and said existing City limits, to an intersection with the south line of Lot 11 of said plat; Thence westerly along said south line and said existing City limits, a distance of32 feet, to the southwest comer of said Lot 11; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 11 and said existing City limits, to the northwest comer thereof; Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 11 and said existing City limits, to the northeast comer of said Lot 11, said northeast comer also being on the westerly right of way margin of Rainier Avenue N.; Thence northerly along said westerly right of way margin and said existing City limits, to an intersection with the south line of the Northwest quarter of said Section 7; Thence westerly along said south line and the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 2019, to an intersection with the southerly extension of the west line of Lot 12, Block 40 of said plat of Bryn Mawr; Thence northerly along said southerly extension and along the west line of Lot 12, Block 40 of said plat, and said existing City limits, crossing vacated S. 120th Street, to the northwest comer of said Lot 12, said northwest comer also being the southeast comer of Lot 22 of said Block 40; Thence westerly along the south line of said Lot 22, and Lots 23 and 24 of said Block 40, and the westerly extension of said south line, and said existing City limits, to an intersection with a line lying 8 feet westerly of and parallel with the west line of said Lot 24 and Lots 9 and 24 of Block 35 of said plat; Thence northerly along said parallel line and said existing City limits, and in part, the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 4090, crossing vacated S. I 19th Street, to an intersection with the southerly right of way margin of S. I 18th Street; Thence easterly along said southerly right of way margin and said existing City limits, to the northwest comer of Lot 24 of Block 35 of said plat; Thence northerly along the northerly extension of the.west line of said Lot 24, and said existing City limits, to an intersection with the centerline of that portion of S. I 18th Street (Irving Avenue, Wallace Street) as vacated by Superior Court No. 156371; Thence easterly along said centerline and said existing City limits, to an intersection with the southerly extension of the west line of Lot 13, Block 30 of said plat; Page6 -- Thence northerly along said southerly extension and the west line of said Lot 13 and said existing City limits, to the northwest comer of said Lot 13; Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 13 and the north line of Lot 14 of said Block 30 and said existing City limits, to the northeast comer of said Lot 14, said northeast comer also being the southwest comer of Lot 18 of said Block 30; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot l 8, to the northwest comer thereof, said northwest comer also being a point on the southerly right of way margin of Hawthorne Street; Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 18, and said southerly right of way margin, to an intersection with the southerly extension of the west line of the east 15 feet of Lot 15, Block 25 of said plat; Thence northerly along said southerly extension, crossing said Hawthorne Street, to an intersection with the south line of said Lot 15 and the northerly right of way margin of said Hawthorne Street; Thence easterly along the south line of said Lot 15 and the south line of Lot 16 of said Block 25, and the easterly extension of said south line and said northerly right of way margin, to an intersection with the centerline of 89th Avenue S., as vacated by Superior Court No. 156371; Thence northerly along said centerline, to an intersection with the westerly extension of the north line of Lot 5, Block 26 of said plat; Thence easterly along said westerly extension, to the northwest comer of said Lot 5; Thence continuing easterly along the north line of said Lot 5 and the easterly extension of said Lot 5, said north line and easterly extension also being said existing City limits, crossing Rainier Avenue N. (Primary State Highway No. 5, State Road 167), to an intersection with the easterly right of way margin of said Rainier Avenue N., said intersection also being a point on the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 1300; Thence northerly along said easterly right of way margin and said existing City limits, to an intersection with a line which is 5 feet south of and parallel with the common line between Lots 7 and 8, Block 18, Bll)'Il Mawr, as recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Page 58, Records of King County, Washington; Thence South 88°27'28" East, along said parallel line and said existing City limits, a distance of 89 .23 feet, to the west line of Defense Plant Corp. 5-24-43; Thence North 05°16'51" East, along said existing City limits, a distance of 438.90 feet, to an intersection with a line which is 2 feet south of and parallel with the common line between Lots 1 and 2, Block 17 of said plat; Thence North 40°09'47" East, along said existing City limits, a distance of 188.55 feet; Thence North, along said existing City limits, a distance of 60 feet; Thence North 29°00'40" West, along said existing City limits, a distance of 197.07 feet; Page 7 - Thence South 88°27'28" East, along said existing City limits, a distance of355.00 feet, to a point on the Inner Harbor Line of Lake Washington, as shown upon Sheet No. 26 of the Plat of Lake Washington Shore Lands Survey 1921, as said plat was filed with the Auditor of King County, Washington, September 19, 1921, under Recording No. 1552504, said point being a distance of 92.62 feet along said Inner Harbor Line from the angle point "862" on said plat, and the terminus of the herein described water service boundary line. Page8 -CAG-03-197 EXHIBITC SKYWAY WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT AND CITY OF RENTON AGREEMENT FOR THE TRANSFER OF FACILITIES AND ESTABLISHMENT OF SERVICE BOUNDARIES (SEWER SERVICE BOUNDARY LINE) A sanitary sewer service area boundary line between the Skyway Water and Sewer District and the City of Renton through C.E. Brownell Donation Land Claim No. 41 in Sections 13 and 14, Government Lot 8 and the Northeast quarter of Section 13, all in Township 23 North, Range 4 East, W.M., King County, Washington and the Southwest quarter and the Northwest quarter of Section 7, both in Township 23 North, Range 5 East, W.M., King County Washington, described as follows: Beginning the aforementioned sanitary sewer boundary line in the Southeast quarter of said Section 14, at the intersection of the northeasterly right of way margin of Burlington Northern Railroad with the northwesterly right of way margin of the vacated street adjoining Lot 33 of Junction Addition to Seattle, as recorded in Volume 12 of Plats, page 75, Records of King County, Washington, all situated in C.E. Brownell Donation Claim No. 41, as recorded in the Records of King County, Washington, said intersection also being the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 4578 and the existing City limits of Tukwila as annexed by Ordinance Nos. 1503 and 1515; Thence northeasterly along the northwesterly right of way margin of said vacated street and said existing City limits of Tukwila and Renton, to an intersection with the southwesterly right of way margin of Beacon Coal Mine Road S. Rev.; Thence northeasterly along said existing City limits of Renton at an angle perpendicular to said southerly right of way margin, a distance of 40 feet, to an intersection with the northerly right of way line of said Beacon Coal Mine Road S. Rev., · Thence southeasterly along said northerly right of way margin and existing City limits, to an intersection with a line dividing Lot 32 of said plat as described by a deed of conveyance to Charles Monster by Oregon and Washington Railroad Company dated June 19, 1923; Thence northeasterly along said dividing line and the existing City limits, crossing 68th Avenue South, to an intersection with the easterly right of way margin of said 68th Avenue South; Thence continuing northeasterly along said dividing line and the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 4642, to the northeast comer of said Lot 32, said northeast comer also being a point on the north line of said plat and also being a point on the northerly right of way margin of South 13 7th Street; Thence easterly along said north line of said plat and said northerly right of way margin, to the southwest comer of the condominium plat of Empire Estates, as recorded in Volume 28 of Condominiums, Pages 106-120, inclusive, Records of King County, Washington, in the Southwest quarter of said Section 13; Page 1 - Thence northerly, easterly and northerly along the west line of said condominium plat, to an intersection with the southerly right of way margin of Martin Luther King Way South (also known as Empire Way South and State Road No. 2), in the Northwest quarter of said Section 13; Thence continuing northerly along the northerly extension of said west line, to an intersection with the centerline of said Martin Luther King Way South; Thence southeasterly along said centerline, to an intersection with the southerly extension of the west line of Lot 1, Block 2 of Stiles View Tracts, as recorded in Volume 46 of Plats, Page 85, Records of King County, Washington; Thence northerly along said extension and the west line of said Lot l, to an intersection with the south line of the north 180 feet of said Block 2; Thence easterly along said south line, through Lots 1-7, inclusive, of said Block 2, to an intersection with the east line of said Lot 7, said east line also being the east line of said Donation Claim and the west line of Lot 8, Block 4 ofR.L. Haddock Addition to Earlington, as recorded in Volume 38 of Plats, Pages 4-5, Records of King County in Government Lot 8 of said Section 13; Thence northerly along said west line of said Lot 8 and said east line of said Donation Claim, to the southwest comer of Lot l of King County Short Plat No. 982004, recorded under King County Recording No. 8301040882; Thence easterly along the south line of said Lot 1 and the easterly extension of said south line, through Lots 8-6, inclusive, of said Block 4, to an intersection with the east line of said Lot 6; Thence northerly along said east line to the northeast comer of said Lot 6; Thence northerly, crossing S. 135th Street, to the southwest comer of Lot 5, Block 3 of said plat; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 5 and the northerly extension of said west line, crossing S. 134th Street and the Cedar River Pipeline right of way, to an intersection with the northerly right of way margin of said street and said pipeline; Thence southeasterly along said right of way margin of said street and pipeline, to an intersection with the westerly right of way margin of76th Avenue S., said westerly right of way margin also being the west line of the Northeast quarter of said Section 13; Thence northerly along said west~rly right of way margin and said west line, crossing S. 132nd Street, to an intersection with the southerly right of way margin of S. Langston Road (also known as John Langston Road No. 3 and 78th Avenue S. Extension Revision); Thence easterly, northeasterly and northerly along said southerly right-of-way margin of S. Langston Road, crossing said 76th Avenue S. and S. 130th Street, to the northwest comer of Lot 6, Block 7 of Earlington Acre Tracts, as recorded in Volume 15 of Plats, Page 84, Records of King County, Washington; Page2 - Thence easterly along the north line of Block 7 of said Plat to the northwest comer of Lot 4 of said Block being common with the southwest comer of Lot 4, Block 3 of said Plat; Thence northerly along said west line of said Lot 4 of said Block 3 to the southerly margin of Renton Avenue; Thence southeasterly along said margin to the southeast comer of Lot 1 of said Block 3, said southeast comer also being a point on the westerly right of way margin of 80th Avenue South; Thence northerly along said westerly right of way margin, to the north line of said Northeast quarter; said north line also being the centerline of S. 128th Street; Thence easterly along said north line and said centerline, to the northeast comer of said Section 13, said northeast comer also being the southwest comer of said Section 7 and a point of intersection with the centerline of 84th Avenue S.; Thence continuing easterly along the south line of said Section 7, crossing said 84th Avenue S., to an intersection with the easterly right of way margin of said 84th Avenue S.; Thence northerly along said easterly right of way margin, to an intersection with the south line of the north 125 feet of the south 270 feet of the west half of the Southwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of said Section 7; Thence easterly along said south line, a distance of 98 feet, to an intersection with the east line of the west 128 feet of said subdivision; Thence northerly along said east line, to the north line of said south 270 feet of said subdivision; Thence easterly along said north line, to the southwest comer of Lot 2 of City of Renton Short Plat No. 023-87, as recorded under King County Recording No. 8712299017, Records of King County, Washington; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 2 and the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 3801, to the southeast comer of Lot 1 of said short plat; Thence westerly along the south line of said Lot 1 and said existing City limits, to the southwest comer thereof, said southwest comer being a point on the easterly right of way margin of said 84th Avenue S.; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 1 and said existing City limits and said easterly right of way margin, to the northwest comer thereof; Thence continuing northerly along said easterly right of way margin and the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 1669, to the southwest comer of Lot 3, Block A of Conner's Lake View Park No. 2, as recorded in Volume 78 of Plats, Page 64, Records of King County, Washington; Page3 - Thence continuing northerly along the west line of said plat, said easterly right of way margin and said existing City limits, to the northwest comer of said plat; Thence easterly along the north line of said plat and said existing City limits, to an intersection with the southerly extension of the west line of Lot A of King County Boundary Line Adjustment No. L96L0145, as recorded under King County Recording No. 9704091385, Records of King County, Washington; Thence northerly along said extension and the west line of Lots A and B of said boundary line adjustment, to the northwest comer of said Lot B; Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot B and the easterly extension of said Lot B, crossing Stevens Avenue NW (87th Avenue S.), to an intersection with the easterly right of way margin of said Stevens Avenue NW, said intersection being a point on the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 1461; Thence northerly along said easterly right of way margin and existing City limits, crossing Taylor Place NW, to the northwest comer of Lot 3, Block 1 ofLatimers Lake Parle Addition, as recorded in Volume 18 of Plats, Page 63, Records of King County, Washington; Thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 3 and its easterly extension, crossing Lind Avenue NW, to the southwest comer of Lot 2, Block 14 of said plat; Thence northerly along the west line of said Lot 2 and along the west line of Lot 1 of said Block 14, to the northwest comer of said Lot 1, said northwest comer also being a point on the southerly right of way margin of NW 7th Street (S. 122nd Street); Thence easterly along said southerly right of way margin and said existing City limits, crossing Taylor Avenue NW, to the northwest comer of Lot 1, Block 16 of said plat; Thence northerly along the northerly extension of the west line of said Lot 1, to the centerline of that portion of NW 7th Street vacated under City of Renton Vacation Ordinance No. 3455; Thence easterly along said centerline, to an intersection with the westerly right of way margin of Rainier Avenue North; Thence northerly along said westerly right of way margin, crossing S. 121st Street, to the northeast comer of Lot 11 of Lenz Farmette Tracts, as recorded in Volume 37 of Plats, Page 36, Records of King County, Washington; Thence easterly along the easterly extension of the north line of said Lot 11, crossing Rainier Avenue North, to an intersection with the easterly right of way margin of said Rainier Avenue North; Thence northerly along said easterly right of way margin, following the tangent and curving courses thereof, said easterly right of way margin being, in part, the existing City limits of Renton as annexed by Ordinance No. 1300, to an intersection with a line which is 5 feet south of and parallel with the common Page4 line between Lots 7 and 8, Block 18, Bryn Mawr, as recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Page 58, Records of King County, Washington; Thence South 88°27'28" East, along said parallel line and said existing City limits, a distance of 89 .23 feet, to the west line of the Defense Plant Corp. 5-24-43; Thence North 05°16'51" East, along said existing City limits, a distance of 438.90 feet, to an intersection with a line which is 2 feet south of and parallel with the common line between Lots 1 and 2, Block 17 of said plat; Thence North 40°09'47" East, along said existing City limits, a distance of 188.55 feet; Thence North, afong said existing City limits, a distance of 60 feet; Thence North 29°00'40" West, along said existing City limits, a distance of 197.07 feet; Thence South 88°27'28" East, along said existing City limits, a distance of355.00 feet, to a point on the Inner Harbor Line of Lake Washington, as shown upon Sheet No. 26 of the Plat of Lake Washington Shore Lands Survey 1921, said plat being filed with the Auditor of King County, Washington, September 19, 1921, under Recording Number 1552504, said point being a distance of 92.62 feet along said Inner Harbor Line from angle point "862" on said plat, and the terminus of said sewer service area boundary line. Page5 -EXHIBITE -CAG-03-197 Existing SWSD Water Service Connections in RENTON Service Area: ADDRESS KING COUNTY PARCEL NUMBER 8543 S 124tn Street i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9049 12424 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9058 12620 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9061 ' 12426 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9068 8423 S 124m Street i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9069 8547 S 124m Street i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9072 8539 S 1241n Street i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9073 12422 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9074 8435 S 124 m Street i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9075 12540 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9077 8537 S 124m Street i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9081 8428 S 124m Street i.e., King County tax lot 072305-9088 12200 85m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5471 12117 8?1n Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5520 12116 85m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5600 12121 87m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5601 12133 87m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6780 12308 85m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6890 8556 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6980 8550 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6990 8544 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7005 8540 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7015 8532 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7026 8524 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7036 8518 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7045 12320 85m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7055 12314 85m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7056 vacant i.e., JSing County tax lot 118000-8225 8525 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8235 8529 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8245 8535 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8255 8541 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8265 854 7 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8270 8553 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8275 8554 S 124 m Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8290 8548 S 124 m Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8295 8542 S 124tn Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8315 -----------------------------------------EXHIBITE -CAG-03-197 8536 S 124 m Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8325 8530 S 124m Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8335 8524 S 124m Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8345 8518 S 124m Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8355 12820 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 182305-9204 12811 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 214480-0005 12823 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 214480-0006 12819 841n Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 214480-0007 12852 80m Avenue s i.e., King County tax lot 214480-0225 7830 S Langston Road i.e., King County tax lot 214480-0336 7840 S Langston Road i.e., King County tax lot 214480-0341 7835 S 130m Street i.e., King County tax lot 214480-0342 7931 S 130m Street i.e., King County tax lot 214480-0345 8531 S 124 m Street i.e., King County tax lot 796140-0025 -EXHIBITF -CAG-03-197 Existing RENTON Water Service Connections in SWSD Service Area: ADDRESS KING COUNTY PARCEL NUMBER 8231 S 121 st Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5795 8246 S 122n° Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5850 8324 S 122n° Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5855 8240 S 122na Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5880 8232 S 122na Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5890 8222 S 122n° Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5900 8218 S 122n° Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5910 8208 S 122na Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5915 Vacant i.e., King County tax lot 118000-5930 12209 82n° Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6230 Vacant i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6250 Vacant i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6350 8207 S 122n° Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6360 8217 S 122na Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6375 8223 S 122n° Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6390 8239 S 122na Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6405 8241 S 122na Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6415 824 7 S 122n° Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6425 8323 S 122na Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6445 8254 S 123r0 Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6460 8246 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6475 8240 S 123r0 Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6477 8228 S 123r0 Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6500 8220 S 123r0 Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6520 8214 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6530 8202 S 123r0 Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6550 . 12202 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6560 8411 S 122n° Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6570 Vacant i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6650 Vacant i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6660 8412 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6670 12212 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-6685 12300 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7080 8411 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7095 Vacant i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7105 8432 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7106 12309 85m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7108 -EXHIBITF -CAG-03-197 8438 S 123ro Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7120 8426 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7140 8416 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7185 12312 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7200 8410 S 123r0 Place ' i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7210 Vacant i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7220 8211 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7230 8217 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7245 8223 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7255 8241 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7265 8229 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7275 8235 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7285 12309 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7295 12315 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7300 12311 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7315 vacant i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7316 8230 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7375 8222 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7405 8216 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7410 8210 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7415 8200 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7420 8205 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7850 8211 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7865 8223 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7875 8217 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7880 8233 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7900 8243 S 123ra Street i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7915 12333 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-7931 12408 84m Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8060 8409 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8070 8415 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8080 8427 S 123ra Place i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8090 12323 851n Avenue S i.e., King County tax lot 118000-8105 CAG -10 -004 CITY OF RENTON and CEDAR RIVER WATER AND SEWER DIST _-°i- 1NTERLOCAL AGREEMENT FOR PROVISION OF WATER AND SEWER SERVICE BY DISTRICT WITHIN C7v dt THIS AGREEMENT, made and entered into this // M day of by and between the CITY OF RENTON, a Washington municipal corporatio , hereinafter referred to as "the City ", and CEDAR RIVER WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, a Washington municipal corporation, hereinafter, referred to as "the District", both being duly organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Washington, WITNESSETH: WHEREAS, the District is a public agency authorized by law to engage in furnishing water 'service and sanitary sewer service, and this Agreement will not limit that statutory authorization; and WHEREAS, the City may, through the City Council, enter into interlocal agreements with respect to the rights, powers, duties, and obligations of municipal parties regarding the use of public rights of -way and other public property, the provision of services, the maintenance and operation of facilities, the performance of contractual obligations and any other matters arising out of the provision of District service to areas within the City, all pursuant to and in accordance with RCW Sections 39.34.080, 35.92.010, 35A.47.040, and Ch. 57.08; and WHEREAS, the District has the ability and authority to provide water service and sanitary sewer service to the areas described in Exhibit A; NOW, THEREFORE: IT IS HEREBY AGREED by and between the parties hereto as follows: SECTION 1. District Facilities Within City. The City and the District hereby agree that the District, its successors and assigns, for a period of fifteen (15) years, commencing on the effective date of this Agreement shall exercise its right and privilege to lay down, construct, relay, connect, replace and/or maintain such and so many pipes, conduits and mains, and all other appurtenances, appendages, and facilities thereto, in, along, through, and under the avenues, streets, highways, and road rights -of way controlled by the City now, and as hereafter amended through annexations, as specifically described in Exhibit A, attached hereto and incorporated herein by this reference, as may be necessary, convenient and/or proper in order to provide water service and sanitary sewer service to the public, and for that purpose to make any and all connections which may be necessary, convenient and/or proper, in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth herein. Exhibit B; attached hereto for administrative convenience, is the current City of Renton Annexation Map showing the current City limits. The City will provide the District an updated Exhibit B annually. SECTION 2. Authority To Manage, Regulate, and Control Water and Sanitary Sewer System_ After the construction of the sanitary sewer facilities as contemplated under this Agreement, the District shall have the sole responsibility to maintain, manage, conduct and operate its water system and sanitary sewer system as installed within the area described in Exhibit A, together with any additions, extensions and betterments thereto. SECTION 3. Authority to Fix Service Rates. The rates charged to the .area described in Exhibit A, shall be fixed, altered, regulated, and controlled solely by the District, pursuant to the limitations on such authority as set forth in Ch. 57.08 RCW, or any applicable regulations promulgated thereafter by the state on the subject of rates and charges for sanitary sewer service. SECTION 4. Non - Exclusive. The rights described in this Agreement shall not be deemed or held to be exclusive. Except for provision of water and sanitary sewer service to the public within the areas described in Exhibit A, it shall in no manner prohibit the City from entering into other agreements or franchises of a like nature or franchises for other public or private utilities, in, over, along, across, under, and upon any of the streets, avenues, highways, alleys, or public places, or ways as herein described, and shall in no way prevent or prohibit the City from using any of said streets, avenues, etc., or affect its jurisdiction over them or any part of them with full power to make all necessary changes, relocations, repairs, or maintenance of same as it deems fit. SECTION 5. Approval of Plans. Prior to construction, repair, or replacement of any of the pipes, conduits, mains, facilities, and appurtenances in the area described in Section 1 herein that are located within the property or rights of way of City, the District shall submit to the Director of Public Works or his designee ( "Director ") for review and approval, the requested number of plan sets drawn to an accurate scale, showing the exact location, character, position, dimension, depth, and height of the work to be done. The plans shall accurately depict the relative position and location of all pipes, conduits, mains, manholes, facilities, and appurtenances to be constructed, laid, re -laid, installed, replaced, repaired, connected or disconnected, and the existing street, avenue, alley, highway, right -of -way or property lines. All streets, avenues, highways, alleys, lanes, or ways denoted thereon shall be designated by their names and number and the local improvements therein such as roadway pavement, shoulders, sidewalks, curbs, gutters, ditches, driveways, parking strips, telephone or electric distribution poles, conduits, storm, gas, or water pipe lines as may exist on the ground or area sought to be occupied shall be outlined. In the construction proposed by the District, all materials and equipment shall be as specified in the District's general conditions and standards and as approved by the City. The exact class and type to be used shall be shown on the plans, as will the equipment to be used and the mode of safeguarding and facilitating the public traffic during construction, The manner of excavation, construction installation, backfill, and temporary traffic control measures (such as traffic turnouts, road barricades, etc.) shall meet with the approval of, pass all requirements of, and be constructed in conformance with approved plans, permit conditions, and specifications under the inspection supervision of the Director. Prior to approval of any work under this Agreement, the Director may require such modifications or changes, as he deems necessary to properly protect the public in the use of the public places, and may fix the time or times within and during which such work shall be done. 2 The District shall pay to the City such amounts as called for in any applicable City permitting fees and, in the judgment of the Director, are reasonably necessary to investigate and process any plans for construction work, to inspect such work, to secure proper field notes for location, to plot such locations on the permanent records of the City's public works department, to supervise such work, or to inspect or re- inspect as to maintenance, during the progress of or after the repair of, any of the initial construction authorized by this Agreement. The City shall make its best efforts to complete all inspections in a timely manner. SECTION 6. Protection Of Public. Whenever an accident, faulty operation, or excavation or fill associated with the construction, installation, maintenance or repair of the facilities authorized under this Agreement has caused or contributed to a condition that appears to substantially impair the structural integrity of the adjoining street or public place, or endangers the public, and adjoining public place, street utilities or City property as determined solely by the Director, the Director may direct the District, at its own expense, to take actions to protect the public, adjacent public places, City property and street utilities, and may require compliance within a prescribed time. In the event that the District fails or refuses to take the actions directed promptly, or fails to fully comply with such directions given by the Director, or if emergency conditions exist which require immediate action, the City may enter upon the property and take such actions as are necessary to protect the public, the adjacent streets, or street utilities, or to maintain the structural integrity thereof, including placing of temporary shoring, backfilling, alterations of drainage patterns and any other actions reasonably necessary to decrease the possibility of earth movement, or actions regarded as necessary safety precautions; and the District shall be liable to the City for the costs thereof. SECTION 7. Repair of Streets, Sidewalks, Public Places and /or Facilities. After construction, maintenance, or repair of the facilities authorized by this Agreement, the District shall repair and restore any damaged or injured streets, avenues, highways, public places, City facilities, or affected portions of same, to their approximate condition that existed prior to the work or better. The Director shall have final approval of the condition of such streets and public places after completion of construction. The District shall comply with the City's trench restoration standards and traffic control standards. SECTION 8. Indemnification. The District hereby releases, covenants not to bring suit and agrees to indemnify, defend, and hold harmless the City, its officers, officials, employees, agents, and representatives, from any and all claims, costs, judgments, awards, or liability to any person, including claims by the District's own employees to which the District might otherwise be immune under Title 51 RCW, arising from injury or death of any person or damage to property of which the negligent acts or omissions of the District, its agents, servants, officers, or employees in performing this agreement are the proximate cause. This covenant of indemnification shall include, but not be limited by this reference to, claims against the City arising as a result of the negligent acts or omissions of the District, its agents, servants, officers, or employees in barricading or providing other warnings of 3 any excavation, construction, or work in any public right -of -way or other public place in performance of work or services permitted under this agreement. Inspection or acceptance by the City of any work performed by the District at the time of completion shall not be grounds for avoidance of any of these covenants of indemnification, Said indemnification obligations shall extend to claims which are not reduced to a suit and any claims which may be compromised prior to the culmination of any litigation or the institution of any litigation, provided that the District shall not be liable to indemnify the City for any settlement of any action or claim effective without the consent of the District, but if settled with the consent of the District, the District shall indemnify and hold harmless the City from and against loss or liability by reason of such settlement. The District shall be obligated to indemnify the City regardless of whether the settlement of the action on the claim is made with the consent of the District if the District has refused to defend the City. In the event that the District refuses the tender of defense in any suit or claim, said tender having been made pursuant to the indemnification clauses contained herein, and said refusal is subsequently determined by a court having jurisdiction (or such other tribunal that the parties shall agree to decide the matter) to have been a wrongful refusal on the part of the District, then the District shall pay all of the City's costs for defense of the action, including all reasonable expert witness fees and reasonable attorney's fees and the reasonable costs of the City, including reasonable attorney's fees for recovery under this indemnification clause. In the event of liability for damages arising out of bodily injury to persons or damage to property caused by or resulting from the concurrent negligence of the District and the City, its officers, officials, employees or agents, the District's liability hereunder shall be only to the extent of the District's negligence. It is further specifically and expressly understood that the indemnification provided herein constitutes the District's waiver of immunity under Title 51 RCW, solely for the purposes of this indemnification. This waiver has been mutually negotiated by the parties. SECTION 9. Insurance. The District shall procure and maintain for the duration of this Agreement, insurance against claims for injuries to persons or damage to property which may arise from or in connection with the exercise of the rights, privileges and authority granted hereunder to the District, its officers, officials, agents, or employees. The District shall provide a copy of such insurance policy to the City for its inspection prior to the adoption of this agreement. a. Minimum Scope of Insurance. District shall obtain insurance of the types described below: 1) Automobile Liability insurance covering all owned, non - owned, hired, and leased vehicles. Coverage shall be written on Insurance Services Office (ISO) form CA 00 01 or a substitute form providing equivalent liability coverage. If necessary, the policy shall be endorsed to provide contractual liability coverage. 2) Commercial General Liability insurance shall be written on ISO occurrence form CG 00 Ol or a substitute form providing equivalent liability coverage 0 and shall cover liability arising from premises, operations, independent contractors, products- completed operations, stop gap liability, and personal injury and advertising injury and liability assumed under an insured contract, The Commercial General Liability insurance shall be endorsed to provide the Aggregate Per Project Endorsement ISO form CG 25 03 11 85. There shall be no endorsement or modification of the Commercial General Liability insurance for liability arising from explosion, collapse, or underground property damage. The City shall be named as an additional insured under the District's Commercial General Liability insurance policy with respect to work performed for the City using ISO Additional Insured Endorsement CG 20 10 10 01 and Additional Insured - Completed Operations endorsement CG 20 37 10 01 or substitute endorsements providing equivalent coverage. 3) Workers' Compensation coverage as required by the Industrial Insurance laws of the State of Washington. b. Minimum Amounts of Insurance. The District shall maintain the following insurance limits: 1) Automobile Liability insurance with a minimum combined single limit or bodily injury and property damage of $1,000,000 per accident. 2) Commercial General Liability insurance shall be written with limits no less than $1,000,000 each occurrence, $2,000,000 general aggregate, and a 2,000,000 products- completed operations aggregate limit. 3) Professional Liability insurance shall be written with limits of no less than 1,000,000 per claim. c. Municipal Risk Management Pool Participation. Notwithstanding the provisions of subsections a. and b. of this Section 9, District may satisfy all of its insurance obligations under this agreement by participating in a risk management pool available to Washington municipal corporations providing reasonably equivalent or better insurance coverage than required in such subsections a. and b. The District's obligation to cause the City to be named as an additional insured shall be subject to the terms, conditions and policies of the District's risk management pool as they may be adjusted from time to time. SECTION 10. Relocation of Lines and Facilities. The District agrees and covenants at its sole cost and expense, to protect, support, temporarily disconnect, relocate, or remove from any street or public place within the Agreement area, any of its installations when so required by the City by reason of traffic conditions or public safety, dedications, or new rights -of -way and the establishment and improvement thereof, freeway construction, change or establishment of street grade, or the construction of any public improvement or structure by any governmental agency acting in a governmental capacity, provided that the District shall in all such cases have the privilege to temporarily bypass, in the authorized portion of the same street upon approval by the City, any water or sanitary sewer line or portion thereof required to be 5 temporarily disconnected or removed; and provided further, that this provision will not apply to District installations located within easements owned by the District. The City shall consult all as -built maps and plans filed by the District pursuant to this Agreement or any permits authorized under this agreement, in order to determine whether the District has placed pipe or facilities in any area affected by a proposed City project. The City will make its best effort and attempt to design or redesign streets, avenues, alleys or public places or ways, and other City utilities to minimize the impact thereof on the District's existing sanitary sewer systems, including the need to require the District's facilities to be relocated and shall coordinate with the District in accordance with RCW 35.21.905. PROVIDED HOWEVER, that the City shall make the final determination on the need for relocation of the District's facilities. Whenever the City determines that any of the above circumstances necessitate the relocation of the District's then existing facilities, the City shall notify the District in writing, And provide the District with copies of pertinent portions of the plans and specifications for such project so that the District is able to relocate its facilities to accommodate the City's project. The City shall provide notice to the District and require relocation of the facilities in a period of time that is reasonable given the circumstances surrounding the project. The City understands that pursuant to RCW 57.08.050, the District is required to comply with certain notice and bid procedures prior to commencement of any construction project. Whenever practical, given the circumstances surrounding the City's project, the City shall provide the District with sufficient notice to enable the District to comply fully with RCW 57.08.050 without resorting to emergency powers granted therein. Upon the District's failure to complete relocation of its installations and facilities as directed by the City, the City may remove same at the District's . expense. The District shall complete the relocation work at least ten (10), days prior to the project's commencement unless the parties agree on a different schedule. If, after reviewing the as -built maps and plans submitted by the District, the City determines that the District's pipe or facilities will not be affected by a proposed City project, no notice shall be given to the District. The City may then commence construction and if the City finds that the District's as -built maps and plans are inaccurate through the actual discovery of pipe and facilities in the construction area, the City shall notify the District and allow the District twenty -four (24) hours, when reasonable, to remove and/or relocate its pipe and facilities. However, should the District be unable to remove and/or relocate its pipe and facilities within this twenty -four (24) hour period after notification, the City may remove and dispose of same at the District's cost. SECTION 11. Abandonment of Pipe and System Facilities. No pipe, conduit, main, appurtenances, appendages or water or sanitary sewer system facilities located within the City's rights of way or property may be abandoned by the District without the express written consent of the City. Abandonment procedures may be initiated by application of the District to the City, which application shall detail, to the City's satisfaction, the location of all pipe or facilities to be abandoned by providing to the City with the abandonment application current as- built drawings showing the exact location of all pipes or facilities to be abandoned, and the procedures the District plans to implement in order to comply with all local, state, and federal regulations pertaining to abandonment of water and sanitary sewer pipe and facilities constructed of asbestos cement or other materials containing asbestos, The District shall, at its sole cost and expense, and pursuant to all local, state, and federal regulations, remove and properly dispose of all abandoned pipes and facilities when so directed by the City for any reason, with cause. PROVIDED, that in no event shall the City direct or require the District to remove abandoned pipes or facilities on the basis of standards not equally applied by the City to require the removal of pipes or facilities abandoned by the City in similar circumstances. The District will commence the removal and disposal of the abandoned facilities within thirty (30) calendar days, and will fully complete the removal within one hundred eighty (18 0) calendar days from the date the City directs the removal, unless the City agrees, in writing, to extend the time for removal. In addition to and in clarification of the indemnity provisions in Section 8, the District specifically shall defend, indemnify and hold the City, its officers, officials, employees, agents and volunteers harmless from any and all claims, injuries, damages, losses or suits, including all legal costs and attorney fees arising out of or in connection with the abandonment and /or removal of pipe and facilities constructed of asbestos cement or other material containing asbestos. In the case of street vacations, the City shall, to the extent possible, retain and grant an easement to the District for any pipe and facilities then in use by the District. The City shall give notice to the District of any proposed project or street vacation requiring removal of abandoned pipe and facilities as set forth in Section 10. If the District does not comply within the time period set by the City, the City may arrange for the removal and proper disposal of all such pipes and facilities at the District's cost. SECTION 12. Excavation. During any period of installation, relocation, maintenance, or repair of the District's facilities and installations located within the City's rights of way and property, all surface structures, if any, shall be erected and used in such places and positions within said public rights -of -way and other public properties so as to interfere as little as possible with the free passage of traffic and the free use of adjoining property, and the District shall at all times post and maintain proper barricades during such period of construction as required by state law or city ordinance. Whenever the District shall excavate in any public right -of -way or other public property for the purpose of installation, repair, maintenance, or relocation of its facilities, it shall apply to the City for a permit to do so and except in the case of an emergency, shall give the City at least three (3) working days notice thereof. In the event that emergency work is required, the District may, without prior written notice to the City, request permits by telephone. The Director shall grant or deny such permits by telephone, but the District shall follow -up all phone emergency permit requests with a written application within three (3) working days of the telephone notification to the Director In all other cases, the City shall approve the District's applications for permits as soon as reasonably possible. During the progress of the work, the District shall not unnecessarily obstruct the passage or proper use of the right -or -way, and shall file maps or plans with the City (as described in Section S herein) showing the proposed and final location of the sanitary sewer facilities. If either the City or the District shall at any time plan to make excavations in any area covered by this Agreement and as described in this section, the party planning such excavation shall afford the other, upon receipt of a written request to do so, an opportunity to share such excavation, PROVIDED THAT: (1) such joint use shall not unreasonably delay the 7 work of the party causing the excavation to be made; (2) such joint use shall be arranged and accomplished on terms and conditions satisfactory to both parties; and (3) either party may deny such request for safety reasons. Prior to commencement of any construction authorized by this agreement, the District shall reference all monuments and markers of every nature relating to subdivision plats, highways and all other surveys for review and inspection by the City. The reference points shall be so located that they will not be disturbed during the District's operations under this Agreement. The method of referencing these monuments or other points to be referenced shall be approved by the Director before placement. The replacement of all such monuments or markers disturbed during construction shall he made as expeditiously as conditions permit and as directed by the Director. The costs of monuments or other markers lost, destroyed, or disturbed and the expense of replacement by approved monuments shall be borne by the District. SECTION 13. Permits Required. This Agreement does not release the District from any of its obligations to obtain applicable local, state, and federal permits necessary to install, construct, operate, maintain, remove, repair, reconstruct, replace, use and inspect its water and sanitary sewer system. SECTION 14. Compliance With Laws, The District shall indemnify the City, its officers, officials, agents, employees or representatives against any claim or liability arising from or based upon the violation by the District of any laws, ordinances or regulations. SECTION 15. City Construction Adjacent to District Installation. The laying, construction, maintenance, and operation of the said District's system of water and sanitary sewer lines, pipes, conduits, mains, etc., authorized under this Agreement shall not preclude the City or its accredited agents and contractors from excavating, grading or doing other necessary road work contiguous to the said District's pipe lines, provided that the District shall have forty - eight (48) hours notice of said excavation, grading or road work in order that the District may protect its line of pipe and property. SECTION 16. Modification. The City and District hereby reserve the right to alter, amend or modify the terms and conditions of this Agreement upon written agreement of both parties to such alteration, amendment, or modification. SECTION 17. Bond. The City and the District acknowledge RCW 35A.21.250. The District shall not be required to furnish any bond before undertaking any of the work, improvements, repair, relocation, or maintenance authorized by this Agreement. SECTION 18. Enforcement. If the District or the City willfully violates or fails to comply with any of the provisions of this Agreement, then the non - breaching party may elect, without any prejudice to any of its other legal rights and remedies, to obtain an order from the superior court having jurisdiction compelling compliance with the provisions of this Agreement and to recover damages and costs incurred by reason of the failure to comply. P SECTION 19. City Ordinances and Regulations. Nothing herein shall be deemed to direct the City's ability to adopt and enforce all necessary and appropriate ordinances regulating the performance of the conditions of this Agreement, including any reasonable ordinance made in the exercise of its police powers in the interest of the public safety and for the welfare of the public. The City shall have the authority at all times to control by reasonable and appropriate regulations the location, elevation and manner of construction and maintenance of any sanitary sewer facilities by the District, and the District shall promptly conform with all such regulations, unless compliance would cause the District to violate other requirements of law. The District further agrees to adhere to City Ordinance(s) prohibiting excavations in City street within 5 years of paving. SECTION 20. Cost of Publication. The cost of publication any ordinance adopting this Agreement shall be borne by the District. SECTION 21. Assignment. The District may not assign the rights, duties, and obligations under this Agreement without the prior, written consent of the City, which consent shall not be unreasonably withheld. If such consent is given for assignment, acceptance of the assignment shall be filed by the District's successor with the City. SECTION 22. Successors And Assigns. All the provisions, conditions, regulations, and requirements contained in this Agreement shall be binding upon the successors and assigns of the District, and all privileges of the District shall inure to its successors and assigns equally as if they were specifically mentioned herein. SECTION 23. Notice. Any notice or information required or permitted to be given to the parties under this Agreement may be sent to the following addresses unless otherwise specified: CITY OF RENTON CEDAR RIVER WATER & SEWER DISTRICT ATTN: Utility Systems Director ATTN: General Manager 1055 South Grady Way P.O. Box 1040 Renton, Washington 98055 Maple Valley, Washington 98038 425) 430 -7239 (425) 255 -6370 FAX) (425) 430 -7241 (FAX) (425) 228 -4880 SECTION 24. Dispute Resolution_ In the event any dispute arises between the Parties, either Party may request in writing that the issue in dispute be resolved by mediation. If the parties are unable to resolve, the dispute within ninety (90) days, then either party may commence a legal proceeding in King County Superior Court for the State of Washington. SECTION 25. Survival. All of the provisions, conditions, and requirements of Sections 6, Protection of Public; 8, Indemnification; 10, Relocation of Lines and Facilities, and 11, Abandonment of Lines and Facilities, of this Agreement shall be in addition to any and all other obligations and liabilities the District may have to the City at common law, by statute, or by contract, and shall survive this Agreement's expiration for the use of the areas mentioned in Section 1 herein including any renewals or extensions thereof for ten (10) years. All of the 6 provisions, conditions, regulations, and requirements contained in this Agreement shall further be binding upon the successors and assigns of the District, and all privileges, as well as all obligations and liabilities of the District shall inure to its successors and assigns equally as if they were specifically mentioned wherever the District is named herein. SECTION 26. Severability. If any section, sentence, clause, or phrase of this Agreement should be held to be invalid or unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity or unconstitutionality shall not affect the validity or constitutionality of any other section, sentence, clause or phrase of this Agreement. In the event that any of the provisions of this Agreement are held to be invalid by a court of competent jurisdiction, the City and the District reserve the right to reconsider this Agreement and by mutual agreement may amend, repeal, add, replace or modify any other provision, or either may rescind its execution of this Agreement. SECTION 27. Utility Planning. This Agreement shall not affect the terms and conditions of existing water and sewer system comprehensive plans, the East King County Coordinated Water System Plan nor that certain agreement between the parties entitled "City of Renton & Cedar River Water and Sewer District For The Establishment of Service Area Boundaries" dated February 8, 1999. SECTION 28. Effective Date. This Agreement shall be effective in thirty (30) days after execution, SECTION 29. Exchange of Information. The District and the City agree to routinely communicate and exchange information concerning their utility plans, including capital improvement plans, within the area of this franchise. The District will also provide the City with any current or future database or mapping showing the location of existing and new facilities constructed within the City; provided, that City will utilize exemptions provided by law to protect the dissemination of such documents for security purposes. Resobjlm Approved by4)rdiTi=e No. y02 2 of the City Council of the CITY OF RENTON, Washington, at its regular meeting held on gie -dey-cf %'&tAcAxln t A 1 2009. ATTEST: Bonnie I. Walton, City Clerk CITY OF RENTON 4 4Z Denis Law, Mayor 10 CITY OF RENTON APPROVED AS TO FORM: FEB 0 4 2010 RECEIVED CITY CLERKS OFFICE Lawrence J. Warren City Attorney Approved by Resolution No. Qa.: LIL of the Board of Commissioners of CEDAR RIVER WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT of King County, Washington, adopted at its regular meeting held on the _,_ day of Qc olDor , 2009. ATTEST: p fir! Gen"e"ral Manager CEDAR RIVER WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT By:/ President of Board B Secretary of Board 11 EXHIBIT A y I i 4 mom J, 3 a L - I y ii N YLI E F K! -' % ] _ 1 _ _ i rrr- fi a r L_ r - n ol)93 26iz9 Un J _ II _ p 1 4 w 66 1961 M Ar 6 /27/1962 f i LJL T" a Effective through Ord. #5488 Public Works, Utility Systems D C ne Tech Printed on D ecember 21, 2 00 9AnnexationHistoryCtyof" t It D1 S IW14IsIIH08.3 Age u CAG-11-187 AGREEMENT FOR THE SALE OF WATER IN AN EMERGENCY BETWEEN THE CITY OF RENTON AND SKYWAY WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT This AGREEMENT made and entered into this 34*t— day of NOLkinnlao-f', 2011, by the CITY OF RENTON, a municipal corporation of the State of Washington, hereinafter called "RENTON" and SKYWAY WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, a municipal corporation of the State of Washington, hereinafter called "SKYWAY". WHEREAS, RENTON and SKYWAY may experience periodic water supply shortfall; WHEREAS, RENTON and SKYWAY recognize the public benefits of cooperation and collaborative problem solving; WHEREAS, RENTON and SKYWAY are willing to sell water in a emergency at the existing system intertie, WHEREAS, the parties desire to enter into an AGREEMENT providing for the sale of water in an emergency; NOW THEREFORE, IT IS AGREED AS FOLLOWS: 1) Term of AGREEMENT. The effective date of this AGREEMENT shall be n1owHm* 2011. The AGREEMENT shall be for a minimum of one 1) year and shall continue in full force and effect in its present form, or as amended until terminated by either party in accordance with Section 15 of this AGREEMENT. The rates and quantities of water sold are set forth in Sections (3), and (7). 2) Sale. Subject to the conditions set out in this agreement either party may sell water to the other in the event that the receiving party is experiencing an emergency. An emergency is defined, for the purposes of this agreement, as a situation of relative short duration during which either RENTON or SKYWAY cannot meet water consumption needs of all or part of its respective distribution system. 3) Rate: RENTON shall pay to SKYWAY for all water delivered at the rate of SKYWAY's wholesale water rate. SKYWAY shall pay to RENTON for all water delivered at the rate of RENTON's wholesale water rate. The rates charged by the SELLER shall be the rate in effect at the time of water delivery. Agreement for the Sale of rimer in an Emergency between the City of Fon and Skyway Water and Sewer District Page 2 of 5 4) Location of Intertie: This Agreement is limited to one (1) intertie locations described as follows: Skyway's Dimmitt Booster Station located at 12603 82nd Avenue South, near the intersection of 82nd Avenue South and South 126th ( Section 12 Township 23 Range 4). The physical arrangement of the intertie is shown in Exhibits 1 and 2. 5) Metering. RENTON and SKYWAY shall each provide, and own and maintain, an appropriate metering device to measure the water flowing through the intertie. Before allowing any water to flow through the intertie, the party requesting the water shall provide a description and documentation of the emergency condition to the other party. 6) Priority and Continuity of Service. The determination of whether water is available for emergency sale shall be at the sole discretion of the party delivering (selling) the water. In the event of a condition requiring restrictions on the delivery of water, the party delivering the water shall have the right to restrict or interrupt service. The party providing water may voluntarily interrupt or reduce deliveries of water if it determines that such interruption or reduction is necessary or reasonable. Except in cases of emergency and in order that operations will not be unreasonably interfered with, the party providing water shall give the party buying water, reasonable notice of any such interruption or reduction, the reason therefore, and the probable duration thereof. The party buying water shall discontinue or reduce service from the intertie upon reasonable notice. Service shall be reactivated or increased again subject to the aforementioned conditions. 7) Water Quality. The quality of water delivered under this AGREEMENT shall comply with all applicable provisions of State and Federal law and rules and regulations of the appropriate State agency governing water quality, and subject also to applicable provisions of City ordinances relating thereto and not inconsistent herewith. Each party agrees to deliver water which shall be of no less quality than is delivered to its other retail customers throughout the service area. Prior to any delivery of water, information on current water quality will be provided to the receiving party so that blending, compatibility and other water quality issues can be evaluated and addressed. 8) Quantity of Water. Depending upon demand conditions, water availability including conservation impacts), as well as aquifer behavior, in the water systems, each party may make available, for the purchase by the other party, up to the approximate amount of one million eight hundred thousand (1,800,000) gallons per day, at flow rates vary from zero to approximately 1,250 gallons per minute, from the intertie described and located in Section (4) of this agreement. H:\File Sys\WTR-Drinking Water Utility\WTR-11-Interagency Cooperation\WTR-11-0016- Skyway Water and Sewer District\Agreement-Emergency-Sale-of-Water-2011\Final_Emergency_water_supply_contract.doc\AG Agreement for the Sale of der in an Emergency between the City of%Obn and Skyway Water and Sewer District Page 3 of 5 9) Coordination and Project Management. A) Operations: For the purpose of operating the intertie between RENTON and SKYWAY, coordination shall occur between representatives of the systems, who are: Water Maintenance Manager for the City of Renton and General Manager for Skyway Water and Sewer or their designated representatives ) The coordination shall consist of exchanging operational information such as the interties used, the respective flow rates, back-pressure sustaining valve setpoints, system pressure effects, water quality characteristics, and other operational information as necessary to accomplish the purposes of this AGREEMENT while maintaining safe operation of both systems. B.Engineering: For the purposes of coordinating engineering issues regarding the RENTON and SKYWAY intertie, the following personnel shall be the designated representatives: Lys Hornsby, Utility Systems Director for the City of Renton and Cheryl Scheuerman, Manager for Skyway Water and Sewer or their designated representatives or replacements) The engineering issues addressed shall include operational criteria as well as hydraulic behavior, water quality considerations, and other appropriate engineering issues. C. Administration: For the purposes of AGREEMENT administration and AGREEMENT modifications or interpretations, the following personnel shall be the designated representatives: Lys Hornsby, Utility Systems Director for the City of Renton or their designated representatives or replacements) Renton City Hall, 1055 S. Grady Way, Renton, WA 98057 and H:\File Sys\WTR-Drinking Water Utility\WTR-11-Interagency Cooperation\WTR-11-0016- Skyway Water and Sewer District\Agreement-Emergency-Sale-of-Water-2011\Final_Emergency_water_supply_contract.doc\AG Agreement for the Sale of*.*ter in an Emergency between the City of R`brr(on and Skyway Water and Sewer District Page 4 of 5 Cheryl Scheuerman, Manager for Skyway Water and Sewer District or their designated representatives or replacements) 6723S. 124 th St., Seattle, WA 98178 10) Payment. The party providing the water shall read the meter once each month at approximately thirty (30) day intervals. Payment shall be made by the party receiving water as soon as possible after receipt of statement from the party supplying water, and in any event, not later than the tenth (10) of the second month following the presentation of the bill. In the event a meter shall fail to register or obviously register incorrectly, the amount of water considered delivered through said meter shall be the amount delivered the previous day or the last day that the meter was previously known to be properly functioning and the total amount registered shall be pro-rated based on the number of days multiplied times the reading used. 11)Penalties For Late Payment. The party supplying water may assess a late charge on the party receiving water for failure to comply with the provisions in Section (10). This charge shall be at the rate of twelve percent (12%) per year. In the event that the party receiving water should fail to make any payment for a period of sixty (60) days after the same becomes due, the party supplying water shall have the right to terminate further water service until such delinquency is cured. 12) Procedure for Amending the Contract. Either party can request the other to consider an amendment of the AGREEMENT. Any proposed amendments shall be made in writing. Amendments may be made if they are mutually acceptable to RENTON and SKYWAY and signed by both parties. 13)Access to Facilities and Records. Each party shall be entitled to inspect the facilities of the other at any reasonable time. Both parties agree to make mutually available such information or records as are at their disposal and as may be reasonably necessary to properly implement any section of this AGREEMENT. 14) Non-Assignability. Neither this AGREEMENT nor any interest therein shall be transferred or assigned by either party without prior written consent of both parties. 15)Termination. This AGREEMENT may be terminated in whole or in part by either party any time after one year from the date of this AGREEMENT, upon ninety (90) days written notice sent by certified mail to the other party. H:\File Sys\WTR-Drinking Water Utility\WTR-11-Interagency Cooperation\WTR-11-0016-Skyway Water and Sewer District\ Agreement-Emergency-Sale-of-Water-2011\Final_Emergency_water_supply_contract.doc\AG Agreement for the Sale of der in an Emergency between the City of R"fon and Skyway Water and Sewer District Page 5 of 5 a,4loZ DATED this day of Authorized by Resiolution No.020 of the City Council of the City of Renton, Washington, at its regular meeting held on Jff# day of 2011. CITY ENT ON By: Denis Law, Mayor ATTEST: a A• Ct c2:E aa'.. s Bonnie I. Walton, City Clerk APP VED AS TO LEGAL FORM: Larry Warren, City Attorney Approved by Resiolution No. P-03-4/71 of the Board of Commissioners of SKYWAY WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, of King County, Washington, adopted at its regular meeting held on O"— day of QQURrribsI' , 2011. SKYWAY WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT By: 0 Cheryl Sche rman, General Manager ATTEST: i/YiS1j"A oY/ fA'/iCeS A U'' H:\File Sys\WTR-Drinking Water Utility\WTR-11-Interagency Cooperation\WTR-11-0016- Skyway Water and Sewer District\ Agreement-Emergency-Sale-of-Water-2011\Final_Emergency_water_supply_contract.doc\AG r,i,r mw EXHIBIT 1 LOCATION OF EMERGENCY WATER SYSTEM INTERTIE BETWEEN SKYWAY WATER AND SEWER AND DISTRICT AND CITY OF RENTON SITE ADDRESS: 12603 82"D AVE SOUTH—DIMMITT BOOSTER PUMP STATION EXISTING 12" WATER CITY OF RENTON) S. 126TH ST. WEST HILL y RESERVOIR TELEMETRY SHELTER CONDUIT FOR RESERVOIR LEVEL SIGNAL e LIMIT OF EASEMENT\ TO SKYWAY WATER\I w do SEWER DIST. w 4 12" DUCTILE IRON o o INTERTIE DIMMITT Go BOOSTER STATION low BEE' Z o rip0N s I pigDIP LL. 41 QD I 12L LLJ nr r a s Z li Z.d 14 Pit:Q - ;N j x a ha kt25 k7R I"1` m Q R wg F'y aQ3 __x, __ - .>-_ FRY d U ++ D 8 IF Oa U LLJLLI S 3t1N3A QNl6 _ l Rir Tr @R,p a y.. r! uj tCC t" ri t r5 7) a a1 ti i\ e Y Hsi c, A rya c uj Ln 1 d$ a OTC t _9> W T 'I,k filly Qy K CJ C'Ci a ORIGINAL' CAG-91-083 Addendum 1-04 FIRST ADDENDUM TO CITY OF RENTON & SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT AGREEMENT FOR THE TRANSFER OF FACILITIES AND FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SERVICE BOUNDARIES THIS ADDENDUM, made and entered into this -°6 day of 2004,by and between the CITY OF RENTON,a Washington muni 1pal corporation, hereinafter referred to as "the City", and SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, a Washington municipal corporation, hereinafter referred to as j the District", both being duly organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Washington, WITNESSETH: WHEREAS,with effective date of the 6th day of August, 1991,the City and the District entered into the following agreement: CITY OF RENTON & SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT AGREEMENT FOR THE TRANSFER OF FACILITIES AND FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SERVICE BOUNDARIES 1991 AGREEMENT); and WHEREAS, by mutual agreement, in 1997 the City and the District amended the boundaries as contained in the Agreement by the execution of the following agreement CITY OF RENTON and SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT 1NTERLOCAL AGREEMENT FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SERVICE BOUNDARIES 1997 AGREEMENT); and WHEREAS, the 1997 AGREEMENT left all obligations of the 1991 AGREEMENT intact, changing only the service area descriptions of the 1991 AGREEMENT; and First Addendum to Renton/Soos Creek Agreement for the Transfer of Facilities and Establishment of Service Area Boundaries- 1 WHEREAS,the parties now desire to modify the 1991 AGREEMENT as to both terms and service area; and WHEREAS,the 1991 AGREEMENT as modified by the 1997 AGREEMENT,and by this Addendum, will continue to provide for maximum efficient use of existing and future facilities, and orderly and efficient water and sanitary sewer system planning. NOW, THEREFORE: IT IS HEREBY AGREED by and between the parties hereto as follows: 1. Sale of Springbrook Area Sewer System to Renton. The parties have agreed that in consideration of the mutual agreements contained herein,that allpayment obligations contained in Section 6. and Section 7. of the 1991 AGREEMENT regarding the sale of the Springbrook Sewer System to Renton shall be deemed to have been satisfied in full, and Renton shall have no further payment or accounting obligation there for. 2. Amended Terms for Service and Payment by District for Stonehaven Area. The parties agree that as an alternative the District may connect the Stonehaven and adjacent area, as shown on Exhibit "A" which is by reference incorporated herein, to the South 47th Street sewer line of Renton, generally in the manner shown on said Exhibit. In the event of such alternate connection,and in consideration thereof,the District shall pay one half of the General Facilities Charges it collects from such area to Renton,after the property owner has made such payment to the District. Total payment will be dependent upon the number of units utilizing such alternate connection, when the charge is paid,the rate at the time of connection,and the number of units developed. 3. Termination on Build-out. The terms hereof with regard to the Stonehaven and adjacent area shall terminate and be of no further force or effect upon completion of build-out within that area. 4. Remaining Obligations Intact. Nothing herein shall be construed to alter the rights, responsibilities,liabilities,or obligations of either the City or the District pursuant to either the 1991 AGREEMENT or the 1997 AGREEMENT,previously executed by the parties, except as specifically set forth herein. Approved by Resolution No. 3681 of the City Council of the CITY OF RENTON, Washington, at its regular meeting held on the 22nd day of December 2t)r)4 2003 First Addendum to Renton/Soos Creek Agreement for the Transfer of Facilities and Establishment of Service Area Boundaries- 2 0 CITY OF RENTON By: G Title: Kathy Keolker-Wheeler, Mayor Attest: City Clerk - Bonnie I. Walton Approved by Resolution No. 2545-S of the Board of Commissioners of SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT of King County, Washington, at its regular meeting held on the 7th day of January 3 2004 SOOS CREE "ER D SE R DISTRICT w By. Philip Su Ivan, President of Board By: etr m a uzl Secretary of Board Randy Reece', Acting First Addendum to Renton/Soos Creek Agreement for the Transfer of Facilities and Establishment of Service Area Boundaries - 3 CAG-91-083 Addendum 1-04 R S. 47TH ST 000, SE 185TH j SEA 186TH S LU r i iI t 187TH PL Q SE 188TH ST. 1 N TH SEi LOTS TEMP(SRARILY SERVED BY GRINDER PUMP5 lie SE 1bOTH:. ST r SE T9. ST F P4 r i CITY OF RENTON/SCWSD INIEFLLO AL I Cl I SERVICE 1 tE 11926, ST I I BOUNDARIES. EXHIBIT A LEGEND asoun.a.wai r • Y.PwYwa.wu t-- t,Q ice Usnc ar.nn runFJ M—tsrro vein 1 uumn nns+vn i wu rro r. OAG-91-083, Adden #2-08 2008 ADDENDUM TO CITY OF RENTON & SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT AGREEMENT FOR THE TRANSFER OF FACILITIES AND FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SERVICE BOUNDARIES THIS ADDENDUM, made and entered into this A8' A day of QA,Q44 2008,by and between the CITY OF RENTON,a Washington inunicipif core ration, hereinafter referred to as "the City", and SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, a Washington municipal corporation,hereinafter referred to as the District", both being duly organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Washington, WITNESSETH: WHEREAS,with effective date of the 6`h day of August, 1991,the City and the District entered into the following agreement: CITY OF RENTON & SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT AGREEMENT FOR THE TRANSFER OF FACILITIES AND FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SERVICE BOUNDARIES 1991 AGREEMENT); and WHEREAS,by mutual agreement,the Agreement has been modified from time to time as to the boundaries of the City and District service areas to reflect service issues regarding the timing of various developments by the City and the District; and WHEREAS, the parties now desire to again modify the AGREEMENT as to service area; and WHEREAS,the 1991 AGREEMENT,as modified by this Addendum,will continue to provide for maximum efficient use of existing and future facilities, and the orderly and efficient water and sanitary sewer system planning. NOW, THEREFORE: i i i 2008 Addendum to Renton/Soos Creek Agreement for the Transfer of Facilities and Establishment of Service Area Boundaries - 1 IT IS HEREBY AGREED by and between the parties hereto as follows: 1. Service Area Boundaries. The parties have agreed that in consideration of the mutual agreements contained herein, the service area boundaries between the City and the District shall be modified as shown in Exhibit A hereto, which is incorporated herein by this reference. 2. Amended Terms for Service by District. The parties agree that the District may install a mainline sewer line in South 28`'Street,which may serve into the City's sewer collection system. 3. Amended Terms of Payment by District. In consideration of the foregoing, the District will pay 50%of the collected General Facility Charges collected for the lots that connect to a mainline sewer line to be installed in South 28`h Street to the City; such lots are identified in Exhibit B hereto, which is incorporated herein by this reference. 3. Remaining Obligations Intact. Nothing herein shall be construed to alter the rights, responsibilities,liabilities,or obligations of either the City or the:District pursuant to either the 1991 AGREEMENT, or any amendments thereto, except as specifically set forth herein. Approved by Resolution No. 3957 of the City Council of the CITY OF RENTON, Washington, at its regular meeting held on the J M day of 2008. CITY OF REN ON By: Title: Denis Law, Mayor Attest: l(JCz—Ori- CityClerk — Bonnie I . Walton 2008 Addendum to Renton/Soos Creek Agreement for the Transfer of Facilities and Establishment of Service Area Boundaries-2 Approved by Motion of the Board of Commissioners of SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT of King County, Washington, at its regular meeting held on the S day of /' Al2008. SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT By: r L Ron Speer, Dist ' t Manager 2008 Addendum to Renton/Soos Creek Agreement for the Transfer of Facilities and Establishment of Service Area Boundaries - 3 EXHIBIT "A" EXISTING SERVICE BOUNDARY REVISED SERVICE BOUNDAR l' EE AREA TRANSFERRED FROM SICSWD TO RENTON S 27th St tE , E3'tE Etf 4'E"t 4E E SEE IB)3rd. EI _ E 1, ;g a t. W 1e5 h St E'. S 9 h St W Q 0 0 400 1 4,800 n EXHIBIT "B" EXISTING SERVICE BOUNDARY REVISED SERVICE BOUNDARY 3 AREA OF SCSWD TO SERVE INTO E RENTON SYSTEM S 27th St O MOP k j mill, o O 00 S S 9hSt W 0 0 100 f 1418 r ! S CAG-083-91 CITY OF RENTON & SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT AGREEMENT FOR THE TRANSFER OF FACILITIES AND FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SERVICE BOUNDARIES I THIS AGREEMENT, made and entered into thiskAL day of 1941, by and between SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, a ashington municipal corporation, hereinafter referred to as "THE DISTRICT", and the CITY OF RENTON, a Washington municipal corporation, hereinafter referred to as "RENTON", both being duly organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Washington, WITNESSETH: WHEREAS, THE DISTRICT is qualified to provide water and sewer service within its prescribed area; and WHEREAS, RENTON is qualified to provide public services, including water and sewer service, within its prescribed area; and WHEREAS, THE DISTRICT has constructed, and has managed, operated, and maintained certain water and/or sewer facilities which exist in areas which have been annexed by RENTON, and which can most efficiently be managed, operated, and maintained by RENTON in conjunction with other facilities in the City; and i WHEREAS, bond covenants, resolutions, and other agreements of THE DISTRICT require that certain steps be taken, and certain financial arrangements made, as part of any transfer of facilities from THE DISTRICT to another party; and WHEREAS, it is in the best interest of both parties to have RENTON administer the collection of General Facilities Charges on behalf of, and to be passed on to, THE DISTRICT for those areas herein described to be transferred to RENTON for management, operation, and maintenance; and WHEREAS, it is in the public interest for the parties herein to enter into an agreement to provide for the efficient planning and development of new water and sewer services in areas which may be served by either, or both, of the parties herein; now therefore, 4-7:04O ft.00l Page 1 of 11 MAY 2 3 1991 tr, s IT IS HEREBY AGREED by and between the parties hereto as follows: 1 . Water service by THE DISTRICT within RENTON City Limits. THE DISTRICT shall provide water service to the properties within THE RENTON City Limits described in attached Exhibit "A", and as shown in attached Figure 1 . Any new construction within the current RENTON City Limits by THE DISTRICT for water service shall be in compliance with RENTON requirements including; materials, techniques, fire flow, and all other standards. Existing watermains are excepted, provided that any upgrading or replacement shall be in compli- ance with said RENTON requirements. Future transfer of service areas shall be by mutual agreement to be determined at that time. Any new or replacement facilities after the date of this agreement shall be transferred to RENTON at no cost if constructed by developer, but RENTON shall reimburse THE DISTRICT for the value of any DISTRICT construction not yet fully depreciated, at an amount equal to the remaining amount to be depreciated. 2. Water Service by THE DISTRICT Within RENTON City Limits Without Annexation to THE DISTRICT. THE DISTRICT shall provide water service to the following areas within the City Limits which are not within DISTRICT boundaries, and by agreement will not require annexation (also shown in attached Figure 1 ): a) Spring Glen Elementary School. b) The West 340.00 feet of the East 670.00 feet of the South 305.00 feet of Section 20, Township 23 North, Range 5 East, W.M., less City and/or County Road. Any new construction within the RENTON City Limits by THE DISTRICT for water service shall be in compliance with RENTON requirements including: materials, techniques, fire flow, and all other standards. Future transfer of service area shall be by mutual agreement to be determined at the time any facilities change hands. 3. RENTON Provide Water Service Within DISTRICT Limits. The following areas have already been transferred to RENTON for service, or are herein released to RENTON for provision of water service by RENTON at no further charge for the transfer of such service area. THE DISTRICT releases all claim to water service within the areas described in Exhibit "B", and as shown in attached Figure 1 . 4-7:04W400g.001 Page 2 of 11 4. Water Service Area Boundary Between RENTON and THE DISTRICT. The attached Exhibit "C" describes the line separating the RENTON water service area from THE DISTRICT water service area. RENTON shall provide ultimate service for the area North and West of the line described. THE DISTRICT shall provide ultimate service for the area South and East of the line described. This line is also shown in attached Figure 1 . 5. PONDEROSA ESTATES: Sale of Sewer System to RENTON. The facilities listed below (and on As-Built page A-43 referenced) and the area as described in attached Exhibit "D", and as shown in attached Figures 2 and 3, are hereby transferred (sold) to RENTON by THE DISTRICT. THE DISTRICT agrees to allow the Ponderosa Estates sewer mains to remain connected to lines belonging to THE DISTRICT. THE DISTRICT further agrees not to charge RENTON for any maintenance of the lines so impacted, so long as RENTON agrees to, and continues to, notify THE DISTRICT whenever maintenance of the lines in Ponderosa Estates will be performed. Furthermore, that the RENTON maintenance crews take steps to minimize the amounts of solids or chemicals which would otherwise be released into the downstream lines as a result of such maintenance. This will allow THE DISTRICT to coordinate maintenance with the action of RENTON maintenance operations. The lines so included are as follows: Soos Creek Cascade) Manhole Run (Will As-Built Include Upstream Length Diameter Page No. Manhole) Feet) Inches) Street PONDEROSA ESTATES A-43 No. 104 to 207 400.0 8 Conc. 116th Ave. S.E. A-43 No. 100 to 201 173.0 8 Conc. 118th Ave. S.E. A-43 No. 201 to 202 96.0 8 Conc. 118th Ave. S.E. A-43 No. 202 to 203 250.0 8 Conc. 118th Ave. S.E. A-43 No. 203 to 204 210.0 8 Conc. S.E. 156th St. A-43 No. 203 to 205 300.0 8 Conc. 118th Ave. S.E. A-43 no. 205 to 206 308.0 8 Conc. 118th Ave. S.E. a) Latecomers: None due. b) General Facilities Charge: None due. c) Portion of Monthly Service Charge to Cover Bond Indebtedness 4-7.04W400g.001 Page 3 of 11 S As described in Soos Creek Water and Sewer District Resolution No. 0145C, based upon outstanding debt, the fraction of THE DISTRICT represented by the area of concern, and the portion of the indebtedness which is to be paid by the monthly service charges (and not by U.L.I.D. assessments). That amount is: Ponderosa Estates = $17,488.10 Amount calculated as follows: Number of Connections in Ponderosa Estates: 35 Number of Connections in Sewer Area: 18,619 Debt Retirement in 1990: 1,881,554 Amount Retired by U.L.I.D. Assessments in 1990: 771,900 Amount Retired by Service Charge in 1990: 1,109,654 (Difference) Amount Retired per Connection in 1990: 59.598 Debt Retired in Full in 2003. Remaining Years: 12 Present Value to Cover Indebtedness (6%): 35 Connections x $59.598 x 8.38384 = $17,488.10 RENTON agrees to compensate THE DISTRICT the amount of $17,488.10 as detailed above, for this portion, within 60 days after the date of this agreement. 6. SPRINGBROOK AREA: Sale of Sewer System to RENTON. The facilities involved are as listed below (and as shown in figure 4 and on As-built pages referenced, Figures 5-10) and the area is as described in attached Exhibit "E". Soos Creek Manhole Run Cascade) Will Include Length Diameter As-Built No. Upstream Manhole) Feet) Inches) Street K-25 No. 80-14 to 80-15 242.0 18 Conc. SR 167 Crossing) K-35 No. 80-15 to 34-OA 140.3 12 PVC S. 192nd St. K-35 No. 34-OA to 34-1 25.9 12 PVC S. 192nd St. K-35 No. 34-1 to 34-2 353.7 12 PVC S. 192nd St. K-35 No. 34-2 to 34-3 375.0 12 PVC S. 192nd St. K-35 No. 34-3 to 34-3A 105.5 12 PVC S. 192nd St. K-35 No. 34-3A to 34-4 233.5 12 PVC S. 192nd St. 4-7:04OW00g•001 Page 4 of 11 I Soos Creek Manhole Run Cascade) Will Include Length Diameter As-Built No. Upstream Manhole) Feet) Inches) Street K-36 No. 34-4 to 34-5 368.0 12 PVC S. 192nd St. K-36 No. 34-5 to 34-6 147.0 12 PVC S. 192nd St. K-36 No. 34-6 to 34-16 399.0 8 PVC 96th Ave. S. K-36 No. 34-16 to 34-17 249.1 8 PVC 96th Ave. S. K-37 No. 34-6 to 34-7 400.0 8 PVC 96th Ave. S. K-37 No. 34-6 to 34-12 403.0 12 PVC S. 192nd St. K-37 No. 34-12 to 34 713 377.2 12 PVC S. 192nd St. K-37 No. 34-13 to 34-14 192.9 12 DIP Easement K-37 No. 34-14 to 34-15 288.0 12 PVC Easement K-38 No. 34-7 to 34-8 400.0 8 PVC 97th Ave. S. K-38 No. 34-8 to 34-9 400.0 8 PVC 97th Ave. S. K-38 No. 34-9 to 34-10 400.0 8 PVC 97th Ave. S. K-38 No. 34-10 to 34-11 400.0 8 PVC 97th Ave. S. K-40 No. 34-17 to 34-26 179.0 8 PVC 96th Ave. S. a) Latecomers (From U.L.I.D. No. 34) Property 062205-9002 440 L.F. @ $35.89 per Lineal Foot Property 793100-0120 170 L.F. @ $35.89 per Lineal Foot + 275.00 for Stub Property 062205-9002 latecomer ($15,791 .60) to be collected by RENTON and paid through to THE DISTRICT at the time of connection. Property 793100-0120 is now RENTON property. However, it is in the watershed" and will never be developed, and is therefore not benefitted by the sewer. It is agreed that no payment need be made to Soos Creek at this time. If the property is ever developed, or a facility requiring sewers is placed on the property,then a latecomer amount of $6,376.30 shall be paid to THE DISTRICT by RENTON within 60 days after the date of connection to the sewer. 4-7:04W400g.001 Page 5 of 11 b) General Facilities Charge The 1991 General Facilities Charge for this basin is $0.0531 per square foot, with a minimum of $531 .00 per unit, or customer equivalent. Payable,at RENTON's discretion, to THE DISTRICT by RENTON, on the schedule as listed below. THE DISTRICT shall advise RENTON of current General Facilities Charges, and any changes to those charges as they occur. Area is described in attached Exhibit "E", and shown in attached Figure 4. Tributary Area: 6,000,000 S.F. (Total area, less 25% for rights-of- way.) Option No. 1 -General Facilities Charge of $199,200 if paid by June 1, 1991 . Option No. 2 -General Facilities Charge of $258,900 if paid be- tween June 2 and December 31, 1991 . Option No. 3 -If payment has not been made by December 31, 1991, the current General Facility Charge must be paid at the time of connection. If not paid according to Option No. 1 or Option No. 2 above, RENTON shall inform THE DISTRICT whenever an agreement is made for sewer service in this area by RENTON, and RENTON shall pay said charges to THE DISTRICT in accordance with Option No. 3, after the property owner has made such payment to RENTON, as described in Section 7. Total payment will be dependent upon when the charge is paid, the rate at the time of connection, and the number of units developed. c) Portion of Monthly Service Charge to Cover Bond Indebtedness Amount for Springbrook Area: $7,994.56 Amount calculated as follows: Number of Connections in Area: 16 (of 18,619 in Total District) Amount Retired by Service Charges in 1990: 1,109,654 ($59.598 per Connection) 4a:04W4 og.00i Page 6 of 11 Present Value of 12 Years of Repayment: 16 Connections x $59.598 x 8.38384 7,994.56 RENTON agrees to compensate THE DISTRICT the amount of $7,994.56 as detailed above, for this portion effective the date of the agreement and due within 60 days. 7. Notification of THE DISTRICT of New Connections, and Payment of THE DISTRICT's General Facilities Charge. Notification shall be made by RENTON to THE DISTRICT at the time of connection of any property in the Springbrook Interceptor Service area. The notification shall be accompanied by a plot plan, or letter, indicating the square footage of the property, and including payment to THE DISTRICT of THE DISTRICT's General Facilities Charges, as described in Section 6b, and based upon the then current rate, as reported to RENTON by THE DISTRICT. The General Facilities Charge shall be based upon the area of the property connected, or the number of dwelling units (or single-family equivalents if not residential), whichever is larger; except that, unserviceable and unusable portions of the property are not included in the calculation of the General Facilities Charge, except for those portions which also benefit the development of the property, such as being included in the normal setback requirements, or landscape requirements. Included in this exempt category are: roads and similar rights-of-way, open space required, wetlands, unusable steep-slope areas, and the setbacks for these restrictive conditions. 8. Transfer of Easement and Right-of-Way Documents. THE DISTRICT shall officially transfer the right-of-way documents for the facilities herein sold to RENTON, and RENTON agrees to accept responsibility for all maintenance or other actions required by said documents. THE DISTRICT shall not have any liability for disputes arising over said rights-of-way or easements so transferred, except that any disputes arising due to the actions of THE DISTRICT prior to said transfer shall not be affected by this section. 9. Disclaimer From Third Party Liability. The DISTRICT shall disclose any and all known defects or problems of or in the facilities herein transferred to RENTON. THE DISTRICT shall not be liable for any claims by third parties arising from acts or damages by RENTON or its customers in using the facilities sold to RENTON pursuant to this Agreement. 4-7:040NON.001 Page 7 of 11 10. Sewer Service Area Boundary Between RENTON and THE DISTRICT. With the above transfer (sale) of existing facilities and service area, and reasonable service area limits corresponding to this action, the line separating the RENTON service area from THE DISTRICT service area for sanitary sewers is described in attached Exhibit "F", and is shown in attached Figure 11 . RENTON shall provide ultimate service for the area north and west of the line shown. THE DISTRICT shall provide ultimate service for the area south and east of the line shown. 11 . Maintenance of Existing Facilities. THE DISTRICT and RENTON will each provide maintenance for its own facilities. If there are any serious problems due to a discharge which can be identified, and for which the source can be identified, the individual or company responsible will be held liable for damage. If a lack of maintenance, or if the type of maintenance by either RENTON or THE DISTRICT is identified as the source of said problem, then the party creating, or allowing, the situation shall be responsible and shall pay the costs of repair. In case of dispute over the source or responsibility of said problems, the Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle (Metro) shall serve as arbitrator in identifying and quantifying said problems provided that said arbitration and/or any reports generated by an investigation by Metro, shall be binding upon both parties in resolution of the dispute. 12. Allowable Capacities in the Lines being Transferred, and at Points Further Downstream. There are no restrictions on the capacity of the sewers from Ponderosa Estates as long as they are consistent with the current use of the properties. There are currently 35 single family residences, and the property is fully developed. If this condition ever changes, a further review of the capacity of the system shall be performed, and an additional agreement shall be developed between the parties. Capacity for the system in the Springbrook drainage basin shall be as follows: AT TIMES OF SIMULTANEOUS PEAK FLOW SOOS CITY OF RESERVED CREEK RENTON FOR CITY OF gpm) gpm) KENT (gpm) S. 192nd Street, at and below 1500 600 0 M H 34-3 4-7.04W400g.001 Page 8 of 11 S. 192nd Street, at and below 1800 1500 0 MH 34-OA S. 192nd Street, at and below 3900 1500 0 MH 80-14 West of MH 80-14 3900 1500 400 No connections, by either party, will be allowed between Manhole 34-OA and Manhole 80-15 except by mutual agreement. Both parties agree that either may exceed this amount at the non- peak times, as long as there are no negative impacts, and the combined capacity of the system is not exceeded, and prior notification is given to the other party. It shall be the responsibility of each part to monitor its flow as and when necessary to determine what the flow rate characteristics of the system are. If the combined capacity of the system is exceeded, the party exceeding its allowable rate shall have the option of making revisions within its own system to bring its flows into compliance with this Section, or of paying for improve- ments to either system which will increase the available capacity of the systems. If both parties exceed their allowable rate, the cost of any new facilities will be divided based upon the ratio of the percentage by which each party is exceeding its allowable rate. If the allowable rate is exceeded at only one location, the ratio at that location will be used. If the rate is exceeded at m